Caroline Ely Lyman (Partridge) (1827 - 1908) MP

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Birthplace: Painesville, Geauga, Ohio, United States
Death: Died in Oak City, Millard, Utah, United States
Occupation: Married Amasa Mason Lyman 9/6/1844 in Nauvoo, IL and had 6 children, Married Amasa Mason Lyman 1/13/1846 in Nauvoo, IL and had 5 children
Managed by: Jake Finlinson
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About Caroline Ely Lyman (Partridge)

Find a Grave

"...Daughter of Edward Partridge and Lydia Clisbee

Married Amasa Mason Lyman, 6 Sep 1844, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois

Children - Walter Clisbee Lyman, Fredrick Rich Lyman, Martha Lydia Lyman, Annie Lyman, Harriet Jane Lyman

Caroline Ely Partridge was the fourth child of Bishop Edward Partridge and Lydia Clisbee. Her father died during the persecution of the Saints in Nauvoo.

In her seventeenth year, on September 6, 1844, she became the first plural wife of Amasa Lyman. Later her sisters Eliza Maria and Lydia were also married to him.

Caroline and Eliza crossed the plains to Utah in 1848. They shared a log cabin their first winter in the valley with seven other people.

During Mr. Lyman's first journey to California in 1849, the sisters lived in a wagon box on their own lot, and Caroline taught school in Farmington for two months in order to buy food.

In the spring of 1851 when Amasa left for California the second time, Caroline went with him. Her first child, a daughter, was born nearly nine years after her marriage. She was named Martha. Two other children were born in Salt Lake, Fredrick and Annie. After Apostle Lyman's return from a European mission he moved Caroline to Fillmore and here she gave birth to Walter Clisbee and Harriet Jane.

When the youngest child was a year old the Lymans separated and Caroline reared her five children alone.

Eliza's son, Platte, was called to be bishop of Oak Creek. Fredrick and Walter accompanied him hoping to find work, so Caroline went with them to keep house. Very soon she bought a lot with a log house on it, and she and her family lived there until her sons were able to build a two-room adobe addition in front of the log room, which had two attic rooms used as bedrooms.

Caroline was chosen president of the Relief Society when it was organized in Oak Creek May 3, 1874. Her life was one of service to her family and friends.

On her seventy-ninth birthday she wrote: "Seventy nine years have passed like a dream and I wonder how many opportunities for doing good to my associates I have neglected. In all the years I have lived my desires have been to do all the good I could and as little evil as possible."

Early in her eighty-first year Caroline contracted pneumonia and passed away May 8, 1908, in the south room of the adobe house which her sons had built for her. She was buried in the Oak Creek cemetery by the side of her sister, Eliza, with whom she had lived so much of her life. — Gene L. Gardner ..."

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Caroline Ely Partridge Lyman

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Birth: Jan. 8, 1827

Painesville

Lake County

Ohio, USA

Death: May 5, 1908

Oak City

Millard County

Utah, USA

Daughter of Edward Partridge and Lydia Clisbee

Married Amasa Mason Lyman, 6 Sep 1844, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois

Children - Walter Clisbee Lyman, Fredrick Rich Lyman, Martha Lydia Lyman, Annie Lyman, Harriet Jane Lyman

Caroline Ely Partridge was the fourth child of Bishop Edward Partridge and Lydia Clisbee. Her father died during the persecution of the Saints in Nauvoo.

In her seventeenth year, on September 6, 1844, she became the first plural wife of Amasa Lyman. Later her sisters Eliza Maria and Lydia were also married to him.

Caroline and Eliza crossed the plains to Utah in 1848. They shared a log cabin their first winter in the valley with seven other people.

During Mr. Lyman's first journey to California in 1849, the sisters lived in a wagon box on their own lot, and Caroline taught school in Farmington for two months in order to buy food.

In the spring of 1851 when Amasa left for California the second time, Caroline went with him. Her first child, a daughter, was born nearly nine years after her marriage. She was named Martha. Two other children were born in Salt Lake, Fredrick and Annie. After Apostle Lyman's return from a European mission he moved Caroline to Fillmore and here she gave birth to Walter Clisbee and Harriet Jane.

When the youngest child was a year old the Lymans separated and Caroline reared her five children alone.

Eliza's son, Platte, was called to be bishop of Oak Creek. Fredrick and Walter accompanied him hoping to find work, so Caroline went with them to keep house. Very soon she bought a lot with a log house on it, and she and her family lived there until her sons were able to build a two-room adobe addition in front of the log room, which had two attic rooms used as bedrooms.

Caroline was chosen president of the Relief Society when it was organized in Oak Creek May 3, 1874. Her life was one of service to her family and friends.

On her seventy-ninth birthday she wrote: "Seventy nine years have passed like a dream and I wonder how many opportunities for doing good to my associates I have neglected. In all the years I have lived my desires have been to do all the good I could and as little evil as possible."

Early in her eighty-first year Caroline contracted pneumonia and passed away May 8, 1908, in the south room of the adobe house which her sons had built for her. She was buried in the Oak Creek cemetery by the side of her sister, Eliza, with whom she had lived so much of her life. — Gene L. Gardner


Family links:

Parents:
 Edward Partridge (1793 - 1840)
 Lydia Clisbee Partridge (1793 - 1878)

Children:
 Martha Lydia Lyman Roper (1853 - 1922)*
 Frederick Rich Lyman (1856 - 1911)*
 Annie Lyman Anderson (1860 - 1921)*
 Harriet Jane Lyman Lovell (1866 - 1946)*

Spouse:
 Amasa Mason Lyman (1813 - 1877)

Find A Grave Memorial# 20205653 www.findagrave.com -------------------- Widow of Joseph Smith before she married Amasa Lyman children with Lyman include Don Carlos; Platte De Alton; Caroline Eliza ("Carlie); Joseph Alvin; and Lucy Zina -------------------- Daughter of Edward Partridge and sister of Emily. Eliza remarried after Smith's death, this time to Amasa M. Lyman, who was already husband to Eliza's older sister, Caroline. William Clayton listed her as one of Smith's wives married during the early May 1843 period.[42]

Eliza Maria Partridge

Home Search Individual Pedigree Descendancy Relationship Timeline Login Birth 20 Apr 1820 Painsville, Geauga, Oh Sex Female Died 2 Mar 1886 Oak City, Millard, Ut Person ID I19305 The Partridge Nest Last Modified 14 Mar 2007


Father Edward Partridge Sr., b. 27 Aug 1793, Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Mass Mother Lydia Clisbee, b. 26 Sep 1793, Marlborough, Middlesex, Ma Group Sheet F1452 The Partridge Nest


Family 1 Jr. Smith Joseph, b. 23 Dec 1805, Sharon, Windsor, Vt Married 1 Mar 1843 Group Sheet F1478 The Partridge Nest


Family 2 Amasa Mason Lyman, b. 30 Mar 1813, Lyman, Grafton, New Hampshire Married 13 Jan 1846 Nauvoo, Hancock, Il Children

	1. Don Carlos Lyman, b. 14 Jul 1846, Winter Quarters, Ne
	2. Platte de Alton Lyman, b. 20 Aug 1848, Banks of the Pla, Goshen Co., Wy
	3. Caroline Eliza Lyman, b. 1 Aug 1851, Salt Lake City, Sl, Ut
	4. Joseph Alvin Lyman, b. 13 Dec 1856, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Ut
	5. Lucy Zina Lyman, b. 26 Aug 1860, Salt Lake, S-Lk, Ut

Group Sheet F1480 The Partridge Nest


Notes BIOGRAPHY: Naturally many of the cases on which Ann was called were sad and destined for trag edy. Eliza Marie Partridge Lyman kept a journal in which she related an incident of her daugh ter Carlie when they called Ann for assistance:

BIOGRAPHY: Carlie very sick indeed. Sent for Platte in the night. Delia came in the morning . Sent to Fillmore for Sister Ann Carling, as the woman we had said she had done that evenin g all she could do. Sister Carling did not get here till 7 in the evening. About half-past ei ght Carlie was delivered of a fine son weighing 8 pounds. Carlie's sufferings during this da y are past description. No mortal but a woman, can suffer so and live. May I never witness su ch suffering again. Platte stood by her like a brother and his wife, Adelia, did all she coul d, as also Sister Caroline and others; but no one could do much good till Sister Carling came . She soon brought relief and the best sound I ever heard was when I heard the baby cry. Sh e rested very well that night but was very lame next day and could not move without being lif ted on a sheet but seemed as comfortable as could be expected under the circumstances.

BIOGRAPHY: Internation Society, Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Our Pioneer Heritage, (28). Sal t Lake City: Infobases, Inc., 1996. Published under license. All Rights Reserved.

BIOGRAPHY: Knutsford Hotel. "Encamped near the bank of a beautiful creek of pure, cold water , in about two hours after our arrival we began to plow, and the same afternoon built a dam t o irrigate the soil. July 24This afternoon commenced planting our potatoes, after which we t urned the water upon them and gave the ground quite a soaking." The Knutsford Hotel corner wa s traversed by City Creek, the stream referred to in the above statement by Orson Pratt, an d the Knutsford Hotel building occupied the half-acre of ground first planted by the pioneers , as identified by William Garter, who held the plow.

BIOGRAPHY: Later a small adobe house was built on the corner and was occupied by the Calkin s family. The little house was set back 60 or 70 feet east of State road (now State Street) a nd 40 to 50 feet north of Emigration Street, so named because this was the entrance to the ci ty from Emigration Canyon. The street is now Broadway. Still later a small adobe cottage wa s built in the northeastern part of the lot and this was occupied by Chariton Jacobs. The Cal kins family lived in the corner for a number of years and afterward Ann Eliza Webb lived ther e with her mother for a short timeprobably in the early '70s. Ann Eliza later became a wif e of Brigham Young. After Ann Eliza moved, the corner was occupied for a short time by Emil y Partridge Young, after which the property was purchased by Aunt Zina D. H. Young. She sol d the property to a Boston syndicate, which started construction of the Knutsford Hotel in 18 80.

BIOGRAPHY: Two years later, the hotel named for Lord Knutsford, noted English traveler, was o pened with Gus Holmes as manager. During the next decade or two the corner was a colorful cen ter of the city's social and business life. It was considered one of the finest hostelries o f the country and people of wealth and national prominence stayed there when they visited thi s city. Several presidents of the United States were lodged and entertained there.

BIOGRAPHY: Internation Society, Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Our Pioneer Heritage, (28). Sal t Lake City: Infobases, Inc., 1996. Published under license. All Rights Reserved.

BIOGRAPHY: Martha J. Coray was among the first trustees appointed upon the establishment of t he Brigham Young Academy, and was the first Dean of Women at that institution. She continue d as a board member until her death and the afternoon that she died had signed some papers fo r the business of the Academy. She will long be remembered as the author of the book Histor y of Prophet Joseph Smith which was written at the dictation of the Prophet's mother, Lucy Ma ck Smith.

BIOGRAPHY: Eliza Partridge Lyman was born in Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio, a daughter of Edw ard and Lydia Clisbee Partridge. At an early age, she was sent to school and acquired a goo d common education. When she was eight years of age, her parents took her on a visit to Massa chusetts to visit her Grandfather. Prior to this, the Book of Mormon had been shown to Edwar d who had not accepted it at first, but after journeying to New York where the Prophet Josep h Smith lived and making inquiry of those in the Church, he became convinced that the Lord ha d commenced to set up his Kingdom on the earth and became a member of the Church of Jesus Chr ist of Latter-day Saints. He was ordained to the office of a Bishop, being among the first t o receive this ordination. Upon his return to Ohio, he was called to go to Missouri to atten d to business for the Church. He went and left his family to get along as best they could. H e never returned to Ohio to settle up his affairs, but left it for others to do, which was do ne at a great sacrifice. His family was moved to Missouri in company with others who were jou rneying to that land. Traveling in extremely cold weather, the family suffered many hardships , but finally arrived at Independence in safety and occupied a small brick house Edward had r ented for them. Eventually he was able to build a home for them there.

BIOGRAPHY: Because of mob violence, the family was obliged to leave this place in November, 1 833, their land, orchards and improvements left to the benefit of those who drove them away . They crossed the river into Clay County where Edward laid up some house logs and stretche d a tent on them so that they would have a place of shelter. The weather was very cold. Afte r Edward had helped others to cross the river he found an old house with one fireplace in it , into which he and a Brother by the name of John Corrill, moved their families. Here they re mained for about two years. During this time, Edward went on a mission to the eastern States . After his return, he, with others, went to look for a location for the Saints. He and thos e that were with him, decided that a good place to locate would be Caldwell County. They boug ht land and removed their families thinking to live in peace by themselves. While here, Eliz a went about thirty miles from home to teach where she received thirteen dollars and her boar d for the three months that she was away. They remained in Caldwell about two or three year s when the authorities of the state said they must leave that county. They left and settled i n Illinois, first at Quincy, then at Pittsfield, then at Nauvoo, which was the gathering plac e for the Saints. After arriving in Nauvoo, with much illness among family members and in poo r circumstances, having moved so many times and Edward having poor health, it was thought bes t for Eliza to take a school at Lima, a town about twenty-five miles distant. About two week s before school was over, a messenger was sent to advise Eliza that her sister Harriet was dy ing. She returned home to see her sister just prior to her death, but found her father in ver y poor health. He had begun building a house and had completed it to the point where the fami ly was moving in expecting him to complete it while they lived in it, when he died. William L aw took the family to his home to stay until their house was finished. He and his wife were v ery kind and nursed Eliza and her sister Lydia who were very ill, back to health. While livin g in Far West, Eliza had learned the tailor's trade and was able to obtain work for which sh e received three dollars a week. This was a great help to the family. After a year or two Lyd ia, her mother, married again. Her new husband's name was William Huntington. He was kind t o Lydia and her children. It was during this time that Emily and Eliza were sent to live in t he family of the Prophet Joseph Smith. They lived there about three years during which time t hey were taught the plan of Celestial marriage. The sisters were sealed to the Prophet in 184 8. Eliza continued to live in his family for a length of time, but was not residing there whe n he was martyred in June, 1844. She was then living with a family by the name of Coolidge. S he stayed with them until her marriage to Amasa Lymanone of the Twelve Apostles of the Churc h. She then went to live with her mother for awhile and after that lived with her husband an d another wife, Maria Louisa.

BIOGRAPHY: They left Nauvoo on the 9th of February 1846. July 14, 1846 Eliza's first child wa s born in a wagon after which she was very ill with childbed fever. For many days her life se emed near an end. She writes: "It is a fearful place to be sick with fever, in a wagon with n o shade over head except the cover and a July sun shining every day. All the comfort I had wa s the pure cold water from a spring nearby." When she recovered she was so thin and changed i n appearance that those who had known her did not recognize her. On the 26th of August they a rrived in Winter Quarters on the bank of the Missouri River. Here they moved into a log hous e with a sod roof and no floor but she expressed thankfulness at finally having the privileg e of sitting by a fire where the wind could not blow it in every direction and where she coul d at least be warm. On the 12th of December 1846, her baby died. In writing of this she says : "I should wish to bid this world farewell for it is full of disappointment and sorrow, bu t I believe there is a power that watches over us and does all things right."

BIOGRAPHY: March 19, 1847, William Huntington, Eliza's step-father died leaving Lydia again a lone with her children. Eliza and Br. Lyman's wives were also left alone as he was among th e first company who had gone to locate a place where their people could settle. By June 29t h 1848, Br. Lyman had returned and his family was very busy making preparations for their int ended journey to the Great Salt Lake Valley where they hoped to live in peace and serve thei r God. The journey was begun and August 20, 1848, DeAlton Platte Lyman was born. Eliza's seco nd son was born in a wagon on the east bank of the Platte River opposite Laramie. At this tim e she expressed the hope that she could raise him in fear of the Lord and where he would neve r suffer by the hands of enemies as they had done. Their company reached their destination i n the Valley of the Great Salt Lake October 17, 1848. When writing concerning this event sh e said: "The country is barren and desolate. I do not think our enemies need envy us this loc ality or ever come here to disturb us."

BIOGRAPHY: After their arrival in the valley, the wives of Br. Lyman found it necessary to pl ant and harvest and be largely responsible for their own welfare as he was kept busy in the s ervice of the Church, He was called to supervise the settlement of San Bernardino taking hi s wife Dionitia with him.

BIOGRAPHY: December 13, 1856 a son Joseph Alvin Lyman was born and a daughter Lucy Zina Augus t 26, 1860.

BIOGRAPHY: By July 1868, Br. Lyman and part of his family had moved to Fillmore. Eliza tempor arily stayed in Salt Lake to take care of her mother who was ill, but later joined the famil y there. She remained there until moving to San Juan County. In each place she proved hersel f to be a true pioneer. April 1867 her son Platte was called to go to England on a mission an d until his return Eliza taught school. Upon his return, he was called to move to Oak Creek t o preside over that settlement. Eliza supported her family at that time by working in the Fil lmore Co-op. October 12, 1875, Platte started on another mission to England leaving his affai rs with his brother Joseph and his wife and children in Fillmore where they stayed at the hom e of Eliza. Upon his return, Eliza moved to Oak Creek to be near them.

BIOGRAPHY: Internation Society, Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Our Pioneer Heritage, (28). Sal t Lake City: Infobases, Inc., 1996. Published under license. All Rights Reserved.

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Caroline Lyman's Timeline

1827
January 8, 1827
Painesville, Geauga, Ohio, United States
1835
March 23, 1835
Age 8
1843
March 8, 1843
Age 16
Smith's Store, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
1844
September 6, 1844
Age 17
Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, USA
1846
January 1, 1846
Age 18
1851
August 1, 1851
Age 24
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, Usa
1853
April 1, 1853
Age 26
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
1856
October 12, 1856
Age 29
Salt Lake City, Utah
December 13, 1856
Age 29
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
1860
July 2, 1860
Age 33
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah