Morgan Bryan, Sr. (1671 - 1763) MP

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Nicknames: "d. on Easter Sunday", "Morgan //", "Morgan Gf of Rebka /Bryan/", "Morgan Jr. /Bryan/"
Birthplace: Å, Fyn, Denmark
Death: Died in Rowan, North Carolina
Occupation: member of the New Garden Quaker community
Managed by: David Andrew Weeks
Last Updated:

About Morgan Bryan, Sr.

To be resolved.. Death Location Mocksville, North Carolina, United States / Yadkin River, Rowan, North Carolina, USA - also, the "Marthas" listed above as Morgan's spouse are the same person, but cannot get them to merge. Perhaps it can be done from someone else's profile?

http://www.fmoran.com/bryan.html

Morgan Bryan Family

Sir Francis Bryan was married to Lady Joan Fitzgerald and their son, Sir Francis Bryan II was born in 1549 and was married to Ann Smith who was born in 1560 in Claire, Ireland.

William Smith Bryan (b. 1600, Claire, Ireland, son of Sir Francis Bryan II and Ann Smith) m. Catherine Morgan (b. 1604, Claire, Ireland)

Sir Francis Bryan III (son of Wm. Smith Bryan) was born in 1630, Claire, Ireland and died in 1677 in Belfast, Ireland. He was married to Sarah Brinker who was born 1634 in Denmark. Their son was Morgan Bryan who settled in North Carolina.

Morgan Bryan was born in 1671 in Denmark. In 1719 he was a member of the New Garden Quaker community as early as 1719, and married Martha Strode in Chester County, PA. Martha was born 1696/1697 in France and not in Holland as previously stated on this website. In 1724 he moved to the west into Pequea Creek district (present-day Lancaster, PA). In 1730 he and Alexander Ross, another Quaker from New Garden, purchased one hundred thousand acres of land on the waters of Qpequon Creek (near present day Winchester VA). In 1734 Morgan Bryan purchased a tract in present day Berkeley Co, WVA and there he settled with his family. In 1748 Bryan moved himself and his large family to North Carolina where he made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most prominet settlers in northwestern North Carolina.

First Generation:

Children of Morgan Bryan (1671-1763) and Martha Strode

Joseph Bryan (1720-1804) m. 1) Hester Simpson, 2) Alice/Aylee (Alee) Linville (1722-1807)

Samuel Bryan (1721-1800) m. Masmilla Simpson

James Bryan (1723-1807, St Charles Co, MO) m. Rebecca Enochs(on)

Mary Bryan (1725-1741) m. Thomas Curtis (?-by 1776); 2) George Forbes

Morgan Bryan, Jr. (1729-1794) m. Cassandra Miller

John Bryan (1730-1780) m. Elizabeth Frances Battle

Elinor Bryan (1729-?) m. William Linville

William Bryan (1734-1780) m. Mary Boone (1736-1819), sister to Daniel Boone

Thomas Bryan (1735-1790)

Martha Bryan (1742) m. Stephen Gano

Kathleen Covell provided information on serveral of the above children and their spouses. Kathleen's e-mail address is RADAR9@prodigy.net

For more information on the Mary Bryan and Thomas Curtis line contact: Betsy Carson, e-mail address: BeejC1@aol.com

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http://awt.ancestrylibrary.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gayfamilyfile&id=I135185&ti=5542

  1. Morgan BRYAN I
  2. Sex: M
  3. Birth: 1671 in Denmark
  4. Death: 3 APR 1763 in Yadkin River, Rowan County, North Carolina
  5. Note: Joppa Cemetery, Mocksville, Rowan, North Carolina.
   This article* (TRANSCRIBED BY DIANA McGINNESS) is verbatim as published in the Register of Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 40, No. 13 2, pp. 318-322. C1974 KY State Historical Society-Frankfort. Edward Bryan, the compiler, is descended from Morgan Bryan. He was born in Louisville, but at the time of the publication, lived in Colorado.
   "The family most closely associated with the redoubtable Daniel Boone, and that one whose exploits most nearly parallel those of the picturesque explorer, was the family of Morgan and Martha Strode Bryan. So much has be en written concerning the kindly and nomadic Boone, that his neighbors and kinsmen, the Bryans, might well be forgotten men, but for some scores of prideful descendants who, from generation to generation, continue to recount the adventures of their forefathers, and recall the role they played in the westward march of empire. Colleagues in the difficult and dangerous enterprise of settling Kentucky, the lives and fortunes of the two families are so inextricably interwoven that some genealogists have, for the sake of convenience, treated them very much as though they were one.
   Daniel Boone married a Bryan, his brother, Edward, married another, his sister, Mary, a third, and these Boone-Bryan alliances were continued into following generations. Joseph, eldest son of Morgan Bryan, taught young Dan'l to ride and to handle a rifle. Friends and neighbors in Pennsylvania, the two families continued their close association on the Yadkin River in North Carolina, and in time blazed the trail together to settle the land of blue-grass and rhododendron.
   Morgan Bryan, progenitor of the Bryans of central Kentucky, was born in Denmark in 1671. He came to America as a young man, settled at the present site of Reading, PA, thence in 1730 to what is now Winchester, VA, then came in 1748 to a point near the present town of Wilkesboro, NC. Here, some sixty miles from the nearest habitation, he founded what came to be known as the "Bryan Settlements," and here he devoted himself to fighting off the Indians, raising fine horses, and rearing a sizeable family of children.
   Much of what is known concerning the ancestry of Morgan Bryan has been gleaned from the family papers of the descendants of his brother, William, who also came to the colonies. While the immigrant ancestor or William and Morgan Bryan migrated to the sea shores from Ireland, he was of Anglo-Irish stock, being descended from Francis Bryan, an Englishman who was sent to Ireland in 1548 as Lord Lieutenant. Some of the writers who have compiled papers on the genealogy of the pioneer Bryans have stated that Morgan Bryan was descended from Brian Boru, an Irish monarch of the tenth century, and great-stem of the royal Irish house of O'Brien.
   While this is true, this statement, without a word of explanation, is indefinite and misleading. Sir Francis Bryan of Buckinghamshire, and ancestor of Morgan Bryan, married Joan, dowager duchess of Ormond and heiress of James Fitz-Gerald. Joan's mother was the daughter of Turlogh O'Brien, and of that branch of the clan known as the "Mac-I-Brien-Ara." Thus do the Bryans descend from the house of O'Brien and from the mighty Boru, but only through the WIFE of Sir Francis Bryan, and not in the direct male line. The Rev. J. W. Shearer, another of the family historians, appears to have succeeded in tracing the ancestry of Morgan Bryan to Sir Francis, but he too, falls into the error of assuming that the later was a Dalcassian.
   A comparative study of the armorial bearings of the Irish O'Briends and the English Bryans reveals that the Brayns of Carolina and Kentucky inherit and display the coat of the English Bryans. This device, described as "Or, three piles in point, azure," was first displayed by Guy, Lord Bryan, at the siege of Calais, 1345. His lordship "le bon Guyon" as he was sometimes called, was descended from a long line of Guy Bryans who settled in Devon since very early times. While there is only heraldic evidence, their name is believed to be a place name, and from the ancient Chateau de Brienne in the former province of Champagne.
   The generations which intervene between Lord Guy and Sir Thomas Bryan (grandfather to Sir Frances) are missing, and it is stated by Beltz (Order of the Garter) that the family of the former became extinct, but it is a matter of record at the College of Arms that Sir Thomas bore arms: three piles in point, and difference from those of Lord Guy only in the matter of color.
   The earliest of the Bryan grandsires of whom there is authentic record is Sir Thomas, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas from 1471 until his death. His will, proved December 11, 1500 mentions his son, Thomas, Thomas' wife and an illegitimate daughter. The son - Sir Thomas Bryan of Chedington, Bucks, was knighted by the seventh Henry in 1497. His wife, the LADY MARGARET BRYAN was a sister of John, Lord Berners, and daughter of Sir Humphrey Bourchier and his wife, Elizabeth Tylney. Through this marriage the Bryans claim descent, on the distaff side, from the houses of Bourchier, Bohun and Plantagenet.
   Following the unhappy death of Anne Boleyn, Lady Margaret was made foster-mother to the princess Elizabeth, and in recognition of this service the king created the Barony of Bryan. She died in 1551,

