Carew Raleigh (1605 - 1666)

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Nicknames: "Raleigh", "Ralegh"
Birthplace: London, London, England, UK.
Death: Died
Managed by: Gillian adams
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Carew Raleigh

  • Elizabeth THROCKMORTON
  • Born: 16 Apr 1565
  • Died: 1618
  • Notes: Bess was nineteen when she first appeared at Court. She was the daughter of Sir Nicholas Trhockmorton, Queen Elizabeth's first Ambassador to Paris, and her brother was also a courtier. Both their parents were dead and they relied on the Court for their livelihood. Bess was intelligent, forthright, passionate and courageous. Though Raleigh was in his early forties, the two fell madly in love. In the summer of 1591, Bess discovered she was pregnant and they secretly married. They were together, but catastrophe loomed. Raleigh's young wife, however, could no longer keep her pregnancy secret. Bess gave birth to a baby boy who was quickly put out to a wet nurse so she could resume her place as Lady-in-Waiting. When Sir Walter returned from the sea, he arranged for the baby and nurse to go to Durham House. However, on 31st May 1592, his marriage was discovered. The Queen had not granted permission for such a match and Raleigh was promptly arrested. Elizabeth expected Walter and Bess to sue for a pardon and, while their fate lay in the balance, she even confirmed the lease of Sherborne.
  • However, the couple refused such a humiliating course of action and by 7 Aug, that same year, the Queen's favourite had fallen into five long years of disgrace. The couple's first child must have died, but Bess was soon pregnant again and their son, Wat, was born in 1593.
  • Said to have carried the shriveled head of her husband in a red leather bag until the end of her days.
  • Father: Nicholas THROCKMORTON (Sir)
  • Mother: Anne CAREW
  • Married: Walter RALEIGH (Sir)
  • Children:
    • 1. Walter RALEIGH
    • '2. Carew RALEIGH
  • http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/THROCKMORTON1.htm#Elizabeth THROCKMORTON1
  • __________
  • Sir Walter Raleigh (c. 1554 – 29 October 1618) was an English aristocrat, . . . .
  • In 1591, Raleigh was secretly married to Elizabeth "Bess" Throckmorton (or Throgmorton). She was one of the Queen's ladies-in-waiting, eleven years his junior, and was pregnant at the time. She gave birth to a son, believed to be named Damerei, who was given to a wet nurse at Durham House, but died in October 1591 of plague. . . . .
  • It would be several years before Raleigh returned to favour. The couple remained devoted to each other. During Raleigh's absences, Bess proved a capable manager of the family's fortunes and reputation. They had two more sons, Walter (known as Wat) and 'Carew'.
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Raleigh
  • _________
  • Elizabeth, Lady Raleigh (16 April 1565 – c. 1647), née Throckmorton, was Sir Walter Raleigh's wife, and a Lady of the Privy Chamber . . . .
  • . . . . Her pregnancy in the summer of 1591 led to their secret marriage; she gave birth to a baby boy named Damerei, after Sir Walter's claimed ancestors, and immediately returned to court. The child died aged six months old in October 1591 of plague.
  • The couple remained devoted to each other, however. Their son Walter was born in 1593. They also had a 'son named Carew (which was both Elizabeth's mother's maiden name and the name of one of Walter's brothers) whose birthdate is unclear.' . . . .
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Raleigh
  • _________
  • 'Sir Walter Raleigh By Raleigh Trevelyan
  • Sir Walter Raleigh By Raleigh Trevelyan
  • Pg. 561
  • Thus at last the stigma was removed from the family name, and from 1635-39 'Carew was a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber. Also in compensation for Sherborne he was allowed the L400 a year that his mother had renounced - the original pension was to have been paid to her and then to Wat for their lifetimes, so now Carew was receiving what would have been his dead brother's inheritance.
  • ' In 1628 he bought the manor of East Horsley, which had been a Throckmorton (or Carew) property. About the same time he married Philippa Weston, the wealthy widow of Sir Anthony Ashley, who had been with his father at Cadiz, and by her he had two sons, Walter and Philip, and three daughters. . . . .
  • Pg. 563
  • ' . . . . At the Restoration Charles II offered Carew a knighthood, but he declined and asked that instead it should be given to his eldest son Walter. This second Sir Walter Raleigh died from plague very soon afterwards, as did his only son and a baby daughter; all three were buried in St. Mary's Church, West Horsley. Five years later Carew sold West Horsley to Sir Edward Nicholas, Secretary of State, and East Horsley to Henry Hildyard. He died in 1666, the year of the Great Fire, at his London home in St Martin's Lane, were his mother must have lived.
  • ' Carew was buried with his father at St Margaret's, Westminster. . . .
  • ______________
  • 'Sir Walter Raleigh By Raleigh Trevelyan
  • Sir Walter Raleigh By Raleigh Trevelyan
  • Pg. 561
  • Thus at last the stigma was removed from the family name, and from 1635-39 'Carew was a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber. Also in compensation for Sherborne he was allowed the L400 a year that his mother had renounced - the original pension was to have been paid to her and then to Wat for their lifetimes, so now Carew was receiving what would have been his dead brother's inheritance.
