Captain Thomas Todd, Sr.

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Captain Thomas Todd, Sr.'s Geni Profile

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Thomas Todd, Sr.

Nicknames: "Captain Thomas Todd of Toddsbury"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Denton, Durham, England
Death: Died in Baltimore County, Maryland, Colonial America
Immediate Family:

Son of Geoffrey Todd and Margaret Todd
Husband of Anne Todd
Father of Anne Todd; Capt Thomas Todd, Jr; Frances Todd; Joanna Todd; William Todd and 4 others
Brother of Margaret Todd and John Todd

Occupation: merchant of the Patapsco River, ship owner & captain
Managed by: Julie Ann Zimmer
Last Updated:

About Thomas Todd, Sr.

Thomas TODD was born on 12 Sep 1619 in Denton, Durham, England. He died on 30 May 1675 in At Sea/North Parish, Patapsco River, Baltimore County, MD.

Captain Thomas Todd of Virginia and Baltimore Coun ty was baptized in Denton, England in 1619. He came to Virginia in 1637 and wa s granted lands in New Norfolk Count for transporting four persons. He patented Toddsbury in Gloucester County in 1652 and there he erected a dwelling for hi s wife and children. Toddsbury was inherited by his oldest son Thomas Todd. The simple but beautifully-proportioned house of Toddsbury is still standing and has been restored and furnished with antiques by its present owner. It is some times opened to visitors in Garden Tour Week. [NOTE: Toddsbury is now known as the North River Inn.]

Captain Thomas Todd was a shipowner, owning the ships Augustine and Virginia. He had extensive land holdings in Virginia as well as in Maryland.

The name of Captain Thomas Todd of Toddsbury appears in Maryland records of August 17, 1664, in connection with the purchase of lands on Patapsco River. He described himself as living in Gloucester County, Virginia. In 1669, designating himself a resident of Patapsco River, Captain Thomas Todd purchased North Point, a tract of 300 acres on the north side of the Patapsco. This was the site of the famous Battle of North Point, fought on September 12, 1814 between the American and British forces in the War o f 1812. In June 1669 Captain Thomas Todd purchased 400 acres of additional lands and in 1670 he received warrants for 1200 acres for having transported 24 persons to Maryland. He was a burgess of Baltimore County in 1674 and 1675. The will of Captain Thomas Todd was probated on May 20, 1677. By it he devised to his brother Christopher Todd of London a tract of land called Todley situated in Queens Anne County, Maryland. Through Christopher Todd the Todds have been traced to Denton in Durham COunty, England.

Captain Thomas Todd married Ann Gorsuch, the daughter of Rev. John Gorsuch, whose wife Ann was a daughter of Sir William Lovelace, and sister of Richard Lovelace, the poet, and of Colonel Francis Lovelace, Gov. of New York. The Gorsuch-Lovelace ancestry is a distinguished one. Rev. John Gorsuch was a staunch supporter of King Charles I and, according to tradition, he met his death in 1647 when the Puritans caused himt o be smothered in a haystack. The widow Gorsuch then came to Virginia with the children, as her brother, Colonel Francis Lovelace, was in Virginia at that time.

After the death of Captain Thomas Todd, his widow Ann Gorsuch Todd married Captain David Jones, who lived at Cole's Harbor, part of the site of the city of Baltimore. Captain Jones, who gave his name to Jones Falls, the stream which runs through Baltimore, arising in the Green Spring Valley, had a dwelling house at what is approximately the corner of High and Fayette Streets in downtown Baltimore. This tract, originally Cole's Harbor, was later re-patented by James Todd, son of Captain Thomas Todd, and called "Todd's Range". It extended from Broadway on the east to Howard Street on the west, the northern boundary being Madison Street and the southern boundary the Baltimore waterfront. When Baltimore Town was established in 1729 "Todd's Range" was subdivided into building lots.

Captain David Jones died in 1686 and his widow, Ann Gorsuch Todd Jones, then married Captain John Oldton of Garrison Forest. Captain Oldton was commanding officer of the Baltimore County Rangers at Garrison on the Reisterstown Road. One of the properties which he and his wife owned was Darley Hall, located at what is now Harford Road and North Avenue in Baltimore City, extending northward to Darley Avenue. This tract was sold to John Ensor in 1697.

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There are in this country three distinct families of Yorkshire Todds. One of these sprung from Thomas Todd, who settled in Virginia, whence his descendants have spread into Kentucky.

In 1664 Thomas Todd came from England and settled in Ware Parish, Gloucester Co., Virginia, bringing with him his wife and one or two children born in England. He was a ship master and died at sea in 1676. His wife was Ann Gorsuch, dau of Rev. John Gorsuch, Rector of Walkham, Hertfordshire, and his wife Anne, dau of Sir William Lovelace. Their children were Thomas, Christopher, James, William Phillip, Joanna, Anne, Frances and Isabella.

One of the descendents of Capt. Thomas Todd, the eldest child, was the distinguished jurist, Thomas Todd of Kentucky.

