Nathaniel Basse (1589 - 1654) MP

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Birthplace: Middlesex Parrish, London, England
Death: Died in cripplegate , london, Middlesex, England
Occupation: House of Burgesses, English Sea Captain and founder of Basse's Choice, Norfolk Co. VA
Managed by: Raymond Booth, III
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About Nathaniel Basse

Genevieve Basse, Peter Knight’s wife, was the eighth of twelve children. Her parents were Nathaniel Bass (b. baptised 29 Dec 1589, at the Church of St. Gabriel, Fenchurch Street, London, Middlesex, England) and Mary Jordan. Nathaniel Basse married Mary Jordan 21 May 1613, in London, Middlesex, England. "Nathaniell Basse and Mary Jordan was married ye 21 day of May in ye year of our blessed Lord and Saviour 1613." (Family Bible Records)

It is believed that Nathaniel Basse brought his children back to London after the 1622 Indian Massacre; however, Nathaniel continued making trips to the colonies.

The first English settlement in the area known by the Indians as Warrosquoyacke (Isle of Wight Co., Virginia) was made by Captain Christoper Lawne, Sir Richard Worsley, Knight & Baronet, and their associates NATHANIEL BASSE, Gentleman, John Hobson, Gentleman, Anthony Olevan, Richard Wiseman, Robert Newland, Robert Gyner and William Willis.

They arrived at Jamestown with one hundred settlers on 27 April 1619 in a ship commanded by Captain Evans. They immediately settled on the south side of the Warrosquoake River (James River) and established the plantation "Warrosquoake", to be known as "Lawne's Creek". When their patent was confirmed it was to become known as the "County of Isle of Wight".

NATHANIEL BASSE and others undertook to establish another plantation in the same neighborhood, to the east, known as "Basse's Choice" situated on the Warrosquoake River (James River) and Pagan Creek. His patent was received 21 Nov 1621 for 300 acres plus 100 acres of marshland. The houses on Captain Basse's plantation were being built when at midday on Good Friday, 22 Mar 1622, the Indians attacked the settlers killing 347 of the 1240 English inhabitants in the 80 settlements on the north and south sides of the river (James). 26 at Isle of Wight were among those killed. The settlers made a valiant defense of themselves with guns, axes, spades and brickbats. It is thought that Nathaniel and his wife, Mary, were in England at the time, and some of the children were at "Basse's Choice" with a nurse. The story is told that five-year old JOHN was one of the children that escaped and was rescued by some friendly Nansemond Indians! His older brother Humphrey died that day. A 1622 passenger list for the ship "Furtherance," from London, arrived in Virginia, lists Nathaniell Basse, age 35. Many ships at that time considered passengers as cargo and did not list their names. Some ships listed the names of the men on board but did not list women and children.

A census taken 16 Feb 1623/24 shows a total of 53 persons living at "Worwicke-Squeak," and "Basse's Choice". Nathaniel Basse and Samuell Basse were among those listed. Capt. Nathaniel Basse, Samuel Basse and William Basse are also found living among the list of 1,033 Early Pioneers of 1624. They are listed as living at Basse Choise, sndx no. B200.

Nathaniel was appointed to the House of Burgesses at the first Legislative Assembly representing Warrosquoake (Isle of Wight) for 1623/24. He was again a member of the House of Burgesses in Oct 1629 and 1631, appointed to Harvey's Council 1631/32 and a member of the Great Council 1631/32. On 6 Mar 1631/32 Nathaniel was commissioned to "trade between 34 and 40 N Latitude, England, Nova Scotia and West Indies to invite inhabitants hither". (If they were tired of cold and damp!) Nathaniel was also commissioned to trade to the Dutch Plantation and Canada. He was given power of Justice of Peace. (Virginia Council & General Court Records 1626-1634)

Basse's Choice originally called for 300 acres but its acreage was closer to 400. Mr. Peter Knight married to Nathaniel's daughter Genevieve, patented 150 acres of the same in 1640 and 255 acres in 1643. Peter Knight sold the tract to John Bland, an eminent London Merchant.

Nathaniel Basse was buried 3 July 1654 in the Church of St. Alphage, Cripplegate, London. Mary, his wife, had died 17 Jan 1630, with the birth of a stillborn son. After Nathaniel's death in 1654, the General Assembly of Virginia in 1659/60 ordered Mr. Wm. Drummond as agent of the Co-heirs of Nathaniel Basse to pay to Theodorick Bland of Westover, 2500 lbs tobacco in settlement of a suit affecting the land.

http://www.geocities.com/knighthistory/VirginiaKnights.htm -------------------- Nathaniel Basse was born December 29, 1589 in London, England, and died July 03, 1654 in Middlesex, Virginia or Cripplegate London, England.

Parents: Humphrey Basse (1565-1616) and Mary Bouchette (?-1616)

Married:

  1. on May 21, 1613 in London, Middlesex Parish, England to MARY JORDAN OR (JOURDAN) She was born Bet. 1590 - 1592 in London, Middlesex Parish, England, and died January 17, 1629/30 in London, England.

Children of NATHANIEL BASSE and MARY (JOURDAN) are:

  1. JOHN4 BASSE, b. September 07, 1616, London, Middlesex Parish, England; d. April 02, 1699, Norfolk County / Virginia.
  2. HUMPHREY BASSE, b. July 15, 1615, London, Middlesex Parish, England; d. March 22, 1621/22, Isle of Wight County / Virginia.
  3. SAMUEL BASSE, b. July 15, 1615, London, Middlesex Parish, England; d. March 22, 1621/22, Isle of Wight County / Virginia.
  4. WILLIAM BASSE SR., b. December 25, 1618, London, Middlesex Parish, England; d. Unknown.
  5. ANTHONY BASSE, b. March 13, 1619/20, London, Middlesex Parish, England; d. 1696.
  6. EDWARD BASSE, b. May 08, 1622, London, Middlesex Parish, England; d. September 1696, Albemarle County / North Carolina.
  7. MARY BASSE, b. June 14, 1623, Norfolk, Virginia; d. Unknown.
  8. GENEVIEVE BASSE, b. Bet. September - October 09, 1624, Norfolk, Virginia; d. Unknown.
  9. ANNE BASSE, b. Bet. September - October 09, 1624, Norfolk, Virginia (just 10 minutes before Genevive); m. THOMAS BURWELL, June 11, 1640.
  10. RICHARD BASSE, b. August 27, 1625, Norfolk, Virginia; d. Unknown.
  11. GREGORIE BASSE, b. December 10, 1628, Norfolk, Virginia; d. Unknown.
  12. GEORGE BASSE, b. December 11, 1628, Norfolk, Virginia; d. 1681.
  13. INFANT SON BASSE, b. January 17, 1629/30, London, Middlesex Parish, England; d. January 17, 1629/30, London, Middlesex Parish, England.

More About NATHANIEL BASSE

Baptism: December 29, 1589, St. Babriel's Church, Fenchurch Street, London, Middlesex Parish, England Burial: St. Alphage Church, London, Middlesex Parish, England. Emigration: April 17, 1619, To Jamestown, Virginia on the ship "Furtherance" Residence: Basse's Choice Plantation, Isle of Wight County, Virginia

