Cecily (Cicely) Bigod, Heiress of Belvoir

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Cecily (Cicely) Bigod, Heiress of Belvoir

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
Death: Died in Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Roger Bigod, I, Earl of East Anglia and Adeliza de Toeni, heiress of Belvoir
Wife of William "Brito" d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir
Mother of Robert d'Aubigny (Albini) Brito; William II "Le Breton" d'Aubigny, of Belvoir; Roger d'Aubigny (Albini) Brito; Ralph (Raoul) d'Aubigny and Basilia d'Aubigny (Albini) Brito
Sister of Maud (Mary) Bigod; Hervey Fitz Bagod; Hugh le Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk; Gunnora Bigod; William Bigod and 1 other
Half sister of Humphrey de Bigod

Occupation: Heiress of Belvoir
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Cecily (Cicely) Bigod, Heiress of Belvoir

Two Bigod sisters each married men named William d"Aubigny. Cecily Bigod married William "Brito" d'Aubigny while her sister Maud Bigod married William "Pincerna" d'Aubigny.

The d'Aubigny's of Belvoir are from this line, since Cecily inherited Belvoir from her mother, Adeliza de Toeni (Tosny/Toni).

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Two Bigod sisters each married men named William d"Aubigny. Cecily Bigod married William "Brito" d'Aubigny while her sister Maud Bigod married William "Pincerna" d'Aubigny.

The d'Aubigny's of Belvoir are from this line, since Cecily inherited Belvoir from her mother, Adeliza de Toeni (Tosny/Toni).

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Cecily Bigod

(circa 1086 - )

Cecily Bigod|b. c 1086|p69.htm#i14255|Roger Bigod|b. c 1060?\nd. 1106|p69.htm#i22632|Adeliza Todeni|d. 26 Nov 1120|p789.htm#i14261|Robert l. Bigod de Loges||p69.htm#i14307||||Robert d. Tosny|d. 1088|p789.htm#i14257|Adelais (?)||p1.htm#i14256|

    
    Cecily Bigod married William D'Aubigne (Brito I), son of Patriarch D'Aubigne.
    She was of Belvoir. K S B Keats-Roahan wrote in Prosopon no. 9 (July 1998): In 1129 the sole surviving issue of Robert de Tosny were his younger daughters Adelisa Bigod and Agnes de Beaufour, who was then already married to Hubert de Ryes. At that date his Bigod granddaughter Matilda de Albini was probably already dead and her sister Gunnor not long removed from her second marriage to Haimo de St Clair. Of their siblings, only Hugh Bigod and Cecilia, then wife of William de Albini Brito, survived. The Carta returned by Hugh Bigod in 1166 shows him holding the fee of his aunt Albreda de Insula.[15] At the same date William de Albini Brito II held the fee of Belvoir. The conclusion from this must be that Adelisa succeeded Albreda in the fees of both Berengar and Robert de Tosny as next surviving sister. When she in her turn died she left issue of both sexes. Her sole surviving son Hugh succeeded his aunt Albreda - and by extension, her eldest brother Berengar - as heir both to Berengar's tenancy-in-chief in Lincolnshire and the Norman lands of Robert de Tosny of Belvoir. His tenancy of Robert's Norman lands is shown in a Norman record of 1172 where he is named as holding land of the fee of Conches and Tosny.[16] More important in terms of size in England, the lordship of Belvoir was nonetheless the lesser of the two Tosny lordships because it as not associated with their Norman heritage. As the inheritance of a woman married to an important tenant-in-chief it could be expected to pass to one of her younger children and not her husband's principal male heir. Since she had no surviving younger sons after 1120, the devolution of Belvoir to one of her daughters was inevitable. Gunnor and Matilda had long since been provided for from their father's inheritance by the time, after c. 1115/1118, that Adelisa succeeded to Belvoir. Consequently it was the youngest daughter Cecilia - quite probably a mere infant at her father's death in 1107 - who became her mother's heiress. She was, of course , an heiress whose marriage could advantageously be used to reward one of the king's loyal new men. Cecilia's marriage to William de Albini Brito has been said to have occurred as early as 1107 on the basis of a Belvoir charter given by Ralph de Raines and attested by Roger Bigod, but it certainly took place much later. The Belvoir charter just mentioned probably begins to the early 1140s . It was attested by William de Albini senior and his wife Cecilia, their son William junior, Roger Bigot, Robert de Toteneio, Ralph de Albeneio and others.[17] Since William, Robert and Ralph were certainly sons of William and Cecilia it is clear that Roger Bigod was also, as is confirmed by the order of their sons William, Robert, Roger, listed in the Thorney Liber vitae (BL Add, 40,000, fol. 2r). Cecily Bigod was born circa 1086. She was the daughter of Roger Bigod and Adeliza Todeni.

Children of Cecily Bigod and William D'Aubigne (Brito I)

   * Eudes D'Aubigne
   * Ralph d'Aubigne d. before Michaelmas 1192
   * William D'Aubigne+ d. bt 1166 - 1167

-------------------- Cecily LE BIGOD. Died After 1164. Heir of her mother in Belvoir.Cecily was alive when her son granted the church of Redmile,Leics to Belvoir Priory in about 1165. [Ref: Richard Borthwick14 Jul 1999 citing: Keats-Rohan Family Trees 175, Keats-RohanDomesday People I:380, Sanders p12, Wareham XVII:230]

Cecily 'de Belvoir' (dau of Roger Bigod), m. William d'Aubignythe Breton, who had obtained part of the fee of Belvoir beforeCecily's mother was given possession of it; this marriage,therefore, may have been arranged to settle rival claims. Cecilyeventually inherited Belvoir from her mother (Hist. MSS. Com.,Rutland MSS., vol. iv. pp. 106-7, 144, 161) [Ref: Utz 10 Jan1999 citing: Geoffrey H. White essay on 'Norfolk' in CPIX:578(c)]

I. J. Sanders, English Baronies, in his discussion of Belvoir,Leicestershire, p. 12, says: 'Robert de Todeni, Domesday lord ofBelvoir, d. 1088. William, s. and h., d.s.p. when his heir forBelvoir was his sister Alice.

'Alice m. Roger Bigod d. 1107 of Framlingham, q.v. She d. postAug. 1127 leaving Cecily.

'Cecily m. William I de Albini Brito d. 1133-55.[3] William IId'Aubigny d. 1168 leaving William III, a minor, d. 1236. . . .'

Footnote 3 reads: 'Regesta, ii, no. 1495; Rutland MSS, iv, pp.144, 161. William seems to have controlled part of the Belvoirestate before the death of Alice (idem, p. 107). Williamwitnesses letters dated 1133 but the early pipe rolls of HenryII give no evidence of his death (Regesta, ii, nos. 1777,1798).'

[Sanders' phrase, 'leaving Cecily,' clearly implies, from hisusage throughout '. . . as daughter and heir.']

Anthony Wagner, English Genealogy, p. 66, comments: '. . .William d'Aubigny the Breton did indeed succeed a son of Robertde Tony at Belvoir, but it was, as Round showed, in virtue ofhis marriage to Robert's granddaughter Cicely.[3]' Footnote 3reads: 'Hist. MSS. Comm. MSS. of the Duke of Rutland, iv. 106;Complete Peerage, ix, 577. [Ref: Utz 10 Jan 1999 (Alan B. Wilson14 Dec 1997)]

More important in terms of size in England, the lordship ofBelvoir was nonetheless the lesser of the two Tosny lordshipsbecause it was not associated with their Norman heritage. As theinheritance of a woman married to an important tenant-in-chiefit could be expected to pass to one of her younger children andnot her husband's principal male heir. Since she had nosurviving younger sons after 1120, the devolution of Belvoir toone of her daughters was inevitable. Gunnor and Matilda had longsince been provided for from their father's inheritance by thetime, after c. 1115/1118, that Adelisa succeeded to Belvoir.Consequently it was the youngest daughter Cecilia - quiteprobably a mere infant at her father's death in 1107 - whobecame her mother's heiress. She was, of course , an heiresswhose marriage could advantageously be used to reward one of theking's loyal new men. Cecilia's marriage to William de AlbiniBrito has been said to have occurred as early as 1107 on thebasis of a Belvoir charter given by Ralph de Raines and attestedby Roger Bigod, but it certainly took place much later. TheBelvoir charter just mentioned probably begins to the early1140s . It was attested by William de Albini senior and his wifeCecilia, their son William junior, Roger Bigot, Robert deToteneio, Ralph de Albeneio and others.[17] Since William,Robert and Ralph were certainly sons of William and Cecilia itis clear that Roger Bigod was also, as is confirmed by the orderof their sons William, Robert, Roger, listed in the ThorneyLiber vitae (BL Add, 40,000, fol. 2r)

[17] Mon. Ang. ii, 289, no. 111. [Ref: PROSOPON 9 Belvoir: TheHeirs of Robert and Berengar de Tosny by K.S.B. Keats-Rohanhttp://www.linacre.ox.ac.uk/research/prosop/PRSPN9.stm]

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Cecily (Cicely) Bigod, Heiress of Belvoir's Timeline

1093
1093
Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
1130
1130
Age 37
Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, England
1130
Age 37
Belvoir Castle, Leicestershire, ABT 1128, England
1132
1132
Age 39
Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
1134
1134
Age 41
South Petherton, Somersetshire, England
1135
December 5, 1135
Age 42
Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
1165
1165
Age 42
Of, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England
1939
October 19, 1939
Age 42
October 19, 1939
Age 42
October 19, 1939
Age 42