whereafter her peerage, conferred only for life, is heard of no more. An interesting account of Dame Bryan's training and her relationship to the little princess, is contained in Agnes Strickland's "Lives of the Queens of England." Her son and heir - Sir Francis Bryan, had a prominent place at the court of Henry VIII. Together with Sir Thomas Wyatt, George Boleyn and Nicholas Carew, he was one of a coterie, the members of which were the companions of the sovereign. Sir Francis was educated at Oxford, was M.P. for Buckinghamshire from 1542 to 1544, and a member of the Privy Council until the close of Henry's reign. At the beginning of the reign of Edward VI, he was given large grants of land, which through the dissolution of the monasteries had reverted to the crown. In 1520 he was knighted, and during this year attended Henry at the Field of Cloth and Gold.

   The circumstances under which he removed to Ireland are curious and interesting. In 1548, James Butler, Earl of Ormond, an Irish noble whose powerful influence was obnoxious to the government at Dublin,

died in London of poison. Thereupon his widow, Joan, daughter or James Fitz-Gerald, sought to marry her relative Gerald Fitz-Gerald. To prevent this marriage, which would have united the leading representatives of the two chief Irish noble houses, Sir Francis was induced to prefer a suit to the lady himself. In the autumn of that same year, he married the widowed countess, was shortly nominated Lord Marshal or Ireland, and sent to Dublin. He died in February, 1550, at Clonmel, and was buried at Waterford.

   The data concerning the ancestry of Sir Francis Bryan is based on research done by The Society of Genealogists, London. Much of this material is also contained in "The Dictionary of National Biography"

and "The Complete Peerage."

   For the line showing the descent of Morgan Bryan from Sir Francis, the writer is indebted to the late Gordon M. Ash, Esq. of Frederick, MD, a Bryan descendant, and lately genealogist to the Society of Descendants of Knights of the Garter. It has also been published in Carter R. Bryan's, "The Bryan Family," Armstrong's "Notable Southern Families, " J. W. Shearer's, "The Shearer-Akers Family," and various

articles on the ancestry of Morgan's brother, William.

   Sir Francis Bryan was twice married, first to Phillippa Montgomery, by whom he had a son, Sir Edward Bryan. By Lady Joan, he had a son, Francis, who married Ann, daughter of Sir William Smith. From his

mother, the second Francis Bryan inherited estates in County Clare. His son, William Smith Bryan, attempted to gain the throne of Ireland, and in 1650 Cromwell deported him as a troublesome subject. Together with eleven sons and a shipload of chattels, including horses and other livestock, he landed at Gloucester Beach, Virginia, and his twenty-one sons and grandsons settled Gloucester County. An article in "The Thoroughbred Record" credits him with being among the first to bring horses to America.

   In time the eldest of his sons, Francis Bryan III, returned to Ireland and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but being persecuted by the government he was obli to seek refuse in Denmark. He was born about 1630, married Sarah Brinker, a cousin to the Princess of Orange. He was permitted to return to Ireland about 1683, and is said to have been standard bearer to William of Orange at the battle of the  Boyne. He died in Belfast in 1694. He had two sons, William, born in Ireland, and Morgan, born in Demark. Both came to America.
   William was the first to settle at the present site of Roanoke, and died there at the age of 104. Many of his descendants are listed in "The Shearer-Akers Family," heretofore referred to. From the time of his arrival until his marriage in 1719 to Martha Strode, not much is know of the movements of his brother, Morgan Bryan. Martha Strode's parents had migrated from France to escape religious persecution. Her mother died at sea, leaving three children, who were provided for by their shipmates until they came of age. Martha died in Virginia in 1747, and it was about a year later that Morgan Bryan began his epic journey through the Blue Ridge to the Yadkin Country, to found what came to be known as the Bryan Settlements in Rowan County, NC. His route was afterward called "Morgan Bryan's Road." It is related that at one point he was obli to take his wagon apart, carry it piece by piece over a mountain, and reassemble it on the other side. He died about July 1763. A copy of his will is contained in Mr. J. R. Cooper's "The Bryan Families of Fayette County," and it is apparent from this document that he had prospered at the Settlement. He reared seven sons and two daughters, namely: Joseph, born c. 1720; Eleanor, born c. 1722; Mary, c. 1724; Samuel, c. 1726; Morgan, c 1728; John, c. 1731; William, c 1733; James, c. 1735; and Thomas, about 1737.
   Researchers who have delved into the Kentucky pioneer period of the Bryan annals have found their task somewhat less arduous than those who have searched out and listed the Morgan Bryan ancestry.

Interest in the brothers William, James and Morgan, founders of Bryan's Station, and in Rebecca Bryan, wife of Daniel Boone, has uncovered the wealth of material to be had from the Fayette County records, family Bibles, gravestones, and two notable collections of family papers, known as the "Shane and Draper Collections." Thanks to these sources, present day descendants of Morgan and Martha Strode Bryan are enabled to complete their lines of descent from their immigrant ancestors, of whom the Bryans, unlike most families, have two.

   When in the autumn of 1773 Boone made his first attempt to settle Kentucky, the Bryans were among the "forty well-armed men" who joined him in Powell's Valley. After being attacked by Indians as they

approached Cumberland Gap, and having several of their number slain, and after retreating forty miles back on the trail over which they had come, most of the company rested a while at Blackmore's fort on the Clinch River, before moving back to North Carolina.

   The Bryans, however, remained at the Clinch settlement, and again joined Boone when he returned there in 1775 to take his family to Boonesorough. Thence they moved on northward to the Elkhorn, where

during the autumn and winter of 1775 they built the stockade fort, which bore their name. The siege of Bryan's Station and the subsequent battle at the Blue Licks, were of national as well as local importance, since they constitute what was, in fact, the final battle of the Revolution.

   Friends and kinsmen in the several colonial communities in which they lived, it is a curious circumstance that the ancestors of both the Boones and the Bryans were long settled in Devonshire, and that both

families claim decent from the ancient Norman house of deBohun, the Bryans through a collateral line. Humphrey, founder of the house, and surnamed "with the beard," came into England with the Con?????, Henry duBohun, great-grandson of Humphrey, joined the barons who obtained the concession of Magna Charta, and was one of the twenty-five appointed to insure it's observance.