Notes

BIOGRAPHY: Arrived in Jamestown, Virginia on April 27, 1619, twelve years after the founding of Jamestown. Sailed on the ship "Furtherance," commanded by Captain Evans. Returned to America aboard the "Abigail" in 1621. He apparently made several trips between England & Virginia, as he is listed on the manifest of the ship Furtherance in 1622. Captain Nathaniel Basse, as one of the Adventurers of the Virginia Company, was granted a patent for his plantation "Basse's Choice" on November 21, 1621, 400 acres on the west side of the Pagan River, near it's mouth, east of Bennet's Tract, and 100 acres under water in what is now Isle of Wight County, VA. It is located northeast of Smithfield, Virginia. As he spent considerable time in London as well, he was not at "Basse's Choice" on Good Friday, March 22, 1622, the date of the Jamestown Massacre. He and his wife left their children with a nurse to go back to England and while they were gone their children were attacked by Indians, all but one died. John was rescued by the Nansemond Indians. Bass's Choice Plantation is a Virginia historic landmark. Virginia Historical Marker K242, Isle of Wight County, Route 10, 2 miles NW of Smithfield read as follows:

BASSE'S CHOICE - This place three miles north, was settled by Nathaniel Basse in 1612. In the massacre of 1622, the Indians killed 20 settlers there.

Approximately 10% of the historical markers erected by the State of Virginia have been decommissioned and removed. Sadly, the Basse's Choice marker is one so decommissioned.

Nathaniel was Justice of the Peace - Isle of Wight County, VA Nathaniel was appointed to the House of Burgesses in 1623-24, & 1629 and a Member of Council 1630, 1631.

On March 6, 1631/1632, Basse was commissioned to "trade between 34 and 40 N Latitude, England, Nova Scotia and West Indies to invite inhabitants hither. "He was also commissioned to trade to the Dutch Plantation and Canada (New England in those days).

NOTE: There has been considerable speculation that there was more than one Nathaniel Basse at Jamestown. Those involved in that speculation have contended that "Captain Nathaniel Basse" is not the same as "Nathaniel Basse, Gentleman". They may be right. However, which ever one it was, and I side with "Captain Nathaniel Basse" of Basses Choice (so called by Col. E. M. Morrison), there is little doubt in my mind but that our Nathaniel Basse, the father of John Basse, was the son Of Humphrey Basse. My opinion in this matter is based on the names of Nathaniel Bass's children. Of Nathaniel's twelve children, six of them have names corresponding to Humphrey's children. Admittedly, five of these are very common names, to wit" Samuel, John, William, Mary and Richard. The other duplication is Humphrey, a much less common name. The sister, Genevieve, however, the name of Nathaniel's grandmother (Genevieve Bushier), to me is the clincher. - J. Albert Bass, Jr.

Death: Died at Cripplegate, London, England? The official of the Jamestown Society have used the deposition in the Mayor's court in London, in August of 1654, concerning the disposition of Nathaniel's property as sufficient evidence to refute the testimony of John Basse and others, that John and others were the offspring of Nathaniel Basse and Mary Jordan.

Links

-------------------- 1. First trip: Nathaniel Basse, Gentleman, helped establish Isle of Wight, VA in 1619. 2. Second Trip: Early Va records indicate Nathaniel Basse age 35 arrived on the ship "Furtherance" in 1622. 3. In 1623, Nataniel Basse was living in Basse's Choice, VA. Jamestown, Virginia 1619 | Jamestown, Virginia

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  1. Name: Capt.Nathaniel BASSE
  2. Given Name: Capt.Nathaniel
  3. Surname: BASSE
  4. Sex: M
  5. Birth: 29 Dec 1589 in London, , , England
  6. Death: 3 Jul 1654 in Virgina
  7. Immigration: April 27, 1619 Jamestown, Virginia
  8. Christening: 29 Dec 1589 St. Gabriel Ch., Frenchchurch St., London, England
  9. Burial: 3 Jul 1654 Church of St. Alphage, Cripplegate, London
  10. Note:
   In The Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1660, pg. 46, Coldham quotes, "Living at Basse's Choice in 1624, Captain Nathaniel Basse and Samuel
   Basse." Then, on August 30, 1654 shortly following Nathaniel's death, this was recorded (slightly paraphrased), "...heirs of Nathaniel Basse deceased without issue. Major Edward Basse, 60, London, deposed that Hester Hobson, Abigail Thorpe, and Sara Hastler are sisters and are daughters of Humphrey Basse and wife Mary. The sisters are co-heirs with Luke Basse who died a bachelor and was the brother and heir of Nathaniel Basse."
   Captain Nathaniel Basse and Samuel Basse were noted living at Basse's Choyce Plantation in 1624, Isle of Wight Co., VA (northeast of Smithfield, VA).
   Basse's Choice Plantation is a Virginia Historic Landmark. Presently, there is an archaeological dig there as scientists try to discover more about the first years of life in Virginia.
   AFN:HB5T-NL
   2. NATHANIEL BASSE, CAPT. (HUMPHREY2, WILLIAM1) was born December 29, 1589 in Middlesex Parrish, London, England, and died July 3, 1654 in Cripplegate, London, England. He married MARY JORDAN May 21, 1613 in Middlesex Parrish, London, England. She was born Abt. 1591 in London, Elgland, and died January 17, 1629/30 in Middlesex Parrish, London, England.
   Notes for NATHANIEL BASSE, CAPT.:
   Nathaniel Basse was christened, December 29, 1589, at the Church of Saint Gabriel Church, Fenchurch St., London, England. Nathaniel was commissioned to bring settlers to the New World. On April 27, 1619, they arrived at Jamestowen, Virginia, founded in1607 (Isle Of Wight County,1608-1907) with one hundred settlers in a ship commanded by Captain Evans. They immediately settled near the mouth of a creek on the south side of the James River still known as Lawne's Creek. Captain Nathaniel Basse and others undertook to establish another plantation in the same neighborhood. This plantation was known as Basse's Choice and was situated on the Pagan River. Nathaniel was back in England in early 1621/22 and returned to Virginia in 1622. He was commissioned to seek colonists for Virginia in New England and elsewhere.
   The houses of Captain Basse's plantation were being built when a great calamity happened to the infant colony. At midday on Good Friday, March 22, 1622 there were twelve hundred fourty British inhabitants in the state of Virginia. Of these, three hundred forty seven were killed by Indians in the eighty settlements on the north and south sides of the James River, of which fifty three were residents of this county (Isle Of Wight County). At the house of Nathaniel Basse every one was slain. Nathaniel, who was in England at the time, escaped.
   A muster of the inhabitants of Virginia taken in 1625 includes Nathaniel Basse, age 35. Nathaniel was a member of the House of Burgesses in 1624,1625, 1628 and again in 1629. He was a Councillor in 1630.
   Nathaniel Bass returned to England and is buried in Church of St. Alphage, Cripplegate, London England, 3 July 1654.
   Sourceses: Nathaniel Basse: "The Bass Family of Black Creek, North Carolina", compiled by James Albert Bass and James Albert Bass, Jr., 1986.
   More About NATHANIEL BASSE, CAPT.:
   Burial: July 3, 1654, Church of Saint Alphage, Cripplegate, London, England
   The first English settlement in the area known by the Indians as Warrosquoake (Isle of Wight Co., Virginia) was made by Captain Christoper Lawne, Sir Richard Worsley, Knight & Baronet, and their associates NATHANIEL BASSE, Gentleman, John Hobson, Gentleman, Anthony Olevan, Richard Wiseman, Robert Newland, Robert Gyner and William Willis. They arrived at Jamestown with one hundred settlers on 27 April 1619 in a ship commanded by Captain Evans. They immediately settled on the south side of the Warrosquoake River (James River) and established the plantation "Warrosquoake", to be known as "Lawne's Creek". When their patent was confirmed it was to become known as the "County of Isle of Wight".

-------------------- http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vaisleof/history.htm

The first English settlement in Isle of Wight county was made by Captain Christopher Lawne and Sir Richard Worsley, knight baronet, and their associates, viz.: Nathaniel Basse, gentleman; John Hobson, gentleman; Anthony Olevan, Richard Wiseman, Robert Newland, Robert Gyner, and William Willis.

On the day the patent last mentioned was granted, Arthur Swaine, Captain Nathaniel Basse and others, undertook to establish another plantation in the same neighborhood. Captain Basse came over in person and his plantation was known as "Basse's Choice," and was situated on Warrosquoyacke (now Pagan) River.

The houses of Captain Basse's Plantation were building when a great calamity happened to the infant colony. At midday on Good Friday, March 22, 1622, there were twelve hundred and forty inhabitants in the State of Virginia. Of these, three hundred and forty-seven, in a few hours, were killed by the Indians in the eighty settlements on the north and south sides of the James River, of which number fifty-three were residents of this county.

After the death of Powhatan, his brother, Opecancanough, who always hated the whites, joined all the tribes in Eastern Virginia into an oath-bound conspiracy to kill the whites, and we are astonished with what concert of action and secrecy this great plot was arranged when we reflect that the savages were not living together as on nation, but were dispersed in little hamlets, containing from thirty to two hundred in a company. "Yet they all had warning given them, one from another, in all their habitations, though far asunder, to meet at this day and hour for the destruction of the English."

So well was the dread secret kept that the English boats were borrowed to transport the Indians over the river to consult on the "devilish murder that ensued"; and even on the day itself, as well as on the evening before, they came as usual, unarmed, into their settlements, with their turkeys and other provisions to sell; and in some places sat down with the English on the very morning to breakfast.

[p7] (picture) County Courthouse

[p8] (blank)

[p9] They spared no age, sex or condition; and were so sudden in their indiscriminate slaughter that few could discern the blow or the weapon that killed them.

Those who had treated them with especial kindness and conferred many benefits upon them fared no better than the rest. The ties of love and gratitude the sacred rights of hospitality and reciprocal friendship, oath, pledges and promises were broken or forgotten in obedience to the commands of their chief for the execution of a great, but diabolical, stroke of State policy.

[p10] Ralph Hamor, who also live nearby. The Indians sent a message to Captain Hamor that their king was hunting in the neighborhood, and had invited him to join them. The captain, not coming as they expected him to do, they set fire to a tobacco warehouse and murdered the whites as they rushed out of Harrison's house to quench the fire. Many were killed, but Thomas Hamor was saved by a chance delay. He remained to finish a letter which he was engaged in writing. When he went out he saw the commotion, and although he received an arrow in his back, with twenty-two others he fought his way back to the house, which, being set on fire by the Indians, he left to burn, and fled to Baldwin's. In the meantime Captain Ralph Hamor was in utmost peril. Going out to meet the king, he saw some of the wretches murdering the unarmed whites. He returned to his new house, where, armed with only spades, axes and brickbats, he and his company defended themselves till the Indians gave up the siege and departed. At the house of Captain Basse, in the same neighborhood, everybody was slain. Basse, who was in England at the time, of course, escaped. The consternation produced by this horrid massacre caused the adoption of a ruinous policy. Instead of marching at once bold to meet and drive the Indians from the settlement, or reduce them to subjection by a bloody retaliation, the colonists were huddled together from their eighty plantations into eight. Works of great public utility were abandoned and cultivation confined to a space too limited merely for subsistence. These crowded quarters produced sickness, and some were so disheartened that they sailed for England. All Worrosquoyacke, from Hog Island down the river for fourteen miles, was abandoned.

p11] dition against the savages down the river. He drove out the Worrosquoyackes and Nansemonds, burned their houses and took their corn. On May 21, 1623, Captain Roger Smith was ordered to build a fort on the Worrosquoyacke shore, opposite to Tindall Shoals, where Captain Samuel Each had a blockhouse in building.

In the summer of 1623 Captain William Tucker, of Kecaughton (Hampton), commanded an expedition against the Worrosquoyackes. He killed many, cut down their corn, and burnt their houses. And this state of fierce warfare continued to rage, with uninterrupted fury, until a peace was concluded in 1632, under the administration of Governor Harvey.

In the course of this warfare the Indians were not treated with the same tenderness which they had generally been before the massacre; but their habitations, cleared lands, pleasant sites, when once taken possession of, were generally retained by the victors, and the vanquished forced to take refuge in the woods ar marshes. Truly, the founding of our nation was no mere holiday amusement.

The proprietors of the abandoned settlements took heart, and were allowed to return.

[p12] During the first hundred years a grant of fifty acres was given for the importation of every emigrant. The names of the "Head-rights" were given in the patents. From the records in the Land Office, the following are subscribed: "Land Grants: Martha Key, wife of Thomas Key, planter (as his personal dividend, being an ancient planter), one hundred and fifty acres lying on the easterly side of Worrosquoyacke River, opposite the land of Captain Nathaniel Basse";***John Moon, planter, two hundred acres in Worrosquoyacke, on the Worrosquoyacke Creek***for the transportation of four persons, viz.: himself, George Martin, Julian Hollier, Clement Thrush, who came in the Catherine, of London, 1623. Granted March, 1623."

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Nathaniel was appointed to the House of Burgesses at the first Legislative Assembly representing Warrosquoake (Isle of Wight) for 1623/24. He was again a member of the House of Burgesses in Oct 1629 and 1631, appointed to Harvey's Council 1631/32 and a member of the Great Council 1631/32. On 6 Mar 1631/32 Nathaniel was commissioned to "trade between 34 and 40 N Latitude, England, Nova Scotia and West Indies to invite inhabitants hither". (If they were tired of cold and damp!) Nathaniel was also commissioned to trade to the Dutch Plantation and Canada. He was given power of Justice of Peace. (Virginia Council & General Court Records 1626-1634)

Basse's Choice originally called for 300 acres but its acreage was closer to 400. Mr. Peter Knight married to Nathaniel's daughter Genevieve, patented 150 acres of the same in 1640 and 255 acres in 1643. Peter Knight sold the tract to John Bland, an eminent London Merchant.

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It is believed that Nathaniel Basse brought his children back to London after the 1622 Indian Massacre; however, Nathaniel continued making trips to the colonies.

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Capt. Nathaniel Basse's Timeline

1589
December 29, 1589
London, England
1613
May 21, 1613
Age 23
London, Middlesex, England

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
about Nathaniel Basse
Name: Nathaniel Basse
Gender: male
Birth Place: En
Birth Year: 1589
Spouse Name: Mary Jordan
Marriage State: of VA
Number Pages: 2
--------------------------------------------
U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
about Nathaniel Basse
Name: Nathaniel Basse
Gender: male
Birth Year: 1589
Spouse Name: Mary Jourdan
Marriage
Year: 1613
Number Pages: 1

1615
July 15, 1615
Age 25
London, Middlesex Parish, England
July 15, 1615
Age 25
Twin City, Emanuel, Georgia, USA
1616
September 7, 1616
Age 26
London, Middlesex Parish, England
1618
December 25, 1618
Age 28
London, Middlesex, England
1620
March 13, 1620
Age 30
London, UK
1622
March 22, 1622
Age 32
Jamestown, Virginia
May 8, 1622
Age 32
London, Middlesex Parish, England
1622
Age 32
Isle Of Wright, Virginia, United States

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
about Nathaniel Basse
Name: Nathaniel Basse
Year: 1622
Age: 40
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1582
Place: Virginia
Source Publication Code: 9450
Primary Immigrant: Basse, Nathaniel
Annotation: Published extracts from The Magazine of American Genealogy, section 4, nos. 1-27 (1929 - [1932]). Good compilation but incomplete, since publication of the magazine was suspended; it contains names from beginning of alphabet through 'Battles' only. Source
Source Bibliography: VIRKUS, FREDERICK A., editor. Immigrants to America before 1750. An Alphabetical List of Immigrants to the Colonies, before 1750, Compiled from Official and Other Records. Surnames 'A through Battles.' Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1965. 220p.
Page: 205