Catherine See (Vanderpool) (c.1725 - 1808) MP

public profile

3

Matches

0 1 2
Adds more complete birth date, more complete death place and burial place.

View Catherine See (Vanderpool)'s complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Catherine See (Vanderpool)
  • Request to view Catherine See (Vanderpool)'s family tree

Share

Nicknames: "The Fighting Squaw", "“Aunt Kitty” Hardy"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Albany,Albany,New York,USA
Death: Died in Coshocton,,Ohio,USA
Occupation: another spouse John Hardy
Managed by: Juanita Millhouse
Last Updated:

About Catherine See (Vanderpool)

Catherine Vanderpool was born 30 Jun 1725 in Albany New York and died in 1808 in Coshocton, Ohio.

"Catherine See, known in later life as “Aunt Kitty” Hardy, died in 1806 or 1807. Truly her history is remarkable, a span of four score years and ten in time; in distance from the Rhine River to the Greenbrier. . . "

captured by Indians

Catherine See, keenly aware that her younger children would soon he exhausted by the hardships of the journey, resolved with a courage born of desperation, to save them from an inevitable fate. One of the warriors rode along the trudging line made up of about one hundred fifty women, young boys and children, many burdened with the loot the Indians had collected. His mount was a horse the property of Frederick See. It was perhaps the third day on the trail that Catherine requested that he give up the horse that her children might ride. This the Indian angrily refused to do. Seizing a pine knot from the ground, Catherine knocked him off the horse. He sprang up brandishing his tomahawk and would have killed her then and there, but for the interference of the other Indians who admired her fearlessness and called her the “fighting squaw.” Catherine was permitted to keep the horse and use it for her family.

At length the weary prisoners and their captors reached Old Town across the Ohio River. One can well imagine the excitement that prevailed on the return of the victorious chieftain and his band; the shouting and rejoicing of the inhabitants as a great procession of both sexes and ages doubtless poured out of their dwellings on hearing the signal gun and peculiar whoop announcing the return of the raiders. Then followed the ceremonies usual for the occasion. There were the trophies to see, the utensils, tools, guns, clothing, horses, etc., all seized from the settlements; and the great number of white captives. One ceremony which provided the Indians with entertainment was an ordeal to which nearly every prisoner was subjected; it was to “run the gauntlet.” It was done in this manner; a large number of squaws and Indian boys armed with clubs and switches lined up in two rows facing each other, then the prisoners were compelled to run between the lines, while the Indians struck them with their sticks and threw dirt or rubbish in their faces.

Catherine See’s turn came. She was now about 48 years of age and had spent the past twenty-five years of her life on the frontier, where to remain alive was to become physically tough and mentally alert. Doubtlessly the story of her triumph in getting her horse had spread through the village and the Indians were eager to see the “fighting squaw” undergo this test. They were not to be disappointed, for to their astonishment, Catherine suddenly seized the club of the nearest Indian and swinging it lustily right and left, soon had the Indians overcome and scattered.

Source:

  1. 32 A Chronicle of the SEE family and their Kindred, written and compiled by Irene See Brasel (1892 - 1963), http://members.aol.com/hconor2/Brasel.htm.

Family

Parents: Wynant Van Der Poel (1683-1750) and Catherine De Hooges (1687-1744)

Married:

  1. in 1744, in Greenbrier Co., Virginia to Frederick Michael See or Zeh. He was born 1710 in Schoharie, Schoharie Co., New York; died July 15, 1763 in Muddy Creek, Greenbrier Co., Virginia; he was scalped at Muddy Creek.

Children

  1. Margaret See, born 1745 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died March 11, 1815 in Franklin Twp., Coshocton Co., Ohio; married Beriah Littleberry Roach, Jr. 1758 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia.
  2. George See, born 1748 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died Abt. 1835 in Warren Twp., Marion Co., Missouri.
  3. Michael See, born 1751 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died May 26, 1792 in Ft. Randolph, Point Pleasant, Mason Co., Virginia.
  4. Catherine See, born February 26, 1754 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died April 23, 1827 in Hardy Co., Virginia
  5. Elizabeth See, born February 26, 1754 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died 1830 in Adams Co., Ohio; married Cornstalk January 04, 1776 in Greenbrier Co., Virginia; born Unknown; died Unknown.
  6. Notes for Cornstalk: Elizabeth married a son of Chief Cornstalk, but i do not know which son it was yet.
  7. Lois See, born 1747 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died Bef. 1841; married (1) Greenberry Roach 1763; born Unknown; died Unknown; married (2) Peter VanBibber 1763 in Hardy Co., Virginia; born Unknown; died October 08, 1838.
  8. John See, born October 10, 1757 in South Branch, Augusta Co., Virginia; died January 02, 1837 in Decatur, Macon Co., Illinois; married Margaret Jarrett; born Abt. 1761 in Monroe Co., Virginia; died Abt. 1837.
  9. Mary See, born Abt. 1760 in Augusta Co., Virginia; died 1823 in Warren Co., Ohio.
  10. William See, born July 15, 1763; died Unknown in Iowa.

Notes


It is generally thought that Frederick Michael married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania. It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool. About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia. They, along with the Yoakums and Harness'.were among the first settlers of that region.

Frederick See built his cabin home along the Greenbriar river on what was called Muddy Creek.

In 1755, war broke out between France and England and the French incited the native Indians to make war on the back-country inhabitants of Virginia. In 1762, after the Greenbrier settlement was renewed, it was felt that it was now safe for settlers to migrate back to the area. They were wrong.

The story of Frederick and Catherine See and their family is quite tragic. The following account of what has become known as "The Muddy Creek Massacre" has been gleaned from various accounts, primarily "A Chronicle of the See family and their Kindred", written and compiled by Irene See Brasel (1892-1963) (see attached document).

Links

-------------------- Birth 1725Albany, Albany, New York, USA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Marriage 1744Warwick, , New Jersey, USA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Marriage 1744New Jersey, United States Posted by burton2401 Comment

Story: Captive Of Shawnee After Muddy Creek Massacre 1763Greenbrier WV, Chilicothe OH, Fort Pitt PA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Death 1806, Coshocton, Ohio, USA Posted by burton2401 Comment

Story: Muddy Creek Massacre Of July 16, 1763

Posted by burton2401 Report abuse <p>   It is generally thought that Frederick Michael See married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania.  It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool.  About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia.  They, along with the Yoakums and Harness' were among the first settlers of that region.  Frederick See built his cabin home along the Greenbrier River on what was called Muddy Creek.</p><p>     In 1755, war broke out between France and England and the French incited the native Indians to make war on the back-country inhabitants of Virginia.  In 1762, after the Greenbrier settlement was renewed, it was felt that it was now safe for settlers to migrate back to the area.  They were wrong.</p><p>     The story of Frederick and Catherine See and their family is quite tragic.  On Saturday, July 16, 1763, a party of 80 or 90 Shawnees, led by Chief Cornstalk swept up the Kanawha on a murderous rampage.  Simultaneously they hit the Frederick See family, and the Felty Yocum family (Felty was a cousin of Frederick Michael See) whose cabin was nearby.  According to all accounts, the Indians suddenly appeared at the Frederick See cabin, with all of the appearance of friendship.  The Sees welcomed them, and as it was near to mealtime they offered to share their food with the Indians.  The Shawnees agreed, no doubt building cooking fires out of doors in order to feed such a large number of people.  The meal finished, the Indians lounged around for a bit and rested.  Suddenly with a whoop the Indians fell upon their hosts, killing the father (Fredrick Michael), his son-in-law (Littleberry Roach) and Felty Yocum, scalping them before the eyes of their families.  It is not known why Frederick and Catherine's son George wasn't also killed as he was 22 yeaers old at the time.  Perhaps he offered no resistance.  Other men and older boys were killed.</p><p>     The women and children of these and other victims of this massacre were taken prisoners.  Leaving the dead where they were slain, the Indians began marching their prisoners back to their camp.  On the way to Oldstown, in Ohio, these women and children who were unable to keep up were killed.  The first born child of Maragaret (See) Roach, a boy, was killed in a most brutal fashion after being snatched from her breast.  Accounts related by James Olson, also told by a Descendant, was that Frederick See's children held up for two to three days.  The smallest, John, was quite weak and Catherine feared for his life.  Seeing a warrior riding their horse, Catherine indicated to him that she wanted it.  When he refused, she picked up a club and attempted to knowck him off the horse.  About to kill her, the amused Indians prevented the warrior from doing so, calling her a "fighting squaw."  Once they reached the Indian campgrounds in what is now Ross County, Ohio, it is said the Shawnee had a celebration.  The women were forced to sing for them, and Catherine was called upon to run the gauntlet.  Grabbing a stick she began making whirling moves swinging the stick which pleased all the arriors greatly.  Captives now for several months, soon cold weather was upon them.  There was not enough room inside for all the prisoners, an was crowded by old Indian squaws they shared a tent with.  A child of Catherine's, a son, had to sleep outside with the dogs to keep warm.  One day the warriors went off hunting leaving Catherine in charge of all the old Indian squaws sitting around the campfire.  One had a fainting spell, falling into the fire.  Catherine let her fall, thus making room for her children in the tent, a bravery which helped her family to survive, intact.</p><p>     Catherine See and her children were taken to Old Town and kept there by the Shawnees until there was a treaty and an exchange of prisoners about a year later.  A document written by Colonel Henry Bouquet to William Penn, Governor of Pennsylvania, on November 15, 1764, stated all Indian tribes led by Chief Cornstalk had at last agreed to release the prisoners, not only from the incident at the See home but a number of other similar incidents at other family homes on the South Branch.</p><p>     Catherine and at least some of her children must have been separated during their captivity, because her youngest child, John, was adopted by an Indian family who had lost their son.  The couple repeatedly told John that he would be burned alive if retaken by the whites.  John became very fond of his new Indian parents, and the year with the Shawnees apparently did much to erase from his mind the memory of his natural family and his former life.  When the time rrived for the Indians to relase their prisoners, all of the See family except the twin, nine-year-old Elizabeth, were freed. Cornstalk would not agree to let her go, but kept her for nine more years during which time his young son took her as his squaw and, according to family tradition, she had an Indian child by him.  Later she excaped or was ransomed, because she eventually left the Indians, and married a white man named Peter Shoemaker.</p><p>     After being released from the Indians, the party traveled about nine miles before darkness overtook them, and  made camp for the night.  Young John made his bed between two of his sisters, but he did not sleep.  He lay awake until he was certain everyone else was asleep, then crept out of camp and hurried back to his adopted Indian family.  Here he stayed for some time.  One version indicates one year, while another says four years.  Eventually his uncle, Michael Adam See (brother of Frederick Michael and husband of Barbara Rebecca Harness) ransomed his nephew John and too him back to Hampshire County, Virginia where the rest of the See family was then living.</p><p>      The return prisoner list included Catherine See and her children Michael, George, John, May, Margaret, and Lois...along with Margaret, George, Elizabeth and Sally Yocum (Yoakum) and Mary Campbell ("The Beaded Moccasins: The Story of Mary Campbell" by Lynda Durrant (NY, 1998, Clarion Books).)  Frederick See's widow is believed to have later remarried a man named John Hardy, a Hardy County pioneer.</p>

view all 18

Catherine Vanderpool's Timeline

1725
June 30, 1725
Albany,Albany,New York,USA
June 30, 1725
NY, NY Co, NY
1732
1732
Age 6
1744
1744
Age 18
Warwick,,New Jersey,USA
1745
1745
Age 19
Augusta, Virginia, United States
1747
1747
Age 21
1747
Age 21
Augusta , Virginia
1748
1748
Age 22
1749
1749
Age 23
1750
1750
Age 24