  • ' In 1628 he bought the manor of East Horsley, which had been a Throckmorton (or Carew) property. About the same time he married Philippa Weston, the wealthy widow of Sir Anthony Ashley, who had been with his father at Cadiz, and by her he had two sons, Walter and Philip, and three daughters. . . . .
  • Pg. 563
  • ' . . . . At the Restoration Charles II offered Carew a knighthood, but he declined and asked that instead it should be given to his eldest son Walter. This second Sir Walter Raleigh died from plague very soon afterwards, as did his only son and a baby daughter; all three were buried in St. Mary's Church, West Horsley. Five years later Carew sold West Horsley to Sir Edward Nicholas, Secretary of State, and East Horsley to Henry Hildyard. He died in 1666, the year of the Great Fire, at his London home in St Martin's Lane, were his mother must have lived.
  • ' Carew was buried with his father at St Margaret's, Westminster. . . .
  • ______________
  • 'Notes and queries, Volume 106 By William White
  • Notes and queries, Volume 106 By William White
  • Pg. 310
  • Sir Walter Raleigh had two sons: 'Carew who married Philippa Weston', and Walter, died unmarried. 'Carew Raleigh had two
  • Pg. 311
  • 'sons and two daughters; the second son, Philip, appears not to have married, but the elder, another Sir Walter, married Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of William Rogers, by whom he had one son, Carew, d.s.p., and four daughters (see Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, vol. ii. pp. 155-6.
  • ____________
  • 'John Timbs. Ancestral stories and traditions of great families illustrative of English history. (page 23 of 30)
  • John Timbs. Ancestral stories and traditions of great families illustrative of English history. (page 23 of 30)
  • ' From Sir Nicholas it would seem that, either by gift or devise, West Horsley passed to his nephew Carew Raleigh, the son of his sister Elizabeth, by the ill-fated Sir Walter Raleigh. Carew was born in the Tower during his father's imprisonment there, about 1604-5. Soon after his father's decapitation he was introduced at Court by his kinsman the Earl of Pembroke ; but the conscience-smitten King James not liking his presence, and saying that ' he appeared to him like his father's ghost ' (so like he was in face and figure), the Earl advised him to travel, which he did until the death of the king, when he returned to England. 1 He soon afterwards petitioned Parliament to be restored in blood, with a view to obtain restitution of the estate and castle of Sherborne in Dorsetshire, 1 which had belonged to Sir Walter, and had been granted by the Crown to Digby Earl of Bristol ; but the new king, Charles i., having (when Prince of Wales) received a bribe of ten thousand pounds to secure that property to the Earl, although he received him with civility, plainly told him that unless ' he would quit all his right and title to Sherborne, he neither could nor would pass the bill of restoration.' At first Mr. Raleigh refused to forego his claims, yet he was eventually prevailed on to do so, on receiving promises of courtly advancement, which were never fulfilled ; but an Act to restore him in blood was passed in the king's third year. He was aftenvards made one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber. He married the Lady Philippa, relict of Sir Anthony Achley, a young and rich widow. By her he had several children, three of whom were born at West Horsley, which he had made his principal residence ; and he continued to reside there many years. During Cromwell's supremacy, Raleigh was twice returned to Parliament. He was appointed Governor of Jersey by the favour, as reported, of General Monk. After the Restoration, Charles n. would have conferred on him some personal honour ; but this was declined, on which the king knighted his eldest son, Walter, who died soon after at West Horsley, and was interred in the parish church, where also two others of his family Carew and Henrietta were buried.
  • 'In 1665 Mr. Raleigh sold this estate to Sir Edward Nicholas for ,9750. According to Oldys, Mr. Raleigh died in 1666 ; and although he says it was thought by Anthony Wood that he was buried at (St. Margaret's) Westminster, in the same grave with his father, ' it is asserted at West Horsley, in Surrey, which was his seat, that the son was buried there ; and they have a tradition that when he was interred, the head of Sir Walter Raleigh, which had been kept by him, was put into the grave with his corpse.' 1
  • 'With reference to this tradition, Oldys quotes a letter he had seen, written by William Nicholas, Esq. (the last possessor of West Horsley of his family), in which he writes, he 'verily believes' the head he saw dug up there in 1703 (most probably on the occasion of his mother's funeral) from the side of a grave where a Carew Raleigh had been buried, was that of Sir Walter Raleigh, there being no bones of a body to it, nor room for any, the rest of that side of the grave being firm chalk. Notwithstanding the current opinion that the body of Sir Walter was interred in St. Margaret's Church, Westminster, the following short note, recorded by Manning from the Carew papers at Beddington, gives cause to believe that he was interred at Beddington, though privately, and at night :
  • ____________

He inherited the embalmed head of his father from his mother. The relic was buried with him.

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Carew Raleigh's Timeline

1605
February 15, 1605
London, London, England, UK.
1666
1666
Age 60
????