   When in 1799 Boone, finding Kentucky too crowded for him, sought "elbow room" in what is now Missouri, he was not long separated from the Bryans. Shortly thereafter, JONATHON, son of James Bryan, as if to continue the Boone-Bryan tradition, followed him to the Femme Osage region and settled within half a mile of him. "However, for the most part, the Bryans were content to remain on the dark and bloody ground. The restlessness, which had so long characterized both families, appears to have ended for them once their roots were embedded in Kentucky's rich limestone soil."
   ======
   The following data concerning the ancestry of Sir Francis Bryan is based on research done by The Society of Genealogists, London. Much of this material is also contained in "The Dictionary of National Biography" and "The Complete Peerage."
   Morgan Bryan, Sr. was:
   1. 3rd great-grandson of Lady Margaret Bourchier and her husband, Sir Thomas Bryan. (Lady Margaret Bourchier Bryan was first the governess of Princess Mary and later foster mother of Princess Elizabeth after the execution of Anne Boleyn. For this, Henry VIII gave her the title of Baroness and an estate.) Charlemagne was Lady Margaret's 19th great-grandfather.
   2. 18th great-grandson of King Brian Boru of Ireland. (Usurped High Kingship of Ireland 1002-1014 from the Ui Neill monarch, Malachi II. Killed at the Battle of Clontarf 1014 A.D. fighting a mixed force of Norse Vikings from Dublin and Leinstermen, but his victory broke,forever, the power of the Northmen in Ireland. He was murdered in his tent by Danes.)
   3. 24th great-grandson of Charlemagne of the Holy Roman Empire (See: Empire, Holy Roman, Charlemagne) for notes by Anne Bryant concerning Germany's three reichs.
   4. Therefore, he was half 9th cousin , 10 times removed, to the present Queen Elizabeth II of England.
   5. Also see Henry Bohun concerning the Magna Carta
   6. Also see England, Richard III of... concerning Warwick Castle
   ======

Morgan BRYAN was of royal lineage, being descended from Bryan O'MORO, the last king of Ireland.

    See the following websites for more information about Morgan Bryan, Sr.: http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/hopewell.htm and http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/monocacy.htm

Morgan Bryan, Sr. was one of the Fathers of the First Quaker Colony in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia: Owned 2,134 acres in 4 tracts, now in Berkeley Co., WV (northwest of Bunker Hill along Mills' Creek) In the year 1730 the Quaker leaders Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan appeared before the Governor and Council of Virginia and from them received a grant of 100,000 acres on the Opequon River in Frederick County, Virginia. This encouraged the move of many Quakers who followed them to back Virginia country. REMEMBER: (Any reference made to "Virginia" or an individual having been born in "Virginia" as early as 1728 to as late as 1863 MIGHT mean the individual was born in: Illinois 1781-1818, Indiana 1787-1816, Kentucky 1775-1792, North Carolina 1728-1799, Ohio 1778-1803, Pennsylvania 1752-1786, Tennessee 1760-1803, W. Virginia 1769-1863).

http://www.rootsweb.com/~pacheste/towns.htm

   You will see that New Garden and Kennett Townships are next to each other. Morgan Bryan married Martha Strode at t he New Garden MM in 1719. This is one year after New Garden MM was formed out of Kennett (Newark) MM. You will see the mention of those places on http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~baily/pages/bailyline.html.
   In this last website it mentions a John Strode as witness to Baily documents after the Bailys moved to the New Garden/Kennet t(Newark) area.
   ======
   From: Noah Smothers
   Death: 3 APR 1763 in Mocksville, Rowan County, North Carolina. Buried in Jappa Cemetery, Mocksville, North Carolina.

In 1724 Morgan Bryan moved to the west into Pequea Creek district (present-day Lancaster, PA.). In 1730 he and Alexander Ross, another Quaker from New Garden, purchased one hundred thousand acres of land on the waters of Qpequon Creek (near present day Winchester, VA.). In 1734 Morgan Bryan purchased a tract in present day Berkeley County, W. VA. and there he settled with his family. In 1748 Bryan moved himself and his large family to North Carolina where he made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most prominet settlers in northwestern North Carolina.

   ********
   Morgan Bryan, born in Denmark in 1671, Morgan was named for his grandmother and was 12 years old when he moved with his family to Ireland, land of his father's birth. He lived in Ireland for the next 12 years and as a young man of 24 migrated to Pennsylvania in 1695 with his brother William, two years after the death of their father. They first settled in Chester County and lived here for many years. They might have

made contact with their many uncles and aunts who had been in Virginia since 1650, but we have no evidence that they did.

   Morgan marrtied Martha Strode. She was reported to have been born in Holland about 1678 (a date we question) and her father was probably Edward Strode, a descendant of a famous English family. Edward was a Protestant exile in Holland and was married in France to a Huguenot. It is believed that edward and his wife died at sea on their way to America and that young Martha together with two brothers, Geremiah and Samuel were bound out until they were of age. This event probably occurred before 24 September 1697 because the will of Edward's father on that date refers to his son as deceased. The marriage date of Morgan and Martha is in question. One source states 1695 when she would have been 17, which

supposedly was two years before she arrived in Pennsylvania, and another source states 1719, when she would have been 41, too old to have later had nine children. Since the first child was born about 1719, it is our guess that the birthdate given is too early by at least ten years. It must also be noted that if Morgan's birthdate is correct, he would have been 48 years old when his first child was born. This is possible, and Martha also could have been his second wife. Eight of their nine children were born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and as a member of the New Garden Quaker community, Morgan had been a successful trader with the Conestoga Indians.

   In 1730, Quakers in Pennsylvania formed a Company under the leadership of Morgan Bryan and Alexander Ross for the purpose of making settlements in Maryland and Virginia. Permission was then gained from the Quaker Meeting of Chester County to build a meeting house in Virginia. On 28 October

1730, Governor Gooch of Virginia granted a right to survey and lay out 100,000 acres west of the Opequan River (just north of present day Winchester, Frederick, County). In 1734, Morgan led a group of Quakers in the building the "Hopewell Monthly Meeting" of Frederick. This settlement flourished for many years at Frederick Town, later named Winchester. Here, where their last child was born, the family lived for over ten years, and son Joseph was first married.

   Sometime about 1745/46 Morgan moved with his wife and eight children up the Shenandoah Valley to the Big Lick at the head of the Roanoke River where land was more plentiful. His oldest son, Joseph, who by now had a family of his own, stayed in Winchester. The family did not like this new area in Roanoke County and in the fall of 1748 they all moved again to the Forks of the Yadkin in North Carolina. Morgan's brother William who had always lived close by up to this point decided to stay in Roanoke County, Virginia where he presumably died. As some of the earliest settlers in this part of the Yadkin River Valley, Morgan, Martha and eight of their children selected the choice pieces of land in an area that was afterward called "The Bryan Settlement." Their nearest neighbors were about 60 miles away. The Bryans claimed large acreages in Rowan County, parts of which are now in Wilkes County, and some 5000 acres in the northeast section of what is now Davie County, from Dutchmans Creek into Farmingotn, Smiths Grove, and the Bend of the River sections of the county. Morgan lived here for the rest of his life surrounded by his family. Martha died first, the date and place require explanation. Most early biographers of the family state that Martha Strode Bryan died in Virginia in 1747, but in the Bryan Papers deposited by the Rev. John D. Shane with the Presbyterian Historical Society in Philadelphia, is the following:
   Martha Bryan died August 24, 1762
   Allenor Bryan died Oct 21, 1772
   Morgan Bryan died Apr 3, 1763, Easter Sunday
   These records given to Lyman Draper are a part of the "Shane Collection: Bryan Family Papers; MS/SH18/B84, Item 2." This document is more likely to reflect the true record of Martha's death since Morgan Bryan did die 3 April 1763 in Rowan County, North Carolina at age 92 and left a will dated 28 March, recorded in Will Book A, Page 13 as follows: "I Morgan Bryan of Rowan County living in perfect mind and memory, blessed be God for his mercies, so dispose of my worledly estate as follows, vis. first, I give and bequeath unto my beloved son Thomas Bryan my mansion house and plantation, also my part of a Negro boy named Jack, also my wagon and wagon horse called Black and the necessaries belonging to the wagon and my plow and utensils thereunto. Two brood mares, viz. a mare called Brown Dent and her yeard and her colt, a cow called Josie and her calf and one called Brown and her calf; also my bed and furniture after my decease reserving a sufficient living for me from the land while I live. Second, I give and beqeueath unto my beloved daughter Elinor Linville all my wife's wearing apparel. I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Mary Forbes my great pot and five shillings Sterling. Eight pounds proclamation to my beloved son James Bryan. I reserve for my funeral charges and sickness. I give and bequeath Joseph, Samuel, Morgan, John William, James and Thomas and my daughter Elinor Linville all the rest of my real and personal estate to be equally divided amongst them, together with that part of my estate which they

have already received. I do nominate and appoint my beloved sons John Bryan and William Bryan to be Executors ratifyng and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament, whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this March 28, 1763. Morgan Bryan" Signed, Sealed, Published and Pronounced by the testator in presence of us - Morgan Bryan Jr., Anthony Heaverloe, Mary (X) Forbes: Proved July Court 1763.

Parents: Francis Bryan III b: 1630 in County Clare, Ireland and Sarah Brinker b: 1646 in Netherlands.

Married to Martha Strode in 1719 in Chester Co., PA. / Marriage 1 Martha STRODE b: 1697 in Pennsylvania - Married: 1719 in Opequoa, Shenandoah, VA ***needs further research***

To be resolved.. Death Location Mocksville, North Carolina, United States Yadkin River, Rowan, North Carolina, USA http://www.fmoran.com/bryan.html'''

   ********************

http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/hopewell.htm and http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/monocacy.htm

   ***********

http://booneinfo.com/scroggin/boone1.htm

About 1728-1730 Morgan Bryan, who lived in Chester County, Pennsylvania, until four or five of his eldest children were born, obtained a grant of 100,000 acres of land on the Potomac and Opequan rivers in Virginia, with Alexander Ross and other Quakers. Morgan Bryan moved to this land about 1730 and settled near the present site of Winchester, where the rest of his children were born. In 1734 he purchased a tract of land in present-day Berkeley Co, WVA, and there he settled with his family. Martha Strode Bryan died here about 1747 and was buried at the homestead. Afterward Morgan sold his interest in the Virginia land and, in 1748 moved his large family to NC where he made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most prominant settlers in northwestern NC. An early pioneer traveler over the road the Bryans followed gave this description: "People had told us that this hill was most dangerous, and that we would scarcely be able to cross it, for Morgan Bryan, the first to travel this way, had to take the wheels off his wagon and carry it piece-meal to the top, and had been three months on the journey from the Shanidore (Shenandoah) to the Etkin (Yadkin)."

   William Bryan, who established Bryan's Station in Kentucky in 1779 with his brothers Samuel, James and Morgan Bryan, was wounded by Indians while on a hunting expedition on 01 May and died at his fort on 07 May 1780. His son William, Jr. was killed in the same encounter and Mary Boone Bryan went back to North Carolina with her other children until 1785 when she returned to Kentucky to stay. (Source: "The Boone Family", Spraker; Letter, David H. Bryan).

http://www.bryanfamilyonline.com/morgantr.html

Children

  1. Has No Children Martha Sarah BRYAN
  2. Has Children Joseph BRYAN , Sr. b: 1720 in Shenandoah Valley, Pennsylvania
  3. Has Children Samuel BRYAN b: 1721 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
  4. Has Children Ellinor BRYAN b: 1722 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
  5. Has Children Mary BRYAN b: 1724 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
  6. Has Children Morgan BRYAN II b: 20 MAY 1729 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
  7. Has Children John BRYAN , Sr. b: 9 APR 1730 in Opequon Creek, Shenandoah, Virginia
  8. Has No Children Mary BRYAN b: 1731
  9. Has Children James BRYAN b: 3 APR 1732 in Virginia
 10. Has Children William Christopher BRYAN , Sr., Capt. b: 10 MAR 1733/34 in Winchester, Frederick, Virginia
 11. Has Children Thomas BRYAN b: 1736 in Opequon Creek, Shenandoah, Virginia

Morgan's father, Francis Bryan III , eldest son of William Smith Bryan and Catherine Morgan, was born about 1630 in Virginia and returned to Ireland in 1667 and tried to regain the Clare County estates. But he was persecuted by the government and forced to seek refuge in Denmark. He married Sarah Brinker of Denmark. Morgan Bryan was born in 1671 in Denmark.

In 1719, Morgan was a member of the New Garden Quaker community and married Martha Strode in Chester County, PA. Martha was born 1696/1697 in France. In 1724, Morgan moved to the west into Pequea Creek district (present-day Lancaster, PA). In 1730, he and Alexander Ross, another Quaker from New Garden, purchased one hundred thousand acres of land on the waters of Qpequon Creek (near present day Winchester, VA). In 1734, Morgan Bryan purchased a tract in present day Berkeley Co, West VA and there he settled with his family. In 1748, Bryan moved himself and his large family to North Carolina where he made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most prominet settlers in northwestern North Carolina.

--------------------

MORGAN BRYAN was born abt. 1671 in Denmark (deported with his father and family to the colony of Virginia by Cromwell). Morgan and his brother William came to Pennsylvania in 1718. There he married MARTHA STRODE abt. 1719 and settled near Winchester, PA and this is where all his children were born. When his children were grown, they and Morgan went on to North Carolina. Morgan died 1763 in Yadkin River, Rowan Co., NC. MARTHA STRODE was born possibly in Holland between 1678/1690. She died 1747/1762 in Rowan Co., NC. Morgan's last will in on file in Rowan County, NC. Will Book A, page 13.

Children of MORGAN and MARTHA BRYAN are:

JOSEPH BRYAN (9)

ELINOR BRYAN (LINVILLE), b. 1722

MARY BRYAN, m. Cornelius Howard.

COL. SAMUEL BRYAN, b. 1726, m. Masmilla Simpson, d. 1800.

MORGAN BRYAN II, b. 1728, m. Mary Forbes.

JOHN BRYAN, b. 1731.

WILLIAM BRYAN, b. Mar. 7 1733, m. Mary Boone, b. Nov 10, 1736, d. May 7, 1780 (killed by Indian raid on Bryan's Station).

JAMES BRYAN, b. 1735, m. Rebecca Enochs.

THOMAS BRYAN, b. 1737, m. Sarah Hunt.

--------------------

Morgan Bryan Family

Sir Francis Bryan was married to Lady Joan Fitzgerald and their son, Sir Francis Bryan II was born in 1549 and was married to Ann Smith who was born in 1560 in Claire, Ireland.

William Smith Bryan (b. 1600, Claire, Ireland, son of Sir Francis Bryan II and Ann Smith) m. Catherine Morgan (b. 1604, Claire, Ireland)

Sir Francis Bryan III (son of Wm. Smith Bryan) was born in 1630, Claire, Ireland and died in 1677 in Belfast, Ireland. He was married to Sarah Brinker who was born 1634 in Denmark. Their son was Morgan Bryan who settled in North Carolina.

Morgan Bryan was born in 1671 in Denmark. In 1719 he was a member of the New Garden Quaker community and married Martha Strode in Chester County, PA. Martha was born 1696/1697 in France and not in Holland as previously stated on this website. In 1724 he moved to the west into Pequea Creek district (present-day Lancaster, PA). In 1730 he and Alexander Ross, another Quaker from New Garden, purchased one hundred thousand acres of land on the waters of Qpequon Creek (near present day Winchester VA). In 1734 Morgan Bryan purchased a tract in present day Berkeley Co, WVA and there he settled with his family. In 1748 Bryan moved himself and his large family to North Carolina where he made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most prominet settlers in northwestern North Carolina.

First Generation:

Children of Morgan Bryan (1671-1763) and Martha Strode

Joseph Bryan (1720-1804) m. 1) Hester Simpson, 2) Alice/Aylee (Alee) Linville (1722-1807)

Samuel Bryan (1721-1800) m. Masmilla Simpson

James Bryan (1723-1807, St Charles Co, MO) m. Rebecca Enochs(on)

Mary Bryan (1725-1741) m. Thomas Curtis (?-by 1776); 2) George Forbes

Morgan Bryan, Jr. (1729-1794) m. Cassandra Miller

John Bryan (1730-1780) m. Elizabeth Frances Battle

Elinor Bryan (1729-?) m. William Linville

William Bryan (1734-1780) m. Mary Boone (1736-1819), sister to Daniel Boone

Thomas Bryan (1735-1790)

Martha Bryan (1742) m. Stephen Gano

Kathleen Covell provided information on serveral of the above children and their spouses. Kathleen's e-mail address is RADAR9@prodigy.net

For more information on the Mary Bryan and Thomas Curtis line contact: Betsy Carson, e-mail address: BeejC1@aol.com

