Catherine Vanderpool

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Catherine Hardy (Vanderpool)

Also Known As: ""The Fighting Squaw"", ""Aunt Kitty” Hardy", "Catherine (Vanderpool) Sharpe Cornstalk Hardy"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Albany, Albany , New York
Death: Died in Conesville, Coshocton, Ohio, United States
Place of Burial: Conesville, Coshocton County, Ohio, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Wynant Melgertse Van Der Poel and Catharina de Hooges
Wife of John Sharpe; Frederick "Michael" See; Hokolesqua, Chief Cornstalk and John Hardy
Mother of John Sharpe, Jr.; William Sharpe; Margaret Roach; Lois Van Bibber; Mary Catherine Cornstalk and 5 others
Sister of Abraham Vanderpoel, Sr.; Anthony Teunis Vanderpool; Melchert Vanderpoel; Margarieta Vanderpoel; Ariaentie Vanderpoel and 1 other

Occupation: Frontierswoman
Managed by: Juanita Millhouse
Last Updated:

About Catherine Vanderpool

Catherine Vanderpool was born 30 Jun 1725 in Albany New York and died in 1808 in Coshocton, Ohio. She had moved with her daughter Margaret (See) Roach Robinson and family when Margaret's husband acquired 4000 acres of land in Franklin Township, Ohio, where the cemetery she is buried in is located.

Catherine is one of many members of her family with phenomenal life experiences.

"Catherine See, known in later life as “Aunt Kitty” Hardy, died in 1806 or 1807. Truly her history is remarkable, a span of four score years and ten in time; in distance from the Rhine River to the Greenbrier. . . "

captured by Indians

Catherine See, keenly aware that her younger children would soon he exhausted by the hardships of the journey, resolved with a courage born of desperation, to save them from an inevitable fate. One of the warriors rode along the trudging line made up of about one hundred fifty women, young boys and children, many burdened with the loot the Indians had collected. His mount was a horse the property of Frederick See. It was perhaps the third day on the trail that Catherine requested that he give up the horse that her children might ride. This the Indian angrily refused to do. Seizing a pine knot from the ground, Catherine knocked him off the horse. He sprang up brandishing his tomahawk and would have killed her then and there, but for the interference of the other Indians who admired her fearlessness and called her the “fighting squaw.” Catherine was permitted to keep the horse and use it for her family.

At length the weary prisoners and their captors reached Old Town across the Ohio River. One can well imagine the excitement that prevailed on the return of the victorious chieftain and his band; the shouting and rejoicing of the inhabitants as a great procession of both sexes and ages doubtless poured out of their dwellings on hearing the signal gun and peculiar whoop announcing the return of the raiders. Then followed the ceremonies usual for the occasion. There were the trophies to see, the utensils, tools, guns, clothing, horses, etc., all seized from the settlements; and the great number of white captives. One ceremony which provided the Indians with entertainment was an ordeal to which nearly every prisoner was subjected; it was to “run the gauntlet.” It was done in this manner; a large number of squaws and Indian boys armed with clubs and switches lined up in two rows facing each other, then the prisoners were compelled to run between the lines, while the Indians struck them with their sticks and threw dirt or rubbish in their faces.

Catherine See’s turn came. She was now about 48 years of age and had spent the past twenty-five years of her life on the frontier, where to remain alive was to become physically tough and mentally alert. Doubtlessly the story of her triumph in getting her horse had spread through the village and the Indians were eager to see the “fighting squaw” undergo this test. They were not to be disappointed, for to their astonishment, Catherine suddenly seized the club of the nearest Indian and swinging it lustily right and left, soon had the Indians overcome and scattered.

From Cornstalk's Raid

The See family returned to Hampshire County to live with their kindred. Catherine See married John Hardy, pioneer of Hardy County. Later they all returned to the Greenbrier, where John Hardy’s name appears on the county tax list in 1783-1786. There is no record of the daughter, Lois, but tradition relates that she married ______ Van Bibber, as yet this fact is unconfirmed. There is little, too, regarding the youngest Catherine (Elizabeth). But a tattered copy of Reverend John Anderson’s marriage records from 1776 to about 1785 gives Peter Tho- or Sho- to Elizabeth Lee (See) in January 1776.

Source:

  1. 32 A Chronicle of the SEE family and their Kindred, written and compiled by Irene See Brasel (1892 - 1963), http://members.aol.com/hconor2/Brasel.htm.

Family

Parents: Wynant Van Der Poel (1683-1750) and Catherine De Hooges (1687-1744). Some sources say she was the daughter of Abraham Vanderpool.

Married:

  1. by 1740 to John Sharpe.
  2. in 1744, in Greenbrier Co., Virginia to Frederick Michael See or Zeh. He was born 1710 in Schoharie, Schoharie Co., New York; died July 15, 1763 in Muddy Creek, Greenbrier Co., Virginia; he was scalped at Muddy Creek.
  3. in 1763 to Keightuqua (Holokesqua), Chief Cornstalk (1710-1777)
  4. after 1765 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia to John Hardy.

Children

  1. John Sharpe, Jr., born 1740
  2. William Sharpe, born 1742
  3. Margaret "Peggy" See, born 1744 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died March 11, 1815 in Franklin Twp., Coshocton Co., Ohio; married Beriah Littleberry Roach, Jr. 1758 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia.
  4. Lois "Sarah" See, born 1746 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died Bef. 1841; married (1) Greenberry Roach 1763; born Unknown; died Unknown; married (2) Peter VanBibber 1763 in Hardy Co., Virginia; born Unknown; died October 08, 1838.
  5. Mary Catherine (Elizabeth) See, born 1748, in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died 1830 in Adams Co., Ohio; married Cornstalk January 04, 1776 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia; born Unknown; died Unknown. Notes for Cornstalk: Elizabeth married a son of Chief Cornstalk, but i do not know which son it was yet.
  6. Michael See, born 1751 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died May 26, 1792 in Ft. Randolph, Point Pleasant, Mason Co., Virginia.
  7. Catherine See, born February 26, 1754 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died April 23, 1827 in Hardy Co., Virginia
  8. George See, born 1756 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died Abt. 1835 in Warren Twp., Marion Co., Missouri.
  9. John See, born October 10, 1757 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died January 02, 1837 in Decatur, Macon Co., Illinois; married Margaret Jarrett; born Abt. 1761 in Monroe Co., Virginia; died Abt. 1837.
  10. William See, born July 15, 1763; died Unknown in Iowa.
  11. Mary Cornstalk, born 1764 in Ohio; died 1823 in Warren Co., Ohio.

Notes


It is generally thought that Frederick Michael married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania. It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool. About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia. They, along with the Yoakums and Harness'.were among the first settlers of that region.

Frederick See built his cabin home along the Greenbriar river on what was called Muddy Creek.

In 1755, war broke out between France and England and the French incited the native Indians to make war on the back-country inhabitants of Virginia. In 1762, after the Greenbrier settlement was renewed, it was felt that it was now safe for settlers to migrate back to the area. They were wrong.

The story of Frederick and Catherine See and their family is quite tragic. The following account of what has become known as "The Muddy Creek Massacre" has been gleaned from various accounts, primarily "A Chronicle of the See family and their Kindred", written and compiled by Irene See Brasel (1892-1963) (see attached document).

The See family returned to Hampshire County to live with their kindred. Catherine See married John Hardy, pioneer of Hardy County. Later they all returned to the Greenbrier, where John Hardy’s name appears on the county tax list in 1783-1786.

 

From Catherine Vanderpool: wife of Frederick See or George Yoakum 2002

That Frederick had a (2nd?) wife named Catherine is generally accepted based on the correspondence of Rev. Michael See, a great-grandson of Frederick and Catherine See who writes in 1887 "I remember hearing my Grandfather (John SEE) say that his mother married a man named Hardy; it may be that her name was Katy." Others refer to "Aunt Kitty Hardy." In reviewing the records of Greenbrier County, we find John Hardy living on Muddy Creek (the site of Frederick See's original survey and subsequent death at the hands of the Shawnee) from 1771-1788. The Mathews Trading Post Account Books (located on the Greenbrier River) lists Michael Sea (son of Frederick and Catherine) as the agent of John Hardy between 1771-75. As yet, I have not found records showing John Hardy's wife's name but there certainly is a high probability  that Frederick See's widow remarried John Hardy.

Catherine See is listed as a released captive on the Bouquet Prisoner lists in 1764-65. Whether or not this was the mother or a daughter by the same name is not known as no age is given. But again, Rev. Michael See relates many stories of his grandfather's capture by Indians and refers to the mother being captured along with the rest of the family.

Links

-------------------- Birth 1725Albany, Albany, New York, USA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Marriage 1744Warwick, , New Jersey, USA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Marriage 1744New Jersey, United States Posted by burton2401 Comment

Story: Captive Of Shawnee After Muddy Creek Massacre 1763Greenbrier WV, Chilicothe OH, Fort Pitt PA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Death 1806, Coshocton, Ohio, USA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Story: Muddy Creek Massacre Of July 16, 1763

Posted by burton2401 Report abuse <p>   It is generally thought that Frederick Michael See married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania.  It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool.  About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia.  They, along with the Yoakums and Harness' were among the first settlers of that region.  Frederick See built his cabin home along the Greenbrier River on what was called Muddy Creek.</p><p>     In 1755, war broke out between France and England and the French incited the native Indians to make war on the back-country inhabitants of Virginia.  In 1762, after the Greenbrier settlement was renewed, it was felt that it was now safe for settlers to migrate back to the area.  They were wrong.</p><p>     The story of Frederick and Catherine See and their family is quite tragic.  On Saturday, July 16, 1763, a party of 80 or 90 Shawnees, led by Chief Cornstalk swept up the Kanawha on a murderous rampage.  Simultaneously they hit the Frederick See family, and the Felty Yocum family (Felty was a cousin of Frederick Michael See) whose cabin was nearby.  According to all accounts, the Indians suddenly appeared at the Frederick See cabin, with all of the appearance of friendship.  The Sees welcomed them, and as it was near to mealtime they offered to share their food with the Indians.  The Shawnees agreed, no doubt building cooking fires out of doors in order to feed such a large number of people.  The meal finished, the Indians lounged around for a bit and rested.  Suddenly with a whoop the Indians fell upon their hosts, killing the father (Fredrick Michael), his son-in-law (Littleberry Roach) and Felty Yocum, scalping them before the eyes of their families.  It is not known why Frederick and Catherine's son George wasn't also killed as he was 22 yeaers old at the time.  Perhaps he offered no resistance.  Other men and older boys were killed.</p><p>     The women and children of these and other victims of this massacre were taken prisoners.  Leaving the dead where they were slain, the Indians began marching their prisoners back to their camp.  On the way to Oldstown, in Ohio, these women and children who were unable to keep up were killed.  The first born child of Maragaret (See) Roach, a boy, was killed in a most brutal fashion after being snatched from her breast.  Accounts related by James Olson, also told by a Descendant, was that Frederick See's children held up for two to three days.  The smallest, John, was quite weak and Catherine feared for his life.  Seeing a warrior riding their horse, Catherine indicated to him that she wanted it.  When he refused, she picked up a club and attempted to knowck him off the horse.  About to kill her, the amused Indians prevented the warrior from doing so, calling her a "fighting squaw."  Once they reached the Indian campgrounds in what is now Ross County, Ohio, it is said the Shawnee had a celebration.  The women were forced to sing for them, and Catherine was called upon to run the gauntlet.  Grabbing a stick she began making whirling moves swinging the stick which pleased all the arriors greatly.  Captives now for several months, soon cold weather was upon them.  There was not enough room inside for all the prisoners, an was crowded by old Indian squaws they shared a tent with.  A child of Catherine's, a son, had to sleep outside with the dogs to keep warm.  One day the warriors went off hunting leaving Catherine in charge of all the old Indian squaws sitting around the campfire.  One had a fainting spell, falling into the fire.  Catherine let her fall, thus making room for her children in the tent, a bravery which helped her family to survive, intact.</p><p>     Catherine See and her children were taken to Old Town and kept there by the Shawnees until there was a treaty and an exchange of prisoners about a year later.  A document written by Colonel Henry Bouquet to William Penn, Governor of Pennsylvania, on November 15, 1764, stated all Indian tribes led by Chief Cornstalk had at last agreed to release the prisoners, not only from the incident at the See home but a number of other similar incidents at other family homes on the South Branch.</p><p>     Catherine and at least some of her children must have been separated during their captivity, because her youngest child, John, was adopted by an Indian family who had lost their son.  The couple repeatedly told John that he would be burned alive if retaken by the whites.  John became very fond of his new Indian parents, and the year with the Shawnees apparently did much to erase from his mind the memory of his natural family and his former life.  When the time rrived for the Indians to relase their prisoners, all of the See family except the twin, nine-year-old Elizabeth, were freed. Cornstalk would not agree to let her go, but kept her for nine more years during which time his young son took her as his squaw and, according to family tradition, she had an Indian child by him.  Later she excaped or was ransomed, because she eventually left the Indians, and married a white man named Peter Shoemaker.</p><p>     After being released from the Indians, the party traveled about nine miles before darkness overtook them, and  made camp for the night.  Young John made his bed between two of his sisters, but he did not sleep.  He lay awake until he was certain everyone else was asleep, then crept out of camp and hurried back to his adopted Indian family.  Here he stayed for some time.  One version indicates one year, while another says four years.  Eventually his uncle, Michael Adam See (brother of Frederick Michael and husband of Barbara Rebecca Harness) ransomed his nephew John and too him back to Hampshire County, Virginia where the rest of the See family was then living.</p><p>      The return prisoner list included Catherine See and her children Michael, George, John, May, Margaret, and Lois...along with Margaret, George, Elizabeth and Sally Yocum (Yoakum) and Mary Campbell ("The Beaded Moccasins: The Story of Mary Campbell" by Lynda Durrant (NY, 1998, Clarion Books).)  Frederick See's widow is believed to have later remarried a man named John Hardy, a Hardy County pioneer.</p> -------------------- See Shawnee Heritage II, by Don Greene -------------------- Excerpts from A Chronicle of the See Family and their Kindred by Irene See Brasel (1892 – 1963)

Captured by the Shawnees

"On June 16, 1763, Cornstalk*, chief of the Shawnees, and sixty warriors suddenly appeared at the settlement at Muddy Creek. They came professing friendship and bringing with them much game which they had procured enroute. The inhabitants feeling secure in the belief that the hostilities (1755-1762) were over remained outside the fort (as did their neighbors the next day at Clendenning's). Preparation for a huge feast was soon underway and Frederick See killed one of his few precious cattle to supplement the venison and wild game supplied by the Indians. * Indian name: Keigh~tugh-qua

At a given signal the next day the Shawnees fell upon the settlers, killing and scalping all the men except one, plundering and burning their homes, and taking the women and children prisoners. Leaving a few warriors behind to guard the terrified, dazed and anguished group, Chief Cornstalk and his band went some twenty miles to the Clendenin settlement, again wearing the mask of friendship to disguise their horrible purpose.

Clendenin was a brave man and a hunter of renown and believed himself to be on good terms with all the Indians, who came to hunt deer and elk in these savannahs. On the day of the massacre, he had just returned from an excursion near the spring of Lewisburg and had three fine elk. The advent of the Indian's friendly visit and the return of the hunters soon attracted all the people, between fifty or a hundred to his home near the stockade being twenty paces apart. The Indians were entertained and feasted on the fruits of Clendenin's hunt and every other item of provision which could be mustered.

An old woman, who was one of the settlement, having a very sore leg and having understood that the Indians could perform the cure of an ulcer, showed it to one near her and asked if he could heal it. His answer was to bury his tomahawk in her brain and raise a fearful war cry. This seemed to be the signal for a general massacre. Too late, Clendenin with one child in his arms, started for the brush but was felled in his tracks. Again, every man was killed (except Conrad Yolkum) and the women and children made captive.

Conrad Yolkum, suspicious of the Indian's professed friendship when they arrived at Clendenin's, took his horse out under the pretext of hobbling it at some distance from the house. Soon afterward, he heard the report of guns and outcries from the house and alarmed, mounted his horse and rode as far as Lewisburg.

Deciding that he must have been mistaken, he rode back to ascertain the truth, but as he neared Clendenin's a number of Indians fired at him. Fortunately all missed, and he fled, going to the fort on Jackson River, spreading the alarm as he went. But the people refused to believe this warning and were massacred at will by the few pursuing Indians, who continued their raid to Carr's Creek in Rockbridge County.

The Indians completely destroyed the settlement and then herded their prisoners, including Mrs. Clendenin and her baby and two small children, westward to Muddy Creek where they joined the captives there and all were kept for several days, awaiting the return of the small Indian band that had gone into Rockbridge county.

Driven to despair by the cruel and unprovoked murder of her husband and friends, Mrs. Clendenin boldly charged the Indians with perfidy and treachery and although the bloody scalp of her husband was flaunted in her face and the tomahawk threateningly raised over her head, she never ceased to revile them.

When the Shawnees were all re-assembled at Muddy Creek, the Indians set out for Ohio. In going over Kenney's Knob, the prisoners were in the center and Indians front and rear, Mrs. Clendenin slipped into a thicket unnoticed. Her escape was revealed when the baby she had handed to one of the women began to cry. Mrs. Clendenin though pursued, managed to elude her foes and returned that night, a distance of ten miles, to the tragic scene of the massacre.

She covered her husband's body with trash and rails and hid in an adjacent cornfield where she spent the night agitated with fear and despondency. Later, as she regained her composure and strength, she resumed her flight and reached the Jackson River fort in safety. Eventually, the two children of Archibald Clendenin's were restored to their mother. Ann Clendenin's grave in the Old Welch graveyard was marked at a ceremony during the 160th Anniversary of Greenbrier County, June 1938.

"The destination of the Shawnees was Old Town near the present city of Chillicothe, Ohio on the banks of the Scioto River. The captives forced along at the tireless pace of the Indians, tried valiantly to keep up for well they knew it was a matter of life or death; any who weakened and fell behind, any crying babe was ruthlessly killed. The trek ahead was long and grueling, a distance of one hundred sixty five miles as the crow flies, over some of the most rugged terrain east of the Mississippi River. Two mountain ranges lay ahead, the Blue Ridge and the Allegheny, not to mention the streams and rivers to cross.

Catherine See, keenly aware that her younger children would soon he exhausted by the hardships of the journey, resolved with a courage born of desperation, to save them from an inevitable fate. One of the warriors rode along the trudging line made up of about one hundred fifty women, young boys and children, many burdened with the loot the Indians had collected. His mount was a horse the property of Frederick See. It was perhaps the third day on the trail that Catherine requested that he give up the horse that her children might ride. This the Indian angrily refused to do. Seizing a pine knot from the ground, Catherine knocked him off the horse. He sprang up brandishing his tomahawk and would have killed her then and there, but for the interference of the other Indians who admired her fearlessness and called her the "fighting squaw." Catherine was permitted to keep the horse and use it for her family.

At length the weary prisoners and their captors reached Old Town across the Ohio River. One can well imagine the excitement that prevailed on the return of the victorious chieftain and his band; the shouting and rejoicing of the inhabitants as a great procession of both sexes and ages doubtless poured out of their dwellings on hearing the signal gun and peculiar whoop announcing the return of the raiders. Then followed the ceremonies usual for the occasion. There were the trophies to see, the utensils, tools, guns, clothing, horses, etc., all seized from the settlements; and the great number of white captives. One ceremony which provided the Indians with entertainment was an ordeal to which nearly every prisoner was subjected; it was to "run the gauntlet." It was done in this manner; a large number of squaws and Indian boys armed with clubs and switches lined up in two rows facing each other, then the prisoners were compelled to run between the lines, while the Indians struck them with their sticks and threw dirt or rubbish in their faces.

Catherine See's turn came. She was now about 48 years of age and had spent the past twenty-five years of her life on the frontier, where to remain alive was to become physically tough and mentally alert. Doubtlessly the story of her triumph in getting her horse had spread through the village and the Indians were eager to see the "fighting squaw" undergo this test. They were not to be disappointed, for to their astonishment, Catherine suddenly seized the club of the nearest Indian and swinging it lustily right and left, soon had the Indians overcome and scattered.

In accordance with Indian custom a general council decided the division of the spoils and the fate of prisoners taken by the tribe. The older daughter, Catherine, was given to the son of Chief Cornstalk for his wife. This girl could hardly have been more than fourteen. How the older boys were placed is unknown and Catherine and the younger girl were taken into some family; at least all were under shelter except little John, who had to stay outside with the Indian dogs. One can imagine that housing was strained by the sudden addition of one hundred fifty prisoners.

It so happened one day that most of the tribe left the village for some special purpose. Catherine was left behind in charge of an aged squaw, who was subject to seizures of some kind. On this day, the old woman had one of these attacks and fell into the fire.

Catherine calmly placed her foot on the old woman's head and held it there until she died. When the Indians returned and heard Catherine's report of the happening (what she chose to tell) she received no blame as the old squaw's condition was generally known. There was one less in the wigwam and John then could sleep inside. Later he was adopted by an Indian family, as were also the Brown and Zane children..."

With the two settlements of Muddy Creek and Clendenin's destroyed by the invasion of the Shawnees, the few remaining settlements were practically cut off from the East after 1763. The Indians continued the war and on some of their excursions went to within a few miles of Staunton, Virginia. Appeals for relief from the border country at length were heeded and the British government ordered Colonel Henri Bouquet to make an expedition against the Ohio Indians to put an end to these deprecations and force the return of their captives.

Colonel Bouquet's headquarters were at Fort Pitt, one hundred and fifty miles from the Shawnee towns on the Scioto. Here he had assembled his regular troops, the Royal Americans, and two hundred Virginia Rangers; many were volunteers. For the meeting with the Shawnee chiefs, he marched down the Ohio River to the forks of the Muskingum where a stockade camp was prepared. In 1763 Bouquet had defeated the Indians at Bushy Run with a small force - five hundred regulars against a large Indian contingent. The Indians, over-awed by his former victory and by his boldness in penetrating so far into the wilderness, were ready to make peace and give up their white prisoners.

With his army drawn up in battle array, Bouquet met in conference with the Ohio chiefs where they tendered him an offer of peace. His reply was a master stroke.

In part he said . . . "and now I am come among you to force you to make atonement for the injuries you have done us. I have brought with me the relatives of those you have murdered. They are eager for vengeance, and nothing restrains them from taking it but my assurance that this army shall not leave your country until you have given them ample satisfaction. I give you twelve days from this date to deliver into my hands all prisoners in your possession, without exception; Englishmen, Frenchmen, and children; whether adopted into your tribe, married, or living among you under any denomination or pretense." The chief sources for Bouquet's expedition are thirty manuscript volumes in the British Museum which were transcribed for the Canadian Archives in Ottawa. The following is from a photostatic copy of pages 317-318:

List of Prisoners going to Fort Pitt under the command of Capt. Lewis Nov. ye 15th 1764.


Males 1. John Wiseman

2. John Donehoe

3. Soremouth

4. Crooket Legs

5. David Bighead

6. Clem

7. James Butler

8. Michael Cobbles

9. Porterm or Wynima

10. Charles Stormontrout

11. Ebenezer

12. Mordicai Babson

13. Henry Bonnet

l4. James

15. Tommy Wig

16. Michael See

17. George See

l8. John Huntsman

19. Solomon Carpenter

20. John Gilmore

Females 

1.Eve Harper

2 .Mary Campbell

3.Anne Finley

4.Mary Cath. Lengenfield

5.Kitty Stroudman

6.Betty-black eyes and hair

7.Eliz. Franse

8.Peggy Baskin

9.Mary McIlroy

10.Sour thumbs

11.Christiana House

12.Mary Lowry

13.Jane Lowry

14.Mary Greenwood

15.Mary Greenwood

16.Nancy Davison

17.Molly Davison

18.Magdalen or Pagthon

19.Mary Craven

20.Catherine Westbrook

21.Molly Metch 

22.Whitehead

23.Margaret Yokeham

24.Mary McCord

25.Eliz. Gilmore

26.Eliz. Gilmore Jun

27.Florence Hitchinson

28.Mary See

29.Barbara Hutchinson

30.Susannah Fishback

31.Margaret Fishback

32.Peggy Freeling

33.Peggy Cartmill

34.Molly Cartmill

35.Peggy Reyneck

36.Eliz. Slover

37.Eliz. Slover Jun.

38.Mary Lanoisco

39. and child

40.Girl with sore knee


Camp at Muskingum Nov. ye 15 1764

Received from Capt. Lewis Durry A. D. Q. M C, the above Sixty Captives which I am to deliver to the commanding officer at Fort Pitt having signed two receipts of this same Tenor and date. - Chas. Lewis

Endorsed: List of Prisoners Sent by Captain Lewis to Fort Pitt the 15th November 1764.

These most certainly are names of Virginia captives. There is Mrs. Gilmore and two children; Margaret Yokeham, the wife of either Felty or Valentine; Peggy Reyneck (Renick); the two See boys and Mary See, which could be Mary Catherine See, the mother or younger sister. The list reveals the physical condition of children; the fact that some either didn't know their own names or the clerk was lax in recording it.

When the day came for the captivated's departure, scenes of grief and anguish prevailed for many Indians refused to give up their beloved adopted children and many half-savage children clung frantically to their foster parents. Despite orders from Colonel Bouquet many of the Indians followed the returning army at a distance. Only a night or two after leaving the Muskingum, little John See stole away from the encampment and rejoined the Indians.

Tradition tells that his Uncle Michael See gave a trader one hundred dollars to get him back. John See returned to Hampshire to live with his uncle's family. He told Nancy Greenlee See when he visited at Point Pleasant in Mason County, Virginia on his way from Kanawha Falls to Indiana about 1825 that when he was a lad returned from the Indians his Aunt Barbara used to tell some of the family to watch and follow him on his excursions into the forest for fear he would return to the Indians. "

Click on http://members.aol.com/hconor2/Brasel.htm to read the entire story and Irene's Chronicle. The website has family group sheets, maps and photos. Note: The link has changed in the past, so you may want to Google "Irene See Brasel" to find the current link.

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Catherine Vanderpool's Timeline

1725
June 30, 1725
Albany, Albany , New York
June 30, 1725
NY, NY Co, NY
1740
1740
Age 14
1740
Age 14
Augusta , Virginia
1742
1742
Age 16
1744
1744
Age 18
Warwick,,New Jersey,USA
1745
1745
Age 19
Augusta, Virginia, United States
1747
1747
Age 21
Augusta , Virginia
1748
1748
Age 22
Augusta, Virginia
1750
1750
Age 24