Captain James Pendleton

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James Pendleton, Captain

Birthdate:
Birthplace: London, London, England
Death: Died in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island
Place of Burial: Westerly, Washington, RI
Immediate Family:

Son of Major Brian Pendleton and Eleanor Pendleton (Price)
Husband of Hannah Pendleton (Goodenow) and Mary Pendleton
Father of James Pendleton, Jr.; Mary Britton; Hannah Bush; Bryan Pendleton; Edmund Pendleton, Sr. and 8 others
Brother of Nicholas Pendleton; Mary Fletcher; Joseph Pendleton; unknown Pendleton and Caleb Pendleton

Occupation: Captain
Managed by: Shannon Quinn Purvis
Last Updated:

About James Pendleton, Captain

James was first at Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, then at Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts before coming to Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island in 1669. He served in the early Colonial wars. He was admitted to the First Church of Stonington November 7, 1680

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HISTORY OF STONINGTON Ct, by Wheeler, page 532, 533.

Was first at Watertown MA, then at Sudbury MA, and came to Westerly RI in 1669. He was in the early Colonial wars. He was admitted to the First Church of Stonington, CT, Nov 7, 1680.

His will is dated Feb. 9, 1702, but does not mention his son James, by the first wife, nor daughters Sarah or Patience by the second wife. They probably died young or without children.

BRIAN PENDLETON AND HIS DESCENDANTS, 1599-1910, Compiled by Everett Hall Pendleton, Privately Printed MCMX, found in the DAR Library, Washington, DC. Page 1-77.

Capt. James Pendleton, was born in England about 1627, or 1628, ans indicated by the facts that he was admitted freeman at Watertown, Mass., 10 May 1548, and that on the 26th of July 1672, he testified at Portsmouth, NH, he was forty-four years of age.

On the 21st of Oct 1650, James Pendleton and Mary, his wife, of Watertown, Mass., sold to George Parkhurst, "Same towne" five or six acres known as "crocked meadow" (Middlesex Co., Mass., Deeds, I, 17). Shortly afterwards he removed to Sudbury, Mass., where he served on a coroner's jury in May, 1654.

In 1671, James began to dispose of the property he had accumulated at Portsmouth and vicinity, with his wife, Hannah, he sold land and buildings at Portsmouth to Thomas Thatcher.

On the 25th Jany. 1688, James Pendleton bought of Nathaniel Lynde 1,000 acres on the sea-coast of Westerly, including Watch Hill. He sold a small part of this land and the rest he willed to his sons, Joseph, Edmund, and Caleb.

His death occurred in Westerly on the 29 Nov, 1709. Like his father he was active in public affairs until the time of his death and like his father too, wherever he went he became at once one of the leading citizens.

The will of James Pendleton, names wife, Hannah, sons: Joseph, Edmund and Caleb, daughters Ann Borwn, Eleanor Pendleton and Dorothy Pendleton, "children by my present wife, Hannah," and daughters Mary and Hannah "had by my former wife."

No reference is made by Capt. James Pendleton to his sons, James and Brian, named in his father's will in 1677, or to any heirs of these sons, and as no mention of any such has elsewhere appeared, it would seem indisputable that James and Brian died without issue. James had died previous to 1698, but we have nothing to show what became of Brian.


Researching this line is Jean Reid, 106 Beal's Court, Tama, Iowa 52339

Researching this line is Nancyann Norman at exis.net


Sources: History of Stonington by Wheeler, Genealogical and Biographical

Record of New London County, Conn., by Beers; Westerly and Its Witnesses

(974.59, H2d); Early New England Pendletons by Everett Hall Pendleton; Babcock and Allied Families; National Society, Daughters of Colonial Wars; AF; R.I. Genealogical Register, v4, #4, p355; NEHGR, v7, p 357; v12, p238, and v17, p255.


Went to Watertown, Mass., with parents from England. They moved to Sudbury, and he was given 140 acres of land by his father. Moved to Portsmouth, N.H., where he was in business with his father. There he was a selectman, 1663 to 1668; town clerk, 1663 and 1664; one of the commissioners (local magistrates) to determine small actions from 1667 to 1671, and captain of the Portsmouth military company from 1666 until 1674, his last year in Portsmouth. He owned property on the Great Island and continued in business after his father moved to Winter Harbor (Saco), Maine, in 1665.

He moved to Stonington, Conn., being granted land, and also had some 700 acres of land given him by his father. Those 700 acres are in what is now Westerly, Rhode Island, but both Connecticut and Rhode Island once claimed the Westerly area. (The land was given him in trust, with instructions it be passed on to his children by his second wife.)

James, a staunch Puritan, favored Connecticut over the more liberal Rhode Island, but he eventually lost that fight. He continued his business activities and was affluent enough to be referred to as "Esquire" and "Gentleman."

He was a selectman in both Stonington and Westerly, sold intoxicants, imported sugar from Barbados and had dealings with tobacco planters in Maryland. Dealing in liquor was not considered reprehensible in those days, and a man could engage in that business, as well as in politics, and still be a community leader and a pillar of the church.

About the time he moved to Stonington, the King Philip's War broke out, and Capt. James took part. He also may have participated in the great Narragansett fight. He was awarded land in Voluntown for his services during the war. He also obtained captive Indians whom he sold into slavery. Eventually, James obtained more property in Rhode Island, buying 1,000 acres at Watch Hill in Westerly. His Watch Hill home still stands. It is unclear when he moved from Stonington to Westerly.

There is a great deal more information in Early New England Pendletons.

Westerly: Capt. James Pendleton, among Westerly freemen named in 1727. Page 151.

Babcock and Allied Families: James Pendleton, born in England in 1627 or 1628. He resided in Watertown and Sudbury, MA; Portsmouth, N.H., and Westerly, RI. Made a captain of the Portsmouth military company 2 Oct. 1666. Served in King Phillip's War from Connecticut, receiving land in Voluntown, CT, for his services. [Much more info on pages 81-83.] Colonial Wars: James Pendleton, born 1627/8 in London, England; died Westerly, R.I., 29 Nov. 1709. Married (2) Hannah Goodenow 2 April 1656/9 in

Sudbury, Mass. "Captain in the Portsmouth (N.H.) Military Company, 10 Oct. 1666 by Court." Also saw active service in King Philip's War on 17 May 1676; in Cedar Swamp Lot Drawing 1701, Connecticut Colony. [See pages 645 and 646 for children and grandson.]

RIGR: Westerly Town Council and Probate, Vol. 2 (1), 1699-1719. Capt. James Pendleton of Westerly, being aged. Will dated 9 Feb. 1702/3 and codicil, proved 21 Dec. 1709, pgs 104-6, 108. Mentions father Brian Pendleton, deceased, testate; Unnamed former wife; present wife Hannah; daughters Mary and Hannah (no surnames) that I had by former wife, 5 pounds each, no more because they received land in Wells, Maine, from testator's father, Brian Pendleton. [Note: pg 108: Nicholas Mowrey signed a receipt for 5 pounds due me from Capt. James Pendleton's will, dated Freetown 7 Sept. 1716--suggesting that Nicholas Mowrey married one of the two daughters, Mary and Hannah.]; sons of present wife Hannah, Joseph, Edmond and Caleb Pendleton; daughters of present wife Hannah, Ann Brown, Eleanor Pendleton and Dorothy, no surnamed. [Note: pg 108: 9 Jan. 1709/10 We John Lewis, Nocholas Cottrell Jr. and Caleb Pendleton, husbandmen, and Hannah Pendleton, widow, all of We stand bound unto the town council for 250 pounds re will of James Pendleton--suggesting that possibly John Lewis and Nicholas Cottrell Jr. married the daughters Eleanor and Dorothy. Further note the will dated 1745 of Caleb Pendleton (the last son this will, without doubt, since he had the same child as the son...]

Ancestral File records list two other death dates: Nov. 20 and 29, 1709.

NEHGR: Cited in Sudbury, Mass., records as father of Brian and James Pendleton. From Vol. 7 article, "Early Settlers of Essex and Old Norfolk":

James Pendleton, Portsmouth (New Hampshire), 1668; wife Hannah. Vol. 12, listed as a free inhabitant of Westerly 3 March 1679/80.

_______________________________________


Will: 9 FEB 1701/02 does not mention his son James, Jr., by his first wife, nor the daughters Sarah and Patience by his second wife. These children probably died young or were without children.

Reference Number: 5669

http://members.cox.net/trm/PendletonBrian.htm

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HISTORY OF STONINGTON Ct, by Wheeler, page 532, 533.

Was first at Watertown MA, then at Sudbury MA, and came to Westerly RI in 1669. He was in the early Colonial wars. He was admitted to the First Church of Stonington, CT, Nov 7, 1680.

His will is dated Feb. 9, 1702, but does not mention his son James, by the first wife, nor daughters Sarah or Patience by the second wife. They probably died young or without children.

BRIAN PENDLETON AND HIS DESCENDANTS, 1599-1910, Compiled by Everett Hall Pendleton, Privatley Printed MCMX, found in the DAR Library, Washington, DC. Page 1-77.

Capt. James Pendleton, was born in England about 1627, or 1628, ans indicated by the facts that he was admitted freeman at Watertown, Mass., 10 May 1548, and that on the 26th of July 1672, he testified at Portsmouth, NH, he was forty-four years of age.

On the 21st of Oct 1650, James Pendleton and Mary, his wife, of Watertown, Mass., sold to George Parkhurst, "Same towne" five or six acres known as "crocked meadow" (Middlesex Co., Mass., Deeds, I, 17). Shortly afterwards he removed to Sudbury, Mass., where he served on a coroner's jury in May, 1654.

In 1671, James began to dispose of the property he had accumulated at Portsmouth and vicinity, with his wife, Hannah, he sold land and buildings at Portsmouth to Thomas Thatcher.

On the 25th Jany. 1688, James Pendleton bought of Nathaniel Lynde 1,000 acres on the sea-coast of Westerly, including Watch Hill. He sold a small part of this land and the rest he willed to his sons, Joseph, Edmund, and Caleb.

His death occurred in Westerly on the 29 Nov, 1709. Like his father he was active in public affairs until the time of his death and like his father too, wherever he went he became at once one of the leading citizens.

The will of James-2 Pendleton, names wife, Hannah, sons: Joseph, Edmund and Caleb, daughters Ann Borwn, Eleanor Pendleton and Dorothy Pendleton, "children by my present wife, Hannah," and daughters Mary and Hannah "had by my former wife."

No reference is made by Capt. James Pendleton to his sons, James-3 and Brian-3, named in his father's will in 1677, or to any heirs of these sons, and as no mention of any such has elsewhere appeared, it would seem indisputable that James-3 and Brian-3 died without issue. James-3 had died previous to 1698, but we have nothing to show what became of Brian-3.

Researching this line is Jean Reid, 106 Beal's Court, Tama, Iowa 52339

Researching this line is Nancyann Norman at exis.net

Sources: History of Stonington by Wheeler, Genealogical and Biographical

Record of New London County, Conn., by Beers; Westerly and Its Witnesses

(974.59, H2d); Early New England Pendletons by Everett Hall Pendleton; Babcock and Allied Families; National Society, Daughters of Colonial Wars; AF; R.I. Genealogical Register, v4, #4, p355; NEHGR, v7, p 357; v12, p238, and v17, p255.

Went to Watertown, Mass., with parents from England. They moved to Sudbury, and he was given 140 acres of land by his father. Moved to Portsmouth, N.H., where he was in business with his father. There he was a selectman, 1663 to 1668; town clerk, 1663 and 1664; one of the commissioners (local magistrates) to determine small actions from 1667 to 1671, and captain of the Portsmouth military company from 1666 until 1674, his last year in Portsmouth. He owned property on the Great Island and continued in business after his father moved to Winter Harbor (Saco), Maine, in 1665.

He moved to Stonington, Conn., being granted land, and also had some 700

acres of land given him by his father. Those 700 acres are in what is now

Westerly, Rhode Island, but both Connecticut and Rhode Island once claimed

the Westerly area. (The land was given him in trust, with instructions it be

passed on to his children by his second wife.)

James, a staunch Puritan, favored Connecticut over the more liberal Rhode

Island, but he eventually lost that fight. He continued his business activities and was affluent enough to be referred to as "Esquire" and "Gentleman."

He was a selectman in both Stonington and Westerly, sold intoxicants,

imported sugar from Barbados and had dealings with tobacco planters in

Maryland. Dealing in liquor was not considered reprehensible in those days, and a man could engage in that business, as well as in politics, and still be a community leader and a pillar of the church.

About the time he moved to Stonington, the King Philip's War broke out, and Capt. James took part. He also may have participated in the great Narragansett fight. He was awarded land in Voluntown for his services during the war. He also obtained captive Indians whom he sold into slavery.

Eventually, James obtained more property in Rhode Island, buying 1,000 acres at Watch Hill in Westerly. His Watch Hill home still stands. It is unclear when he moved from Stonington to Westerly.

There is a great deal more information in Early New England Pendletons.

Westerly: Capt. James Pendleton, among Westerly freemen named in 1727. Page 151.

Babcock and Allied Families: James Pendleton, born in England in 1627 or

1628. He resided in Watertown and Sudbury, MA; Portsmouth, N.H., and Westerly, RI. Made a captain of the Portsmouth military company 2 Oct. 1666. Served in King Phillip's War from Connecticut, receiving land in Voluntown, CT, for his services. [Much more info on pages 81-83.]

Colonial Wars: James Pendleton, born 1627/8 in London, England; died

Westerly, R.I., 29 Nov. 1709. Married (2) Hannah Goodenow 2 April 1656/9 in

Sudbury, Mass. "Captain in the Portsmouth (N.H.) Military Company, 10 Oct. 1666 by Court." Also saw active service in King Philip's War on 17 May 1676; in Cedar Swamp Lot Drawing 1701, Connecticut Colony. [See pages 645 and 646 for children and grandson.]

RIGR: Westerly Town Council and Probate, Vol. 2 (1), 1699-1719. Capt. James Pendleton of Westerly, being aged. Will dated 9 Feb. 1702/3 and codicil, proved 21 Dec. 1709, pgs 104-6, 108. Mentions father Brian Pendleton, deceased, testate; Unnamed former wife; present wife Hannah; daughters Mary and Hannah (no surnames) that I had by former wife, 5 pounds each, no more because they received land in Wells, Maine, from testator's father, Brian Pendleton. [Note: pg 108: Nicholas Mowrey signed a receipt for 5 pounds due me from Capt. James Pendleton's will, dated Freetown 7 Sept. 1716--suggesting that Nichoas Mowrey married one of the two daughters, Mary and Hannah.]; sons of present wife Hannah, Joseph, Edmond and Caleb Pendleton; daughters of present wife Hannah, Ann Brown, Eleanor Pendleton and Dorothy, no surnamed. [Note: pg 108: 9 Jan. 1709/10 We John Lewis, Nocholas Cottrell Jr. and Caleb Pendleton, husbandmen, and Hannah Pendleton, widow, all of We stand bound unto the town council for 250 pounds re will of James Pendleton--suggesting that possibly John Lewis and Nicholas Cottrell Jr. married the daughters Eleanor and Dorothy. Further note the will dated 1745 of Caleb Pendleton (the last son this will, without doubt, since he had the same child as the son...]

Ancestral File records list two other death dates: Nov. 20 and 29,

1709.

NEHGR: Cited in Sudbury, Mass., records as father of Brian and James

Pendleton. From Vol. 7 article, "Early Settlers of Essex and Old Norfolk":

James Pendleton, Portsmouth (New Hampshire), 1668; wife Hannah. Vol. 12, listed as a free inhabitant of Westerly 3 March 1679/80.

_______

  1. Will: 9 FEB 1701/02 does not mention his son James, Jr., by his first wife, nor the daughters Sarah and Patience by his second wife. These children probably died young or were without children.
  2. Reference Number: 5669
  3. Note:
   1. James was first at Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts where he was admitted freeman May 10, 1648, then at Sudbury, Middlesex Count y, Massachusetts where he received in 1656 a deed of gift to his father 's homestead and other property and was chosen selectman, keeper of the town books in 1662 and 1663 and town clerk until March, 1665 He apparently removed to Rhode Island where he was admitted freeman in September 11, 1666, chosen Captain of the Portsmouth Military Company October 2, 1666 and granted land in 1667 becoming one of the founders of a school in March 1670 and ordered the school house built, forming the first church in Portsmouth with the Rev. Joshua Moody in 1671, and continued living there until 1673 when he removed to Stonington, New London County, Connecticut where he was admitted to the First Church of Stonington November 7, 1680 and was Justice of the Peace 1686-1689.  Records indicate he was in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island before, after and even while in Stonington where he purchased 1,000 acres from Nathaniel Lynd on the seacoast of Westerly and chosen as a town council man of Westerly in 1689 and other offices there until 1709. He served in the early Colonial wars.

_____

James was first at Watertown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, then at Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts before coming to Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island in 1669. He served in the early Colonial wars. He was admitted to the First Church of Stonington November 7, 1680

______

They Came to Milton

<http://wc.rootsweb.com/~jonsaunders>

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PENDLETON, James - the name Brian PENDLETON appears in the list of 108 townsmen in Watertown, MA, in 1636. He was afterwards of Portsmouth and was styled "Major". His will bears the date 9 Aug 1667. He m. Eleanor ___ & had but one son, James, & a dau [m. Rev. Seth FLETCHER]. James was first of Watertown, then Sudbury, and lastly of Westerly, R.I., where his name appears in the list of free inhabitants in 1669. He m. 1) Mary ___ & had James, b. at Watertown, MA, 5 Nov 1650; & daus. Mary & Hannah. He married 2) Hannah ___ and had Joseph, b. at Sudbury, 29 Dec 1661; Edmund; Sarah, bap. at Stonington, 18 Apr 1674/5 [sic]; Eleanor. bap. 20 Jul 1679 [admitted to Church at Stonington, 24 Oct 1702]; Dorothy, bap. 3 Oct 1686 [m. ___ COTTRELLE]; Anna [m. Eleazer BROWN of Stonington, 18 Oct 1693]; Patience; & Caleb. Capt. James PENDLETON was admitted to the church at Stonington, 7 Nov 1680. His will is dated 9 Feb 1702. He died 29 Nov 1709 (MINOR diary) James, his son by wife Mary, & daus. Sarah & Patience are not mentioned in it and probably died early.

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Volume 3 page 388

Pendleton, Bryan, Watertown, an early sett. freem. 3 Sept. 1634, help. to sett. Sudbury, of wh. he was selectman some yrs. but rep. bef. and aft. for W. betw. 1636 and 48 six yrs. rem. to Ipswich perhaps, certain. to Portsmouth, of w. he was rep. some yrs. then rem. to Saco, Winter harbour, thence after near a dozen yrs. driv. by the Ind. war, Aug. 1676, went again to Portsmouth, there made his will 9 Aug. 1677, wh. was pro. 5 Apr. 1681. He was capt. and major many yrs. left w. Eleano, s. James and d. Mary, wh. m. Seth Fletcher. CALEB, Westerly 1679. JAMES, Watertown, s. of Bryan, by w. Mary had James, b. 1 Nov. 1650; she d. 7 Nov. 1655; and he m. sec. w. 29 Apr. 1656, at Sudbury, Hannah, d. of Edmund Goodenow, had Bryan, b. 27 Sept. 1659; Joseph, Dec. 1661; Edmund, prob. 24 June 1664; Ann, 12 Nov. 1667; Caleb, 8 Aug. 1669; and James, older or younger, nam. in the will of his gr.f. He was one of the found. of the first ch. at Portsnouth 1671, but perhaps had his f's. love of rem. and li. at Stonington 1674-8, then call. capt. and serv. in the war against Philip 1676; was at Westerly 1686 to 1700. JOSEPH, Boston 1651, witness that yr. to the will of Robert Turner, may have been s. of Bryan.

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His death occurred in Westerly on the 29 Nov, 1709. The will of James Pendleton, names wife, Hannah, sons: Joseph, Edmund and Caleb, daughters Ann Borwn, Eleanor Pendleton and Dorothy Pendleton, "children by my present wife, Hannah," and daughters Mary and Hannah "had by my former wife." No reference is made by Capt. James Pendleton to his sons, James and Brian, named in his father's will in 1677, or to any heirs of these sons, and as no mention of any such has elsewhere appeared, it would seem indisputable that James and Brian died without issue. James had died previous to 1698, but we have nothing to show what became of Brian.

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PENDLETON GROUND (1): This is found on the lands of William R. CHAPMAN, Esq., on the point of land running into the Pawcatuck, south of Lottery Village, and called Graves's Neck. Here lie the first generations of the PENDLETON family, but without inscribed tombstones. The remains of some of the former generations, however, appear to have been removed to toher grounds. The spot is inclosed by a wall, but the wall is in a state of neglect.

Capt. Ephraim PENDLETON, died Jan. 2, 1780, age 32.

Capt. John BENDLETON, died March 31, 1812, in his 77th year.

Sarah (wife of John PENDLETON), died Feb. 21, 1829, age 85.

Mrs. Mercy BABCOCK (wife of Silas BABCOCK), died Sept. 23, 1819, age 55.

Nancy (wife of Briten J. CLARKE), died Nov. 11, 1839, age 28 ys., 9 mo., 7 ds.

Numerous graves, large & small, are marked by rough, unlettered stones.

Here are buried, says report, Edmund PENDLETON (son of James, the father of the Westerly PENDLETONs), and his son William (who died near 1784), and William's sons, Benjamin (who died near 1826), and Ephraim; also Lois (wife of Benjamin). Capt. James PENDLETON, the first of that family name, came to Westerly prior to 1669.

PENDLETON GROUND (2): This is an inclosed spot a few rods northeast of Mr. A. PIERCE's residence, near the Citizens' Ground. Here lie the remains of Simeon PENDLETON, died about 1819, age 84; and his wife, Mercy PENDLETON, died within a week of her husband, age 79. Both were esteemed members of the Hill Church. The graves of the SMITHs have been removed to Elm Grove Cemetery.

Here also rests, beneath rude, unlettered stones, a long-remembered slave woman and faithful servant, Philis JUMBO, whod died at the good age of about one hundred years.

Abiel SHERMAN, died Aug. 17, 1811, age 32.

Lucy SHERMAN (wife of Abiel SHERMAN), died Jan. 7, 1811, age 27. -------------------- From "Brian Pendleton and his Descendants 1599-1910, With Some Account of the Pembleton Families of Orange County NY, Otsego Co NY, and Luzerne Co. PA, and notices of other Pendletons of Later Origin in the United States," compiled by Evertt Hall Pendleton (privately printed, 1911), pp. 30ff.

Capt. James Pendleton, oldest son of Major Brian Pendleton, was born in England about 1627 or 1628, as indicated by the facts that he was admitted freeman at Watertown, Mass., 10 May 1648 and that on the 26th of July, 1672, he testified at Portsmouth, NH, that he was forty-four years of age.

    On the 21st of Oct. 1650, James Pendleton and Mary, his wife, of Watertown Mass., sold to George Parkhurst, "Same towne," five or six acres known as "crooked meadow" (Middlesex Co., Mass., Deeds, i, 17).  Shortly afterwards he removed to Sudbury, Mass., where he served on a coroner's jury in May, 1651.
    On the 22nd of March 1656, he received from his father, Brian Pendleton, a deed of gift to Brian's homestead, and other property, in Sudbury.  In this deed Brian refers to James as his "eldest sonne" (Ibid., ii, 30).  James retained ownership of this property for thirty-five years, though he did not live in Sudbury more than one or two years after receiving this deed.  It is likely, however, that his family made Sudbury their home for some time longer, for although the Portsmouth, NH, records show that among the landholders there, "Free comers unto [Portsmouth] to the year 1657," James Pendleton was the proprietor of 31 acres of land, that he was chosen a grandjuryman at Portsmouth for the year ensuing the 4th of July, 1659, and was also granted one acre of swamp land there on the Great Island on the 13th of Jany., 1660, yet the births of his first two sons by his second wife are recorded upon the Sudbury records in 1659 and 1661.
    On the 10th of June 1661, James Pendleton was chosen constable at Portsmouth (T.R.) and shortly afterwards the grant of swamp land previously made him was located as joining "His own land upon the norwest and to the southwest of Mr. John Cutts and Calch Pendleton butting upon the common on the south, compassing the swamp round and is about two pole upon the common to make up his acre."  Another small tract was given him when on the "26 Feby. 1661, Goodman Mussell refusing to let the towne have there own land he hath fenced near Mr. James Pendleton's house without the trial of a suite in law although he had formerly agreed thereunto and had an acre of land given him upon the poynt next the Little Harbor which he hath rendered unto the town again, which acre of land is given by the selectmen unto Capt. Pendleton and James Pendleton to make them satisfaction for that they were to have of that which the said Mussell had fenced in against Mr. James Pendleton's House."
    At a general town meeting held at Portsmouth the 2nd of March 1662/3, James Pendleton was chosen one of the selectmen and was also elected "to keep the towne Booke."  At the same meeting his father had been chosen town treasurer and depty to the General Assembly, so the Pendletons were well represented in the affairs of Portsmouth at that time.  James Pendleton held the office of town clerk until the 6th of March 1664/5, and was reelected selectman the 1st of March 1663/4, the 8th of March 1666/7, and the 9th of March 1667/8.  On the 8th of March 166/7, he was also elected one of the commissioners to cud small causes, and was reelected to this office the three following years (P. T. R.).
    On the 23rd of May, 1666, he was on a committee appointed to select "The Convenientest place for creating necessary fortification for the welfare and safety of the place" (Mass. Records. Vol. IV. part 2).  On the 11th of Sept. 1666, he was "admitted to the freedom of this Commonwealth," and on the 2nd of the next month, he was chosen Captain of the Portsmouth Military Co.  10 Oct 1666, the Court "allowes and approves of James Pendleton for captaine" (Ibid.).
    In Jany. 1667, there was "Layd out to Capt. James Pendleton sixtie nine acres of land viz. thirtie acres due to Capt. Brian Pendleton, ten acres due to Jessole [??] Pendleton in 52 and 29 acres divident land, due to said James Pendleton" (P. T. R.).  On the 11th of July 1668, James Pendleton "of Portsmouth" sold to John Winsland and Edward Bennett for 250, fifty acres of land in Sprace Creek, in the Township of Kittery, Me.  This land had been bought by Brian Pendleton for 200, 1 Sept. 1660 (York Deeds).
    The early beginning of the public school system in New Hampshire is shown by the following item from the Portsmouth records: "31 March 1670, the selectmen together with Capt. Pendleton and Mr. Deering have agreed that there shall be a schoole house sett up upon the land above menconed to be of the Deutereons Coll. [??] viz. 10 foot in length 20 foot in breadth.  7 foote between joynts with a double chimney of brick the sides and roof to be double bordeed to dwell and keepe school in."
    In 1671, Capt. Pendleton assisted Joseph Moss, the town surveyor of Portsmouth for the four days ending Feby. 27, for which he received 12 shillings -- no doubt fair pay for that time.  A little later we find his name among those of ten men who entered into covenant and formed the first church of Portsmouth with Rev. Joshua Moody, pastor.  In this year James began to dispose of the property he had accumulated at Portsmouth and vicinity: with wife Hannah, he sold land and buildings at Portsmouth to Thomas Thatcher on the 19th of May (Rockingham Co. NH Deeds, iii, 104), and on the 6th of July, "James Pendleton of Portsmouth, merchant", sold to William and Benedict Oliver, for 45 pounds "My dwelling house on the Isles of Shoals with half the stage and the flake rooms belonging to it."  Brian Pendleton had had considerable business interests at the Isles of Shoals and as his son was associated with him in many of his enterprises, it is not unlikely that James lived at these Islands for a year or two.
    Late in 1672 James Pendleton and his wife disposed of three more tracts of land in Portsmouth as shown by the Rockingham County Deeds, but he was still a resident of the town in 1673 when on the 7th of May in that year Walter Neale was appointed "Left [Lieut.] to the foot company under the conduct of James Pendleton (Mass. Records. Vol IV. Part 2, p. 555).  During this year he also acted as attorney at Portsmouth for his father "Major Brian Pendleton, Gentleman, of Saco."
    Sometime in 1673 or 1674, Capt. Pendleton left Portsmouth to look over a 700 acre tract of land his father had purchased for him of John Paine of Boston, 12 June 1673.  This property was situated upon the east side of the lower Paweatuck river, and later when this stream was made a boundary between Rhode Island and Connecticut, became part of the former colony; at that time, however, as stated in the deed this land was "taken into the town of Stonington, Conn." (Rockingham County Deeds iii, 95.)  In view of subsequent events it is fair to assume James had determined to remove from Portsmouth and that during his visit here he made all suitable arrangements for the housing of his family in the new home.  Capt. Pendleton's military knowledge made him a valued addition to the little settlement nearby, and on the 9th of March 1674, he was chosen with Mr. Noyes, Capt. Denison, Lieut. Mason and Mr. Sanders. "A comittee to appoint the respective garrisons and to endeavor that there be a due respect to the Court order in that regard."  (Stonington Town Votes, ii. 15.)  These preparations were evidently made in anticipation of King Philip's war, which was then brewing.
    In the summer of this year James Pendleton returned to Portsmouth to settle his affairs and to bring his family to the new habitation.  On the 12th of August, he sold to John Fabes of the Isles of Shoals, lands on Great Island (New Castle), and Sandy Beach, and a warehouse on Starr Island, Isles of Shoals (Rockingham Co. Deeds, iii, 98).  On the 31st of August his father gave him a life interest in the property bought from John Paine, the deed stating that it was to be held in trust for James' children by his second wife (Ibid., iii, 3).  [Author's footnote: On the 2 Nov., 1730, his son, Caleb Pendleton, and Eleazer Brown, Sr., made a statement, "That an old stump, standing by the great rock near the Pawcatuck River, upstream a little from the place known by the name of the 'White Rock,' was the northwest corner of land that formerly belonged to James Pendleton, deceased, near 30 years ago" (W. L. E., v. 196).]  Five days later in a power of attorney given to Nathaniel Fryer he says "Whereas I, James Pendleton, of Portsmouth, Piscattaqua River, Merchant, have formerly mortgaged my now dwelling house . . . situate on the Great Island in piscattaque River, aforesaid, unto Mr. Tho. Thatcher of Boston, minister, for a debt which Mr. Nathaniel Fryer was bound with me for & I have tendered said house & premises unto the use of the said Mr. Thatcher to satisfy thereof, now for as much as I am now removing from home. these are to impower Nathaniel Fryer to be my lawful attorney or any by him impowered of all the particulars specified in the said mortgage whose delivery thereof shall be sufficient in law to all interests and purposes whatsoever as if it were actually done and acted by myself."  It would appear from this that James Pendleton had met with some business reverses at Portsmouth, and this may have been his reason for leaving that town.  Capt. Pendleton evidently made a quick return trip to Stonington, as on the 10th of September following he was a "partaker" at the ordination of the Rev. James Noyes as pastor of the First Church of Stonington (Church rec.).
    On the 28th of April 1675, there was "Layd out to Capt. James Pendleton, seven hundred Ackers of Land which he bought of Mr. John Payne . . . Also, layd out unto Captaine James Pendleton to make up the full summe of one thousand Ackers of land Layd out to Mr. John Payne and the above Sayd Capt. James pendleton weee say forty ackers of meadow at the meadow called omegansett."  This deed is found in Book 1, p. 195. of the Westerly Land Evidences as it was not entered until the 26th March, 1703 ("by Joseph Pendleton, Towne Clerk") at which date James Pendleton's property had been decided to be in Westerly, RI.
    On the 27th of Dec. 1675, Capt. Pendleton, Mr. Sanders, Thomas Wheeler and Ephraim Miner were chosen "Lister and Raters" of Stonington (Ston. Town votes, Book 2, p. 20).  King Philip's War had broken out in this year and Capt. Pendleton saw active service as on the 17th of April, 1676, at a meeting of the Council of war in Hartford, Conn., it was voted that "Whereas Major Palmes hath had sundry Captives dileved to him and Major Winthrop of Minicroft and those he bought of Capt. Pembleton and Ensign Leffingwell which are now in the hands of the Pequots and Moheags, besides some others that the Pequots formerly took captive before Capt. Denison went out, which are not otherwise disposed of the Councill orders that they be forthwith delivered to Major Palmes and Major Winthrop upon their demands . . . " (Col. Pec. of Conn.)
    Additional proof of James Pendleton's service in King Philip's War is found in his drawing lot 13 in the Cedar Swamp lots at Voluntown, Ct., assigned by the Connecticut Legislature in 1701 to the soldiers of that colony who served in the conflict.  During this war Capt. Pendleton's property at Sudbury, Mass., was damaged to the extent of 60 pounds in the Indian attack upon that place, 21 April 1676 (Bodge's "Soldiers in King Philip's War.")
    As Capt. Pendleton was active in Connecticut and Rhode Island during 1676 it seems more likely that it was his son James Pendleton who witnessed a deed at Wells, Maine, in that year.  On the 14th of Nov. 1677, James Pendleton and wife, Hannah, of Stonington, Conn. sold to Brian Pendleton, "his father" of Great Island (New Castle) NH, land on Great Island (Rockingham Co. [NH] Deeds, iii. 131).
    On the following 27th of December, Capt. Pendleton, Nehemiah Palmer, Mr. Tobias Sanders, Ephraim Miner, and Capt. Denison, were chosen selectemen of Stonington.  On the same day Capt. Pendleton and others were appointed a committee to ascertain the town debt and with Nehemiah Palmer he was engaged to "Seal the eastward end of the meeting house from the pulpit to the main post, that is to say from the gift upwards to the wall plate."  Capt. Pendleton was re-elected selectman the 27th De. 1677 and the 25th Dec. 1678.  He was also moderator of the Town meetings held during 1677 (Stonington Town Votes, ii. 25, 30, 32).  Although he had been active in the affairs of the town and in its defense against the Indians, yet the Connecticut Colonial records for May, 1679, state that "Capt. James Pendleton [and others] being presented to the Court in October last for the privelege of freemen are now accepted to that privelege and the commissioners of Stonington are to administer the freemen's oath to them."
    On the 17th of Sept. 1679, he took the oath of allegiance to King Charles at Westerly, RI, and his name appears upon the list of free inhabitants of the town in that year, when he received an allotment of land.  On the 27th of Aug. 1680, he was granted several parcels of land amounting to 150 acres upon the Town Commons of Stonington, which he afterward sold.  On the 7th of Nov. 1680, James Pendleton was admitted to the Church at Stonington. Conn.  1 June 1681 he sold to William Vahan (Vaughan) "for 20 000 merchantable redd oake pipe staves," 300 acres of land and three islands at Cape Porpoise, which he had received by his father's will, his mother relinquishing her rights of dower in this property.  (York Deeds, iii, folio 93).
    On the 25th Jany. 1688, James Pendleton bought of Nathaniel Lynde 1000 acres on the sea-coast of Westerly, including Watch Hill.  He sold a small part of this land and the rest he willed to his sons, Joseph, Edmund, and Caleb.
    During Sir Edmond Andros' governorship of New York and New England from 1686 to 1689, James Pendleton was assigned as a Justice "To keep the peace of our Sovereign Lord, the King, and all his subjects."  28 May 1686.  Shortly afterwards, "Joseph Dudley, William Stoughton, John Winthrop, Edward Rnadolph, and Richard Wharton, John Blackwell, Edward Palmes, and Samuel Sewall Esqrs. Elisha Hutchinson, Richard Smith, Francis Brinley and John Saffin, Esqrs. John Fones, Thomas Ward. James Pendleton Gent." were appointed by the President and Council of New ENgland, 18 June 1686, "Commissioners within the Narragansett Country . . . to settle and dispose of the affairs of that Province, and the people thereof" (Mass. Hist. Soc. Col. Fifth Series. Vol 9).
    

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Captain James Pendleton's Timeline

1627
November 12, 1627
London, London, England
1628
1628
Middlesex Massachusetts
1628
1628
Of, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA
1628
Of, Sudbury, Middlesex, MA
1647
October 22, 1647
Age 19
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts
1650
November 5, 1650
Age 22
Stonington, New London, CT, USA
1653
1653
Age 25
Stonington, New London, CT, USA
1655
1655
Age 27
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
1656
April 29, 1656
Age 28
Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts