George Denison (c.1618 - 1694) MP

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Nicknames: "George", "Denyson", "Dennison"
Birthplace: Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England
Death: Died in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
Cause of death: Died while discharging his duties while attending the Massachussetts General Assembly at Hartford
Occupation: Militia Capt; town and county positions., Soldier and Legislator, Emigrant, came to Amer, in 1631, Had rank of Captain
Managed by: Glen Lofton Bedgood
Last Updated:

About George Denison

Biographical Summary #1:

"...Captain George DENISON was born in 1618 in Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England. He died on 23 Oct 1694 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut. "George Denison bpt Bishop's Stortford, Herts., England, Dec. 10, 1620; d Hartford Oct. 23, 1694; m (1) Bridget Thompson bpt Preston Capes, Northants, England, Sept 11, 1622, d Roxbury, Mass Aug 1643 dau John and Alice (Freeman) Thompson; m (2) in England ca 1645 Ann Borodell, d Stonington Sept 26, 1712, ae 97 (g s, Elm Grove).

"George's bro, Gen. Danl Denison wrote in 1672: 'My two brothers, Edward and George had all the Estate of my father left between them, being both marryed long before my father's death; my Brother George buried his first Wife in the year 1643, went into England was a good souldier ther above a year, was at the Battle of York, or Marston Moor, where he did good service, was afterward taken Prisoner, but got free and having married a second Wife he returned to New England the year before our Mother died, and not long afterward removed himself to New Ldon near whereunto (viz) at Stonington he now liveth, having 3 sons John, William, and George, 4 or 5 daughters...3 of Daughters are marryed to Stanton, Palmer and Cheesebrook (sic) all living at present in the same town.'

"The tradition that George served in Cromwell's army is thus verified. The story is also told that he was wounded and was nursed at the home of John Borodell, a cordwainner (leather merchant) of Cork, by his dau Ann whom he married for his second wife.

"He served as Deputy to the Conn Gen Court from New London Sept 1653, May 1654, and Feb 1657, and from Stonington Oct 1671, Oct 1674, May 1678, Oct 1682, May and Oct 1683, May, July, and Oct 1684, May and Oct 1685, May 1686, May 1687, Sept 1689, May, Sept and Oct 1693, and May 1694. When 1st mentioned in Conn Col Recds he is called "Captain," based upon his service and commission in England. He served on the War Comm for New London in 1653 when war threatened with Dutch. Although 56 he served as Capt in King Philip's War 1676 in command of New London County troops and second in command of the Conn Army under Maj Robert Treat. He was ap'pted Provost Marshal May 1677. He was Capt of volunteer troops against the enemy sept 1689. (See Conn Col Recds Vol I)"

"George Denison, b. in 1618*, was married, first, in 1640, to Bridget Thompson, daughter of 'John Thompson, gent., of Preston, Northamptonshire, England,' whose widow Alice had come to America, and was living in Roxbury. She had in this country, besides Bridget, these three sons: John Thompson; Anthony Thompson, recorded in New Haven, Conn., in 1643, as a planter; and William Thompson, who died in New Haven in 1683. George and Bridget (Thompson) Denison had two children born in Roxbury...

"The wife, Bridget, died in 1643. George Denison then went to England, served under Cromwell in the army of the Parliament, won distinction, was wounded at Naseby, was nursed at the house of John Borodell, by his daughter Ann, was married to Ann, returned to Roxbury, and finally settled in Stonington, Conn...

"George Denison died in Hartford, Oct. 23, 1694, while there on some special business, being 76 years old. His wife, Ann Borodell, died Sept. 26, 1712, aged 97 years. They were both remarkable for magnificent personal appearance, and for force of mind and character. She was always called "Lady Ann." They held a foremost place in Stonington. At the time of their marriage, in 1645, she was 30 years old and he 27. He has been described as 'the Miles Standish of the settlement;' but he was a greater and more brilliant soldier than Miles Standish. He had no equal in any of the colonies, for conducting a war against the Indians, excepting perhaps Capt. John Mason. Miss Calkins, in her history of New London, says of him: 'Our early history presents no character of bolder and more active spirit than Capt. George Denison; he reminds us of the border men of Scotland.' In emergencies he was always in demand, and he was almost constantly placed in important public positions."

"Capt. George Denison.--He came here to reside in the year 1654. He received several large grants of land from the towns of Pequot and Stonington, also large tracts from Oneco and Joshua, sons of Uncas. He erected his dwelling-house near Pequotsepos, a few feet west of the late residence of Oliver Denison (deceased), and subsequently surrounded it by a stockade fort. His homestead place was bounded on the west by John Stanton's farm, on the south by the Mason highway eastward to Palmer Hill, and then by Amos Richardson's land, easterly by Richardson's land and the town lots, and northerly by said lots and lands of Capt. John Gallup.

"Capt. Denison was the youngest son of William and Margaret Denison, and came to this country in 1631, in company with the Rev. John Eliot, and settled in Roxbury, Mass., where he married Bridget Thompson in 1640. She died in 1643, leaving two children. After her death he returned to England and engaged in the civil conflict with which the kingdom was convulsed. On his return to this country, about two years afterward, he brought with him his second wife, Ann, daughter of John Borodel, of Cork, Ireland, and one son, John Denison. He was chosen captain in Roxbury, and was called a young soldier lately come out of the wars in England. 'In 1651 he came to Pequot to reside, bringing his family with him, consisting of his wife and four children, and had a house-lot given him by the town, which he occupied until 1654, when he sold out and removed to this town.'

"Capt. Denison took an active and decided part in 1656 in favor of having 'Mystic and Pawcatuck' set off from Pequot, and a new township with a ministry of its own established. By this course he incurred the displeasure of the leading men of Pequot, and by favoring the claims of Massachusetts to the jurisdiction of the place he drew upon himself the censure of the General Court, and when Southertown was incorporated and annexed to Suffolk County, he was appointed first townsman, commissioner, and clerk of the writs. He was active and influential in securing the favor of the Massachusetts court, and aided in securing large grants of land here to parties there, which overlapped grants made to Chesebrough, Palmer, Stanton, and others by the General Court of Connecticut.

"This alienated some of his friends. But the reunion of the settlement by means of the new charter had the effect of extinguishing these Massachusetts claims, and the Connecticut grants were left undisturbed.

"When Mr. Chesebrough, in 1664, asked the General Court of Connecticut for amnesty for the planters who had favored the claim of Massachusetts to this place, it was extended to him, and ever afterwards he was regarded with favor by the General Court.

"From 1671 to 1694 he represented Stonington for fifteen sessions of the General Court. He was appointed magistrate, selectman, and held almost every office in town. While Capt. Denison was prominent and active in civil affairs, he was more distinguished in military matters. With the exception of Capt. John Mason, he was the most conspicuous and daring soldier of New London County, and was, in fact, the Miles Standish of the settlement, a natural military leader, and though holding the rank of captain, he often commanded expeditions against the Indians, and was always most successful when commander-in-chief, and at one time he was provost-marshal for Eastern Connecticut and Rhode Island. He participated in the Narragansett swamp-fight in 1675, and performed prodigies of valor. As early as February following a series of forays were commenced against the Narragansett Indians. They were commanded by Capt. Denison, Capt. John Gallup, and Capt. James Avery. These partisan bands were composed of volunteers, regular soldiers, Pequots, Mohegans, and Niantics. It was the third of these roving excursions, begun in March and ended April 19, 1676, in which the celebrated Narragansett chieftan, Canonchet, was taken prisoner. He was brought to Stonington, and was put to death at Anguilla, near where Gideon P. Chesebrough now resides. A council of war was held, during which his life was promised him if he would use his influence with the Indians to put a stop to the war, but he indignantly refused, saying that the Indians would not yield on any terms.

"He was told of his breach of faith in not keeping the treaties which he had made with the English, and of the men, women, and children that he had massacred, and how he had threatened to burn the English in their houses, to all of which he haughtily and briefly replied 'that he was now in their hands, and they could do with him as they pleased.' he was importuned and urged to let a counselor of his go and treat with his people, but he haughtily refused, whereupon the council voted for his immediate execution.

"When Canonchet was told that he must die, he seemed not at all moved, but cooly answered 'that he liked it well, and that he should die before his heart had grown soft, or he had said anything unworthy of himself.'

"He was shot by Oneco, son of Uncas, and by Cassasinamon and Herman Garret, two Pequot sachems. The Mohegans quartered him, and Niantics built the fire and burnt his remains. His head was sent as a 'token of love' to the council at Hartford. In June following Capt. Denison commanded a company raised in New London County for Maj. Talcott's expedition against the Indians in Massachusetts. They went as far north as Northampton, and returned after having scoured the country far up the Connecticut River, but met with a few fo the Indians. After a few days' rest rest this army again went in pursuit of the Indians. This time they went first to the northwest of Providence, then south to Point Judith, then home through Westerly and Stonington to New London. After a short respite they started again, July 18, 1676, and made their way this time into Plymouth colony. They went to Taunton, from whence they returned homeward, but hearing that a large number of Indians were working their way westward, making depredations as they went, they pursued and overtook them, and had a sharp and final struggle with them beyond the Housatonic, after which they returned and the men were disbanded. There were ten of these expeditions, including the volunteer forays under Denison and Avery. They inflicted speedy vengeance upon the Indians, and broke their power forever. The remnants of the Indian tribes were gathered together and located wherever the English desired. In all these military expeditions Capt. Denison bore a conspicuous part, and won for himself undying fame.

"Capt. Denison was born in 1618, and died at Hartford, Oct. 24, 1694, during the session of the General Court, which he was attending officially, and was buried there. The following is a copy of his will:

"I George Denison of Stonington, in the county of New London and Colony of Connecticut in New England being aged and crazy in body but sound in mind and memory, and being desirous to make preparations for death, and to set my house in order before I die, I do, therefore, as I becometh a Christian, first, freely and from my heart, resign my soul through Christ, into the hands of God who gave it me, and my body to the earth from whence it came, and to be buried in decent manner by my executor and friends, in the hope of a joyful and a glorious resurrection, through the perfect merits and mediation of Jesus Christ my strong Redeemer.

"And as concerning my outward estate, which the Lord hath still entrusted my with, after all my just debts are paid, I give and dispose of as followeth: First, I give and bequeath unto my dear and loving wife, Ann Denison, my new mansion place, to wit, the house we live in the barns and buildings the orchards and the whole tract of land and improvements thereon, as far as Mistuxet eastward and as it is bounded upon record, south, west, and north, except thirty acres given to my son, John Denison, which is to lie on the south side next to Capt. Mason's, east of our field, and also one hundred pounds in stock, prized at the country price, all which is and hath been under our son William Denison's improvement and management for these several years, to mutual comfort and content, which I do will and bequeath unto my said wife for her comfortable supply during her natural life.

"And I give unto my said wife, all the household stuff that was and is properly belonging unto us, before my son William took the charge of the family, to be wholly at her disposal, to bequeath to whom she pleaseth at her death.

"Unto my eldest son, John Denison, I have already given his portion and secured to him by a deed or deeds, and I do also give unto him, his heirs or assigns, forever, a country grant of two hundred acres of land or two hundred pounds in silver money, which grant may be found in the General Court Records.

"Also, I give unto him, my great sword and the gauntlet which I wore in the wars of England and a silver spoon of ten shillings marked G & A.

