John 'Old Trooper' Rush (1623 - 1707) MP

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Nicknames: "Old Trooper"
Place of Burial: Poquessing Creek, Byberry Township, northwest of Philadelphia
Birthplace: Old Rectory, Boreham, Essex, England
Death: Died in Byberry Township, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Occupation: Captain, Commanded a troop of horses in Cromwell's army
Managed by: James Patrick Ferrick
Last Updated:

About John 'Old Trooper' Rush

John Rush commanded a troop of horses in Cromwell's army. He embraced the principals of the Quakers in 1660 and came to Pennsylvania in 1683 with seven children and several grandchildren. He settled at Byberry, thirteen miles from Philadelphia. In 1691, he and his whole family became Keithians, and by 1697, most of them had become Baptists.

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL ACCOUNT OF THE RUSH FAMILY, by Sylvester R. Rush, 1925.

The first of the American English Quaker Colonists was Captain John Rush of French ancestry and the family name was originally Roix, but was changed to the English RUSH when the English king gave a French knight, Siour de la Roix, a fief of land in the Saxon stronghold for his heroic service in his effort to gain possession of the Holy Sepulchre during the Crusade against the Moslems. [John Levi Rush p.20]

During the English Civil War, Oliver Cromwell fought to assert the power of parliament as opposed to the absolute power of the king. Born of country gentry, he succeeded in persuading many of England's greatest families to follow him. His reign (1649-1659), however, was characterized by the support of a strong strain of religious Dissenters which included zealous Puritan elements. The Rushes were Separatists who supported Cromwell while in England and the cause of independence here in America. Capt. John Rush commanded a horse troop in the Puritan army under Cromwell. Family legend indicates that Cromwell judged him among his best officers and he was given the name 'Old Trooper'. After the war John began farming and rearing a family. In about 1660 he became a Quaker, holding that persuasion throughout the Restoration, a harsh time for those who refused to conform to the Church of England. When William Penn opened his 'holy experiment' for settlement, the Old Trooper, then age sixty three, sold all his holdings. Like a second Noah, he and his wife, Susanna, gathered together their many grown children and grandchildren, and in 1683 boarded the ship, WELCOME, for America. They settled northeast of Philadelphia in the Quaker community of Byberry, founded by William Penn as sanctuary for this persecuted religious minority. The number of Quakers grew rapidly and included many of the higher classes, including ministers of the Established Church, army officers and justices. Most notable were Robert Barclay and William Penn. In 1682 Penn created an asylum for this group in the colony of Pennsylvania and thousands of Quakers quickly settled there. Rush arrived in Byberry just a year later. By 1697, however, the family had become Baptist. Their 500-acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations. John was a member of a separatist group of Friends known as the 'Christian Quakers,' at a time when the Quakers faced much persecution for not joining the Church of England, and (after reaching America) from the Puritans.

Gr.-Gr.-Grandson, Benjamin Rush later wrote 'it is sufficient gratification to me to know that he fought for liberty, and migrated into a remote wilderness in the evening of his life in order to enjoy the priviledge of worshiping God according to the dictates of his own conscience.' -------------------- Captain in Oliver Cromwell's Army

Nicknamed "The Old Trooper"

--------------------

http://www.rootsweb.com/~wvmarsha/rushfam.htm

Captain John Rush who was a soldier in Cromwell’s Army later became a Quaker. In 1683 Captain Rush, his wife, Susanna Lucas, several children and grandchildren emigrated to America with William Penn and settled at Byberry near Philadelphia. Later most of the family following the lead of one of the sons-in-law, Rev. John Hart, became Keithians and still later Baptists. Some of the descendants moved across the river into New Jersey. About 1773 some fifteen or twenty families more or less related by marriage moved from New Jersey to Lower Turkeyfoot Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania and founded what came to be known as the Jersey Settlement. In 1775 they formed the Jersey Baptist Church near the present village of Ursina. Among these were the families of William Rush, a descendant of Captain John Rush, Nathaniel Skinner, Senior, Robert Colborn, William Tissue, David King, Oliver Drake, Andrew Ream, Joseph Lanning, William Lanning, William Brooks, Obediah Reed and others. Jacob Rush, a son of William Rush, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and left many descendants, a considerable number of whom still live in western Pennsylvania and many others have been traced to other states as far west as California. Others of the New Jersey Rush tribe, Michael, William, Peter, and Jacob Rush, all nephews of William Rush of Lower Turkeyfoot moved to Washington and Greene Counties, Pennsylvania. Descendants still live in that region. Sylvester R. Rush, a lawyer of Omaha, Nebraska, a descendant of Michael Rush, in 1916 published a genealogical account of his branch of the Rush family.” (From: Rush and Skinner Families of Lower Turkeyfoot by Harry Speer Rush. 1943)

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Baptism: 1620,Old Rectory, Boreham, Essex, England.

Marriage: 8 Jun 1648, Horton, Oxfordshire, England.

Immigration: 1683, in William Penn's Colony, Pennsylvania. He and his whole family came on the ship "Welcome."

Working backwards (would be mother or father of each line in succession): Richard S. Crowell > Mary Kathrine Crowell > William Riley Shelmire > William H. Shelmire > Joseph Hart Shelmire > Sarah Hart > Josiah Hart > Joseph (Colonel) Hart > John Hart Jr > John Hart married Susanna Rush > {John Hart > Christopher Hart > John Hart} -- {Susanna Rush > John "Old Trooper" Rush > John (Captain) Rush}. For more information see Rootweb and Sundheim.

The following information came February 4, 1997 from Luther Olson, Lyndhurst, Ohio from his website on the Internet: 'During the English Civil War, Oliver Cromwell fought to assert the power of Parliament as opposed to the absolute power of the king. Born of country gentry, he succeeded in persuading many of England's greatest families to follow him. His reign (1649-1659), however, was characterized by the support of a strong strain of religious dissenters which included zealous Puritan elements.' 'The Rushes were Seperatists who supported Cromwell while in England and the cause of independence here in America. Captain John Rush commanded a horse troop in the Puritan army under Cromwell. Family legend indicates that Cromwell judged him among his best officers and he was given the name 'Old Trooper.'

'After the war John Rush began farming and rearing a family. In about 1660 he became a Quaker, holding that persuasion throughout the Restoration, a harsh time for those who refused to conform to the Church of England. When William Penn opened his 'holy experiment' for settlement, the 'Old Trooper,' then age sixty-three, sold all his holdings.' 'Like a second Noah, he and his wife, Susanna, gathered together their many grown children and grandchildren, and in 1683 boarded the ship 'WELCOME' for America. They settled northeast of Philadelphia in the Quaker community of Byberry, founded by William Penn as sanctuary for this persecuted religious minority.'

'The number of Quakers grew rapidly and included many of the higher classes, including ministers of the Established Church, army officers, and justices. Most notable were Robert Barclay and William Penn. In 1682 Penn created an asylum for this group in the colony of Pennsylvania and thousands of Quakers quickly settled there. Rush arrived in Byberry just a year later. By 1697, however, the family had become Baptist.' 'Their 500-acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations. John Rush was was a member of a separatist group of Friends known as the 'Christian Quakers,' at a time when the Quakers faced much persecution for not joining the Church of England, and (after reaching America) from the Puritans.' 'Great-Great Grandson Benjamin Rush later wrote 'It is sufficient gratification to me to know that he fought for liberty, and migrated into a remote wilderness in the evening of his life in order to enjoy the priviledge of worshipping God according to the dictates of his own conscience.' (I have been told that the Quaker meetings in Philadelphia County were called 'Byberrys.')

Fact 1: Commanded a 'troop of horse' in Oliver Cromwell's army in England.

Fact 2: June 08, 1648, Married Susanna Lucas at the close of the war.

Fact 3: 1660, He embraced the principles of the Quakers.

Fact 4: 1683, Came to Pennsylvania with 7 children and several grandchildren.

Fact 5: 1683, Settled in Byberry, 13 miles from Philadelphia.

Fact 6: 1691, He and his whole family became Keithians.

Fact 7: 1697, Most of his family then became Baptists.

Fact 8: 1699, Died at Byberry

-------------------- The following information came February 4, 1997 from Luther Olson, Lyndhurst, Ohio from his website on the Internet:

"During the English Civil War, Oliver Cromwell fought to assert the power of Parliament as opposed to the absolute power of the king. Born of country gentry, he succeeded in persuading many of England's greatest families to follow him. His reign (1649-1659), however, was characterized by the support of a strong strain of religious dissenters which included zealous Puritan elements."

"The Rushes were Separatists who supported Cromwell while in England and the cause of independence here in America. Captain John Rush commanded a horse troop in the Puritan army under Cromwell. Family legend indicates that Cromwell judged him among his best officers and he was given the name "Old Trooper."

"After the war John Rush began farming and rearing a family. In about 1660 he became a Quaker, holding that persuasion throughout the Restoration, a harsh time for those who refused to conform to the Church of England. When William Penn opened his "holy experiment" for settlement, the "Old Trooper," then age sixty-three, sold all his holdings."

"Like a second Noah, he and his wife, Susanna, gathered together their many grown children and grandchildren, and in 1683 boarded the ship "WELCOME" for America. They settled northeast of Philadelphia in the Quaker community of Byberry, founded by William Penn as sanctuary for this persecuted religious minority."

"The number of Quakers grew rapidly and included many of the higher classes, including ministers of the Established Church, army officers, and justices. Most notable were Robert Barclay and William Penn. In 1682 Penn created an asylum for this group in the colony of Pennsylvania and thousands of Quakers quickly settled there. Rush arrived in Byberry just a year later. By 1697, however, the family had become Baptist."

"Their 500-acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations. John Rush was was a member of a separatist group of Friends known as the "Christian Quakers," at a time when the Quakers faced much persecution for not joining the Church of England, and (after reaching America) from the Puritans."

"Great-Great Grandson Benjamin Rush later wrote "It is sufficient gratification to me to know that he fought for liberty, and migrated into a remote wilderness in the evening of his life in order to enjoy the privilege of worshipping God according to the dictates of his own conscience."

(I have been told that the Quaker meetings in Philadelphia County were called "Byberrys.")

[v55t2482.FTW]

Had 10 children.

IMMIGRATION: Came to Penn in 1683 with 7 children & several grandchildren. Sailed on the "WELCOME". Settled in Penn's Quaker community of Byberry. "Their 500 acre farm in Byberry Township was located twelve miles up the Delaware River from Philadelphia on Poquessing Creek. This was to become the family home for the next five generations.

RELIGION: Quakers - 1691 Keithians, 1698 Baptists.

Facts about this person:

Military service

English Civil War./

[v71t0778.ged]

John Rush commanded a troop of horses in Cromwell's army. At the close of the war he married Susanna Lucas, at Hortun, in Oxfordshire, June 8, 1648. He embraced the principles of the Quakers in 1660, and came to Pennsylvania in 1683, with seven children and several grandchildren, and settled at Byberry, thirteen miles from Philadelphia. In 1691 he and his whole family became Keithians, and in 1697 most of them became Baptists. He died at Byberry in May, 1699. His sword is in the possession of Jacob Rush, and his watch now belongs to General William Darke, of Virginia. He had issue (as appears by a record in his own handwriting now in possession of Dr. Benjamin Rush).

"Captain John Rush who was a soldier in Cromwell's Army and later became a Quaker. In 1683 Captain Rush, his wife, Susanna Lucas, several children and grand children emigrated to America with William Penn and settled at Byberry near Philadelphia. Later most of the family following the lead of the son-in-law, Rev. John Hart, became Keithians and still later Baptists. Some of the descendants moved across the river into New Jersey. About 1773 some fifteen or twenty families more or less related by marriage moved from New Jersey to Turkeyfoot Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania and founded what came to be known as the Jersey Settlement. In 1775 they formed the Jersey Baptist Church near the present village of Ursina. Among these were the families of WILLIAM RUSH, a descendant of Captain John Rush, Nathaniel Skinner, Sr., Robert COLBORN, WILLIAM TISSUE, David King, Oliver Drake, Andrew REAM, Joseph Lanning, William Lanning, William Brooks, Obediah Reed and others. JACOB RUSH, a son of WILLIAM RUSH, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and left many descendants, a considerable number of whom still live in western Pennsylvania and many others have been traced to other states as far west as California.

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Capt. John "Old Trooper" Rush's Timeline

1623
May 20, 1623
Boreham, Oxfordshire, Eng.
May 22, 1623
Old Rectory, Boreham, Essex, England
May 22, 1623
Boreham, Essex, UK
1648
June 8, 1648
Age 25
England
1652
July 21, 1652
Age 29
Hornton, Oxfordshire, England
1654
November 7, 1654
Age 31
United Kingdom
1656
December 26, 1656
Age 33
Horton, Oxfordshire, England
December 26, 1656
Age 33
UK
1659
1659
Age 35
Hornton, Oxfordshire, England, UK
1660
1660
Age 36
Hornton, Oxfordshire, , England