Caroline Wilhelmina von Brandenburg-Ansbach, Queen Consort of the UK and Ireland, Kurfürstin zu Hannover (1683 - 1737) MP

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Place of Burial: Westminster Abbey, London, England
Birthplace: Ansbach, Bavaria, Germany
Death: Died in Saint James Palace, London, Middlesex, England
Occupation: Queen Consort Caroline of Great Britain / Member of the House of Hohenzollern, Queen of England/Princess of Wales, Queen Consort of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen consort of the United Kingdom and Ireland, Electress to Hanover
Managed by: Henn Sarv
Last Updated:

About Caroline Wilhelmina von Brandenburg-Ansbach, Queen Consort of the UK and Ireland, Kurfürstin zu Hannover

Name/Title: Wilhelmine Charlotte Karoline Princess(Prinzessin) von Brandenburg-Ansbach.

Usually went by her middle name of Caroline. She was a member of the House of Hohenzollern.

Queen Consort Caroline of Great Britain on 11 October 1727.

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_of_Ansbach

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Wilhelmine Charlotte Karoline Prinzessin von Brandenburg-Ansbach was born on 1 March 1683 at Ansbach, Germany.1 She was the daughter of Johann Friedrich Markgraf von Brandenburg-Ansbach and Eleanore Erdmuthe Luise Prinzessin von Sachsen-Eisenach.1 She married George II Augustus Hanover, King of Great Britain, son of George I Louis Hanover, King of Great Britain and Sophie Dorothea Herzogin von Braunschweig-Lüneburg, on 22 August 1705.1 She died on 20 November 1737 at age 54 at St. James's Palace, St. James's, London, England.1 She was buried at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.1

    Wilhelmine Charlotte Karoline Prinzessin von Brandenburg-Ansbach usually went by her middle name of Caroline. She was a member of the House of Hohenzollern. She gained the title of Prinzessin von Brandenburg-Ansbach.3 As a result of her marriage, Wilhelmine Charlotte Karoline Prinzessin von Brandenburg-Ansbach was styled as Queen Consort Caroline of Great Britain on 11 October 1727.1

Children of Wilhelmine Charlotte Karoline Prinzessin von Brandenburg-Ansbach and George II Augustus Hanover, King of Great Britain

Frederick Louis Hanover, Prince of Wales+ b. 20 Jan 1707, d. 20 Mar 1751

Anne Hanover, Princess Royal of Great Britain+ b. 2 Nov 1709, d. 12 Jan 1759

Amelia Sophia Eleanor Hanover, Princess of Great Britain b. 30 May 1711, d. 31 Oct 1786

Caroline Elizabeth Hanover, Princess of Great Britain b. 30 May 1713, d. 28 Dec 1757

son1 Hanover b. 9 Nov 1716, d. 9 Nov 1716

George William Hanover, Prince of Great Britain b. 3 Nov 1717, d. 6 Feb 1718

William Augustus Hanover, 1st Duke of Cumberland b. 26 Apr 1721, d. 31 Oct 1765

Mary Hanover, Princess of Great Britain+ b. 22 Feb 1723, d. 14 Jan 1772

Louisa Hanover, Princess of Great Britain and Ireland+ b. 18 Dec 1724, d. 19 Dec 1751

Citations

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 277. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S130] Wikipedia, online www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

[S12] C. Arnold McNaughton, The Book of Kings: A Royal Genealogy, in 3 volumes (London, U.K.: Garnstone Press, 1973), volume 1, page 94. Hereinafter cited as The Book of Kings.

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Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach, Queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland; Electress of Hanover; Duchess of Brunswick-Luneburg


Consort June 11, 1727 – November 20, 1737

Coronation October 11, 1727

Consort to George II

Father Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach

Mother Eleonore Erdmuthe of Saxe-Eisenach

Born 1 March 1683

Ansbach, Germany

Died 20 November 1737 (aged 54)

St. James's Palace, London

Burial 17 December 1737

Westminster Abbey, London

Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of George II.

Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach was born at Ansbach in Germany, the daughter of Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach and his second wife, Princess Eleanor Erdmuthe Louise of Saxe-Eisenach. Orphaned at an early age, Caroline grew up an intelligent, cultured and attractive woman, and was much sought-after as a bride. Her brother was Wilhelm Friedrich (Brandenburg-Ansbach).

When the opportunity to become Queen of Spain presented itself, she turned it down because it would have meant renouncing her Protestant faith. Shortly afterwards, she met and married Georg August, son of the Elector of Hanover, who would later become heir to the throne of Great Britain and eventually George II of Great Britain. Their wedding took place in Hanover on 22 August 1705, and their first child, Prince Frederick, was born on 1 February 1707.

On the accession of George I in 1714, Caroline's husband automatically became Duke of Cornwall, and was invested, shortly afterwards, as Prince of Wales, whereupon she became Princess of Wales. They moved to England at this time.

As the King had in 1694 divorced his wife Sophia Dorothea of Celle, there was no Queen consort in Great Britain, and Caroline was the most important woman in the kingdom. Within three years of their arrival in England, however, her husband fell out with his father at the 1717 baptism of her fifth living child, George William. The King, who was godfather to the new prince, insisted on having the Duke of Newcastle as the second godfather, instead of his brother, Ernest, Duke of York and Albany, whom the Prince of Wales preferred. During the ceremony, the prince insulted Newcastle, an action for which he was temporarily arrested, banned by his father from St. James's Palace, and excluded from all public ceremonies.

Caroline had struck up a friendship with Sir Robert Walpole, politician and occasional Prime Minister, and his influence ensured that the Prince and Princess of Wales were able to maintain their position and lifestyle during the estrangement. He also played a role in the 1720 reconciliation.

Caroline's intellect far outstripped George's. As a young woman, she corresponded with Gottfried Leibniz, the intellectual colossus who was courtier and factotum to the House of Hanover. She also helped initiate the Leibniz-Clarke correspondence, arguably the most important of all 18th century philosophy of physics discussions, which is still widely read today.

By and large, however, George and Caroline had a successful marriage, though he continued to keep mistresses, as was customary for the time. The best-known of these was Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk, one of Caroline's ladies of the bedchamber.

Caroline became Queen consort on the death of her father-in-law in 1727. In the course of the next few years, she and her husband fought a constant battle against their eldest son, Frederick, Prince of Wales, who had been left behind in Germany when they came to England. He joined the family in 1728, by which time he was an adult and had formed many bad habits. He opposed his father's political beliefs, and, once married, applied to Parliament for the increase in financial allowance which had been denied him. Caroline, despite having personally selected her new daughter-in-law, Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, seemed determined that the marriage should not be a happy one, and was dismayed when she learned, in 1736, that Augusta was pregnant. A peculiar episode followed, in which the prince, on discovering that his wife had gone into labour, sneaked her out of Hampton Court Palace in the middle of the night, in order to ensure that the queen could not be present at the birth.

Queen Caroline held a powerful position; she was made Guardian of the Kingdom of Great Britain, and His Majesty's Lieutenant within the same during His Majesty's absence, thus acting as regent when her husband was in Hanover. It is also worth noting that she was co-heiress to Sayn-Altenkirchen through her mother, whose mother Johanette reigned as Countess of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn-Altenkirchen, but ultimately never inherited it. Her grandson, George III, was compensated for this in 1803. Template:Infobox consortstlyes

As Queen, she continued to surround herself with artists, writers, and intellectuals, commissioning works such as terracotta busts of the kings and queens of England and even cottages. She collected jewellery, especially cameos and intaglios, acquired important portraits and miniatures, and enjoyed the visual arts.

Further quarrels with her son followed the birth of the Prince of Wales's daughter, and a complete estrangement between them occurred in the remaining months before Caroline's death.

She died of complications following a rupture of the womb on 20 November 1737, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. Handel composed an elaborate 10-section anthem for the occasion, The ways of Zion do mourn / Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline. The King had arranged for a pair of matching coffins with removable sides, so that when he followed her to the grave (twenty-three years later), they could lie together again.

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http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_von_Brandenburg-Ansbach

Caroline von Brandenburg-Ansbach

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Caroline von Ansbach, Königin von Großbritannien

Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline von Brandenburg-Ansbach (* 1. März 1683 in Ansbach; † 1. Dezember 1737 in London) war eine geborene Prinzessin von Brandenburg-Ansbach und als Ehefrau von Georg II. ab 1727 Königin von Großbritannien und Irland sowie Kurfürstin von Hannover.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

[Anzeigen]

   * 1 Leben
         o 1.1 Kindheit und Jugend
         o 1.2 Heirat
         o 1.3 Königin
   * 2 Nachkommen
   * 3 Vorfahren
   * 4 Einzelnachweise
   * 5 Literatur
   * 6 Weblinks

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Kindheit und Jugend [Bearbeiten]

Carolines Eltern waren Johann Friedrich, Markgraf von Brandenburg-Ansbach und dessen Gemahlin Prinzessin Eleonore von Sachsen-Eisenach. Als Caroline 3 Jahre alt war, verstarb ihr Vater an den Pocken. Neuer Markgraf in Ansbach wurde Carolines noch minderjähriger, älterer Halbbruder Christian Albrecht. Dessen Vormundschaftsregierung verbrachte Caroline mit ihrer Mutter und ihrem jüngeren Bruder Wilhelm Friedrich nach Crailsheim, wo sie in ärmlichen Verhältnissen lebten.

1692 hatte Carolines Mutter in zweiter Ehe den sächsischen Kurfürsten Johann Georg IV. geheiratet. Die mehr als unglückliche Ehe endete nach zwei Jahren mit dem Tod von Carolines Stiefvater, der ebenfalls an den Pocken starb. Caroline zog nun mit Mutter und Bruder nach Schloss Pretzsch, dem Witwensitz der Kurfürstin. Vier Jahre später starb 1696 Carolines Mutter. Die 13-jährige Prinzessin wurde in die Obhut der späteren brandenburgischen Kurfürstin Sophie Charlotte gegeben, die für eine umfassende Ausbildung der Prinzessin sorgte. Als 1705 Sophie Charlotte starb, zog Caroline zu ihrem Bruder nach Ansbach, der dort inzwischen als Markgraf von Brandenburg-Ansbach regierte.

König Georg II. von Großbritannien und Irland

Heirat [Bearbeiten]

Caroline galt als schön und gebildet; sowohl Karl XII. von Schweden als auch Kaiser Joseph I. und vor allem Friedrich Wilhelm I. von Preußen waren als Bewerber um ihre Hand aufgetreten.

Sophie Charlottes Mutter, Kurfürstin Sophie von Hannover, waren Carolines Vorzüge bei einem Besuch bei ihrer Tochter in Berlin aufgefallen und sie trieb ein Eheprojekt mit ihrem Enkel Georg voran; dazu arrangierte sie ein erfolgreiches geheimes Treffen der beiden in Triesdorf. [1]

Am 22. August 1705 heiratete Caroline in Herrenhausen Georg, den Sohn des Kurfürsten von Hannover. Schon seit 1701 stand fest, dass Sophie von Hannovers Nachkommen den englischen Thron erben würden. Der Fall trat schließlich 1714 mit dem Tod von Sophie und der Königin Anna ein. Carolines Schwiegervater wurde als Georg I. König von Großbritannien und Irland.

Die Zeit zwischen 1717 und 1720 war überschattet von Streitigkeiten zwischen Georg und seinem Vater, während deren die Opposition in der Residenz des Prince of Wales, Leicester House, verkehrte, in die der Kronprinz 1717 verwiesen wurde. Caroline verstand es bei diesen Streitigkeiten als Mittlerin aufzutreten. In Zusammenarbeit mit Robert Walpole erreichte sie schließlich die Aussöhnung des Königs mit seinem Sohn.

Caroline erhielt von ihrem Gemahl Richmond Lodge, welches dieser 1719 erworben hatte und das Caroline zusätzlich ausstattete.

Königin [Bearbeiten]

Prinzessin Caroline von Brandenburg-Ansbach als britische Königin

Mit dem Tod von Georgs Vater wurde Carolines Ehemann 1727 als Georg II. König von Großbritannien. Carolines und Georgs Krönung fand am 11. Oktober 1727 in der Westminster Abbey statt. Georg II. entließ zunächst Walpole, den Premierminister seines Vaters, doch Caroline erwirkte schließlich dessen Rückberufung. Caroline übte erheblichen Einfluss auf die Regierung aus. Während der häufigen Abwesenheiten ihres Gatten Georges (1729, 1732, 1735 und 1736-37) führte sie die Staatsgeschäfte mit ihrem Premierminister Walpole. Sie initiierte eine Reform des englischen Strafrechtes. Englische Historiker urteilten, dass Georg II. weitgehend von seiner Königin geleitet würde. [2]

Der alte Vater-Sohn-Konflikt setzte sich nun fort in Auseinandersetzungen zwischen Georg II. und Caroline auf der einen Seite und auf der anderen Seite dem Sohn Friedrich Ludwig von Hannover, dem neuen Prince of Wales, der nach der Übersiedlung der Eltern nach London in Hannover zurückgelassen worden war. Dies hatte zu einer Entfremdung zwischen Sohn und Eltern geführt, deren erklärtes Lieblingskind Wilhelm August, der spätere Herzog von Cumberland gewesen war. Der Konflikt zwischen dem Prince of Wales und seinen Eltern konnte nie beigelegt werden; er vertiefte sich noch, als Georg seine Gemahlin und nicht den Prinzen zeitweise zur Regentin bestimmte. 1736 war die Popularität des Königspaares gesunken, zu einem durch oppositionelle Kräfte, die sich um den Prinzen von Wales scharten, andererseits durch ein, durch die Königin gefordertes, Prohibitionsgesetz, den sogenannten gin-act.

Obwohl Georg zeitweise Mätressen unterhielt, war sein Verhältnis zu Caroline über die Jahre vertraut und innig.

Caroline hatte viele wissenschaftliche und künstlerische Interessen. Sie korrespondierte unter anderem mit Leibniz und Thomasius. Ihre Unterstützung Voltaires in seiner Zeit im englischen Exil 1726–1729 dankte er ihr, indem er ihr seine Henriade widmete. Caroline gilt ebenso als eine der größten Förderinnen des Komponisten Georg Friedrich Händel; seine Wassermusik ist ebenfalls Caroline gewidmet.

Nach der Geburt ihres letzten Kindes 1724 litt die Königin immer wieder unter krampfartigen Schmerzen im Unterleib. Ohne Betäubungsmittel wurde sie 1737 an einer Unterleibsgeschwulst operiert und erhielt immer wieder Aderlässe. Auf dem Totenbett hatte sie ihren Mann gebeten, nach ihrem Ableben erneut zu heiraten, worauf dieser geantwortet haben soll: „Nein, ich habe doch meine Mätressen.“[3]

Caroline wurde in der Westminster Abbey beigesetzt, Händel schrieb zu diesem Anlass ein Requiem.

Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

   * Friedrich Ludwig (1707–1751), Fürst von Wales
   * Anne (1709–1759) ∞ 1734 Wilhelm von Nassau-Dietz
   * Amelia Sophie (1711–1768)
   * Carolina Elizabeth (1713–1759)
   * Georg Wilhelm (1717–1718)
   * Wilhelm August (1721–1765), Herzog von Cumberland
   * Maria (1722–1772) ∞ 1740 Friedrich II. von Hessen-Kassel
   * Louisa (1724–1751) ∞ 1743 Friedrich V. von Dänemark

Vorfahren [Bearbeiten]

Ahnentafel Königin Caroline von Großbritannien und Irland

Urgroßeltern

Markgraf

Joachim Ernst von Brandenburg Ansbach

(1583–1625)

∞ 1612

Gräfin

Sophie von Solms-Laubach

(1594–1651)

Graf

Joachim Ernst zu Öttingen-Öttingen

(1612–1658)

∞ 1633

Gräfin

Anna Sibylle von Solms-Sonnenwalde († 1635)

Herzog

Wilhelm IV. von Sachsen-Weimar

(1598–1662)

∞ 1625

Prinzessin

Eleonore Dorothea von Anhalt-Dessau

(1602–1664)

Graf

Ernst von Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn

(1594–1632)

∞ 1624

Gräfin

Luise Juliane von Erbach

(1603–1670)

Großeltern

Markgraf Albrecht von Brandenburg-Ansbach (1620–1667)

∞ 1651

Gräfin

Sophie Margarete zu Öttingen-Öttingen (1634–1664)

Herzog

Johann Georg I. von Sachsen-Eisenach (1634–1686)

∞ 1661

Gräfin

Johanetta von Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn (1626–1701)

Eltern

Markgraf Johann Friedrich von Brandenburg-Ansbach (1654–1686)

∞ 1681

Eleonore von Sachsen-Eisenach (1662–1696)

Königin Caroline von Großbritannien und Irland (1683–1737)

Einzelnachweise [Bearbeiten]

  1. ↑ Panzer S. 184
  2. ↑ Panzer S. 187
  3. ↑ Panzer S. 191

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Marita A. Panzer, Englands Königinnen, Piper 2006
   * Wilkins, W. H., Caroline: The Illustrious, London 1901
   * Schuhmann, Günther, Die Markgrafen von Brandenburg-Ansbach. Eine Bilddokumentation zur Geschichte der Hohenzollern in Franken. Ansbach 1980

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

Commons: Caroline von Brandenburg-Ansbach – Sammlung von Bildern, Videos und Audiodateien
   * FemBiografie Caroline von Brandenburg-Ansbach von Andrea Schweers mit Zitaten, Links und Literaturangaben

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger

Georg von Dänemark Queen Consort von Großbritannien und Irland

1727–1737 Charlotte von Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Diese Seite wurde zuletzt am 2. August 2010 um 20:26 Uhr geändert.

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http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_av_Ansbach

Caroline av Ansbach

Från Wikipedia

Hoppa till: navigering, sök

Målning av Godfrey Kneller (1716)

Caroline av Ansbach, född 1 mars 1683 i Ansbach, död 20 november 1737 på St. James's Palace, London. Dotter till Johan Friedrich, markgreve av Brandenburg; drottning och tidvis till förordnad regent av Storbritannien och Irland, gift med Georg II av Storbritannien.

Biografi [redigera]

Gift 1705 med den dåvarande kurfurstliga prinsen Georg av Hannover. Hon följde med maken till Storbritannien när hans far blev kung Georg I av Storbritannien 1714 och hon och maken tronföljarpar. I avsaknad av en drottning hade hon högre status än någon annan kvinna i Storbritannien redan från början. Hon och maken hade en dålig relation till hennes svärfar kungen. Hon blev drottning 1727.

Hon utövade ett stort inflytande över sin make, även om han ofta var henne otrogen. När Georg II befann sig i utlandet, vilket han ofta gjorde då han besökte rikets andra del, Hannover i Tyskland, var hon landets officiella tillförordnade regent. Hon bar titeln: Beskyddare av de Brittiska riket, Hans Majestäts löjtnant och regent av detsamma under Hans Majestäts frånvaro. De hade en dålig relation till sonen och svärdottern.

En samtida satirisk vers om hennes politiska aktivitet löd:

   You may strut, dapper George, but 'twill all be in vain,
   We all know 'tis Queen Caroline, not you, that reign.
   (Du kan strutta, Georg, men det saknar grund
   Vi vet alla att det är drottning Caroline, inte du, som styr)

Hon var beskyddare av flera framstående författare och politiker och var intresserad av politik, filosofi och konst och samlade på juveler. Hon beskrevs som vacker, kultiverad och intelligent.

Caroline avled 1737 under en operation för bråck.

Barn [redigera]

  1. Fredrik Ludvig, (1707-1751).
  2. Anna, (1709-1759). Gift med Vilhelm IV av Oranien
  3. Amalia Sophia, (1711-1786)
  4. Elizabeth Caroline, (?-1757)
  5. George William, (?-1718)
  6. Vilhelm August, hertig av Cumberland, (1721-1765)
  7. Maria, född 5 mars 1723, död 14 januari 1772. Gift med Fredrik II av Hessen-Kassel.
  8. Louise, född 1724, död 1751, gift med Fredrik V av Danmark.
   * Wikimedia Commons har media som rör Caroline av Ansbach
     Bilder & media

Företrädare:

Sofia Dorotea av Celle Drottning av Storbritannien (ej regent)

1727–1737 Efterträdare:

Charlotte av Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Sidan ändrades senast den 10 maj 2010 kl. 08.30

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Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of George II.

Early life

Margravine Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach was born at Ansbach in Germany, the daughter of Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach and his second wife, Princess Eleanor Erdmuthe Louise of Saxe-Eisenach. Orphaned at an early age, Caroline grew up an intelligent, cultured and attractive woman, and was much sought-after as a bride. Her brother was Wilhelm Friedrich (Brandenburg-Ansbach).

[edit]Marriage

When the opportunity to become Queen of Spain presented itself, she turned it down because it would have meant renouncing her Protestant faith. Shortly afterwards, she met and married Georg August, son of the Elector of Hanover, who would later become heir to the throne of Great Britain and eventually George II of Great Britain. Their wedding took place in Hanover on 22 August 1705, and their first child, Prince Frederick, was born on 1 February 1707.

[edit]Princess of Wales

On the accession of George I in 1714, Caroline's husband automatically became Duke of Cornwall, and was invested, shortly afterwards, as Prince of Wales, whereupon she became Princess of Wales. They moved to England at this time.

As the King had in 1694 divorced his wife Sophia Dorothea of Celle, there was no Queen consort in Great Britain, and Caroline was the most important woman in the kingdom. Within three years of their arrival in England, however, her husband fell out with his father at the 1717 baptism of her fourth living child, George William. The King, who was godfather to the new prince, insisted on having the Duke of Newcastle as the second godfather, instead of his brother, Ernest, Duke of York and Albany, whom the Prince of Wales preferred. During the ceremony, the prince insulted Newcastle, an action for which he was temporarily arrested, banned by his father from St. James's Palace, and excluded from all public ceremonies.

Caroline had struck up a friendship with Sir Robert Walpole, politician and occasional Prime Minister, and his influence ensured that the Prince and Princess of Wales were able to maintain their position and lifestyle during the estrangement. He also played a role in the 1720 reconciliation.

Caroline's intellect far outstripped George's. As a young woman, she corresponded with Gottfried Leibniz, the intellectual colossus who was courtier and factotum to the House of Hanover. She also helped initiate the Leibniz-Clarke correspondence, arguably the most important of all 18th century philosophy of physics discussions, which is still widely read today.

By and large, however, George and Caroline had a successful marriage, though he continued to keep mistresses, as was customary for the time. The best-known of these was Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk, one of Caroline's ladies of the bedchamber.

[edit]Queen

Caroline became Queen consort on the death of her father-in-law in 1727. In the course of the next few years, she and her husband fought a constant battle against their eldest son, Frederick, Prince of Wales, who had been left behind in Germany when they came to England. He joined the family in 1728, by which time he was an adult and had formed many bad habits. He opposed his father's political beliefs, and, once married, applied to Parliament for the increase in financial allowance which had been denied him. Caroline, despite having personally selected her new daughter-in-law, Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, seemed determined that the marriage should not be a happy one, and was dismayed when she learned, in 1736, that Augusta was pregnant. A peculiar episode followed, in which the prince, on discovering that his wife had gone into labour, sneaked her out of Hampton Court Palace in the middle of the night, in order to ensure that the queen could not be present at the birth.

Queen Caroline held a powerful position; she was made Guardian of the Kingdom of Great Britain, and His Majesty's Lieutenant within the same during His Majesty's absence, thus acting as regent when her husband was in Hanover. It is also worth noting that she was co-heiress to Sayn-Altenkirchen through her mother, whose mother Johanette reigned as Countess of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn-Altenkirchen, but ultimately never inherited it. Her grandson, George III, was compensated for this in 1803.

As Queen, she continued to surround herself with artists, writers, and intellectuals, commissioning works such as terracotta busts of the kings and queens of England and even cottages. She collected jewelery, especially cameos and intaglios, acquired important portraits and miniatures, and enjoyed the visual arts.

A satirical verse of the period went:

You may strut, dapper George, but 'twill all be in vain,

We all know 'tis Queen Caroline, not you, that reign.

She is also subject of the popular children's nursery rhyme:

Queen, Queen Caroline

Washed her hair in turpentine.

Turpentine made it shine,

Queen, Queen Caroline.

[edit]Later life

Further quarrels with her son followed the birth of the Prince of Wales's daughter, and a complete estrangement between them occurred in the remaining months before Caroline's death.

She died of complications following a rupture of the womb on 20 November 1737, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. Handel composed an elaborate 10-section anthem for the occasion, The ways of Zion do mourn / Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline. The King had arranged for a pair of matching coffins with removable sides, so that when he followed her to the grave (twenty-three years later), they could lie together again.

Queen Caroline famously asked him to remarry on her deathbed, to which he replied "No, I shall only have mistresses" or in French, "Non, j'aurai seulement des maîtresses!".

It is probable that, alongside Mary of Modena, who caused the Glorious Revolution, and Prince Albert, who determined foreign policy, Queen Caroline was one of the most important consorts in British history.

Issue

Frederick, Prince of Wales

Anne, Princess Royal

Princess Amelia Sophia

Princess Caroline Elizabeth

Prince George William of Wales

Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland

Princess Mary, Landgravine of Hesse

Louise, Queen of Denmark and Norway

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Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of George II.

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Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (later Queen Caroline; Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737) was the queen consort of George II.

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Hopefully it not just my imagination where I am beginning to note the simularity of Caroline & faces of those of our Littlefield ancestors i.e. my Nana Hazel Bell Littlefield Dunham & her son (my father) Alvin Dean Dunham. Caroline's titles: Princess of Wales, Queen Consort of Great Britain & Ireland. A woman of good taste, educated & an interest in theological matters. Fair skinned & blond hair. Birthplace ~ Ansbach was a small German principality. Death ~ Caroline had sustained an unbilical rupture at the birth of her last child in 1724 & doubtless fearing the crude medical practices of the day made light of the matter for many years until the condition became acute in 1737 & surgical intervention became imperative. There was no anaesthetic & while the surgeons prodded & probed the Queen's body she had to beg them to desist for a moment where she was overcome with laughter at the sight of a smoldering wig on the head of a surgeon who had bent over her in too close proximity to a candle. The operation was hopeless, gangrene set in & all hope of saving the Queen's life was abandoned. Burial ~ Her husband gave instructions that on his own death the side boards of their coffins were to be removed & the two joined together so that their bones might mingle. These orders were carried out & years later those whose business it was to enter the royal vault beneath Henry VII Chapel were to describe the two discarded coffin sides neatly leaning against a wall.

Sources:

The book, 'The Queen Mother'

The book, 'The Book of the Royal Wedding'

(plus, many more ~ see Ancestors/Descendants)

view all 19

Caroline, Queen Consort's Timeline

1683
March 1, 1683
Ansbach, Bavaria, Germany
1705
August 22, 1705
Age 22
Hannover, Hannover, Deutschland(HRR)
1707
February 1, 1707
Age 23
Hannover, Braunschweig-Lüneburg, Deutschland(HRR)
1707
Age 23
1709
November 2, 1709
Age 26
Hannover, Hannover, Deutschland(HRR)
1711
June 10, 1711
Age 28
Hannover, Hannover, Deutschland(HRR)
1713
June 10, 1713
Age 30
Hannover, Hannover, Deutschland(HRR)
1716
November 9, 1716
Age 33
St. James Palace, London, England
1717
November 13, 1717
Age 34
London, Britain (UK)
1721
April 26, 1721
Age 38
Leicester House, London, Middlesex, England