Captain John Pyke, Jr.

Is your surname Pyke?

Research the Pyke family

Captain John Pyke, Jr.'s Geni Profile

Records for John Pyke

52,215 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

About John Pyke, Jr.

(From Fellows/Rhodes book) Of Newburyport, Mass. Representative 1657/8.Of Woodbridge, NJ, 1667. "President" of that town in 1670,71,72,75. Captain 1673. Member, Governors council, 1672.

Here is his Wikipedia page, which is slightly different:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Pike_(settler)

--------------------

Apparently from John Pyke's Find A Grave page:

Birth: Nov. 8, 1613 - Wiltshire, England

Death: Jan. 20, 1688 - Woodbridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey, USA

John Pike (1613-1688) was a founder of Woodbridge, New Jersey, and a Judge and politician of the early colony of New Jersey.

Pike was born in Wiltshire, England. He came to America with his parents, John Pike (1572-1654) and Dorothy Day, first settling in Newbury, Massachusetts. In 1665, acting on the invitation of Governor Philip Carteret, a number of Newbury residents formed a corporation to settle in Woodbridge, named after Rev. John Woodbridge, a Newbury clergyman. Pike, one of the original nine "associates" (and thereby granted some 300 acres, much more than other freeholders), was "the prominent man of the town" in its early years. He was President of Woodbridge, and in 1671 was appointed to the Governor's Council. After 1675, he was Captain of the militia, and afterward known as Captain Pike. He was chosen to represent the township in the colonial General Assembly three times: 1692-3, 1696, and 1697-8.

In 1684, together with his son John, he was convicted of possession of stolen goods, a felony. After his death, the New Jersey assembly passed an Act clearing his name, as well as one allowing his family to sue for defamation.

Pike married Elizabeth FitzRandolph in 1685, although he already had several grown children: John, Thomas, Joseph, Hannah, Ruth - and three others who predeceased him.

Pike is an ancestor of Zebulon Montgomery Pike (1779-1813) explorer and army general, after whom Pikes Peak is named. He is also the patriarch of a large clan of modern day Pikes. According to genealogists using DNA analysis, almost 25% of current Pikes in the United States are descendants from his line!

Family links:

Children:

  • 1. John Pike (1639 - 1714)*
  • 2. Hannah Pike Ayers (1643 - 1689)*

Spouses:

  • Mary Tarbelle Pike (1615 - 1680)
  • Elizabeth Blossom Fitzrandolph-Pike (1620 - ____)

--------------------

John Pike (1613-1688/1689) was a founder of Woodbridge, New Jersey and a judge and politician of the early colony of New Jersey.

Pike was born in Wiltshire, England. He came to America with his parents, John Pike (1572-1654) and Dorothy Day, first settling in Newbury, Massachusetts.

In 1665, acting on the invitation of Governor Philip Carteret, a number of Newbury residents formed a corporation to settle in Woodbridge, named after Rev. John Woodbridge, a Newbury clergyman.Pike, one of the original nine "associates" (and thereby granted some 300 acres, much more than other freeholders), was "the prominent man of the town" in its early years. He was President of Woodbridge, and in 1671 was appointed to the Governor's Council. After 1675, he was Captain of the militia, and afterward known as Capt. Pike. He was chosen to represent the township in the colonial General Assembly three times: 1692-3, 1696, and 1697-8.

In 1684, together with his son John, he was convicted of possession of stolen goods, a felony. After his death, the New Jersey assembly passed an act clearing his name, as well as one allowing his family to sue for defamation.

--------------------

"The Pikes of Woodbridge are all probably the descendants of JOHN PIKE, who came from Southampton, England, in the ship James in 1635, and had a son John, by wife, Mary, born in England. This son, known as CAPTAIN JOHN PIKE, OF NEWBURY, was one of the earliest settlers in Woodbridge. Others of this name in the old records there are probably his children and grandchildren.

In 1685 he married ELIZABETH, the WIDOW OF EDWARD FITZ RANDOLPH, then an elderly woman living in Piscataway.

CAPTAIN ZEBULON PIKE of the Revolutionary War was a descendant of this Captain John Pike.

As appears, CAPTAIN JOHN PIKE, coming from Newbury to Woodbridge as one of the Associates and probably its first settler and was the first of the name in that vicinity. As to his ancestry the records of the PIKE FAMILY above referred to carry the same back to the year 1385. The intermediate lineages cannot be given here, but the first immigrant to America was John Pike, and, quoting from this authority:

"Eighth from Sir Richard and first of the line in America, who came to this country, sailing from Southampton, April 6, 1635, in the ship James, Captain Cooper, arriving in Boston on Monday, August (???), 1635. James S. Pike in "The New Puritan," says with wife Sarah. What authority he has for making the statement his wife's name was Sarah or that his wife came with him I do not know. I believe it was based upon the record of the death of Sarah Pike at Newbury, November 19, 1659, and she was presumed to be his wife because her name was not given among his son's (CAPTAIN JOHN PIKE) children, but as he died May 26, 1654, and having made his will not mentioning any wife, such presumption cannot be maintained. The early records of Newbury are quite complete and they do not record the death of his wife, so without any further evidence one would conclude she died before he came to this country.

He settled at first at Ipswich, but after a short stop at that place removed to Newbury and settled on the banks of the Parker River and was made freeman in 1642. He was a highly educated man and wrote a fine hand, unknown among the uneducated of his times, and left his country at the time of the great reformation and has often been classed as among the many Dissenters who left their native land for the "freedom to worship God." Quoting from the history of the Pike family, "he was a man of pronounced opinions, bold in his assertions; but as history has shown, educated a lawyer, he undoubtedly knew how to keep within bounds of prudence in his intercourse with the elements of the times."

It must be remembered that the church and the State were practically the same in those days, and that the laws of the land were largely Scriptural, and that law was argued from a Bible standpoint. He was conversant with the theological reasonings for the preservation of peace as adopted by the lawyers and as the theological reasonings for the salvation of souls as adopted by the ministry must differ in some of their essential points, is it to be wondered at that May 5, 1638, after having listened for a time to a certain discourse, "it is ordered that John Pike shall pay two shillings and six-pence for departing from the meeting without leave and contemptuously," and, before this, February 24, 1638, "John Pike, Robert Pike and three others were fined two shillings and sixpence apiece for being absent from town meeting at eight o'clock in the morning, having had fit and due warning." But he must have risen high in the esteem of his fellow-citizens, for in 1647 he was one of the chosen to administer "the prudential affairs of the town," and in 1648 to "end small causes," which he did in an exemplary manner, as the court records show. His will was probated August 3, 1654, in which he mentions daughters, DOROTHY, who married DANIEL HENDRICK; Ann, who married John Fiske; Israel (?), who married Henry True, and sons, John and Robert.

CAPTAIN JOHN PIKE, ninth from English and second from American lines, was born at Bridgewater, England (presumably) in 1605, if he is the one who sailed "from ye port of London, November 26, 1635, for Barbadoes, aged thirty." He settled in Newbury, Mass., where he married Mary Tarville (or Tarbell). (See Coffin's "History of Old Newbury," where he asks for a grant of land for his brother. Thomas Tarville.) Well educated, he soon became one of the leading men of the place, was educated a lawyer, was elected selectman in 1647-1648, was chosen to end small causes in the town during the years 1651, 1654, 1656, 1657, 1660; was elected deputy to the General Court in 1657 and 1658, which position he most ably filled. He was educated a Congregationalist, but later in life became a Presbyterian.

Quoting from the history--"When in Newbury there was a contention in the church discipline because the pastor and teacher changed their minds after the first few years, from the Congregational to the Presbyterian form. It seems the matter was carried into court for adjustment, and he being summoned as a witness testified 'that he was present at the gathering of the church at Newbury and that he heard the pastor, Mr. Parker, preach from the eighteenth chapter of Matthew and seventeenth verse, wherein the preacher held forth that the power of discipline belonged to the whole church and he (John Pike) strongly favored his doctrine, he taking notes of what was said'."

"Early in 1665 he removed to Woodbridge, N. J., and May 21, 1666, articles of agreement were signed by GOVERNOR CARTERET, JOHN PIKE, ABRAHAM TAPPAN and JOSHUA PIERCE in behalf of themselves and Associates of Woodbridge and Piscataway, whereby a colony was established over which he was chosen judge and Governor, which position he held for many years. After his return from a trip to Newbury, in 1671, he was chosen a member of Governor Carteret's council, and in 1675 was appointed a captain of militia, and by this appellation he was generally known. His first wife having died, he married, June 10, 1685, ELIZABETH FITZ RANDOLPH OF PISCATAWAY. He died in January 1688-9, and his remains are buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery at Woodbridge. His children were: Joseph; John, who died young; Hannah, who married Obadiah Ayer; John; Ruth, who married Abraham Tappan; Samuel; Thomas and Sarah, who died in 1659."

April 10, 1915. No. 5020. Continued from No. 5008, in issue of March 27.

view all 30

Captain John Pyke, Jr.'s Timeline

1613
November 8, 1613
White Parish, Wiltshire, England
November 8, 1613
Whiteparish, Wiltshire, England
November 8, 1613
Whiteparish, , Wiltshire, England
1613
White Parrish, Wiltshire, England
1641
January 12, 1641
Age 28
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1643
April 26, 1643
Age 30
Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1645
September 6, 1645
Age 32
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1647
November 11, 1647
Age 34
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1650
March 30, 1650
Age 37
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1650
Age 37