Edmund Goodenow, Capt. (c.1611 - c.1688) MP

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Birthplace: Sutton-Mandeville, Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, present United States
Occupation: CHRISTENED 12-20-1617 ST. PARISH DONHEAD, WILTS, em. 4.24.1638 on the Confidence from Southampton, CAME TO USA 1638
Managed by: Thomas Edward Shirley
Last Updated:

About Edmund Goodenow, Capt.

As a churchwarden of Donhead St. Andrew, he was cited in 1636 for not attending his parish church; with his borthers Ralph and Simon, he was cited in Feb. 1637 for not attending church in Shaftesbury (Powell pp. 72-73). He and his family immigrated on the Confidence, his age given as 27 and his residence as "Dunhead in Wilsheire" (TAG 52:208). He was one of the "three youngest children" in the will of Thomas Goodenow (TAG 52:209); Ursula Goodenow's will implies that he was her youngest son.

Sources: Banks, Planters, p. 196: Wm Barry, Hist. Farmingham, p. 264; Bond, Watertown, p. 392; Hudson, History Sudbury, pp. 28, 34-35; Mas. Colon. Recs., I, 291-92; Meacham family recs.; NEHGR 6:379; 14:355; 17:170, 254, 312; 59:243; 60:59-60; S. C. Powell, Puritan Village, pp. 72-73, 82-98, passim; E.M.L. Rixford, Three Hundred Colon. Ancest., p. 229; Savage, II, 271, 272; Sudbury VR, pp. 52, 53, 54, 57, 202, 203, 249, 305, 306.

In Wiltshire, England, Edmund Goodnow, though a church warden of Donhead St. Andrew, was influenced by the nonconformist doctrines being preached in his and neighboring parishes. In 1636, he and his fellow churchwarden Roger Strong were finded and required to do pendance for their wanderings from their force to come before their archdeacon because they had gone to chruch in Shaftsbury. Resenting such strictness, Edmund and several of his relatives embarked for New England in the Confidence, which sailed from Southampton on April 24, 1638.

Edmund and his family settled in Sudbury MA. A committee examining about fifty candidates for citizenship in 1639 ranked him as sixth in the economic hierarcay, and the General Court of the MA Colony appointed him the town's first constable. In 1640 the inhabitants of Sudbury chose him and Brian Pendleton to distribute "the third division of upland," making grants that would "stand forever," and he and John Bent were authorized to assign all tember "according to any man's necessity." with power affairs for one year." That is, he was a selectman, and he served as such until March, 1655/6. In 1645 he was elected an ensign in the town troops, in 1648 a civil judge, and in 1649 a Deputy to the General Court.

Both were buried in Old Burying Ground at Wayland MA.

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Edmund was church warden of the parish of Dunhead, St. Andrew. Despite this standing, he was fined and sentenced to do public penance in 1636 for attending "nonconforming" sermons outside his parish. In 1637, he was reprimanded for attending church in Shaftsbury.

It was therefore perhaps for greater religious freedom that Edmund and Anne traveled to New England in 1638. The family, along with the families of several of Edmund's siblings, traveled on the ship "Confidence", arriving on April 24, 1638. They settled in Sudbury, Massachusetts.


As a founder of Sudbury, Edmund was active in the town's government and served in a number of government posts. He was also a Deputy Lieutenant and Captain in King Philip's Indian War in 1674.

Anne (Berry) Goodenow died on March 9, 1675/76. Edmund would live until 1688, dying on April 5. Both were buried in Old North Cemetery in Sudbury.

http://www.geocities.com/pkfishers/bioegab.html

citing "Goodenow Who Originated in Sudbury, Massachusetts" by Theodore James Fleming Banvard, Goodenow Family Association (Gateway Press Inc., Baltimore, 1994)

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As a churchwarden of Donhead St. Andrew, he was cited in 1636 for not attending his parish church; with his borthers Ralph and Simon, he was cited in Feb. 1637 for not attending church in Shaftesbury (Powell pp. 72-73). He and his family immigrated on the Confidence, his age given as 27 and his residence as "Dunhead in Wilsheire" (TAG 52:208). He was one of the "three youngest children" in the will of Thomas Goodenow (TAG 52:209); Ursula Goodenow's will implies that he was her youngest son.

Sources: Banks, Planters, p. 196: Wm Barry, Hist. Farmingham, p. 264; Bond, Watertown, p. 392; Hudson, History Sudbury, pp. 28, 34-35; Mas. Colon. Recs., I, 291-92; Meacham family recs.; NEHGR 6:379; 14:355; 17:170, 254, 312; 59:243; 60:59-60; S. C. Powell, Puritan Village, pp. 72-73, 82-98, passim; E.M.L. Rixford, Three Hundred Colon. Ancest., p. 229; Savage, II, 271, 272; Sudbury VR, pp. 52, 53, 54, 57, 202, 203, 249, 305, 306.

In Wiltshire, England, Edmund Goodnow, though a church warden of Donhead St. Andrew, was influenced by the nonconformist doctrines being preached in his and neighboring parishes. In 1636, he and his fellow churchwarden Roger Strong were finded and required to do pendance for their wanderings from their force to come before their archdeacon because they had gone to chruch in Shaftsbury. Resenting such atrictness, Edmund and several of his relatives embarked for New England in the Confidence, which sailed from Southampton on April 24, 1638.

Edmund and his family settled in Sudbury MA. A committee examining about fifty candidates for citizenship in 1639 ranked him as sixth in the economic hiararcay, and the General Court of the MA Colony appointed him the town's first constable. In 1640 the inhabitants of Sudbury chose him and Brian Pendleton to distribute "the third division of upland," making grants that would "stand forever," and he and John Bent were authorized to assign all tember "according to any man's necessity." with power affairs for one year." That is, he was a selectman, and he served as such until March, 1655/6. In 1645 he was elected an ensign in the town troops, in 1648 a civil judge, and in 1649 a Deputy to the General Court.

Both were buried in Old Burying Ground at Wayland MA.

NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL & GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, Vol. XIV, 1860, page 335.

List of Names of Passeng the good shipp the Confidence of London or C.C. tonnes, John Jobson, Mr. And thus by vertue of the Lord Treas warr of the xjth of April, 1638. Southampton, 24 April, 1638.

Edmvnd Goodenowe of Dunhead in Wilsheire Husbandman 27

Ann Goodenowe his wife

John Goodenowe their sons 4 years and under

Thomas Goodenowe

Richard Sangar his servant 18

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John Goodenowe of Semley in Wilsheir Husbandman 42

Jane Goodenowe his wife

Lydia Goodenowe their daughters

Jane Goodenowe

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Thomas Goodenowe of Shasbury (probably in Dorsetshire) 30

Jane Goodenowe his wife

Thomas Goodenowe his sone 1

Ursula Goodenowe his sister

Sources: Pioneers of Mass.; NEHGR, Vols. 2, 13; National Society, Daughters of Am. Colonists; Gen. Register of the First Settlers of New England; Flintlock and Tomahawk; Topographical Dictionary of Emigrants to New England; Three Hundred Colonial Ancestors and War Service; TAG, v52, No. 4, and v59, No. 1; Founders of Early American Families; National Society, Daughters of Colonial Wars, Lineage Book V; NEHGR, v13, p261, & V18, p48; The Great Migration Begins, Vol.1, pages 302 and 1126; Puritan Village by Sumner Chilton Powell.

Name sometimes spelled Goodyknow, Goodynow, Goodnow, Goodenowe and Goodenough.

From Pioneers of Massachusetts:

"Edmund Goodenow, husbandman, ae. 27, from Dunhead, Wilts., Eng., with his wife Anne and sons John and Thomas under 4 yrs. of age, with servant Richard Sanger, ae. 18, came in the Confidence April 11, 1638. Settled at Sudbury, propr. 1639, frm. May 13, 1640. Town officer, deputy. Lieut. 1 (2) 1651. [Mdx. Files.] Ch. Hannah b. 28 (9) 1639, Sarah b. 17 (1) 1642, Joseph b. 19 (5) 1645. Capt. Edmund d. April 5, 1688."

New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. II, prints the list of ship passengers, but that record is very muddled. A corrected copy is found in Founders of New England.

The latter lists "Edmund Goodenowe of Dunhead (current map has Donhead) in

Wilsheire. Husbandman, 27." With him were his wife Ann; two sons four years

and under, John and Thomas, and Richard Sanger, 18, his servant.

Two other Goodenow families came on the same ship: John, 42, with wife Jane and daughters Lydia and Jane, came from Semley, Wiltshire. Thomas, 30, with wife Jane, son Thomas, 1, and sister Ursula, came from Shaftsbury, England.

All three families settled in Sudbury, Mass. Edmund and Thomas were listed in NEHGR, Vol. 13, p213 as original proprietors of Sudbury.

TAG: Edmund Goodenow, born about 1611, son of Thomas Goodyknow of Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire. Died 6 April 1688 Sudbury, MA. Living 1638 at Donhead St. Andrew, immigrating from there at age 27 to New England in 1638. He came on the ship Confidence with his wife Ann, sons John and Thomas, both under four years, and his servant, Richard Sanger, age 18.

Ancestral File record says parents of Edmund were Thomas and Ursula Goodenow. They probably were the parents of at least three Goodenows on the ship: Thomas, Edmund and Ursula. John was 12 years older than Thomas and 15 years older than Edmund, so he could have been an uncle or an older brother.

A NEHGR, Vol. II, correction entry lists the Goodenows as passengers on

the "goode shipp, the Confidence of London, of 200 tonnes." The passenger list is dated April 11, 1638--presumably the date, or approximate date, of sailing.

NEHGR, v14, p335, in another update: Edmvnd (sic) Goodenowe of Dunhead (now it is known as Donhead) in Wilsheire, Husbandman; Ann Goodenowe, his wife; John and Thomas Goodenowe, their sonns 4 yeares and under; and Richard Sangar, his servant.

National Society of the Daughters of American Colonists Lineage Book,

Vol. 2, says Edmund was a representative to the General Court from Sudbury,

1645-80.

Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of N.E. says he was in Sudbury

in 1640, was a first lieutenant and later captain in the military train band

and a representative to the General Court in 1645 and 1650.

"Flintlock and Tomahawk" by Douglas Edward Leach describes an Indian attack in 1676 on Sudbury during King Philip's War. Among the town's defensive buildings was the "Goodnow Garrison House," very probably the house of Capt. Edmund Goodenow.

Topographical Dictionary of English Emigrants: Edmond Goodnow from Donhead

Parish, Wiltshire, came on the Confidence to Sudbury, Mass.

Three Hundred: He was honored as leader of the militia. Died 1676.

Founders: Edmund Goodenow. Came with family on "Confidence" 1638. Sudbury,

MA, 1639. Died there 6 April 1688. Husbandman on passenger list. Deputy.

Captain of foot company.

Colonial Wars: Capt. Edmund Goodnow, born Wiltshire, England, 1611; died

Sudbury, Mass., 5 or 6 April 1688, age 77. Married Ann _______ about 1634.

Deputy from Sudbury, Mass., 1645, 1649, 1650, 1660, 1673, 1674 and 1680. Ensign of Military Company, 1745; Lieutenant in 1651; Captain of Sudbury Foot Co. 1674; commanded a garrison house during King Philip's War, 1675/6.

NEHGR: The original proprietors of Sudbury, Mass., included Edmund, Thomas

and John Goodenow. (Vol. 13). Capt. Edmund Goodenow died 5 April 1688. Sudbury records cited in Vol. 18.

Migration: Edmund Goodenow of Sudbury, Mass. Father of Sarah Goodenow.

Puritan Village: Edmund Goodnow. A non-conformist residing in St. Andrew Parish, Wiltshire, he preferred hearing sermons spoken by religious leaders outside his home parish. He was cited in 1636 for wandering from his parish church. He and brothers Simon and Ralph the next year were presented before their archdeacon "for going to Shaftsbury to church on Sundays and Holy Days." [Edmund came to New England in 1638, but not Simon and Ralph.] He was a founder of Sudbury and and a prominent public figure, serving 13 terms as a selectman and three as a deputy to the Massachusetts General Courts. He was appointed by the General Court as the first constable. Other town jobs included fence viewer, judge of small causes, surveyor of highway, invoice taker, timber keeper and ensign in the train band. [Apparently he had risen to captain at the time of the King Philips War, see above.] A new generation of young turks gained control of the town government, and Edmund in March 1555/56 was out of office for the first time in his Sudbury political life. Later former selectman Edmund was reduced to the public job of swine warden.

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"Captain" Edmund Goodenow's Timeline

1611
April 11, 1611
Sutton-Mandeville, Wiltshire, England
1617
December 20, 1617
Age 6
Donhead, St. Andrew, Wiltshire, England
December 20, 1617
Age 6
Donhead, St. Andrew, Wiltshire, England
December 20, 1617
Age 6
Donhead, St. Andrew, Wiltshire, England
1630
1630
Age 18
Dunhead St. Andrews, Wiltshire, England, UK
1634
January, 1634
Age 22
Dunhead, St. Andrew, Wiltshire, England
1637
November 26, 1637
Age 26
St. James, Shaftesbury, Wiltshire, England
1638
April 24, 1638
Age 27
Boston, Suffolk County, MA, USA in the 'Confidence' departed Southhampton
1639
November 28, 1639
Age 28
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
1642
March 17, 1642
Age 30
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States