Capt. John Rogers, Jr., Principal Chief

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Capt. John Rogers, Jr., Principal Chief's Geni Profile

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John Rogers, Jr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Cherokee Nation, North Carolina (Present Tennessee), United States
Death: Died in Washington, District of Columbia, United States
Place of Burial: Congressional Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Capt. John "Hellfire" Rogers and Elizabeth Rogers, Ani'Gilâ'h Long Hair Clan
Husband of Elizabeth Rogers and Elizabeth Rogers
Father of Charles Coody Rogers; Isaac Rogers; George Washington Rogers and Thomas Lewis Rogers, Sr.
Brother of Charles Rogers, Sr.; Aky U-lv-s-qua-to-gu Vickery (Rogers); James Rogers; Nannie Grubb and James Rogers
Half brother of Annie Irons; Susannah Miller; Diana Rogers; <private> Rogers; <private> Rogers and 4 others

Managed by: Private User
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About John Rogers, Jr.

John Rogers was the last elected Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation West, elected 11 October 1839 by the faction of Old Settlers who rejected the unity constitution of September 1839. The rejectionist faction gained no further adherents and the effort died the next year. Rogers was the nephew of previous Cherokee Nation West principal chiefs Tahlonteeskee and John Jolly

Find A Grave Memorial# 5213350

John Rogers Jr., who was born about 1776. John Jr. is also known as Captain John Rogers for his service with the Cherokee troops of General Andrew Jackson in the Creek Wars. He was elected Chief after the death of his uncle, Chief OO-LOO-TES KEE or John Jolly. John Jr. died at the home of Mrs. Eugenia Townsley, in Washington, D.C., June 12, 1846, while presenting his claims for possession or reimbursement for the salt works. The Rogers were supplanted by John Ross, leader of the anti-treaty party, who became chief of the Cherokees after the general Removal in 1826. Captain John Rogers and Colonel A. P. Chouteau had established the salt works on the east side of the Grand River, near the present town of Salina, in Mayes County, Oklahoma. They manufactured large quantities of salt which was sold to the garrison at Fort Gibson as well as the Cherokees and other Indian tribes. Chouteau died in 1832 - possession passing to Rogers. Then John Ross, Principal Chief, in the name of the Cherokees, took over the salt works and gave the concession to his brother, Lewis Ross. Ross asserted the springs were the property of the national domain of the Cherokee tribe and might be leased to a new party if deemed expedient. Captain and Chief John Rogers, Jr., is buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. There were three Cherokees buried about the same time; John Rogers, Jr., Thomas W. Starr and W. B. West. Their grave sites are #89-90-91, Range 40. -------------------- http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/i/c/James-R-Hicks-VA/BOOK-0001/0015-0003.html --------------------

John Rogers was the last elected Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation West, elected 11 October 1839 by the faction of Old Settlers who rejected the unity constitution of September 1839. The rejectionist faction gained no further adherents and the effort died the next year. Rogers was the nephew of previous Cherokee Nation West principal chiefs Tahlonteeskee and John Jolly

Find A Grave Memorial# 5213350

John Rogers Jr., who was born about 1776. John Jr. is also known as Captain John Rogers for his service with the Cherokee troops of General Andrew Jackson in the Creek Wars. He was elected Chief after the death of his uncle, Chief OO-LOO-TES KEE or John Jolly. John Jr. died at the home of Mrs. Eugenia Townsley, in Washington, D.C., June 12, 1846, while presenting his claims for possession or reimbursement for the salt works. The Rogers were supplanted by John Ross, leader of the anti-treaty party, who became chief of the Cherokees after the general Removal in 1826. Captain John Rogers and Colonel A. P. Chouteau had established the salt works on the east side of the Grand River, near the present town of Salina, in Mayes County, Oklahoma. They manufactured large quantities of salt which was sold to the garrison at Fort Gibson as well as the Cherokees and other Indian tribes. Chouteau died in 1832 - possession passing to Rogers. Then John Ross, Principal Chief, in the name of the Cherokees, took over the salt works and gave the concession to his brother, Lewis Ross. Ross asserted the springs were the property of the national domain of the Cherokee tribe and might be leased to a new party if deemed expedient. Captain and Chief John Rogers, Jr., is buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. There were three Cherokees buried about the same time; John Rogers, Jr., Thomas W. Starr and W. B. West. Their grave sites are #89-90-91, Range 40.

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Capt. John Rogers, Jr., Principal Chief's Timeline

1781
1781
Cherokee Nation, North Carolina (Present Tennessee), United States
1800
1800
Age 19
1810
1810
Age 29
Old Cherokee Nation
1812
1812
Age 31
1816
1816
Age 35
1846
June 12, 1846
Age 65
Washington, District of Columbia, United States
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Washington, District of Columbia, United States