"Unto my son, George Denison, I have formerly given a farm, lying and being at the northwest angle of Stonington bounds, and adjoining the ten-mile tree of the same bounds, which farm containeth one hundred and fifty acres, more or less, as also, the one-half of a thousand acres of land, lying to the northward or northwest of Norwich, given to me as a legacy by Joshua the son of Uncas the same time Mohegan sachem, the said land to by divided as may more fully appear in the deed, which I then gave him of both those tracts in one deed, signed and sealed, with both my own and my wife's hand, and delivered to him and witnessed, and I have several times tendered to him to acknowledge it before authority, that so it might have been recorded according to the formality of law, the which he had wholly neglected or refused, and will not comply with me, therein, and yet hath sold both those parcels and received pay for them; what his motive may be I cannot certainly divine, but have it to fear they are not good, nor tending to peace after my decease. Wherefore to prevent further trouble, I see cause herein to acknowledge said deed, and to confirm those said parcels of land unto him according to the date of said deed, and the conditions therein expressed, but do hereby renounce any other deed not herein expressed, the which two tracts of land before mentioned, with two Indian servants, to wit, an Indian youth or young man, and a woman, together with a considerable stock of neat cattle, horses, sheep, and swine, I then give him, and permitted him to have and carry with him, I do now confirm to him, the which was and is to be, the whole of his portion, I either have or do see cause to give him, only I give unto him twenty shillings in silver, or a cutlas or rapier, the which I leave to the discretion of my executor, to choose which of them to do.

"Unto my son, William Denison, I have formerly given him one hundred and thirty acres of land, to by more or less, to wit, all of the land to the eastward of Mistuxet Brook, which did originally belong unto my new mansion place, and is part of three hundred acres granted unto me by New London, as may appear upon record, and three hundred acres of land, lying and cutting upon the North boundary of Stonington, as may more fully appear upon record in Stonington, and the native right thereof, with some addition, confirmed to me by Oneco, as may more fully appear by a deed under his hand and seal, acknowledged before Capt. Mason, and recorded in Stonington. Also, I then gave him two Indian servants, biz., John, whom I bought of the country, and his son Job, which was born in our house, together with one-third part of stock, which we have together, all which as aforesaid we formerly gave unto my son, William Denison, by a former deed, under our hands and seals, and I see just reason to confirm the same unto my son William, in this my last will, that so I may take off all scruple or doubt respecting the said deed. Moreover, I give unto my son, William Denison, fifty acres of land as it was laid out and bounded unto me by Stonington surveyors, and joins upon the before-mentioned three hundred acres, on south side thereof, cut also upon land belonging to my son, John Denison, to be to him, my said son, William Denison, and his heirs forever. Also, I give unto my son William Denison, and his heirs forever, the one-half of my allotment at Windham, to wit, five hundred acres of land, which is part of a legacy given me by Joshua, the son of Uncas, the same time sachem of Mohegan, as may more fully appear upon the Court Records at New London, as also, upon that former experience, we have had of his great industry and childlike duty in the management of all our concerns for our comfort, and comfortable supply, &c., it is therefore my will, and in confidence of his love, duty, and wonted care of his loving mother, my dear wife, after my decease, I say I do still continue him in the possession and improvement of my new mansion place, with the stock mentioned herein in my deed to my loving wife, he taking care of his said mother, forty shillings in silver money, yearly, or half-yearly, while she shall live, and at her decease, I fully and absolutely give and bequeath that my aforesaid mansion place, together with the stock mentioned before unto my said son, William Denison, and his heirs forever. Also, I give unto my son, William Denison, my rapier and broad buff belt, and tin cartridge-box, which I used in the Indian wars, together with my lone carbine, which belt and sword I used in the same service.

"Unto my eldest daughter, Sarah Stanton, as I have given her formerly her portion as I was then able, as I do now give unto her ten pounds out of the stock as pay, and one silver spoon of ten shillings price, marked G & A.

"Unto my daughter, Hannah Saxon, as I have given unto her, also, her portion as I was then able, as I do now give unto her ten pounds out of the stock as pay.

"Unto my daughter Ann Palmer, besides that I have formerly given ger, I do now give her ten pounds out of the stock as pay.

"Unto my daughter Margaret Brown I have given already her portion, and give her ten pounds out of the stock as pay.

"Unto my daughter Borodel Stanton I have formerly given, and do now give her five pounds out of the stock as pay, and commend it to my beloved wife, that at or before her death, she would give her silver cup, which was sent us from England, with brother Borodel's name, J. B., under the head, to her.

"Unto my grandson, George Denison, the son of my oldest son John Denison, I give my black fringed shoulder belt, and twenty shillings in silver money, toward the purchase of a handsome rapier to wear with it.

"Unto my grandson George Palmer I give the grant of one hundred acres of land, which was granted unto me by the town of Stonington, not yet laid out, or forty shillings out of my stock, as pay, at the discretion of my executor to choose which. And whereas there is considerable rent due me for a house of my wife in Cork, in Ireland, which was given unto her as a legacy by her father John Borodell, at his death, and no doubt may appear upon record in Cork, the which house stands upon lands which they call Bishop's land, and was built by our said father, he to have lived in the same, whereof my said wife was next to himself, as may also appear there upon record; and whereas I have a right to land in the Narragansett country, which is mine by deed of the native right from the true proprietors thereof, as may appear upon record in Boston, and in the records of Stonington, the which my rights, have been and are under the possession and improvement of those who have no just right to them, to which by reason of the many troubles, wars and difficulties which have arisen, together with our remoteness, we have not been able to vindicate our just rights, but have been great sufferers, thereby; but if it please God to send peaceable times, and our rights be recordable in law, I do by this my last will, give and bequeath my said right unto my sons John Denison and George Denison, to be equally divided betwixt them, probided that they each one bear their equal share in the trouble and recovery of the same. Provided, also, that my son George Denison, do relinquish and deliver up any right he may pretend unto by a former deed which I gave him of the one half of Achagromeconsest, according as I formerly obliged him to do in a deed I gave him of the other farm, and gave him upon that consideration.

"And in reference with Nathaniel Beebe, who hath been a retainer and boarder in our family between thirty and forty years; and for his board at our last reckoning, which was March 20th 1680, he was indebted to me forty-six pounds, six shillings and three pence,--I say 46 pounds, 6s, & 3d. as may appear under his hand to said account in my book, --since which time he hath boarded in teh family near upon fourteen years, which at four shillings and six-pence the week, amounts to one hundred and sixty-three pounds, sixteen shillings, and the remainder will be one hundred thirteen pounds, which one hundred and thirteen pounds, sixteen shillings, together with the forty six pounds six shillings and three pence due upon book, under his hand, at our last reckoning as aforesaid, being added unto one hundred and thirteen pounds, sixteen shillings, the whole will be 160 pounds 2s. 3d. the which I give unto my son William Denison, and his heirs forever, for him or them or any of them, or if they see cause to demand, receive and improve as their own proper estate. Also, I give unto my son William Denison, all and singular, whatsoever that belongeth unto me, not aleady disposed of, and to be to him and his heirs forever, whom also I do hereby constitute, appoint, and make my sole executor, to pay all just debts, if any shall appear of which I know not any, and to receive all dues, which either are or shall be due to me, and to pay all legacies according to this my will, within twelve months after my wife's decease, and to take care for my decent burial. But in case my son William Denison shall decease before he hath performed this my will, or before his children are of age, then my will is that the whole estate be under the improvement of his wife, our daughter-in-law Sarah Denison, during the time of her widowhood, for her comfortable supply, and the well educating and bringing up their children in religion and good learning; all which she shall do by the advice of the Reverend and my loving friend Mr. James Noyes, my son John Denison and my son-in-law, Gershom Palmer, them or any two of them, if three cannot be obtained; but without advice she may not act, which three my dear friends, I do earnestly desire and hereby appoint as overseers for the children, and to take effectual care that this my will may be performed according to the true intent thereof; but if my said daughter-in-law, shall marry again, then this whole estate to fall into the hands of those my overseers and by them to be secured for my son William Denison's children, to wit William Denison, George Denison, and Sarah Denison, and by those overseers, to be improved for their well bringing up as aforesaid, and faithfully to be delivered unto the children as they shall come of age, to wit: the males at twenty-one years of age, and the females of eighteen; and if any of the said children should die before they come of age, the survivors shall inherit the same, and if they should all die before of age, (the which God forbid, but we are all mortal,) then it is my declared mind and true interest of this my will that my grandson George Denison the son of my oldest son John Denison, shall be the sole heir of that estate, out of which he shall pay unto his four brothers to wit, John Denison, Robert Denison, William Denison, and Daniel Denison, ten pounds apiece in current pay, and also ten pounds in current pay unto his cousin Edward Denison, the son of my son George Denison; and in token that this is my last will and testament, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 24th day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and ninety three-four."

"GEORGE DENISON" (Seal.) He was married to Ann BORODELL about 1645.

George's brother, General Daniel Denison wrote in 1672: " My Brother George buried his first Wife in the year 1643, went into England, was a souldier ther above a year, was at the Battle of York or Marston Moor where he did good service, was afterward taken prisoner, but got free, and having married a second Wife, he returned to New England the year before our Mother died, and not long afterward removed himself to New London, near whereunto at Stonington he now liveth."

The story is that George met his second wife, Ann Borodell, when he was wounded and took shelter in her father's house. He married her in England and returned to Massachusetts about 1644.

George did not stay in Roxbury long. He became offended after not being elected to a position he wanted and moved with his family to New London, an area claimed by both Massachusetts and Connecticut. Here he got himself into trouble again, by encouraging settlers to accept the authority of Massachusetts. When the land was at last assigned to Connecticut, he was ordered to pay a fine. He refused to pay, and fortunately, had enough influence and connections, for the fine to be eventually forgiven.

The New London/Stonington area was first settled by William Chesebrough in 1649. Some of the other early settlers of the area were Thomas Stanton, Thomas Minor, Governor Haynes, Walter Palmer, Capt. John Gallup, and Robert Park; the children and grandchildren of George Denison married into many of these families.

In 1675-1676, George (now almost sixty) was a successful captain in King Philip's War.

George's first wife was Bridget Thompson. She died in August of 1643, leaving two daughters under the age of three. After her death, George returned to England to fight on the side of Cromwell in the English Civil War.

Children of George and Bridget (born at Roxbury):

Sarah, baptized 20 March 1641/1642, married Thomas Stanton, Jr.

Hannah, baptized 21 May 1643, married first Nathaniel Chesebrough, second Joseph Saxton.

Children of George and Ann: (first two born at Roxbury, rest at New London or Stonington, CT)

John, baptized 16 June 1646, married Phebe Lay.

Ann, baptized 20 May 1649, married Gershom Palmer.

Borodell, born about 1651, married Samuel Stanton.

GEORGE Jr., born about 1653, married Mercy Gorham.

William, born about 1655, married Sarah Prentice.

Margaret, born about 1657, married James Brown, Jr.

Mercy, born about 1659, died 10 Mar 1670/1671.

SOURCE: Unknown

Biographical Summary #1:

"...Captain George Denison (1620-1694) was born Dec 1620 in Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England and was christened 10 Dec 1620 in Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England. He died 23 Oct 1694 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut and was buried in Old Center Church Cemetery, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut.

George was christened 10 Dec 1620 in Bishop's, Stortford, Hertfordshire, England.

George's bro. Gen. Danl Denison wrote in 1672 "My two brothers, Edward and George had all the estate of my father left between them, being both married long before my father's death: my Brother George buried his first Wife in the tear 1643, went into England was a souldier there above a year, was at the Battle of York, or Marston Moor, where he did good service, was afterward taken Prisoner, but got free and having married a second Wife he returned to New England the year before our mother died, and not long afterward removed himself to New London near whereunto at Stonington he now liveth.

The tradition that George served in Cromwell's army is thus verified. The story is also told that he was wounded and was nursed at the home of John Borodell, a cordwainner, (leather merchant) of Cork, by his daughter Ann who he married for his second wife.

During 15 sessions George was Deputy for New London or Stonington at the CT General Ct., and he died at Hartford, while discharging this duty. His gravestone, which was cut by an illustrious craftsman, James Stanclift, Sr., is in the yard of the old Center Church, Hartford.

George came to New England in 1633 on the "Lion". After the death of his wife Bridget, he returned to England and joined Cromwell's army. The story is told that he was wounded and was nursed at the home of John Borodell, a cordwainer (leather merchant) of Cork, Ireland, and later married his daughter, Ann. His first appearance after his return with Ann was in 1651 principally as a Guarantee of New London, CT. He had been in Roxbury, MA where he had a house lot given him on his settling there. He was a Capt. in 1647 in Roxbury and a Freeman in 1648. He was called a "young soldier lately come out of the wars in England". He was called a bold and distinguishing leader. He served as Deputy to the Connecticut General Court from New London CT, Sept. 1653 to May 1654 and Feb. 1657. He served from Stonington CT Oct 1671, Oct 1674, 1678, 1682, 1683, and to the time of his death.

When George was first mentioned in CT records he is called "Captain", based upon his service and commissioned in England. He served on the War Commission for New London in 1653, when war threatened with the Dutch. Although only 56, he served as Capt. in King Phillip's war in 1676 in command of the New London Troops and 2nd in command of the Conn. Army under Robert Treat. He was appointed Provost Marshall in 1677..."

SOURCE: ELDRED AND ASSOCIATED FAMILIES, Researched by: Catherine Matson & Clarice McNiven, Compiled by: Carol & Susan Matson, pp. 56. Retrieved from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nanc/denison/aqwg01.htm on May 11, 2011.

Biographical Summary #2:

Capt. George Denison, born 1618 in England, came to New England about 1631 with his father and two brothers and settled at Roxbury, Mass. He married Bridget Thompson of Stonington in 1640 and had two daughters. After her death in 1643, he returned to England "and engaged in the civil war"--side not stated. In Ireland he married Anne Brodil, daughter of John Brodil. They had seven children: John, George, William, Anne, Margaret, Brodil and Mary.

The daughters by Bridget Thompson were Sarah, born 20 March 1641, who married a Stanton, and Hannah, born 20 May 1643, who married a Saxton.

He was the first representative from Stonington in the General Assembly at Hartford. He died 23 Oct. 1694, age 76, while attending the assembly at Hartford.

SOURCE: Montville; Park Society Newsletter, 1978, SOURCE: Coe; The Great Migration Begins, v1, p523; SOURCE: Magna Charta Sureties 163-11; AF.

Biographical Summary:


Soon after death of Bridget, George left the two children with grand parents, and returned to England to serve under Oliver Cromwell in the Parliamentary army. He won distinction there and was in the Battle at Marston Moor July 2, 1644, where he was take prisoner. He later gained freedom. In the Battle of Nasby, he was woounded and take to home of John Borodell. John’s daughter Ann acted as nurse and later married him., They returned to Roxbury about 1645. They moved to New London CT in 1651 where he was prominent in military and civic affairs. Served several terms as Representative at Hartford.

Moved to tract of 500 acres east of Mystic, Conn in 1654. Built a log cabin first, then in 1663 built what he called his “Mansion House.” New house replaced it in 1717, by a grandson George. Called Pequotsepos Manor in 1939; 9th generation of Denison to live there.

[Denison Genealogy pg 11]

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He was a soldier in Oliver Cromwell's army during the English Civil War circa 1645 and fought at the battle of York or Marston Moor.

Deputy to the Connectict General Court form New London, CT three time during the 1650's and from Stonington, CT eighteen times between 1671 and 1694.

1653- Served on the War Committee when was was threatened with the Dutch.

1676- Served as Captain, age 56, during King Phillip's War in command of the New London County troops and second in command of the Connecticut army under Major Robert Treat.

1677, May- Appointed Provost Marshal.

1689, September- Captain of volunteer troops against the emeny. He was 69 years of age at the time.

Siblings: John bapt. 5 October 1605, William, Jr. bapt. 5 October 1606, General Daniel bapt. 18 October 1612, Sarah bapt. 8 October 1615, and Edward bapt. 1616.

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He was a resident of Roxbury, MA by 1643 when his first wife died. He returned to England shortly after.

He was a soldier in Oliver Cromwell's army during the English Civil War circa 1644-45 and fought at the battle of York or Marston Moor.

Deputy to the Connectict General Court form New London, CT three time during the 1650's and from Stonington, CT eighteen times between 1671 and 1694.

1653- Served on the War Committee when Connecticut was threatened by the Dutch.

1676- Served as Captain, age 56, during King Phillip's War in command of the New London County troops and second in command of the Connecticut army under Major Robert Treat.

1677, May- Appointed Provost Marshal.

1689, September- Captain of volunteer troops against the emeny. He was 69 years of age at the time.

Siblings: General Daniel Denison and Edward.

  1. Baptism: 10 DEC 1620 Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire, England
  2. Immigration: 1631 in the "Lyon"
  3. Military Service: BET 1644 AND 1645 Parliamentary Forces under Oliver Cromwell in England
  4. Military Service: 19 DEC 1676 Narrangansett Swamp Fight and other venues during King Philip's War
  5. Will: 24 JAN 1693/94 probated 29 Nov 1694, Stonington, New London County, CT, USA

1. George returned to England following his wife Bridget's death, engag ed in the Civil War serving under Oliver Cromwell including the Batt le of York or Marston Moor where he distinguished himself, escaped aft er he was taken prisoner and wounded at Naseby, Northamptonshire, and lat er married Ann Boradell (Borodell), daughter of John from Cork Ireland. G eorge was nursed in John's home. In 1646 he returned to America with Ann a nd son John who died young. In 1651 he came to Pequot (New London), wi th Ann and 3 children. Here he occupied a house given him by the town unt il 1654, when he removed to what is now Stonington and built his dwelli ng house, about 5 miles west of William Chesebrough's, near Mystic, Connec ticut. He was then 36 years old. He had been chosen Captain of a milita ry company in Roxbury, Massachusetts. In 1658 he was a signer of the Pawca tuck Articles. He supported the claims of Massachusetts in respect to t he territory lying between the Mystic and Pawcatuck Rivers, and was a lead er in the opposition to the claims of Connecticut. Even after the chart er of King Charles had fixed the boundary of Connecticut at the Pawcatu ck River, he refused for a time to submit to the jurisdiction of this colo ny, so that he was under an interdict for a time, which was, however, even tually removed through the intercession of William Chesebrough. he w as a freeman of Connecticut and represented Stonington in the General Cou rt for 15 sessions (1671 - 1694). He filled almost every important offi ce in the town: was Captain of Volunteers in 1689: Commissary for New Lo ndon County in 1690. He was an officer in several expeditions against t he Narragansetts and other Indian tribes in Massachusetts: was Capta in of New London County forces in King Phillip's War.

2. George apparently died in General Court, Hartford, Connecticut (BOKH NL p. 161).

Biographical Summary:


When George was first mentioned in CT records he is called "Captain", based upon his service and commissioned in England. He served on the War Commission for New London in 1653, when war threatened with the Dutch. Although only 56, he served as Capt. in King Phillip's war in 1676 in command of the New London Troops and 2nd in command of the Conn. Army under robert Treat. He was appointed Provost Marshall in 1677.

CAPT. GEORGE DENISON, emigrant, the head of the clan whose family records are given in this genealogy, came over to this country in the good ship Lion, with his father, William Denison, his brothers Daniel and Edward, and Rev. John Eliot, the apostle to the Indians. George was at this time thirteen years of age, and, doubtless, received much of his mental and moral training from Mr. Eliot, who was tutor in his father's family. William Denison was a merchant, and from the fact that he employed a tutor in his family, it is inferred that he must have been a man of considerable means. He was a deacon in the First Church in Roxbury, Conn., a man of liberal education, and of large influence in the colony. His wife did not come to this country until 1632, and did not unite with the Church until some years later.

William Denison built a house in Roxbury, and it remains until this day in good preservation. He died there, Jan.25, 1653, an old man. She died there Feb. 23,1645.

George Denison began his adult life in Roxbury, and at the age of 22 married Bridget Thompson in 1640. She was the daughter of John Thompson, gentleman, of Preston, Northamptonshire, England, whose widow, Alice, had come to America, and was living in Roxbury. We find quite widely distributed among the descendants a courtship letter in verse, addressed by our ancestor to Miss Bridget Thompson, who seems to have been his first flame. We make room for it, not only as an interesting relic of the olden time, and a sample of the methods of courtship in 1640, but to correct a little romance, invented by one of his descendants, which alleges that he was betrothed to Ann Borodell before he came to this country, and hastened back to her immediately upon the death of his first wife.

There is no evidence of this, but much to the contrary. He was but thirteen when he emigrated, and probably never heard of Ann Borodell until he was carried a wounded soldier to her father's house, John Borodell, of Cork, Ireland (who was then living in England), where Ann became his nurse, and afterward his wife.

After three years of wedded life, Bridget died, leaving two daughters, Sarah and Hannah, who lived to be the heads of families in Stonington. Very soon after her death he returned to England, enlisted under Cromwell in the army of the Parliament, won distinction, was wounded at Naseby, was nursed at the house of John Borodell by his daughter Ann, which led to his marriage with her, and his early return to Roxbury, where he was chosen captain, and was called "a young soldier lately come out of the wars in England." He is said to have had one son, John, born July 14, 1640, when he came to Roxbury the second time, which would make his absence about three years. He did not long content himself with the quiet life in Roxbury. His daughter Ann had been born to him in that place, May 20, 1649. In 1651, he left Roxbury with his wife and four children for the Pequot settlement upon the west bank of the Thames, now New London. Here he had a house and lot given him by the town, which he occupied until 1654, when he sold out, went to Stonington, and settled on the land, a part of which has been in the possession of his descendants until the present generation, a tract of some five hundred acres in all, lying east of Pequotsop brook. His homestead place was bounded on the west by John Stanton's farm, now mainly owned by Joseph S. Williams; on the south by the Mason highway, which, with slight variations, is the road from Mystic Bridge to the Road Church, eastward to Palmer hill, and then by Amos Richardson's land, easterly by Richardson's land and the town lots, and westerly by said lots and lands of Capt. John Gallup.

The first house was probably a log house, which only served a temporary purpose, and was removed in Captain Denison's lifetime to make room for his mansion house. This was located in the northwest corner of his tract, a few feet west of the present dwelling of the Misses Sarah and Phebe M. Denison

The spot was undoubtedly selected, with the eye of a military leader, for the purpose of defense against Indians, who were then numerous and disputed possession of the country with the English.

There is no other spot so eligible for the purpose of defense in the neighborhood.

The house stood upon the southern slope of a narrow plot of ground about twenty-five rods long, buttressed with steep ledges on every side. This acre of ground, more or less, elevated from twenty to thirty feet above the surrounding ravines, and stockaded, was impregnable against any force the Indians could muster. There was a stone fort inside of the stockade near the house, and the remains of the old wall are still pointed out.

It was removed about a hundred years ago by those who had slight appreciation of the value of historical monuments. The stones are still visible in the walls near the house. The location is a pleasant one, standing high above the adjacent fields and looking out southward over a broad tract of intervale, once probably cultivated by the aborigines, and now lying in meadow, the best part of the neighboring farms.

In this direction you get glimpses of the Mystic River and the Sound, with Fisher's Island and Long Island in the distance. To the west lies Pequod hill, once crowned with an Indian fort, and the scene of the terrible slaughter under Capt. John Mason. To the north lies Quocataug, with the Mystic valley on the left, stretching away toward Lantern hill-a scene of rural beauty not easily matched in the county. The land has many ledges, with loose well rounded boulders upon the top, left in the ice period, geologists tell us, and ground into their present form by the moving glaciers. It is still hard land, even for Stonington, with rough pastures which the plow has never broken and probably never will. There are, however, smooth fertile acres between. Emigrants had been here five years before Captain Denison, to spy out the land, and the best locations had already been appropriated.

The mansion house which he erected could not have been a very imposing or substantial structure, for it was removed by his grandson George, son of William, about the year of 1724. Tradition affirms that George, eldest son of George and Lucy Gallup Denison, was the first child born in the new house. The records fix the date of his birth July 9, 1725, and that of his next older sister, Mary, July 14, 1724. This would make the age of the present structure 160 years, in the present year 1884. Upon this spot seven generations of the Denison family have been born. William2 was probably born in the log house ; his son, George,3 was born in the mansion house ; his son, George,4 Oliver,5 Ohiver,6 Edgar,7 and his children. The present farm of 250 acres remained undivided from George3 until the death of the sixth owner, Oliver,6 in the year 1873, a period of two hundred and twenty years from the settlement. About fifty acres, including the house and outbuildings, were deeded to his daughters, Sarah and Phebe, and the rest of the land divided among the other heirs. It is quite rare in this country to find a farm that has been held in the same family by inheritance for seven generations.

Perched on this ledge of rocks, like a baron in his castle, Captain Denison had a commanding influence among his townsmen for forty years, was their trusted military leader in forays against the Indians, and their frequent representative at the General Court at Hartford. He had great executive ability, and managed well the public trusts committed to him, and his own private affairs. He not only lived and raised a numerous family from these rude acres, but accumulated, for those times, a large estate. Numerous tracts of land were given to him by the authorities, for his military service principally, so that at the time of his death he owned several thousand acres of land in Stonington, in Norwich and Windham, and in the State of Rhode Island. This laid the foundation of comfortable homes for his children and their descendants for several generations, and retained nearly all of them within easy reach of the ancestral homestead for a hundred years after his death.

His sons and his daughters, with the exception of Margaret, who went to Swanzey, Mass., all remained in Stonington, or in adjoining towns. Of his eleven grandsons four remained in Stonington, two in Westerly, R. I., one in North Stonington, one in Montville, one in New London, and two in Saybrook. Nearly all were quite large landholders and men of influence in their respective towns.

It is a little remarkable that none of the sons or grandsons, with a single exception, obtained the good old age of the emigrants. Capt. Denison died at the age of 76, and his wife, Ann Borodell, at 97, which shows that our emigrant ancestors were favored with unusual physical vigor. Of their three sons, John died at 52, and George and William at 59. William only survived his mother a year and a half. The grandsons died at the ages of 30, 37, 38, 40, 43, 46, 55, 64, 67, 86. This last was George, the son of William, who lived at Pequotsop, and removed the mansion house to make room for the present more spacious dwelling. The hardships of the wilderness will hardly account for this diminution of vital force in the second and third generations. They were almost all cut off in the midst of life; and they had fewer difficulties and less exposure than the emigrants. It is not improbable that the products of the orchards they planted and the barley they harvested, when manufactured into alcoholic beverages, proved more perilous to life than struggles with the primitive forest and the Indians.

Later generations seem to have recovered the vigor of the founders of the clan, and give us a long list of persons who passed their three-score years and ten. There is food for profitable reflection in these statistics.

There is a solitary entry upon the records of the First Church of Stonington, under date of August 24, 1684 : "Capt. Denison was took into full communion," which shows that his mind had not been much occupied with religious things until late in life. The name of his wife appears among the communicants at the organization of the church, ten years earlier.

His active military life, and the clearing of the wilderness had not favored religious culture. His will, made ten years later, shows a very positive religious character, and a warm appreciation of his pastor, Rev. James Noyes, and of "the well bringing up and educating his grandchildren in religion and good learning."

The selection of the youngest son to be the principal heir, and to take the homestead, is probably a practical protest against the aristocratic usage of the mother country, which makes the eldest the favorite.

William, the youngest son of Capt. Denison, takes the homestead and cares for his widowed mother. The youngest sons of John, George, and William also inherit the homestead of the respective fathers.

SOURCE: Unknown

Jointure:

"...This witnesseth that I, George Denison of Southerton, in Quenecticut Jurisdiction, in New England, for and in consideration of an Jointure due unto my now wife Ann Denison, upon marriage, and upon my former engagement, in consideration of the sum of three hundred pounds by me received, of Mr. John Borodell, which he freely gave to my wife, his sister Ann Denison, and I have had the use and improvement of, and for and in consideration of conjugal and dearer affection moving me thereto, have for the reasons above said, and for the only use and benefit of my said wife Ann Denison, her heirs, and assigns, and by these presents do fully and absolutely give, grant, alien, make over and confirm unto my brother Edward Denison, all that my farm, which, I now dwell upon, consisting of five hundred acres, more or less, as It lyeth at Mystick In Southerton upon the East side of Mystick River, together with all the housing that at present are, or hereafter may be raised upon the said farm, with the household furniture, together with all the fencing privileges, and appurtenances belonging to it, with all the stock upon that farm aforesaid, reserving only to myself there, my bald faced mare and all my goats, and the present use and improvement of the said farm, housing household stuff, lands, stock, fencing, and privileges according to my pleasure during my natural life, to have and to hold the said farm, housing, lands, furniture, stock, and fences, with all the privileges and appurtenances for the only use of the said Ann Denison, under him the said Edward Denison his heirs and assigns forever, to his and their own proper use and behoof for the only benefit of the said Ann Denison, and the said George Denison, for himself, his heirs, executors and administrators, doth further covenant and grant to and with the said Edward Denison, his heirs and assigns, that he, the said George Denison, his heirs and executors, shall at all times forever hereafter warrant the said bargained premises, against all persons whatsoever claiming any right thereunto by from or under me. In witness hereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal. Dated according to a former deed of the same to my wife, May the third, One thousand six hundred and sixty-two..."

GEORGE DENISON, (Seal. Read, sealed, and delivered in the presence of

THOMAS MICHELL, and ELIZABETH DENISON,

This is a true copy of the Original examined and compared therewith this 17th of March, 1667-8.

From me, JOHN ALLEN, Secretary.

Date: 3 May 1662

SOURCE:1st Book CT State Records, Vol. 1, P. 273-4

Biographical Summary:


Capt George Denison buried his wife in 1643, went back to Eng same yr, where, as we learn from ltr of his brother, Maj Gen Daniel Denison, published in New Eng Historical & Genealogical Register Apr 1892, in which he says: "My brother George was a soldier there above a yr, was at the Battle of York or Marston Moor, where he did good service, & was afterwards taken prisoner, but got free & m 2nd wife, Miss Ann Borodell, & with her returned to New Eng in the yr 1645, & took up his abode again in Roxbury, MA, where he continued to live until 1651, when he came with his family to CT & located himself at N London, CT, where he resided until 1654, when he came to Stonington with his family to live, & remained there until his death, which took place at Hartford, CT, Oct 24 1694." Records of MA & CT: Capt George Denison not only distinguished civilian, but became most distinguished soldier of CT in early settlement, except Maj John Mason. Military services are on record in Colonial archives where he is recognized & portrayed. Find his name in History of New London & Stonington, where services are acknowledged & described in full. There is no date of marriage of Capt George Denison & Ann Borodell, but he was doubtless m in Eng. Pending their courtship agreement was made between them, which was afterwards ratified & confirmed at Hartford, CT May 3 1662, as follows: "This witnesseth that I, George Denison, of Southertown, in CT jurisdiction in New Eng, for & in consideration of a jointure due unto my now wife, Ann Borodell Denison, in consideration of the sum of 300 pounds by me received of Mr John Borodell, which he freely gave to my wife, his sister, Ann Borodell Denison, & I have had the use & improvement of & for, & in consideration of conjugal & dearer affection moving me, thereunto." This jointure agreement may be seen on 1st Book of CT State Records, in Harford, CT, p 274. Recorded instrument is proof of marriage of Capt George Denison & wife, Ann Borodell, & birth of their children & his will in his own handwriting bequeathing to them his entire property. Capt George Denison was capt of N London Co forces in King Phillips War, with Capt John Mason Jr, under Maj Robert Treat, in great swamp fight Dec 19 1675. Also served next yr in command of forces raised by him as Provo-Marshal, who pursued the remnant of Narragansett & Wampanaug Indians, & succeeded in defeating them & capturing Indian Chief Canonchet, who was brought to Stonington, & on his refusal to make peace with Eng, was shot. He assisted as magistrate to enable Pequot chiefs designated by Eng control the remnants of Pequots. He was assistant & deputy from Stonington to Gen’l Court for 15 sessions. Town of N London granted Capt George Denison 200 acres of land in Pequot-se-pos valley at Mystic in 1652, upon which he subsequently built a dwelling house (May 3 1663, it was raised), where in he & his family made their permanent, final home, known as Oliver Denison house, & which stood a few ft west of present residence of Mr & Mrs Reuben Ford (1899). He d Oct 24 1694, & his widow d Sep 26 1712, age 97, by gravestone, found in Elm Grove Cem, Mystic.

SOURCE: Unknown

Burial:

Birth: Dec 10 1620, England

Death: Oct 23 1694, Hartford, Hartford Co, CT, USA

Burial: Ancient Burying Grnd, Hartford, Hartford Co, CT, USA

SOURCE: www.findagrave.com; http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=11435695

George came to New England in 1633 on the "Lion". After the death of his wife Bridget, he returned to England and joined Cromwell's army. The story is told that he was wounded and was nursed at the home of John Borodell, a cordwainer (leather merchant) of Cork, Ireland, and later married his daughter, Ann. His first appearance after his return with Ann was in 1651 principally as a Guarantee of New London, CT. He had been in Roxbury, MA where he had a house lot given him on his settling there. He was a Capt. in 1647 in Roxbury and a Freeman in 1648. He was called a "young soldier lately come out of the wars in England". He was called a bold and distinguishing leader. He served as Deputy to the Connectiuct General Court from New London CT, Sept. 1653 to May 1654 and Feb. 1657. He served from Stonington CT Oct 1671, Oct 1674, 1678, 1682, 1683, and to the time of his death.

When George was first mentioned in CT records he is called "Captain", based upon his service and commissioned in England. He served on the War Commission for New London in 1653, when war threatened with the Dutch. Although 56, he served as Capt. in King Phillip's war in 1676 in command of the New London Troops and 2nd in command of the Conn. Army under robert Treat. He was appointed Provost Marshall in 1677.

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Captain George Denison, of Stonington's Timeline

1618
December 10, 1618
Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England
1620
December 10, 1620
Age 2
Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England
1620
Age 1
Probably England
1633
1633
Age 14
England
1640
1640
Age 21
Roxbury, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
1641
March 20, 1641
Age 22
Roxbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1643
May 20, 1643
Age 24
Roxbury, Suffolk, MA
1644
1644
Age 25
Naseby, Northamton, , England
1646
July 14, 1646
Age 27
Roxbury, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
1649
May 20, 1649
Age 30
Stonington, New London County, Connecticut Colony