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LAST LETTER FROM THOMAS TODD TO HIS SON Dear Son: My love to you remembered, this is to give you notice that I am aboard of Captain James Conaway Commander of the Ship “Virginia” factor bound for England. I am very weake and sick and have beene a long time, all my desire is to see you before I goe for fear I shall never see you. We lie against Munday’s Creek and intend to set sayle tomorrow if it be a faire winde being the eleventh day of April. I want some good syder to keep mee alive, which I suppose you have enough of; if the win hand Easterly wee may stay longer but if North or Horthwest or south west we shall be gone. I looked long for you to bring up the negroes, which I shall loose my crop for want of them. If it be not my luck to see you, let me heare from you by writing. Direct your letters to M: Barnaby Dunne his house for me. Yo’r mother brothers and sisters are well. I pray you send me what tobaccos you can, and my love to John Robinson & all the rest of my friends. I have made my will and made you my executor. Nor else at present but the Lords blessing and mine be with you. Your loving Father till death. April the 10th 1676

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Thomas Todd was a merchant and was described as the "merchant of the Patapsco River" He was very successful and used his plantations to complete his merchant's business. At his death, he was taking 87 hogsheads of tobacco to England. Unlike other merchants, he did not use agents to conduct his business. He owned two ships the "Augustine" and "Virginia" and they were perfect ships to conduct business along the coast.

At Todd's death, 65% of his personal assets were in livestock. He evidently had orchards because in a letter to his son sent from the ship "Virginia" he asked his son Thomas to send "some good syder" that might "keepe mee alive". It may have been he marketed some apple sidar and possibly some hard cidar. He shifted labor and other assets back and forth between his plantations.

Todd's first plantation was on the North River in Gloucester County Va of more later. When he moved to Maryland he built another plantation called Toddsbury but also had Todd's Range on the Patapsco River. It was at the corner of High and Fayette street in downtown Baltimore. Called Cole's Harbor, it was repatented by James Todd who was the son of Captain Thomas Todd. It was then called Todds Range. It extended from Broadway on the East and Howard Street on the west. The Northern boundary was Madison Street and the Southern boundary the Baltimore Waterfront. (See map) Todds Range was divided into lots in 1729

Toddsbury is one of the Old Dominion's celebrated early homes." Founded by Thomas Todd in the early part of the seventeenth century, this property was once part of a "generous acreage in Maryland and Virginia." At his death in 1676 his son, Thomas Todd inherited the estate where it "remained directly in the Todd family for four generations before passing from Christopher Todd to his nephew, Phillip Tabb, son of Lucy Todd and Edward Tabb, whose home was in Amelia County. Phillip Tabb married his first cousin, Mary Mason Wythe-Booth, daughter of Elizabeth Todd, leaving Toddsbury in possession of two direct descendants of the first Thomas Todd." The house of colonial architecture style is surrounded by a wide expanse of lawn facing the North River. "Seven generations of Todds lie in the old family burying grounds at the East side of the lawn, their records inscribed on the monument. The house itself is a story and a half building of brick, laid in Flemish bond. It is covered by a gambrel roof with an unusually steep lower slope which is pierced by gabled dormers. The house is L shaped with a center stair hall and two flanking rooms in the long arm and a subsidiary stair hall and another room in the wing. In elevation, the river front of the building, which is the facade, is six bays long with the doorway off center to the left. Centered on the building and covering the doorway and one window is a three bay porch with slender Doric columns which support a porch room above. This has two windows on the front, off center with the windows below, and are at either end. The gable roof of the porch motive’ was formerly treated as a high pediment but recently the gable end was pitched back and shingled. The lower windows have the original nine over nine light sash and the upper six over nine light. The north end windows vary in size. The interior has excellent woodwork of the period. The hall has a dado and a cornice with a dentil band, the stair has an open string with scrolled brackets. The balusters are square in section set diagonally, three to a tread. The molded handrail is not ramped. The flanking rooms are fully paneled. The dining room, to the north has arched recesses at either side of the chimney heart. These have glazed cupboards in the Jambs with double hung sash. The stair in the rear wing has a closed string with turned Balusters. The wing room, was the kitchen, has a paneled end as do the second floor rooms in the front section of the house Toddsbury is often called a 17th century house with 18th century additions, the wing being called the earlier section. There is, however, no evidence of this as the roof boarding of the latter projects under the roof of the former, indicating that they were built simultaneously. The land was patented by Thomas Todd but later went to the Tabb family. It was purchased by the parents of Mr. William Mott, who died about 1939 and it has been since then become the Mott family house. It is located East of the Junction of Routes 662 and 14. 37o 26’ 0” N 76o 27’ 9” west.

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Captain Jones, who gave his name to Jones Falls, the stream which runs through Baltimore, arising in the Green Spring Valley, had a dwelling house at what is approximately the corner of High and Fayette Streets in downtown Baltimore. This tract, originally Cole's Harbor, was later re-patented by James Todd, son of Captain Thomas Todd, and called "Todd's Range". It extended from Broadway on the east to Howard Street on the west, the northern boundary being Madison Street and the southern boundary the Baltimore waterfront. When Baltimore Town was established in 1729 "Todd's Range" was subdivided into building lots.

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Captain Thomas Todd, Sr.'s Timeline

1619
September 12, 1619
Denton, Durham, England
1658
1658
Age 38
1660
1660
Age 40
Toddsbury, Gloucester, Virginia
1669
April 1669
Age 49
April 1669
Age 49
April 1669
Age 49
1670
1670
Age 50
Gloucester County, VA, USA
1670
Age 50
1675
May 30, 1675
Age 55
Baltimore County, Maryland, Colonial America
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