--------------------

  The circumstances under which he removed to Ireland are
  curious and interesting. In 1548, James Butler, Earl of Ormond, an Irish
  noble whose powerful influence was obnoxious to the government at Dublin,
  died in London of poison. Thereupon his widow, Joan, daughter or James
  Fitz-Gerald, sought to marry her relative Gerald Fitz-Gerald. To prevent
  this marriage, which would have united the leading representatives of the
  two chief Irish noble houses, Sir Francis was induced to prefer a suit to
  the lady himself. In the autumn of that same year, he married the
  widowed countess, was shortly nominated Lord Marshal or Ireland, and sent
  to Dublin. He died in February, 1550, at Clonmel, and was buried at
  Waterford.
  The data concerning the ancestry of Sir Francis Bryan is
  based on research done by The Society of Genealogists, London. Much of
  this material is also contained in "The Dictionary of National Biography"
  and "The Complete Peerage."
  For the line showing the descent of Morgan Bryan from Sir
  Francis, the writer is indebted to the late Gordon M. Ash, Esq. Of
  Frederick, MD, a Bryan descendant, and lately genealogist to the Society
  of Descendants of Knights of the Garter. It has also been published in
  Carter R. Bryan's, "The Bryan Family," Armstrong's "Notable Southern
  Families, " J. W. Shearer's, "The Shearer-Akers Family," and various
  articles on the ancestry of Morgan's brother, William.
  Sir Francis Bryan was twice married, first to Phillippa
  Montgomery, by whom he had a son, Sir Edward Bryan. By Lady Joan, he had
  a son, Francis, who married Ann, daughter of Sir William Smith. From his
  mother, the second Francis Bryan inherited estates in County Clare. His
  son, William Smith Bryan, attempted to gain the throne of Ireland, and in
  1650 Cromwell deported him as a troublesome subject. Together with
  eleven sons and a shipload of chattels, including horses and other
  livestock, he landed at Gloucester Beach, Virginia, and his twenty-one
  sons and grandsons settled Gloucester County. An article in "The
  Thoroughbred Record" credits him with being among the first to bring
  horses to America.
  In time the eldest of his sons, Francis Bryan III, returned
  to Ireland and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but being
  persecuted by the government he was obli to seek refuse in Denmark. He
  was born about 1630, married Sarah Brinker, a cousin to the Princess of
  Orange. He was permitted to return to Ireland about 1683, and is said to
  have been standard bearer to William of Orange at the battle of the
  Boyne. He died in Belfast in 1694. He had two sons, William, born in
  Ireland, and Morgan, born in Demark. Both came to America.
  William was the first to settle at the present site of
  Roanoke, and died there at the age of 104. Many of his descendants are
  listed in "The Shearer-Akers Family," heretofore referred to.
  From the time of his arrival until his marriage in 1719 to
  Martha Strode, not much is know of the movements of his brother, Morgan
  Bryan. Martha Strode's parents had migrated from France to escape
  religious persecution. Her mother died at sea, leaving three children,
  who were provided for by their shipmates until they came of age. Martha
  died in Virginia in 1747, and it was about a year later that Morgan Bryan
  began his epic journey through the Blue Ridge to the Yadkin Country, to
  found what came to be known as the Bryan Settlements in Rowan County,
  NC. His route was afterward called "Morgan Bryan's Road." It is related
  that at one point he was obli to take his wagon apart, carry it piece
  by piece over a mountain, and reassemble it on the other side. He died
  about July 1763. A copy of his will is contained in Mr. J. R. Cooper's
  "The Bryan Families of Fayette County," and it is apparent from this
  document that he had prospered at the Settlement.
  He reared seven sons and two daughters, namely: Joseph, born
  c. 1720; Eleanor, born c. 1722; Mary, c. 1724; Samuel, c. 1726; Morgan, c
  1728; John, c. 1731; William, c 1733; James, c. 1735; and Thomas, about
  1737.
  Researchers who have delved into the Kentucky pioneer period
  of the Bryan annals have found their task somewhat less arduous than
  those who have searched out and listed the Morgan Bryan ancestry.
  Interest in the brothers William, James and Morgan, founders of Bryan's
  Station, and in Rebecca Bryan, wife of Daniel Boone, has uncovered the
  wealth of material to be had from the Fayette County records, family
  Bibles, gravestones, and two notable collections of family papers, known
  as the "Shane and Draper Collections." Thanks to these sources, present
  day descendants of Morgan and Martha Strode Bryan are enabled to complete
  their lines of descent from their immigrant ancestors, of whom the
  Bryans, unlike most families, have two.
  When in the autumn of 1773 Boone made his first attempt to
  settle Kentucky, the Bryans were among the "forty well-armed men" who
  joined him in Powell's Valley. After being attacked by Indians as they
  approached Cumberland Gap, and having several of their number slain, and
  after retreating forty miles back on the trail over which they had come,
  most of the company rested a while at Blackmore's fort on the Clinch
  River, before moving back to North Carolina.
  The Bryans, however, remained at the Clinch settlement, and
  again joined Boone when he returned there in 1775 to take his family to
  Boonesorough. Thence they moved on northward to the Elkhorn, where
  during the autumn and winter of 1775 they built the stockade fort, which
  bore their name. The siege of Bryan's Station and the subsequent battle
  at the Blue Licks, were of national as well as local importance, since
  they constitute what was, in fact, the final battle of the Revolution.
  Friends and kinsmen in the several colonial communities in
  which they lived, it is a curious circumstance that the ancestors of both
  the Boones and the Bryans were long settled in Devonshire, and that both
  families claim decent from the ancient Norman house of deBohun, the
  Bryans through a collateral line.
  Humphrey, founder of the house, and surnamed "with the
  beard," came into England with the Con?????, Henry duBohun,
  great-grandson of Humphrey, joined the barons who obtained the concession
  of Magna Charta, and was one of the twenty-five appointed to insure it's
  observance.
  When in 1799 Boone, finding Kentucky too crowded for him,
  sought "elbow room" in what is now Missouri, he was not long separated
  from the Bryans. Shortly thereafter, JONATHON, son of James Bryan, as if
  to continue the Boone-Bryan tradition, followed him to the Femme Osage
  region and settled within half a mile of him. "However, for the most
  part, the Bryans were content to remain on the dark and bloody ground.
  The restlessness, which had so long characterized both families, appears
  to have ended for them once their roots were embedded in Kentucky's rich
  limestone soil.
  ======
  The following data concerning the ancestry of Sir Francis Bryan is based
  on research done by The Society of Genealogists, London. Much of this
  material is also contained in "The Dictionary of National Biography" and
  "The Complete Peerage."
  Morgan Bryan, Sr. was:
  1. 3rd great-grandson of Lady Margaret Bourchier and her husband, Sir
  Thomas Bryan. (Lady Margaret Bourchier Bryan was first the governess of
  Princess Mary and later foster mother of Princess Elizabeth after the
  execution of Anne Boleyn. For this, Henry VIII gave her the title of
  Baroness and an estate.) Charlemagne was Lady Margaret's 19th
  great-grandfather.
  2. 18th great-grandson of King Brian Boru of Ireland. (Usurped High
  Kingship of Ireland 1002-1014 from the Ui Neill monarch, Malachi II.
  Killed at the Battle of Clontarf 1014 A.D. fighting a mixed force of
  Norse Vikings from Dublin and Leinstermen, but his victory broke,
  forever, the power of the Northmen in Ireland. He was murdered in his
  tent by Danes.)
  3. 24th great-grandson of Charlemagne of the Holy Roman Empire (See:
  Empire, Holy Roman, Charlemagne) for notes by Anne Bryant concerning
  Germany's three reichs.
  4. Therefore, he was half 9th cousin , 10 times removed, to the present
  Queen Elizabeth II of England.
  5. Also see Henry Bohun concerning the Magna Carta
  6. Also see England, Richard III of... concerning Warwick Castle
  ======
  See the following websites for more information about Morgan Bryan, Sr.:
  http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/hopewell.htm
  http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/monocacy.htm
  One of the Fathers of the First Quaker Colony in the Shenandoah Valley of
  Virginia: Owned 2,134 acres in 4 tracts, now in Berkeley Co., WV
  (northwest of Bunker Hill along Mills' Creek) In the year 1730 the
  Quaker leaders Alexander Ross and Morgan
  Bryan appeared before the Governor and Council of Virginia and from them
  received a grant of 100,000 acres on the Opequon River in Frederick
  County, Virginia. This encoura the move of many Quakers who followed
  them to back Virginia country.
  REMEMBER: (Any reference made to "Virginia" or an individual having
  been born in "Virginia" as early as 1728 to as late as 1863 MIGHT mean
  the individual was born in:
  Illinois 1781-1818, Indiana 1787-1816, Kentucky 1775-1792, North
  Carolina 1728-1799, Ohio 1778-1803, Pennsylvania 1752-1786,
  Tennessee1760-1803, W. Virginia 1769-1863.)
  http://www.rootsweb.com/~pacheste/towns.htm
  You will see that New Garden and Kennett
  Townships are next to each other. Morgan Bryan married Martha Strode at t he New Garden MM
  in 1719. This is one year after New Garden MM was formed out of Kennett (N ewark)
  MM. You will see the mention of those places on
  http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~baily/pages/bailyline.html
  In this last website it mentions a John Strode as
  witness to Baily documents after the Bailys moved to the New Garden/Kennet t(Newark) area.
  ======
  From: Noah Smothers
  Death: 3 APR 1763 in Mocksville, Rowan County, North Carolina 1
  Note: Buried in Jappa Cemetery, Mocksville, North Carolina.
  Morgan Bryan was a member of the New Garden Quaker community in
  Penn. as early as 1719. In
  1724 he moved to the west into Pequea Creek district
  (present-day Lancaster, PA.). In 1730 he
  and Alexander Ross, another Quaker from New Garden, purchased
  one hundred thousand acres of
  land on the waters of Qpequon Creek (near present day
  Winchester, VA.). In 1734 Morgan Bryan
  purchased a tract in present day Berkeley County, WVa. and
  there he settled with his family. In
  1748 Bryan moved himself and his large family to North Carolina
  where he made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and
  was one of the most prominet settlers in northwestern North
  Carolina.
  ********
  Morgan Bryan, born in Denmark in 1671, Morgan was named for his
  grandmother and was 12 years old when he moved with his family to
  Ireland, land of his father's birth. He lived in Ireland for the next 12
  years and as a young man of 24 migrated to Pennsylvania in 1695 with his
  brother William, two years after the death of their father. They first
  seettled in Chester County and lived here for many years. They might have
  made contact with their many uncles and aunts who had been in Virginia
  since 1650, but we have no evidence that they did.
  Morgan marrtied Martha Strode. She was reported to have been born in
  Holland about 1678 (a date we question) and her father was probably
  Edward Strode, a descendant of a famous English family. Edward was a
  Protestant exile in Holland and was married in France to a Huguenot. It
  is believed that edward and his wife died at sea on their way to America
  and that young Martha together with two brothers, Geremiah and Samuel
  were bound out until they were of age. This event probably occurred
  before 24 September 1697 because the will of Edward's father on that date
  refers to his son as deceased. The marriage date of Morgan and Martha is
  in question. One source states 1695 when she would have been 17, which
  supposedly was two years before she arrived in Pennsylvania, and another
  source states 1719, when she would have been 41, too old to have later
  had nine children. Since the first child was born about 1719, it is our
  guess that the birthdate given is too early by at least ten years. It
  must also be noted that if Morgan's birthdate is correct, he would have
  been 48 years old when his first child was orn. This is possible, and
  Martha also could have been his second wife.
  Eight of their nine children were born in Chester County, Pennsylvania,
  and as a member of the New Garden Quaker community, Morgan had been a
  successful trader with the Conestoga Indians.
  In 1730, Quakers in Pennsylvania formed a Company under the leadership of
  Morgan Bryan and Alexander Ross for the purpose of making settlements in
  Maryland and Virginia. Permission was then gained from the quaker Meeting
  of Chester County to build a meeting house in Virginia. On 28 October
  1730, Governor Gooch of Virginia granted a right to survey and lay out
  100,000 acres west of the Opequan River (just north of present day
  Winchester, Frederick, County). In 1734, Morgan
  led a group of Quakers in the building the "Hopewell Monthly Meeting" of
  Frederick. This settlement flourished for mahy years at Frederick Town,
  later named Winchester. Here, where their last child was born, the family
  lived for over ten years, and son Joseph was first married.
  Sometime about 1745/46 Morgan moved with his wife and eight children up
  the Shenandoah Valley to the Big Lick at the head of the Roanoke River
  where land was more plentiful. His oldest son, Joseph, who by now had a
  family of his own, stayed in Winchester. The family did not like this new
  area in Roanoke County and in the fall of 1748 they all moved again to
  the Forks of the Yadkin in North Carolina. Morgan's brother William who
  had always lived close by up to this point decided to stay in Roanoke
  County, Virginia where he presumably died.
  As some of the earliest settlers in this part of the Yadkin River Valley,
  Morgan, Martha and eight of their children selected the choice pieces of
  land in an area that was afterward called "The Bryan Settlement." Their
  nearest neighbors were about 60 miles away. The Bryans claimed large
  acreages in Rowan County, parts of which are now in Wilkes County, and
  some 5000 acres in the northeast section of what is now Davie County,
  from Dutchmans Creek into Farmingotn, Smiths Grove, and the Bend of the
  River sections of the county.
  Morgan lived here for the rest of his life surrounded by his family.
  Martha died first, the date and place require explanation. Most early
  biographers of the family state that Martha Strode Bryan died in Virginia
  in 1747, but in the Bryan Papers deposited by the Rev. John D. Shane with
  the Presbyterian Historical Society in Philadelphia, is the following:
  Martha Bryan died August 24, 1762
  Allenor Bryan died Oct 21, 1772
  Morgan Bryan died Apr 3, 1763, Easter Sunday
  These records given to Lyman Draper are a part of the "Shane Collection:
  Bryan Family Papers; MS/SH18/B84, Item 2." This document is more likely
  to reflect the true record of Martha's death since Morgan Bryan did die 3
  April 1763 in Rowan County, North Carolina at age 92 and left a will
  dated 28 March, recorded in Will Book A, Page 13 as follows:
  "I Morgan Bryan of Rowan County living in perfect mind and memory,
  blessed be God for his mercies, so dispose of my worledly estate as
  follows, vis. first, I give and bequeath unto my beloved son Thomas Bryan
  my mansion house and plantation, also my part of a Negro boy named Jack,
  also my wagon and wagon horse called Black and the necessaries belonging
  to the wagon and my plow and utensils thereunto. Two brood mares, viz. a
  mare called Brown Dent and her yeard and her colt, a cow called Josie and
  her calf and one called Brown and her calf; also my bed and furniture
  after my decease reserving a sufficient living for me from the land while
  I live. Second, I give and beqeueath unto my beloved daughter Elinor
  Linville all my wife's wearing apparel. I give and bequeath unto my
  granddaughter Mary Forbes my great pot and five shillings Sterling. Eight
  pounds proclamatin to my beloved son James Bryan. I reserve for my
  funeral charges and sickness. I give and bequeath
  Joseph, Samuel, Morgan, John William, James and Thomas and my daughter
  Elinor Linville all the rest of my real and personal estate to be equally
  divided amongst them, together with that part of my estate which they
  have already received. I do nominate and appoint my beloved sons John
  Bryan and William Bryan to be Executors ratifyng and confirming this and
  no other to be my last will and testament, whereof I have hereunto set my
  hand and seal this March 28, 1763. Morgan Bryan"
  Signed, Sealed, Published and Pronounced by the testator in presence of
  us - Morgan Bryan Jr., Anthony Heaverloe, Mary (X) Forbes: Proved July
  Court 1763.
  Parents: Francis Bryan III and Sarah Brinker.
  He was married to Martha Strode in 1719 in , Chester, PA.(328) (2)
  Children were: Joseph Bryan Sr., Eleanor Bryan, Colonel Samuel Bryan,
  James Bryan, John Bryan,
  Jr. Bryan Morgan, Mary Bryan, William Bryan, Thomas Bryan.
  ********************
  NOTE: Recent research suggests that during the American Revolution,
  Morgan Bryan, Sr. and his clan were all loyalists and wealthy Tories who
  fought on the side of the English.
  See: Those Confusing John Bryan's by John K. Bryan, Jr.
  "The Bryans were Loyalists. Their reasons for supporting the Crown are
  unclear, but one factor may have been a mistrust of North Carolina's
  eastern-based political leadership.
  In the late 1760's, the Regulator Movement developed in the Piedmont in
  reaction to the excesses of corrupt local officials and others who
  shared power. In many counties, crooked Sheriffs and Justices seemed to
  be in league with member os the General Assembly and the eastern
  merchants and attorneys who dominated it."
  *********************************
  SEE:http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/hopewell.htm AND
  http://www.rootsweb.com/~quakers/monocacy.htm
  ***********
  http://booneinfo.com/scroggin/boone1.htm
  About 1728-1730 Morgan Bryan, who lived in Chester County, Pennsylvania,
  until four or five of his eldest children were born, obtained a grant of
  100,000 acres of land on the Potomac and Opequan rivers in Virginia, with
  Alexander Ross and other Quakers. Morgan Bryan moved to this land about
  1730 and settled near the present site of Winchester, where the rest of
  his children were born. Martha Strode Bryan died here about 1747 and was
  buried at the homestead. Afterward Morgan sold his interest in the
  Virginia land and moved to the Forks of the Yadkin River in North
  Carolina. An early pioneer traveler over the road the Bryans followed
  gave this description:(47)
  People had told us that this hill was most dangerous, and that we
  would scarcely be able to cross it, for Morgan Bryan, the first to
  travel this way, had to take the wheels off his wagon and carry it
  piece-meal to the top, and had been three months on the journey from the
  Shanidore (Shenandoah) to
  the Etkin (Yadkin).
  ...William Bryan, who established Bryan's Station in Kentucky in 1779
  with his brothers Samuel, James and Morgan Bryan, was wounded by Indians
  while on a hunting expedition on 01 May and died at his fort on 07 May
  1780. His son William, Jr. was killed in the same encounter and Mary
  Boone Bryan went back to North Carolina with her other children until
  1785 when she returned to Kentucky to stay.
  "The Boone Family", Spraker; Letter, David H. Bryan.
  A member of the New Garden Quaker community in PA as early as 1719.
  In 1724 he moved to the west into Pequea Creek district (present-dayLancas ter, PA).
  In 1730 he and Alexander Ross, another Quaker from New Garden,purchased o ne hundred thousand acres of land on the waters of QpequonCreek (near pres ent-day Winchester, VA).
  In 1734 he purchased a tract of land in present-day Berkeley Co, WVA,and t here he settled with his family.
  In 1748 he moved his large family to NC where he made his home nearthe sou th bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most prominantsettlers in northwe stern NC. --Joe Dallas Bryant
  ======

http://www.bryanfamilyonline.com/morgantr.html

Father: Francis BRYAN III b: 1630 in Claire, Ireland

Mother: Sarah BRINKER b: 1646 in Netherlands

Marriage 1 Martha STRODE b: 1697 in Pennsylvania

  * Married: 1719 in Opequoa, Shenandoah, Virginia

Children

 1. Has No Children Martha Sarah BRYAN
 2. Has Children Joseph BRYAN , Sr. b: 1720 in Shenandoah Valley, Pennsylvania
 3. Has Children Samuel BRYAN b: 1721 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
 4. Has Children Ellinor BRYAN b: 1722 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
 5. Has Children Mary BRYAN b: 1724 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
 6. Has Children Morgan BRYAN II b: 20 MAY 1729 in Chester County, Pennsylvania
 7. Has Children John BRYAN , Sr. b: 9 APR 1730 in Opequon Creek, Shenandoah, Virginia
 8. Has No Children Mary BRYAN b: 1731
 9. Has Children James BRYAN b: 3 APR 1732 in Virginia
10. Has Children William Christopher BRYAN , Sr., Capt. b: 10 MAR 1733/34 in Winchester, Frederick, Virginia
11. Has Children Thomas BRYAN b: 1736 in Opequon Creek, Shenandoah, Virginia

Morgan's father, Francis Bryan III , eldest son of William Smith Bryan and Catherine Morgan, was born about 1630 in Virginia and returned to Ireland in 1667 and tried to regain the Clare County estates. But he was persecuted by the government and forced to seek refuge in Denmark. He married Sarah Brinker of Denmark. Morgan Bryan was born in 1671 in Denmark.

In 1719, Morgan was a member of the New Garden Quaker community and married Martha Strode in Chester County, PA. Martha was born 1696/1697 in France. In 1724, Morgan moved to the west into Pequea Creek district (present-day Lancaster, PA). In 1730, he and Alexander Ross, another Quaker from New Garden, purchased one hundred thousand acres of land on the waters of Qpequon Creek (near present day Winchester, VA). In 1734, Morgan Bryan purchased a tract in present day Berkeley Co, West VA and there he settled with his family. In 1748, Bryan moved himself and his large family to North Carolina where he made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most prominet settlers in northwestern North Carolina.

--------------------

MORGAN BRYAN was born abt. 1671 in Denmark (deported with his father and family to the colony of Virginia by Cromwell). Morgan and his brother William came to Pennsylvania in 1718. There he married MARTHA STRODE abt. 1719 and settled near Winchester, PA and this is where all his children were born. When his children were grown, they and Morgan went on to North Carolina. Morgan died 1763 in Yadkin River, Rowan Co., NC. MARTHA STRODE was born possibly in Holland between 1678/1690. She died 1747/1762 in Rowan Co., NC. Morgan's last will in on file in Rowan County, NC. Will Book A, page 13.

Children of MORGAN and MARTHA BRYAN are:

JOSEPH BRYAN (9)

ELINOR BRYAN (LINVILLE), b. 1722

MARY BRYAN, m. Cornelius Howard.

COL. SAMUEL BRYAN, b. 1726, m. Masmilla Simpson, d. 1800.

MORGAN BRYAN II, b. 1728, m. Mary Forbes.

JOHN BRYAN, b. 1731.

WILLIAM BRYAN, b. Mar. 7 1733, m. Mary Boone, b. Nov 10, 1736, d. May 7, 1780 (killed by Indian raid on Bryan's Station).

JAMES BRYAN, b. 1735, m. Rebecca Enochs.

THOMAS BRYAN, b. 1737, m. Sarah Hunt.

Morgan BRYAN was a member of the New Garden Quaker community in

Pennsylvania as early as 1719.

1724 moved to the west into Pequea Creek district (present day Lancaster, PA)

1730 he and Alexander ROSS, another Quaker from New Garden, purchased

one hundred thousand acres of land on the waters of Qpequon Creek, near present day Winchester, Frederick Co, VA.

1734 he purchased a tract in present day Berkeley Co, WVA and there he

settled with his family.

1737 Bryan's land stretched from Mill Creek to Tuscarora Creek. His home was located southwest of present-day Bunker Hill in Southern Berkeley Co, WVA.

1748 BRYAN moved himself and his large family to North Carolina where he

made his home near the south bank of Deep Creek and was one of the most

prominet settlers in northwestern North Carolina.

Morgan BRYAN was of royal lineage, being descended from Bryan O'MORO, the last king of Ireland.

According to the best of tradition, Morgan Bryan came to America in 1718 or 1719 with his younger brother, William Bryan of Ballyroney, Ireland and the Roanoke Settlement of Virginia. William and his wife, Margaret, were given a Letter of Commendation from the Ballyroney Presbyterian Church in April of 1718 "on the eve of their departure to America." According to tradition in the William and Morgan families, Morgan was married to Martha Strode in 1719. -------------------- Birth: 1671, Ireland Death: Apr. 3, 1763 Davie County North Carolina, USA

Morgan immigrated in 1697 on the "Paysay," where he met Martha Strode. He married her. She died in 1747, and he then migrated to North Carolina. He lived near Squire Boone. Morgan's granddaughter Rebecca married Daniel Boone.

Spouse:
 Martha Strode Bryan (1697 - 1762)*

Children:
 Joseph Bryan (1715 - 1805)*
 James Bryan (1723 - 1807)*
 William Bryan (1734 - 1780)*
 

Burial: Joppa Cemetery Mocksville Davie County North Carolina, USA


-------------------- Morgan Bryan Birth 1671 in Denmark, exiled, Ireland Death 5 Apr 1763 in River, Cleveland, North Carolina, United States

Family Members Parents Francis Bryan 1630 – 1693 Sarah Brinker 1634 – 1698

U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 about Captain Morgan Bryan Name: Captain Morgan Bryan SAR Membership: 52386 Birth Date: 1681 Death Date: 1793 Father: Frances Bryan Spouse: Martha Strode Children: John Bryan

U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 about Captain Morgan Bryan Name: Captain Morgan Bryan SAR Membership: 52386 Birth Date: 1681 Death Date: 1793 Father: Frances Bryan Spouse: Martha Strode Children: John Bryan

view all 27

Captain Morgan Bryan's Timeline

1671
June 11, 1671
Å, Fyn, Denmark
1719
1719
Age 47
Frederick, Virginia, United States
1720
June 1, 1720
Age 48
Chester, Pennsylvania
1721
1721
Age 49
1723
April 3, 1723
Age 51
Chester, Pennsylvania
1727
May 20, 1727
Age 55
Chester, Delaware, Pennsylvania
1729
1729
Age 57
Chester, Pennsylvania, United States
1730
April 9, 1730
Age 58
Shenandoah, Page, Virginia
1731
1731
Age 59
Winchester, Frederick, Virginia
1732
1732
Age 60
Frederick County, Province of Virginia