Cecily Reynolds (c.1601 - 1660) MP

‹ Back to Reynolds surname

Is your surname Reynolds?

Research the Reynolds family

Cecily Reynolds's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Nicknames: "Sisley Greene", "Cicely Bayley", "Cecily Jordan", "Cicily Farrar", "Sisley", "The first southern belle"
Birthplace: Dorset, England
Death: Died in Charles City, Virginia
Occupation: 5 husbands, "Ancient Planter", original "Southern belle", flirt
Managed by: Linda Louise Ford
Last Updated:

About Cecily Reynolds

Cicely Reynolds, born betw 1593 and 1604 in Dorset, England; died 1677 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA. She was also known as Sisley or Cesley Greene, Reynolds, Farrar, Jordan, Bayley, and Montague. She was awarded with the title of "Ancient Planter" of the Jamestown Colony in 1620.

She was on her own from the age of 11, and grew into the much-courted and many times married "Glamour Girl" of the Jamestown Colony. She had good friendships with women as well as men; and by the time she was 24 years old, due to the death of her husband Samuel Jordan, she owned outright a successful plantation, Jordan's Landing, one of only four to continue operation after the Indian Massacre of 1622. Both Samuel and Cicely earned the designation "Ancient Planter" by the London Company of Virginia.

Parents: Thomas Reynolds and Cicely Pippen (1593-?) . Note: "There is no proof whatsoever anywhere that Cecily Baley Jordan Farrar, Ancient Planter, was a Reynolds or connected to the Phippin family at all. I am descended from her through both her daughter, Temperance Cocke and her son, William Farrar. I have studied these families over 50 years. I am a Founder of Order of Descendants of Ancient Planters and it is very important to us to have the lines correct based on documentary evidence." Temperance Bailey and her ancestors Posted 15 February 2011.

married:

  1. 1618 to Thomas Bayley or Bailey, thought to be the son of Samuel Bailey; Thomas was a member of the Governor's Guard stationed at Jamestown. He died of illness and in accordance with the custom of the Colony, Cecily promptly remarried.
  2. abt 1621 to Samuel Jordan (1590-1623) as his second wife.
  3. on May 02, 1625 in Jamestown, VA to Commissioner William Farrar.

marriages sometimes listed to Peter Montague and Thomas Parker were discussed and not shown in the Geni tree. See below.

Children of Cicely Reynolds and Thomas Bailey:

  1. Temperance Bailey, born 1617 in Charles City County, VA; died 1647 in Charles City County, VA. married Lieutenant Colonel Richard Cocke, Sr., born Bef. September 05, 1602 in Stottesdon, Shropshire, England; died October 04, 1665 in Bremo, Henrico, VA. He was the son of John Cocke and Elizabeth. It is thought that Temperance was named in honor of Temperance West, Lady Yardley, wife of Governor George Yardley.

Children of Cicely Reynolds and Samuel Jordan:

  1. Mary Jordan, born 1621 in Jordan's Journey, VA; died Abt. 1670 in Henrico County, VA; married (1) Arthur Bailey 1654 in Henrico County, VA; married (2) Christopher Foster Aft. 1658 in Virginia.
  2. Margaret Jordon, born 1623 in Jordan's Journey, VA, after her father's death.

Children of William Farrar and Cicely Reynolds are:

  1. Col. William Farrar II, born 1626 in Jamestown, VA; died February 11, 1677/78 in Henrico Co., VA; married Mary Williams 1656.
  2. Cicely Farrar, born 1627 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died 1703; married Henry Sherman, Sr.
  3. Lt. Col. John Farrar, born 1631 in Farrar's Island, Henrico Co., VA; died March 1684/85 in Henrico Co., VA.

the quotable Miss Reynolds

Mr. Pooley maught thank himself for he might fared the better but for his own words." - Cecely Reynolds Baley Jordan Farrar, 1623

the invention of flirting in America

Cicely survived the Jamestown Massacre in 1622 by, as the story goes, standing firmly at her front door and refusing to move. The Powhatan Indians were impressed with her fortitude and beauty and let her live. That story seems a little far-fetched, but who knows?

Note: Records show that few lives were lost at Jordan's Journey during the Indian Massacre of 1622 -- Samuel Jordan's son was killed trying to warn neighbors -- and it was one of the four fortified plantations not abandoned after the massacre. In the dawn's darkness, William Farrer rowed as rapidly as he could from Farrer's Island to take refuge at Jordan's Journey. He was to stay at there for the next 6 years.


Within three or four days of Samuel Jordan’s death, Cicely agreed to become the wife of Rev. Greville Pooley. She was pregnant with Samuel Jordan’s child, so she asked that the engagement be kept secret. However, Rev. Pooley was so impressed that he had won Cicely’s hand that he spread the word. Not a good move, now a furious Cicely refused to go through with the wedding, causing the first "breach of contract" lawsuit in the Colonies. n.b. Quite wisely the Virginia House of Burgesses kicked the case over to London, and Cecily won.


Finally, at 59, Cicely Reynolds Bailey Jordan Farrar Montague married husband five, Thomas Parker. There were no children from this marriage, and Parker died three years later. Unfortunately, as was the case with many women, after this we lose records on Cicely. As a member of my mother’s family, I can surmise that, at this point, she had thick wavy white hair, a wry and dark sense of humor, and perfect grace.

Family Notes

  • from: The Sister of Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight VA?, by Susan E. Clement and Sybil R. Taylor © 1992 Reynolds Family Association

From the evidence examined to date, it appears that the first American genealogical writer of Cecily and Christopher was J.R.B. Ray in 1901. (The North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol II, No 4, Oct 1901. Repr Balto: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1979, pp135-136.) Unfortunately, Ray gave little in the way of sources for his information.


Ray appears to have found Cecily entrancing, and he wrote of the "Mysterious Cicely Jordan"

At or about the same time, if not on the same vessel, in the year 1611, a ten year old girl named Cicely Reynolds, and a comparatively young widower, who had left his small sons behind him in England, arrived at Jamestown in the Colony of Virginia.


The young widower was Samuel Jordan, who afterwards established a seat on the James River near its confluence with the Appomattox, which he called 'Jourdan's Jorney'. Almost contemporaneously with the coming of these two, but perhaps a year earlier, Sir Thomas Gates and his companions of the ill fated 'Sea Venture' had landed, among them being Capt. William Pierce."

"This was followed by Joane Pierce, the Captain's wife on the 'Blessing.' Capt. Pierce was a relative in some degree of the young girl Cicely Reynolds, and doubtless the advance arrival of Cicely was known to both Captain Pierce and his wife.


Besides, Samuel Jordan was a near-relative of Cicely and her mother's cousin, and still another cousin (of her mother) Silvester Jordan, came about the same time, so there was no lack of relatives to look after the ten year old child, whose mother, still living in Dorsetshire, for some reason had consented to her coming."

These sudden and swift transitions in the life of Cicely Reynolds were characteristic of one of such adventurous spirit as to undertake a long sea voyage into strange lands, even though accompanied by near relatives. She was ten years of age in 1611, and must have married her first husband ___ Bailey when but about 14 years old, as in 1623-4 her daughter Temperance was seven years of age. The Christian name of her first husband has not been found, but it is safe to say he was of the same family as the Samuel Bailey who is known to have married a grand-daughter of Capt. William Pierce, her relative.


The grandfather of Cicely Reynolds was Thomas Jordan, of Dorsetshire, England, grand daughter, the mother of Cicely married a Reynolds [sic]. Her mother's maiden name was Cicely Fitzpen or Phippen, and she was the daughter of Robert Phippen and his wife Cicely or Cicellie Jordan. Robert Phippen was the son of one Joseph Phippen, whose mother was Alice Pierce, and thus Ciceley Reynolds was related to Capt. William Pierce and his wife Joane. This last couple were the parents of Jane Pierce who married as his third wife another celebrated Virginia character -John Rolfe.

But to continue the story:

Samuel Jordan of Jordan's Jorney, became the second husband of this adventurous daughter of his first cousin Cicely Phippen.

"Twelve years later, her brother, Christopher Reynolds, arrived on the 'John and Francis' and may have discovered for the first time that his sister was then married to her second husband Samuel Jordan and the mistress of Jordan's Jorney, with a six year old daughter by her first husband, named Temperance Bailey..."

At their home on the James [River] he and his wife and their household survived the Indian uprising that occurred in 1622-23. But not long after that Samuel Jordan died.

Very shortly after the death of Samuel Jordan, of Jordan's Jorney, one of the legatees in the will of Abraham Persey, a certain Rev. Greville Pooly, vociferously "woed" the widow Cecily Jordan, who rejected his early advances on the ground that she was with child; but thereafter she married Capt. William Farrar, a prominent man of the Virginia Council. Thereupon the parson brought what has been called by Alexander Brown "the first breach of promise suit in America". The astute third husband, being a lawyer, succeeded in quashing the proceedings, and Parson Pooly went on his way. But the child was born.

Thus Cicely Reynolds had been married twice and was the mother of one child by each of her first two husbands. By Captain William Farrar, she became the mother of two sons Capt. William Farrar Jr and Lieut. Colonel John Farrar, of Henrico Co. [VA] who left no children and never married, so that the girl-emigrant thus became the ancestress of the numerous Farrars of VA, through her son William Farrar, Jr. Her third husband, Capt. (or Colonel) William Farrar died about 1635-6.

The history of 'Aunt Cecily' becomes obscured by the ascendancy of the Independents or Puritans. In that transition, the old plantation aristocracy of which she was a part lost power in the affairs of the Colony. But her original chaperon in America, Captain William Pierce (II) wound up on the winning team in that shuffle. So did her brother, Christopher Reynolds (III)." [23]

Discussion

  • Researchers have Cecily marrying for a fourth time to Peter Montague. Peter left a wife, Cecily , in his will proved 1 July 1659 in Lancaster county, Virginia. It is felt that Peter's first wife was Cecily Mathews, the daughter of Anthony Matthews. Many researchers state that Cecily Farrar had five children by Peter Montague.
  • After Peter's death, researchers say she married in 1660 Thomas Parker, who also left a wife Cecily. Thomas came in the Neptune with William Farrar in 1618 and on 23 January 1625 was at "College Land."
  • Said to have given birth to Samuel Jordan's posthumous son named Richard Jordan. This seems unlikely as the Jamestown Muster of 1624 reports her with three children (in a household of 37): Temperance Bailey, Mary Jordan and Margaret Jordan (b. 1623). Therefore Margaret is most likely the child born after Samuel Jordan's death. There is no further record of Margaret so presume died young.
  • Said to be the younger sister of Christopher Reynolds of Isle of Wight.
  • She is variously listed as a Fludd, a Greene, and most interestingly, as a street orphan swept up and sent to the Jamestown Colony. However the name "Cecily" runs in the Phippen family, and the connections to the Bailey and Jordan families, carried over in Jamestown, seem firmly rooted in Dorset. The real question is why a mother allows / sends her 11 year old child on such an adventure to Jamestown. That Cecily prospered materially -- she was a wealthy woman in her own name by age 24 -- seems an unlikely motivation, even for a family of merchant / adventurers.

links

Other references

  • Coldham, Peter Wilson, "The Complete Book of Emigrants" Baltimore, MD Genealogial Publishing Company 1988.
  • Holmes, Alvahn, "The Farrar's Island Family and its English Ancestry", Baltimore, MD , Gateway Press Inc. 1977
  • Nugent, Neil Marion, "Cavaliers and Pioneers" Baltimore, MD , Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983

Footnotes

  • [23] For a capsule description of the transition that cast the parliament and the King of England at loggerheads during this period, see White, Concise History of England, pages 93-97.
  • [497] According to the muster of the inhabdaitants of "Jorns Journey" Plantation taken the 21st of January 1624, Cecily Jordan was then aged 24 -- William Farrar (I) was 31, her daughter Temperance Baily was 7, Mary was 3 and Margaret was 1 -- so Richard apparently arrived late in the year 1624. Hotten, List of Emigrants to America - 1600-1700, pp209-210. -- Worth S. Ray
==============

Notes on Cecily Reynolds
:

Cecily was born 1600 in England, and died Abt. 1662 in Charles City, Henrico Co. Virginia. She married (1) Unknown Bailey on Abt. 1616 in Henrico Co. Virginia. She married (2) Samuel Jordan on Bef. December 01, 1620 in Henrico Co. Virginia. She married (3) William Farrar on Bet. January 03, 1624/25 - May 02, 1625 in Charles City, Henrico, Co. Virginia, son of John Farrer and Cecily Kelke.

She was said to have introduced the art of flirting in Virginia... she was the original southern belle, and no doubt beautiful for she won the hearts of some of the colony's outstanding citizens. The fascinating Cecily earned her reputation as a heartbreaker and a place in history when she became the object of the first breach of promise suit in America. There is much myth and speculation, but few facts truly known about this often married elusive lady of whom so many today claim to be descendants. There has long been a mystery surrounding the little girl who arrived in Jamestown at the tender age of ten, and received the distinction of "Ancient Planter." Genealogists have long pondered the question, "Who was Cecily"? 



FACTS: Cecily was born in England about 1600. In June 1610, at age ten, Cecily sailed from the port of London aboard the "Swan" arriving at the Jamestown Colony in late August 1610. The "Swan" was one of a fleet of three ships belonging to Sir Thomas Gates, which along with the "Tryall" and the "Noah" carried 250 passengers and a years worth of provisions for 400 men. Fortunately for Cecily she arrived well supplied because the previous year 1609 had been known as that dreadful "starving time" when the infant colony was reduced from about 500 souls to "a haggard remnant of 60 all told, men, women and children scarcely able to totter about the ruined village". The only surviving record of the passengers on the "Swan" are Cecily "Sisley Jordan" and ten other persons named in the Virginia Muster of early 1624/25 taken 14 years after the voyage. 



Passengers from the Port of London on the Swan to Virginia, June - August 1610:

 Biggs, Richard . . . . . . .Age 41 in Virginia Muster, January 22, 1624/5. 
Bouldinge, Thomas . . . Age 40 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5
 Fludd, John . . . . . . . . . See name in Virginia Muster, January 21, 1624/5
 Garnett, Thomas . . . . . Age 40 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5
 Jordan, Sisley . . . . . . . Age 24 in Virginia Muster, January 21, 1624/5. 
Lupo, Albiano (Lt.) . . . .Age 40 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5
 Stepney, Thomas . . . . .Age 35 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5
 Taylor, John . . . . . . . . Age 34 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5
 Waine, Amyte . . . . . . Age 30 in Virginia Muster, February 7, 1624/5 
Gates, Thomas (not Sir)..Age ? in Virginia Muster, January 21, 1624/5, arrived 1610, not 1609. 
Wright, Robart . . . . . . . Age 45 in Virginia Muster, February 4, 1624/5, arrived 1610, 1608.



FACT: It is not known for certain who Cecily's parents were, who brought her to Virginia, or who raised her in Virginia. 

MYTHS ABOUND: Some researchers have assumed her name was Greene because there was a Cecily Greene listed in "Hakluyt's List of Immigrants to Virginia" before 1624. The most popular myth of all is that she was Cecily Reynolds, daughter of Thomas Reynolds and Cecily Phippen (Fitzpen) and sister of Christopher Reynolds, arriving in America in 1610 with her mother and brother. Amazingly the Reynolds' daughter Cecily is listed in numerous Ancestral File and IGI records in the LDS Family Search files as born in 1575, 1586, 1594, 1595, 1600, 1601 & 1605 and all with absolutely no sources to support the dates given. Some alternately list her mother as Jane Phippen, a twin, rather than Cecily Phippen; some list any one of a combination of five supposed husbands, and Cecily's death dates also vary just as widely: 1610, 1620, 1637, 1656, 1659, Sept. 12, 1660, 1662 & 1677. The problem with the theory of Cecily being Thomas Reynolds and Cecily Phippen's daughter Cecily was that the most plausable records place her birth circa 1575-1586 with a death date as early as 1610-20, therefore she was about a generation older than our Cecily (born 1600) and died young. Another variation speculates that Cecily was the first "Reynolds" to reach America, arriving in 1610 with "Uncle Billy Pierce" actually her cousin, but he arrived on the Seaventure 1609-10 along with Samuel Jordan, of whom there is also speculation of a family connection. Christopher Reynolds arrived on the "John & Francis" in 1622. 



Another fascinating speculation arises- going back some 50 years before Cecily's birth- The "will of John Yerdely of Myles Grene" of Audeley, Co. Stafford, England, dated in 1558 and proved in 1559, it names "Cicilye my wife" and "John GERNETT, my son in law", and the will of Ralph Yerdley of Audeley, Co. Stafford, gentleman, dated 1587 and proved in 1588 not only states that the testator's father was "William Yerdeley, gentleman" and that his brothers are John and George Yerdley, but he was also appointed as one of the executors of a "kinsman" named "William BOULTON" (Boulding?). --The significance of these names, besides "Cicilye" Yerdley, mentioned in these wills is that there were two men with the surnames- "Bouldinge" and "Garnett" who arrived on the Swan in 1610 along with Cecily and are listed in the 1624/25 Virginia Muster.

Sir George Yeardley was the son of Ralph Yardley, citizen and merchant tailor London; and Sir George Yeardley's brother was Ralph Yardley, "citizen and Apothecarie of London". Exactly what was the link between the Yerdley's of Staffordshire and the Yardley's or Yearle's of London is not known but it is likely that there was some tie of kinship between them both and the little girl "Sislye" who sailed for Virginia in the Swan in 1610. Two of her fellow passengers on that boat were Thomas Garnett, a servant of the famous Indian fighter Captain William Powell, and one Thomas Boulding (Bouldin), who was then twenty-six years old. Neither of them could have been Sislye's father, but the name Thomas Garnett is strangely reminiscent of "Thomas Gernett" who more than fifty years before was the son-in-law of John Yerdley and his wife "Cicilye", and there is a close resemblance between Thomas Boulding's name and that of Ralphe Yerdley's "kinsman" William Bouldin. Perhaps William Bouldin (Boulding), yeoman, who, together with his wife Mary, also came to Virginia in 1610 (whether in the Swan or on another ship) was Sislye's father, but nothing more is known of this couple from the day they came ashore. Not so, however with Thomas Boulding (Bouldin, Bolding, Bolden) "of Elizabeth Cittie Co., Yeoman and Ancient Planter:, and Thomas Garnett, for both of them gradually acquired tracts of land in Virginia and were apparently living side by side as late as 1635.



FURTHERMORE: Based on naming patterns and proximity Cecily seems to have had a close connection to Governor and Lady Yeardley - Temperance Flowerdew, who became Lady Yeardley, and arrived in Virginia in 1609 on the "Falcon" (her husband and Samuel Jordan were aboard the ill-fated Seaventure, presumed lost at sea, but joyfully to all arriving in May 1610). Temperance Flowerdew and Cecily may have been related or simply became friends. Whatever the connection Cecily's first child Temperance Bailey was believed to be the namesake of Temperance Flowerdew.

FACT: There is strong circumstancial evidence that Cecily, at about age 16, married her first husband and had daughter Temperance Bailey from this union about 1617, and was widowed before 1620. Even though solid proof is lacking it is generally accepted as fact that Cecily was the mother of Temperance Bailey based on the two Musters of Jordan's Journey of February 16, 1623 and January 21, 1624/5, land patents and deeds, and wills in the Cocke family into which Temperance Bailey married. Lineage societies accept the descendants of Temperance Bailey Cocke as proven. 
SPECULATION: Without stating any sources for the following details some researchers have written that Cecily's first husband was either John or Thomas Bailey, who came to Virginia in 1612 sponsored by William Pierce... he was a young member of the Governor's Guard stationed at Jamestown... He and Cecily were married in the home of William Pierce in Jamestown... The young couple lived at Bailey's Point, Bermuda Hundred... and Bailey died of malaria shortly after the marriage. There are no records to support these details, only the existence ot Temperance Bailey. 



CECILY AND SAMUEL JORDAN


As was the custom of the time it was an absolute necessity for the safety of the early female settlers to have a male protector. For this reason we frequently find widows marrying within a few weeks or months following the death of their husbands. Cecily 20, promptly married her much older neighbor Samuel Jordan 42, shortly before December 1620. Cecily was about a year younger than Samuel Jordan's eldest son. Samuel had been previously married in England with four known children, but after his first wife died he immigrated to America in 1609 aboard the "Seaventure" which was shipwrecked off Bermuda, not arriving in Virginia till May 1610. He was a member of the initial House of Burgesses of the Colony in 1619 where the first specific instance of genuine self-government emerged in the British Colonial Empire. 

Samuel and Cecily settled at "Beggar's Bush" later renamed "Jordans Journey" near the confluence of the Appomattox and James Rivers southside. One of Sir George Yeardley's first acts was to grant a patent of land at James City on Dec. 10, 1620 to Samuel Jordan of Charles City in Virginia. Gent. an ancient planter "who hath abode ten years Compleat in the Colony" and to "Cecily his wife an ancient planter also of nine years continuance." The land grants for being "Ancient Planters" were the rewards they had earned by their perseverance in establishing the first permanent beachhead of English colonization on American soil.

Samuel Jordan later added large holdings on the south bank of the James at Jordan's Point. On the point jutting out into the James River, Samuel and Cecily developed a large home plantation later renamed "Jordan's Journey," consisting of a palisaded fort enclosing 11 buildings. They were soon expanding their family too with the arrival of daughter Mary Jordan, born in 1621 or early 1622. 

Baby Mary Jordan probably had no memory of that fateful day of the vernal equinox, 22 March 1622, when the Great Indian Massacre fell on the colony like a thunderbolt from the sky. Powhattan's tribe tried to wipe out the entire English Colony in a concerted uprising on Good Friday. Fortunately for the Jordans they received a forewarning of the plot in sufficient time to fortify "Beggar's Bush" against attack. Early that morning Richard Pace had rowed with might and main three miles across the river from Paces Paines to Beggars Bush to warn Samuel Jordan of the impending blow. Without losing an instant, Samuel Jordan summoned his neighbours from far and near and gathered them all, men, women and children, within his home at Beggar's Bush, "where he fortified and lived in despight of the enemy." So resolutely was the place defended, that not a single life was lost there on that bloody day. They were also able to save their buildings and most of the livestock. The agony and terror of the women and children huddled together in the farthest corner of the little stronghold can only be imagined. The next day their neighbor Mr. William Farrar reached "Beggar's Bush" a few miles journey from his plantation on the Appomattox River. Ten victims had been slaughtered at his home and he himself had barely escaped to safety at the Jordan's where circumstances would force him and other survivors to remain for some time. About one third of Virginia colonists died during the Indian Massacre including Samuel's son Robert Jordan at Berkley Hundred in Charles City while trying to warn neighbors across the water of the impending Indian attack. In those days most people got around by boat and freely went from one side of the river to the other. 

Less than a year later in early 1623 Samuel Jordan passed away at the home he built later known as Jordan's Journey. Cecily was soon due to give birth to their second child. Samuel Jordan is known to have died prior to the February 16, 1623 census of Virginia colonists because his name is conspicuously missing from the list of inhabitants at Jordan's Journey and his and Cecily's second daughter Margaret had recently been born: 

From Persons of Quality: "A List of Names; of the Living in Virginia, February the 16, 1623"
"Living
At Jordan's Jorney
Sislye Jordan
Temperance Baylife
Mary Jordan
Margery Jordan
William Farrar" 
(37 more names follow the above listed.)



CECILY AND WILLIAM FARRAR


After Samuel Jordan died Cecily 23, was left with daughter Mary 2, her eldest daughter Temperance Bailey 6, and another child soon to be delivered. Reverend Greville Pooley, age 46, who had conducted Samuel Jordan's funeral service, proposed to Cecily only four days afterwards. She apparently consented, feeling the need for a protector, but subject to the engagement being kept secret due to the timeliness of Samuel's death and her pregnancy. However, Rev. Pooley "spread the word" of the engagement, and this so ired the young widow that she refused to go through with the wedding. Soon afterwards Cecily accepted another proposal of marriage and became engaged to William Farrar who had been living at Jordan's Journey since the massacre. Undaunted, the enraged Rev. Pooley brought suit for breach of promise to compel Cecily to marry him. When the Parson sued on June 14, 1623, he accused the lady of having jilted him and alleged that it was nothing short of "Skandelous" for Mr. Farrar, his rival, to be "in ordinary dyett in Mrs. Jordan's house and to frequent her Company alone." This was the celebrated case of its day. William Farrar, trained for the law in England and the executor of Samuel Jordan's estate, was enlisted by Cecily to represent her.

The Governor and Council could not bring themselves to decide the questions and continued the matter until November 27, 1623, then referred the case to the Council for Virginia in London, "desiring the resolution of the civil lawyers thereon and a speedy return thereof." But they declined to make a decision and returned it, saying they "knew not how to decide so nice a difference." Reverend Pooley was finally persuaded by the Reverend Samuel Purchase to drop the case. As a result on January 3, 1624/25, the Reverend Pooley signed an agreement freely acquitting Mrs. Jordan from her promises. Cecily then formally "contracted herself before the Governor and Council to Captain William Farrar." 

The Governor and Council of the Colony were so stirred by the extraordinary incident that they issued a solemn proclamation against a woman engaging herself to more than one man at a time. Passage of this law for the protection of Virginia bachelors gave Cecily a place in history. And there is not in Virginia any known record that this edict has ever been revoked.

That the first breach of promise case in this country was filed by a parson is commentary on the times. Although ministers were carefully selected, the salary was very small and Pooley can hardly be blamed for being alert to a chance to feather his nest. The small poplulation afforded little choice of a desirable mate, and insecurity and terror following the Great Massacre the year before would have led any widow to feel need for protection. Due to insecurity of plantation life throughout colonial times, widows often remarried soon after their husband's death, sometimes before settlement of his estate.



A rather dramatic version of events is recounted in the book "The Farrars" by William B. & Ethyl Farrar: 
CICILY FARRAR: Interesting accounts of Cicily Jordan Farrar are found whenever the genealogy of the Farrar family is given. Below are portions of two stories: 
(After the death of Samuel Jordan)... there was a rush for the hand of his beautiful young wife, led by the Rev. Greville Pooley. Jordan had been in his grave only a day when Pooley sent Capt. Isaac Madison to plead his suit. Cecily replied that she would as soon take Pooley as any other, but as she was pregnant, she would not engage herself she said, "until she was delivered." But the amorous Reverend could not wait, and came a few days later with Madison, telling her "he should contract himself to her" and spake these words: "I, Greville Pooley, take thee Sysley, to be my wedded wife, to have and to hold till death do us part and herto I plight thee my troth." Then, holding her by the hand he spake these words, "I, Sysley, take thee Greville, to my wedded husband, to have and to hold till death do us part." Cicily said nothing, but they drank to each other and kissed. Then, showing some delicacy about her condition and the situation she found herself in, she asked that it might not be revealed that she did so soon bestow her love after her husband's death. Pooley promised, but was soon boasting of his conquest, very impetuously for "Sysley" now engaged herself to William Farrar, a member of the Governor's Council. Enraged, Pooley brought suit for breach of promise. The case too much for the the authorities at Jamestown, who referred it to London. The jilted Pooley soon found solace in a bride, it appears, but met a tragic death in 1629, when Indians attacked his house, and slew him, his wife and all his family. (From "Behold Virginia" by G.F. Willison--1951)



REVEREND POOLEY'S FATE:
 Pooley continued as minister for Fleur-Dieu Hundred until his death in 1629, but he does not seem to have been a very peaceful parson, for he was brought into court twice, ironically by William Farrar, for trouble with settlers. At the March 1628 Court "Yt is thought fitt the Mr. ffarrar (then Councilor) at the next meeting of the Court do bring down Mr. Pooley and Edward Auborne to aunswer to such things as shall be objected against them." And on another occasion, after a disagreement with Captain Pawlett, he was brought into court to answer charges against him; however in this case Pawlett was required to apologize. Pooley married and had a family but they are said to have met a tragic death at the hands of the Indians. 

During the course of the lawsuit in which he successfully defended Cecily, William Farrar performed the duties of executor of Samuel Jordan's estate in 1623 (Jordan's will does not survive). At a Court held on November 19, 1623, and presided over by Sir Francis Wyatt, Governor, and Christopher Davison, Secretary, records indicate that a warrant was issued "to Mr. Farrar to bring in the account of Mr. Jordan his estate by the last day of December." Another warrant was issued to "Mrs. Jordan, that Mr. Farrer put in security for the performance of her husbands' will." An abstract of the orders were to be delivered to Sir George Yeardley. 



THE MUSTER OF THE INHABITANTS
OF JORDAN'S JOURNEY AND CHAPLAIN CHOICE
 TAKEN THE 21TH OF JANUARY 1624



THE MUSTER OF Mr WILLIAM FERRAR & Mrs JORDAN

WILLIAM FERRAR aged 31 yeares in the Neptune in August 1618. 
SISLEY JORDAN aged 24 yeres in the Swan in August 1610. 
MARY JORDAN her daughter aged 3 yeares }
MARGARETT JORDAN aged 1 yeare }borne heare
TEMPERANCE BALEY aged 7 yeares }

(There is a single bracket three lines high to the right of the three daughters names, then the words "borne heare" indicating all three girls born in Virginia. William Farrar's age listed as 31 is incorrect. He was ten years older.)

Below the family listing is a section listing "SERVANTS" followed by the names of ten males ages ranging from 16 to 26 years.

Following that is a list of food, livestock, ammunition and buildings at Jordan's Journey:

PROVISIONS: Corne, 200 bushells; Fish, 2 hundred.
ARMS AND MUNITION: Powder, 14 lb; Lead, 300 lb; Peeces fixt, 11; Coats of Male, 12.
CATTLE, SWINE ETC: Neat cattell young and old 16; Swine, 4; Poultrie, 20.
HOUSES AND BOATS: Houses, 5; Boats, 2. 

MYTH: Cecily is said by some researchers to have had three children with second husband Samuel Jordan. Two daughters- Mary and Margaret, and a son Richard Jordan who married his first cousin Elizabeth Reynolds, daughter of Christopher Reynolds (presuming Cecily was a Reynolds). 
FACT: There are no records showing that Cecily and Samuel Jordan had a son Richard. If he existed he must have died before the 1623 and 1624/25 musters of Jordan's Journey on which he is not listed. Cecily was widowed while in the late stages of her pregnancy with youngest daughter Margaret Jordan who would have been a newborn at the time of the 1623 census, and in the 1624/25 muster Margaret Jordan is shown to be "aged 1 years" as would be expected. There was no Richard Jordan, son of Cecily. 



William Farrar 42, and Mrs. Cecily Jordan 25, were married shortly before May 2, 1625. Cecily's third husband was the son of John Farrer the elder of Croxton, Ewood, and London, Esquire and Cecily Kelke. He was born into the wealthy landed gentry of Elizabethan England in 1583. The Farrar ancestral estate Ewood had been handed down in the distinguished Farrar family since 1471. William Farrar had arrived in Virginia in August 1618 aboard the "Neptune" and settled a few miles up the Appomattox River from Jordan's Journey. It isn't know if he'd been previously married. William Farrar acquired a ready-made family of females when he married the young, attractive, and wealthy widow Cecily; Mary Jordan 4, Margaret Jordan 2, and Temperance Bailey 8, were thereafter his step-daughters.

Since William Farrar and Cecily Jordan had married, his bond to administer Samuel Jordan's estate was ordered canceled: "At a Court, 2 May 1625, 'Yt is ordered yt Mr. William Farrar's bonde shall be cancelled as overseer of the Estate of Samuel Jordan dec'd."

Within the first year of their marriage William Farrar was given a position of great responsibility when on March 4, 1625/6, Charles I appointed him a member of the King's Council, a position he probably held until just prior to his death in 1636. William and Cecily Farrar continued to reside at Jordan's Journey after their marriage. Records from the Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia 1622-1632 show that William Farrrar was living at Jordan's Journey as late as September 1626, and possibly until 1631/32. William and Cecily Farrar had three children together; the first two born prior to 1631. Their first was a girl named for her mother, Cecily, born about 1625/6. After becoming the mother of four girls there must have been excitement at the birth of Cecily's first son- William Farrar II in 1627. William II, as the first boy, was no doubt the long awaited little prince of the family. His godfather was Captain Thomas Pawlett, who had sailed to Virginia in the "Neptune" in 1618 with William Farrar. Son John was born about 1632 and may have been the only one of Cecily and William Farrar's children to be born at Farrar's Island. 

William Farrar's father died in 1628 and William returned to London in the summer of 1631 and sold his sizable inheritance to his brother, Henry Farrar of Berkshire, for £200 in a document dated September 6, 1631. Cecily and their children, Cecily and William, appear in the deed and relinquished their rights to his inheritance. It isn't known whether Cecily or the children accompanied William on the trip to England. 


FROM SALE OF WILLIAM FARRAR'S INHERITANCE: "September 6, 1631, indenture between William Farrar of London gent of the one part and Henry Farrer of Reading, Berkshire, Esquire, of the other part. Whereas John Farrer the elder of London Esquire, deceased, bequeathed to William Farrar and Cecily his wife and Cicely and William his children.."

The achievement for which Cecily's husband William Farrar is most remembered is the establishment of Farrar's Island, an estate their descendants would own for 100 years. It was located in what is now Henrico Co. Virginia on a bend in the James River at the former site of the city of Henricus, the second settlement of the colony. The estate consisted of 2000 acres, very large for its day, granted to William Farrar for the transportation of 40 settlers. It was not until after William Farrar's death in 1636, at the age of 54, that the patent for Farrar's Island was granted posthumously by King Charles I to his and Cecily's son William Farrar II on June 11, 1637. Presumedly thrice widowed Cecily Farrar continued to raise her six children at Farrar's Island. Daughter Temperance Bailey married Thomas Cocke in 1637. There are no known records of the fates of Mary and Margaret Jordan. Young Cecily Farrar is said to have married Isaac Hutchins and Henry Sherman, or Michael Turpin? William Farrar II inherited Farrar's Island at the age of ten and followed in his illustrious father's footsteps. Youngest son John Farrar held important offices in the colony, but never married or had offspring. The numerous Farrar descendants of William and Cecily all stem from the elder son, Col. William Farrar II. The name Cecily lived on in the Farrar family as several of her descendants were bestowed as her namesakes. 

MYTH: There is speculation that Cecily, widowed again by 1637 (at age 37), married a fourth and fifth time. There has, so far, been no proof of any later marriages for Cecily Bailey Jordan Farrar. She disappears from the records after 1637 and other women named "Cecily", of whom there were several in the colony, have been confused with her. 

From Elizabeth Tissot: Many have said, with no proof, that Cecily also married Peter Montague and Thomas Parker. This is FALSE. Cecily Montague was the relict of William Thompson I and had one son William Thompson II who married Ellen Montague, his step sister. Cecily Montague returned to England following the deaths of Peter Montague (in 1659) and her son, William Thompson II. Peter Montague's first wife was Elizabeth and she was mother of all his children. 
Source: "A Place in Time, Middlesex Co. VA 1650-1750", by Rutman, pp. 50, 96-98. This is a history of the County of Middlesex which relies on court records.

From- Daughters of The American Colonists, Member #14341 -Mrs.Louise Boone Ratliff: Her papers state Peter Montague, 1st married in 1633 Cecily Watkins -not Matthews, -not Farrar. Her lineage in Vol. 15 also says Peter Montague, 2nd married Elizabeth. 
Note: Additionally the marriage of Peter Montague to his Cecily was said to be in 1629 or 1633, both these dates predating the 1636 death of William Farrar, therefore making it impossible for Cecily Bailey Jordan Farrar to be the Cecily that Peter Montague married.
-Peter Montague, born 1603 in England, had come to Jamestown in 1618 aboard the "Charles" at the age of 18 as a headright of Billy Pierce. Peter Montague had six children - Peter, Margaret, William, Ellen, Elizabeth, and Ann with his first wife Elizabeth. He died in 1659 and named his wife Cecily (widow of Thompson) Montague in his will. Evidence shows she was not our Cecily Bailey Jordan Farrar.

-Thomas Parker, the immigrant, died in 1663 in Isle of Wight, Virginia. Parker family researchers are not sure which Thomas Parker of Isle of Wight, Virginia "is said to have married" the widow of a Peter Montague. The unnamed widow of a Peter Montague is mentioned in an Isle of Wight County deed transaction: On May 29, 1683 a patent was issued to Thomas Parker and James "Bagnall" for 470 acres, of which 50 acres granted to Peter Montague, and 40 acres for tranportation of a Negro Francisco. The patent stated that Thomas had married the widow of Peter Montague who had left two daughters Dorothy and Sarah and that Sarah had married James "Bageall." 
-Our Cecily Bailey Jordan Farrar would have been 83 years old at the time of this patent, and it has been proven she could not have been the survivng wife of immigrant Peter Montague. Therefore this record does not pertain to the generation of our Cecily or the immigrant Peter Montague who had a widow named Cecily, or to the immigrant Thomas Parker who died in 1663 long before the land patent mentioning the widow of Peter Montague. By all accounts Cecily is estimated to have died years before 1683. 

It is thought Cecily Farrar died prior to 1676, probably about 1662, but she may have died much earlier. There is no conclusive proof. Perhaps because her son, Col. William Farrar II, wrote his will in 1676 and doesn't mention his mother in it may be the reason she is presumed deceased before 1676.

Cecily's name survives today on the historical marker in Smithfield, Virginia at the location of "Jordan's Journey," where she lived circa 1620-1631 on the estate of her second husband Samuel Jordan. The marker reads:
"SAMUEL JORDAN OF JORDAN'S JOURNEY
Prior to 1619, Native Americans occupied this prominent peninsula along the upper James River, now called Jordan's Point. Arriving in Jamestown by 1610, Samuel Jordan served in July 1619 in Jamestown as a burgess for Charles City in the New Word's oldest legislative assembly. A year later, he patented a 450 acre-tract here known first as Beggar's Bush and later as Jordan's Journey. He survived the massive Powhatan Indian attack of March 1622 here at his plantation, a palisaded fort that enclosed 11 buildings. He remained at Jordan's Journey with his wife, Cicely, and their daughters until his death in 1623."

Today there are impressive brick entrance gates to "Jordan On The James," a high-end residential development. On the pillar is a small insert "c. 1619." In the development there is a road called "Beggars Bush" and outside is "Jordan's Point Road." Nearby one can play golf at Jordan's Point Country Club. The location of Samuel and Cecily Jordan's house, which has perished, was where the base of the Benjamin Harrison Bridge is now that connects both sides of the river. The Jordan Point Yacht Haven is now located at their former home site.

Sources:
THE FARRAR'S ISLAND FAMILY AND ITS ENGLISH ANCESTRY by Alvahn Holmes 1972.

More About Cecily and Unknown Bailey:
Marriage: Abt. 1616, Henrico Co. Virginia.

More About Cecily and Samuel Jordan:
Marriage: Bef. December 01, 1620, Henrico Co. Virginia.

More About Cecily and William Farrar:
Marriage: Bet. January 03, 1624/25 - May 02, 1625, Charles City, Henrico, Co. Virginia.



Children of Cecily and Unknown Bailey are: Temperance Bailey, b. Abt. 1617, Jordan's Journey, Henrico Co. Virginia, d. Abt. 1651, Bremo, Henrico, Co. Virginia.


Children of Cecily and Samuel Jordan are: Mary Jordan, b. Abt. 1621, Jordan's Journey, Henrico Co. Virginia. Margaret Jordan, b. Bef. February 16, 1622/23, Jordan's Journey, Henrico Co. Virginia.


Children of Cecily and William Farrar are: Cecily Farrar, b. Abt. 1625, Jordan's Journey, Henrico Co. Virginia, d. April 1703, Henrico Co. Virginia. William Farrar, b. Abt. 1627, Jordan's Journey, Henrico Co. Virginia, d. February 01, 1677/78, Charles City, Henrico Co. Virginia. John Farrar, b. Aft. 1632, Farrar's Island, Henrico Co. Virginia, d. March 1683/84, Henrico Co. Virginia.

___________________________________ Reynolds History Annotated (1475-1977)
Compiled by William Glasgow Reynolds
Copyright 1978 by W.G. Reynolds
Rockville MD: Mercury Press, 1978 Except where noted, the following is verbatim from book except for "..." (material which has no value as a source of proof) with reference at end of sentence or paragraph to which it pertains, and W.G. Reynolds' annotation. Roman numerals after a person's name supplied by W.G.R. to differentiate between individuals with same name. The first Reynolds to reach the New World was an 11 year old girl named Cecily. Cecily arrived at the VA Colony in Jamestown Aug 1610 aboard the Swan [1]. She came without her parents but under the auspices of several near relatives of Dorsetshire England. [1] Hotten, Lists of Emigrants to American 1600-1700, p 209; Nugent Cavaliers and Pioneers, p XXX: "Her arrival was a year before 1611, the year that gave birth to the King James Version of the Holy Bible..."] The name "Cecily" was an hereditary one [2]. [2] Ray, Index and Digest to Ray's NC Historical & Genealogical Register, p 135. Her mother's maiden name had been Cecily Phippen before she was married around 1594 to Thomas Reynolds (II) [3] [3] "Thomas Reynolds (II) had a near relative, William Reynolds (I) who attained distinction from a bequest in William Shakespeare's will, whereby he bequeathed 25 shillings 'to William Reynolds, Gent. to buy him a ring.' This will was dated Mar 1616 and was proved at Stratford-on-Avon England Jun 1616." See Bentley, A Handbook of Shakespeare, p 59]. ...Her [Cecily's] father, Robert Phippen, sprang from grandfather Joseph Phippen whose wife was Cecily's great-grandmother Alice Pierce. Alice Pierce's forebears have been traced to 1475, which means that this line of Reynolds is now documented on the distaff side back half a millennium to the times of Christopher Columbus. [4] The lineage of this Pierce family is set forth in Ray, Index & Digests to Hathaway's NC Historical & Genealogical Register, p 135. See also Appendix E [Pierce Lineage Chart, which see later in this article.] A grandson of Alice Pierce's brother was a Capt William Pierce (III) who, with his wife Joan, served as chaperon to young Cecily Reynolds after her voyage to VA [5]. [5] Ray, Index & Digest to Hathaway's NC Historical & Genealogical Register, p 135. "She lived in their home where she met and married the first of her several husbands, Thomas Bailey." Thomas Bailey was a member of the Governor's Guard at Jamestown.... Young Bailey became a victim of malaria. He left his widow with a young daughter, Temperance Bailey, who had been born in 1616 [6]. [6] Ibid. Note 5. "It is believed that Thomas Bailey's father was Samuel Bailey." In accordance with the custom of the Colony, Cecily promptly remarried [7]. [7] "A male protector was an absolute necessity for the safety of the early female settlers in VA. For this reason we frequently find widows marrying within a few weeks or months after the death of their husbands, their newly acquired mate joining with the widow in the administration upon her deceased husband's estate...We find many 'much married persons' among these early immigrants." Hathaway, NC Historical & Genealogical Register, Vol I, No 2, p 310. Her 2d husband was Samuel Jordan (I), a cousin of her mother, who had been previously married in England, and after the death of his first wife migrated to America. He came to VA on the 1610 voyage of the "Sea Venture" [8]. [8] "The detailed history of this Jordan migration will be found in Ray, Index & Digest to Hathaway's NC Historical & Genealogical Register, p 135. "The 'Sea Venture' left England in 1609. Sir Thomas Gates and Captain William Pierce (III) were fellow passengers with Samuel Jordan (I). The ship ran aground in West Indies and did not arrive at Jamestown until 1610." See Boddie Colonial Surry, p 21-22. He settled first at "Jordan's Journey" near the confluence of the Appomattox and James Rivers; later added large holdings on the south bank of the James at Jordan's Point, where he built a house called "Beggar's Bush" named after a popular London theatrical performance at the time. [9] [9] Samuel Jordan's home on the south bank of the James "he had named 'Beggar's Bush' after a popular play at the time..." in London. Hale Virginia Venturer, p 81. . . . As the 'Mayflower' was unloading in New England back in 1620 ... Cecily and Samuel Jordan, along with the surviving stockholders of the first Virginia Company were honored with the label of "Ancient Planters," given legal title to their lands and various immunities and privileges in connection with their use, as rewards earned by their perseverance in establishing the first permanent beachhead of English colonization on American soil... Nugent, p 226: To all to whom these presents shall come etc Greeting in our Lord God Everlasting. Know yee that I George Yardley Knight, Governor and Capt. Genll. of Virginia etc. by verture of the great Charter of orders and lawes concluded on in a great and Genll. Quarter Court by the Treasurer Councill and Company of Adventurers and planters for this first Southern Colony of Virginia (according) to the authority granted them by his Majtie under the great Seal) and by them dated at London the Sixteenth of November 1618 and directed to myself and the Councill of Estate here resident, do with the appraobation and consent of the same Councill who are joined in Condicion with mee Give and grant to Samuel Jourdan of Charles Citty in Virga. Gent, an ancient planter who hath abode ten years Compleat in this Colony and performed all services to the Colony that might any way concern him etc and to his heirs and assignes for ever for part of his first genll. dividend to be augmented &c, 450 acs. on his personal right, etc. and out of the rules of Justice, equity and reason and because the Company themselves have given us president in the like kind of the personall claim of Cecily his wife an ancient planter also of nine years continuance, one hundred acres more and the other 250 acs. in recompence of his trans. out of England at his own charges of five servants, namely John Davies, who arrived in 1617 for whose passage the sd. Samuel hath paid to the Cape. Mercht., Thomas Matterdy bound apprentice to sd. Samuel by indenture in England dated 8 Oct 1617; Robert Marshall brought out of England by Capt. Burgrave in May 1619, at the costs of sd. Samuel; Alice Wade the same year in the George, etc., & Thomas Steed in the Faulcon in July 1620; and maketh choice in 3 several places: one house & 50 acs. called --ilies Point [Bailies Point] in Charles hundred, bordering E. upon the gr. river, W. upon the main land, S. upon John Rolfe and N. upon the land of Capt. John Wardeefe; 2ndly, 1 tenement containing 12 acs., etc., encompassed on the W. by Martins Hope, now in tenure of Capt. John Martin, Master of the Ordinance; & 388 acs. in or near upon Sandys his hundred, towards land of Temperance Baley, W. upon Capt. Woodlief, etc. To have etc. Yielding & paying to the sd. Treasurer & Company & Provided, & c.
Given at James City 10 December 1620 and Signed
George Yardley
Fr. Pory, Secr.
This patent certifeid to the Treasurer. Lawr. Hulett. At a Genll. Ct. held at James Citty Oct. 20, 1690, Present: The Right Honble. Francis Nicholso, their Maj. Lt. Richard Bland, the patent being for 450 acs. in Chas. Citty Co. granted to Mr. Samuel Jordan in 1620, which is truly recorded. Test: R. Beverley, by W. Soward, Cl. Genll. Ct. P.B. No.8, p125. Footnote 13: "The story of the massacres at the lower plantations on the James is recounted in Boddie, Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County, Virginia, pages 35 and 36." Footnote 14: Hale, Virginia Venturer, pages 81-82: "Far up the James at Jordan's Point, stalwart old Samuel Jordan, one of the original Burgesses of the first Assembly, having escaped an early attack and being warned of what was happening by a colonist who rowed over the river to his plantation, gathered together a few stragglers, fortified... 'Beggar's Bush' and lived on there without loss of live despite assaults on the enemy and carnage among his neighbors." Footnote 15: Ray, Index and Digest to Hathaway's North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, page 135: "But not long after that (the 1622 massacre) Samuel Jordan died... Cecily's third husband was William Farrar (I); they had two sons: John and William (II), the last of whom became the sire of the famous Farrar clan of Virginia." [19] [19] Ibid. Note 18 {Ray, Index and Digest to Hathaway's North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, page 135}. She next married Peter Montague; they had 7 children during their 23 years of marriage. When Peter Montague died in 1659, Cecily married, Thomas Parker by whom there were no heirs." [22]. [22] Ray, Index and Digest to Hathaway's North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, page 135. Beyond this point, the history of 'Aunt Cecily' becomes obscured by the ascendancy of the Independents or Puritans. In that transition, the old plantation aristocracy of which she was a part lost power in the affairs of the Colony. But her original chaperon in America, Captain William Pierce (II) wound up on the winning team in that shuffle. So did her brother, Christopher Reynolds (III)." [23] [23] For a capsule description of the transition that cast the parliament and the King of England at loggerheads during this period, see White, Concise History of England, pages 93-97. Thus, Aunt Cecily Reynolds-Baily-Jordan-Farrar-Montague-Parker was able to end out her days in calm assurance that her title "Number One Wife and Mother of America" was abundantly secure." [24] [24] Ibid. Note 22. {Ray, Index and Digest to Hathaway's North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, page 135}.

_____________________________________

The Third Supply was a flotilla of nine ships, all intended for Jamestown, Virginia, commanded by Admiral Sir George Somers. The ships were: 
The flagship, the Sea Venture, also called the Seaventure or Sea Adventure, with Captain Christopher Newport 
The Blessing with Captain Gabriel Archer and Captain Adams - Archer died the winter of 1609
The Lion with Captain Webb 
The Falcon with Captain John Martin and Master Francis Nelson 
The Unitie with Captain Wood and Master Pett 
The Diamond with Captain John Ratcliffe and Captain King - Ratcliffe was killed by Indians Dec 1609
The Swallow with Captain Moone and Master Somers 
The Virginia of the North Colony with Captain Davis and Master Davis 
The Catch with Master Matthew Fitch Thirty two people from two ships were thrown overboard with yellow fever. The London plague broke out on the Diamond, and the ships were all separated in a tempest (hurricane) on Saint James Day, July 25th. After the storm, The Blessing, the Lion, the Falcon and the Unitie (all on board were sick) came together and headed for Virginia, "falling into the James River." The Diamond appeared a few days later, and the Swallow a few days after that. The Catch was lost at sea, the Seaventure purposely wrecked in Bermuda. Four days after the hurricane, the Seaventure began taking on water. Land was sited and she wrecked between two reefs off the shores at Discovery Bay of Bermuda on 28 July 1609. All of approximately 150 passengers safely made land, "not a hair perished." Two pinnances were built during the following nine months, the "Deliverance" and the "Patience" from the timber of the ruined Seaventure. The Deliverance was started September 7, 1609 built by Robert Frobisher, eighty tons, the Patience was only thirty tons, built by George Somers. These vessels sailed on to Virginia 20 May 1610, landing Monday. May 31 at Point Comfort, Virginia. (May 30 was a Saturday, May 31 did not exist?) They left two men behind, Christopher Carter and Robert Waters. The Virginia arrival date is unknown, but is noted to have stayed at Jamestown along with the Swallow, while other ships returned.. The ships carried supplies for six hundred people, but these were damaged by the storm. In three days, the new settlers ate Jamestown's entire crop of corn. About two hundred people arrived from the Third Supply, and found only less than 109 people alive in Jamestown. The Diamond, Falcon, Blessing, Unitie and Lion left Virginia October 14, 1609, taking Captain John Smith with them to England, along with thirty unruly youths sent from England but not accepted in Virginia. Some reports say the two ship had given up and were headed home when they came across more ships under Thomas West, Lord de la Warr, on his way to the colonies, and were persuaded to return on their voyage to Jamestown. Some reports say 150 landed and 142 left, leaving behind 8 people, some say three men were left on the islands to hold the claim in Bermuda. Fourteen days later, the two ships reach Virginia where only 60 of the other 140 settlers survived. Also reported May 23, 1610 for the date of arrival of 140 survivors per Coldham pg 3. 19 June 1610 Sir George Somers volunteered to return to Bermuda aboard the "Patience" for supplies for the struggling colony of Virginia. George Somers returned to in Bermuda, dying there in November of 1610. Captain Matthew Somers returned to England aboard the "Patience" with his uncle's body. Alphabetical: Bagwell, Henry Aged 35, listed on the Deliverance, landed at Jamestown presumably originally in the wrecked Seaventure. 8a: Aged 35 at muster at West & Sherley's Hundred, Charles City 1624 with Symon Turgis and two servants. Bennit, Nicholas Carpenter Brian, William Briars, Jeffrey Died in Bermuda Buck, Richard Sailed June 1609 with wife, Miss Langley and four Buck children. Marooned for 9 months embarked for Virginia from Bermuda 10 May 1610. Arrived in Jamestown 21 May 1610. He was a minister. The four Buck children, Elizabeth, Bridget and Bermuda were born and died while their parent marooned on Somers Island (1609-10) Mara born in Virginia 1611 ward of brother-in-law, John Burrows. Bucke, Richard Reverand Chaplain to the expedition Carter, Christopher Deserted and stayed behind on the island Chard, Edward Stayed behind on the island Chard, Joseph Josuah? 8a: Listed as on the 1607 voyage, aged 36 st muster at Colledge Land, wife Ann on the Bonnie Bess. Eason, Edward and wife, Baby boy Bermuda born in Bermuda to Edward and wife Frobisher, Robert Shipwright Gates, Sir Thomas Governor for Virginia Godby, Thomas Aged 38 in the Deliverance, landed at Jamestown presumably originally in the wrecked Seaventure 8a: Listed as on the 1608 voyage, muster at Elizabeth CIty 1624 with wife Joane on the FLying Hart, John Curtis and Christopher Smith. Grave, George 8a: At muster James City, wife Elnor on the Susan. Hitchman, William Died in Bermuda Hopkins, Stephen Left England 9 June 1609 among 150 persons cast ashore etc etc then it states "Although there is no complete list of the shipwrecked party which eventually reached Jamestown in the two pinnaces Patience and Deliverance, built on the islands, Hopkins did not remain on The Somers Islands and the conclusion is that the recalcitrant came to Virginia despite his known wish to return to England. (He went back to England and came on the Mayflower in 1620 to Plymouth, Mass. No further connection with the Colony. Horton, Mistress Joons, Elizabeth Aged 30, servant, landed at Jamestown presumably originally in the Seaventure Jourdain, Silvester Of Lyme Regis, Dorset Knowles,Richard Lewis, Richard Died in Bermuda Lightfoote, John Landed at Jamestown presumably originally in the wrecked Seaventure 8a: At muster in James City 1624 as servant to Cap Raph Harmor. Martin, William Newport, Christopher Captain of the Sea Venture, former privateer Paine, Henry Shot to death for mutiny Pearepoint, Francis Persons, Elizabeth Maid to Mistress Horton; married Thomas Powell while in Bermuda Pierce, William Capt. 8a: At muster at James City, January 1624 with 4 servants and 13 more at Mulburie Island. Wife Jone was on the Blessing. Powell, Thomas Cook Proctor, John Landed at Jamestown presumably originally in the Seaventure 8a: Listed as on the 1607 voyage. muster at Paces Paine, James City. Wife Allis on the 1621 George. Ravens, Henry Master mate; lost at sea when he sailed for help Reede, Humfrey Rich, Robert Brother of Sir Nathaniel Rich, a shareholder. Was a soldier. Returned to Bermuda 1617 and died there 1630. Rolfe, John and wife. A young man in his twenties and traveling with his wife. 9 months on Somers Island. Their baby girl was born in Bermuda, christened Bermudas 11 Feb 1610, died and buried there. His wife died on Somers Island or shortly after reaching Virginia Spring 1610. He married Pocahontas in April 1614. Samuel, Edward Murdered by Robert Waters Sharpe, Samuel 8a: Listed on the 1609 voyage. At muster at Peirsey's Hundred January 1624.1 servant, Henery Carman. Wife Elizabeth on 1621 Margaret & John. Shelly, Henry Mr Somers, Captain Matthew Nephew and heir of Sir George, was aboard the "Swallow" on the same expedition Somers, Sir George Admiral of the flotilla Strachey, William From Surrey England b 1572 on SV, marooned 9 mo Strachney, William Secretary-elect of Virginia Company, colonist secretary Swift, James Walsingham, Robert Cockswain Want, John Waters, Edward Lieut. On SV and on to Virginia on the Patience. Waters, Robert Deserted and stayed behind on the island, murdered Edward Samuel Waters, Edward Aged 40 in the Patience, landed at Jamestown presumably originally in the wrecked Seaventure Whittingham, Thomas Lost at sea with Henry Ravens Yeardley, Sir George, Knight, Capt Experienced veteran of the Dutch wars (on the Deliverance) Yeardley, Lady Temperance

   1608 voyage, wife of Sir George, on the Falcon

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Sir Thomas Gates, Governor for Virginia Sir George Somers, Admiral of the flotilla Rev Richard Bucke, chaplain to the expedition William Strachney, Secretary-elect of Virginia Company Silvester Jourdain, of Lyme Regis, Dorset Joseph Chard Mr Henry Shelly Robert Walsingham, cockswain Robert Frobisher, shipwright Nicholas Bennit, carpenter Francis Pearepoint William Brian William Martin Henry Ravens, master mate; lost at sea when he sailed for help Richard Knowles Stephen Hopkins Christopher Carter deserted and stayed behind on the island Robert Waters who deserted and stayed behind on the island Edward Waters Samuel Sharpe Henry Paine, shot to death for mutiny Humfrey Reede James Swift Thomas Powell, cook Edward Eason Mistress Eason baby boy Bermuda Eason, born in Bermuda to the above John Want Mistress Horton Elizabeth Persons, maid to Mistress Horton; married Thomas Powell while in Bermuda Capt (Sir) George Yeardley, experienced veteran of the Dutch wars (on the Deliverance) Jeffrey Briars (died in Bermuda) Richard Lewis, died in Bermuda Edward Samuel, murdered by Robert Waters William Hitchman, died in Bermuda Thomas Whittingham, lost at sea with Ravens (above) Edward Chard who stayed behind on the island Captain Matthew Somers nephew and heir of Sir George, was aboard the "Swallow" on the same expedition Robert Rich*, the brother of Sir Nathaniel Rich, a shareholder. Was a soldier. Returned to Bermuda 1617 and died there 1630. Christopher Newport*, Captain of the Sea Venture, former privateer Stephen Hopkins* John Rolfe*, a young man in his twenties and traveling with his wife. Their baby girl was born in Bermuda, christened Bermudas and died shortly thereafter. His wife died shortly after reaching Virginia Spring 1610 and he married Pocahontas in April 1614. Mistress Rolfe, first wife of above Bermuda Rolfe, baby girl born in Bermuda, christened 11 Feb 1610, died and buried there others

Additional persons listed in reference #3 as arriving at Jamestown in the Patience and the Deliverance (and therefore assumed to be aboard the Sea Venture when it wrecked at Bermuda) were: Henry Bagwell, aged 35 in the Deliverance Thomas Godby, aged 36 in the Deliverance Edward Waters, aged 40 in the Patience Elizabeth Joons, aged 30, servant John Lytefoote John Proctor

(references: 1) The Generall Historie of the Bermudas by Captain John Smith 1624, reprint 1966; *Royal Naval Dockyard Museum, Somerset, Bermuda; 2) Bermuda - unintended destination by Terry Tucker, 1982; 3) Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents & Grants, Cavaliers and Pioneers by Nell Marion Nugent 1963)

Virginia Historical Index by Swem: 4V344 "As a results of the efforts, Sir Thomas Gates as sole and absolute Governor, with Sir George Summers, Admiral, and Capt. Newport, Vice Admiral of Virginia, and divers and other persons of ran four cke and quality in seven ships and two pinnaces, left Falmouth on the 8 of June 1609, and on the 24 day of July, 1609 they encountered a terrible storm that prevailed from Tuesday noone till Friday noone; that scattered the fleet and wrecked The Sea Venture(on July 28 1609) upon the island of Bermuda" 24V248 Francis Michell lived at Elizabeth Citty February 1623 and Josuah Chard, aged 36, who came in the Sea Venture, May 1607. 29V299 Josuah Chard came in the SV

Purse and Person The following came in the sea Ventura ( from different pages) p15 Henry Bagwell on the Deliverance p22 Samuel Sharp p30 John Lightfoote p31 Capt. Wm Pierce p32 George Grave p38 John Procter p140 Richard Buck sailed June 1609 with wife, Miss Langley and four Buck children. Marooned for 9 months embarked for Virginia from Bermuda 10 May 1610. Arrived in Jamestown 21 May 1610. He was a minister . The four Buck children , Elizabeth, Bridget and Bermuda were born and died while their parent marooned on Somers Island(1609-10) Mara born in Virginia 1611 ward of brother-in-law, John Burrows. p374 Stephen Hopkins left England 9 June 1609 among 150 persons cast ashore etc etc then it states "Although there is no complete list of the shipwrecked party which eventually reached Jamestown in the two pinnaces Patience and Deliverance, built on the islands, Hopkins did not remain on The Somers Islands and the conclusion is that the recalcitrant came to Virginia despite his known wish to return to England. (He went back to England and came on the Mayflower in 1620 to Plymouth, Mass. No further connection with the Colony. p475 Wm Pierce p507 John Rolfe and wife . 9 months on Somers Island. Wife died on Somers Island or shortly after arriving in Virginia. p590 Wm Strachey from Surrey England b 1572 on SV, marooned 9 mo etc p650 Lieut. Edward Waters on SV and on to Virginia in Patience. p724 George Yeardley

The following entiries were obtained from the Hotten book, from the Musters of the Inhabitants in Virginia 1624/1625 chapters, pages 201 thru 265, which lists the muster captain, and what ship the individual arrived on. Chard, Josuah, 1607 voyage, aged 36 at muster at College Land. DATE ERROR!! Graue (Grave), George, muster at James City. Wife Elnor on the Susan, no date Lightfoote, John, servant to Cap Ralph Hamor, no date Sea Venture sources: Coldham's Emigrants http://www.rootsweb.com/~bmuwgw/seaventure.htm http://www.tobacco.org/History/Jamestown.html http://www.jamestowne.org/Jamestowne_Society_Chronology.htm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Supply http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/England-History/SirGeorgeSomers.htm http://www.germanheritage.com/Publications/Jamestown/glassmakers.html

_________________________________

The story unfolds on the pages of three series of books -- The Records of the Virginia Company of London as edited by Susan Kingsbury, The Journals of the House of Burgess of Virginia and the Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia both series edited by H. R. McIlwaine. Our first piece of our story dated 20 September 1620 records an event of 16 November 1618. When "George Yardley, Knight, Governor and Captain General of Virginia with the consent of the Council gave to Samuel Jordn of Charles City in Virginia, ancient planter who hath abode here in the Colony for 10 years .... 450 acres and to Cecily his wife an ancient planter also of nine years continuance ... 100 acres more ...." This is not recorded until 1690. On 16 February 1623 in a list of the living and dead since April 1622 was made by the Virginia Company of London. We find the first five settlers listed at Jordan's Journey are Siscly ( Cecily ) Jordan, Temperance Baylise, Mary Jordan and William Farrar. On 16 June 1623 there appears in the Council of Virginia Records an examination of Captain Issac and Mary Maddison and the Serjeant John Harris taken before the Council of Virginia regarding thg a supposed contract of marriage between Mr. Greville Pooley and Mrs. Cecily Jordan a few days afetr the death of her husband. Cecily Jordan has since contracted herself to William Farrar. Details of this examination will be given later. On 21 January 1625 another list was made of the settlers in Virginia. We find the first five settlers at Jordan's Journey as follows: "Mr. William Ferrer, 31 by Neptune August 1618, Sisley Jordan 24 by Swan August 1610 , Mary Jordan, her daughter 3 born here; Margrett Jordan 1 born here; Temperance Baley 7 born here. A list of servants follows. From these four entries, we know Cecily/ Sisley arrived on the Swan in August 1610 at 9 or 10 years of age, and that she probably married a Bayley and was married to Samuel Jordan who dies before 16 February 1623. Also that at the age of 17 or 18 she is an ancient planter and has land in her own name. In addition she has now contracted to marry William Farrer, the lawyer. Some researchers say that Cecily was a Reynolds, the daughter of Thomas and Cecily Phippen Reynolds of Dorsetshire. The name Cecily was hereditary. Cecily's mother was a first cousin ( called a near relative by many researchers) of Samuel Jordan. Samuel had at least 3 sons by a previous marriage all of whom were much older than Cecily. It is felt that Cecily had a brother Christopher Reynolds who followed her to Virginia aboard the John and Francis in 1622. There is no documentation for this theory yet. Why she came alone is still a mystery. It appears she had near relatives living in Virginia. It is thought that she met her first husband, Thomas Bailey while she lived with Captain William Pierce (perhaps a near relative) and his wife Joan. Thomas was a member of the Governor's Guard stationed at Jamestown. Young Bailey became the victim of malaria and left his widow and a young daughter, Temperance, who was born in 1617. His daughter inherited this land. Many believe Thomas was the son of of Samuel Bailey and that Temperance was named in honor of Temperance West Lady Yardley , wife of Governor George Yardley. Records show that few lives were lost at Jordan's Journey during the Indian Massacre of 1622 and it was one of the four fortified plantations not abandoned after the massacre. Records indicate that Cecily had married Samuel Jordan by September 1620. At the time of the massacre, William Farrer had sought refuge at Jordan's Journey. In the dawn's darkness, he rowed as rapidly as he could from Farrer's Island. He was to stay at Jordan's Journey for the next 6 years.

___________________________________

-------------------- It was also about 1619 (the exact date is not known) that Samuel married his second wife, Cicely Reynolds Jordan. Samuel had already fathered at least 2 and possibly 3 children that were older than his new wife. By Samuel, Cicely bore two more daughters:

1.            Mary Jordan, born Jordan’s Journey 1621 or 1622. 
2.            Margaret Jordan, born Jordan’s Journey 1623, after her father’s death. Cicely was also named an Ancient Planter in her own right by the Governor. Only five females are known to have held that distinguished title which she had received while still in her teens. 
 

Following Samuel's death, Cicely was the center of what became known as the colony’s "juiciest" scandal. It is said that not only are the details of this story true but in fact are recorded in detailed court transcripts dated 4 Jun 1623 on file at the National Archives in Washington DC. The widow Jordan was carrying Samuel’s last child. Considering the time and circumstances of frontier life, it was a normal and acceptable custom of the period that courtship of a widow could be started almost immediately following the funeral. Rev. Grivell (or Greville) Pooley was a minister of the nearby Flowerdew Hundred plantation church. In conversation several days after Samuel’s death, Cicely reportedly said words to the effect that "I would as soon marry Pooley as anyone else" but she would marry no one until she had delivered her child. Pooley took this as an acceptance of his suit and called personally on the widow. The minister, it was testified, suggested a "dram" [a toast of spirits?]. Cicely called a servant to fetch him one. The Rev. said, "I will have of your fetching or not at all". Cicely apparently acquiesced.

 

After drinking a toast, the parson is said to have taken the widow’s hand and declared words to the effect, "I, Grivell Pooley, take thee, Cicely, as my wedded wife, to have and to hold until death do us part . . . ." Still holding her hand, the preacher is said to have repeated the same vow again but substituting Cicely’s name as if she were saying the words. Cicely apparently did not protest. Witnesses testified they were uncertain that Cicely actually repeated the vows herself nor verbally acknowledged them in any way.

 

Reportedly additional toasts were proposed and, as "tittering" women servants later stated under oath, the couple did kiss after drinking from a single cup. Later Pooley could not resist boasting of his conquest over spirits at the local tavern, whereupon the angry lady is reported to have said that he would have "fared better if he had talked less". In time, Cicely let it be known that she had instead accepted the hand of another more worthy gentleman. The Rev. protested. The "tongues of gossip" wagged from one end of the colony to the other.

 

The Rev. instituted a lawsuit for Breach of Promise the first such for the new colonies. The Court and Council of State could not decide the case and referred it to London. During the interminable delay in reaching a settlement, the Rev. found solace elsewhere (he married another) and the matter ceased to be a sensation. Eventually London officially decreed that it was contrary to the ecclesiastical law for a woman to contract herself to "two several men" at the same time "whereby much trouble doth grow between parties of the government and cause Council of State much disquiet." For a third offense, the culprit was to undergo corporal punishment, or punishment by a fine. As Mrs. Jordan had not committed a third offense, the decree did not affect her directly in any way.

-------------------- Cicely Jordan Farrar was considered to have been the first true "Southern Belle" and is credited with introducing the 'Art of flirting" to American

Cecily Reynolds came to Jamestown in 1610 aboard the Swan. Cicely married Thomas Bailey. Unfortunately he soon dropped dead from malaria. She then quickly married Samuel Jordan.

The Jordans neighbors were John Rolfe, who had married Matoaka Pocahontas Powhatan. After her death, Rolfe married Capt. William Pierce’s daughter, Jane Pierce.

Cicely survived the Jamestown Massacre in 1622 Soon after the Massacre, Samuel Jordan dropped dead, too. Now, this may seem too coincidental. One husband after another dies suddenly. Marrying Cicely may have seemed like a death sentence. But, in Jamestown death was common and Samuel Jordan was her senior by many years.

Within three or four days of Samuel Jordan’s death, Cicely agreed to become the wife of Rev. Greville Pooley. She was pregnant with Samuel Jordan’s child, so she asked that the engagement be kept secret. However, Rev. Pooley was so impressed that he had won Cicely’s hand that he spread the word. Not a good move, now a furious Cicely refused to go through with the wedding. Rev. Pooley sought to hold her to her promise. William Farrar, the administrator of her late husband’s estate defended her, causing the first breach of promise suit in America. Farrar then became husband three.

They were married for 10 years, and then in 1634, Farrar, surprisingly, died too.

The following is from Wikipedia Cicely Jordan Farrar

Cicely Jordan Farrar was an early settler and Ancient Planter of colonial Jamestown. She came to the colony as a child, in 1611.[1] Nothing is known of her origins, or who she traveled with. She married three times, and died sometime after 1631.[1] Contents

  

First Marriage

Cicely Jordan Ferrar's first marriage is inferred from circumstantial evidence. In the census taken in 1623,[2] and also in the 1624/5 Muster, a child, Temperance Baley, is shown living with Cicely Jordan and her family. The 1624 muster provides the additional information that the child was "borne in Virginia" in 1617. Temperance Baley is mentioned as an adjacent landholder in the 1620 patent of Cicely's husband Samuel Jordan,[3] proving that the child had ownership of her land by the time she was three years old, and therefore must have been the sole heir of her (deceased) father. Since she lived with Cicely, and no guardian's record has been found, the conclusion is that Temperance was probably Cicely's daughter by a first marriage to the unknown Baley.[4] Second Marriage

By 1620, Cicely was married to Samuel Jordan, as shown by the wording of his patent (dated September 10, 1620):

   ...to Samuel Jourdan of Charles Citty in Virga. Gent, an ancient planter who hath abode ten years Compleat in this Colony and performed all services to the Colony that might any way concern him etc and to his heirs and assignes for ever for part of his first genll. dividend to be augmented &c, 450 acs. on his personal right, etc. and ...[for] the personall claim of Cecily his wife an ancient planter also of nine years continuance, one hundred acres more and the other 250 acs. in recompence of his trans. out of England at his own charges of five servants, namely John Davies, who arrived in 1617 for whose passage the sd. Samuel hath paid to the Cape. Mercht., Thomas Matterdy bound apprentice to sd. Samuel by indenture in England dated 8 Oct 1617; Robert Marshall brought out of England by Capt. Bargrave in May 1619, at the costs of sd. Samuel; Alice Wade the same year in the George, etc., & Thomas Steed in the Faulcon in July 1620; and maketh choice in 3 several places: one house & 50 acs. called --ilies Point [Bailies Point] in Charles hundred, bordering E. upon the gr. river, W. upon the main land, S. upon John Rolfe and N. upon the land of Capt. John Wardeefe [Woodlief]; 2ndly, 1 tenement containing 12 acs., etc., encompassed on the W. by Martins Hope, now in tenure of Capt. John Martin, Master of the Ordinance; & 388 acs. in or near upon Sandys his hundred, towards land of Temperance Baley, W. upon Capt. Woodlief, etc.[3]

On the tract of 388 acres mentioned in the patent ("...towards land of Temperance Baley, W. upon Capt. Woodlief..."), Samuel Jordan established a plantation known as "Jordan's Journey".[5] The two censuses show that two children were born from Cicely's marriage to Samuel Jordan: Mary, born around 1621, and Margaret, born in 1623, after her father's death.

Jordan died before April 1623.[1] In November 1623, administration of his estate was granted to fellow-colonist William Farrar, a relative of Nicholas Ferrar, a leading member of the Virginia Company. Dispute with Rev. Greville Pooley

Immediately following the death of Samuel Jordan, Greville Pooley made a proposal of marriage to the widow. His advances were apparently not welcomed by Cecily Jordan, who was then pregnant with her deceased husband's younger child. Pooley claimed however that his offer had been accepted, and complained to the court, seeking to hold her to what he claimed was her promise. The ensuing case provides an interesting insight into changing attitudes toward marriage in English law and society in the early modern period.[6]

On 4 June 1633, the Council called Isaac Maddeson, Pooley's reluctant go-between, to testify as to whether Mrs Jordan had contracted herself to Rev Pooley: “ Captain Isack Maddeson sworne and examined saith that (as near as he remembreth) the first motion to him by Mr. Grivell, touching a match with Mrs. Jordan was about three or four days after the Mr. Jordan’s death, who entreating this examinant to move the matter to her, he answered he was unwilling to meddle in any such business; but being urged by him he did move it. Mrs. Jordan replied that she would as willingly have him as any other, but she would not marry any man until she delivered. After this Mr. Pooley (having had some private talk with Mrs. Jordan) told this examinant that he had contracted himself unto her, and desired him and his wife to be witnesses of it, whereupon Mr. Pooley desiring a dram of Mrs. Jordan, and she bidding her servant fitch it said he would have it of her fetching or not at all. Then she went into a room, and the examinant and Mr. Pooley went to her, but whether she were privy to his intent this examinant knoweth not; when Mr. Pooley was come of her, he told her he would contract himself unto her and spake these words. I Grivell Pooley take thee Sysley to my wedded wife, to have and to hold till death us depart and there to I plight thee my troth. Then (holding her by the hand) he spake these words I Sysley take thee Grivell to my wedded husband, to have and to hold till death us depart; but this examinant heard not her say any of those words, neither doth he remember that Mr. Pooley asked her whether she did consent to those words or that she did answer any things which he understood. then Mr. Pooley and she drank each to other and he kissed her and spake these words, I am thine and thou art mine till death us separate. Mrs. Jordan then desired that it might not be revealed that she did so soon her love, after her husbands death; whereupon Mr. Pooley promised before God that he would not reveal it, till she thought the time fitting.[7] ”

The case was referred to London, with the following note:

   This Woman before Mr Grivell Pooley called her into the Court, contracted her self to Mr Willm Ferrar: before the Governor and Counsell disavowing the former and affirminge the latter: Wee (not knowinge how to decide so nice a difference, our devines not takeinge uppon them precisely to determine, whether it be a formall and legal contract desire the resolution of the Civill Lawiers, and a speedy return thereof.[7]

This note spells out very clearly the confusion as to whether marriage disputes were to be resolved under canon or civil law, and seems to confirm Stone's assertion in The Road to Divorce that "Marriage law as it operated in England from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries was a mess."[8]

Cicely Jordan's was not the only case of its kind in Virginia in this period. In June 1624 the Council in Virginia ordered that:

   ...the next Saboth day in the tyme of devine service Elinor Sprage shall publickly before the Congregatione, Acknowleg her offence in contractinge her selfe to two severall men at one tyme, and penetently Confessinge her falte shall ask god and the Congregationes forgiveness. And to prevent the like offence in others it is ordered that every minister give notice in his church to all his parishioners y' wt man or woman wtsoeuer shall vse wordes Amountinge to a Contract of mariage to severall psons though not precise and legall, yet soe as may intangle and brede scrouple in their Conseyences, shall for such their offence shall vnder goe either Corporall punishment as by whippinge or otherwyse by or other temporall parishiness as by find or other wyse Accordinge to ye qualletie of ye pson offendinge.[9]

Eventually, in January 1625, Pooley withdrew his claim. Cicely Jordan then married William Farrar. She died after 1631 (when she was mentioned in a deed); her exact year of death is unknown.[1]

It has been suggested that Cicely Farrar might have outlived her third husband and gone on to marry a fourth husband, Isaac Hutchins (whose will of 1658 mentioned his wife Cicely), and a fifth husband, Henry Sherman (who is proved to have married Isaac Hutchins's widow Cicely.)[1][10] However, evidence appears to make this unlikely. Sherman and his wife Cicely, who married after 1658, had at least four children; yet by 1658 Cicely Farrar, if still alive, would have been in her late 50s and unlikely to be still bearing children.

Alternatively, it has been suggested that Cicely Farrar might have married, as her fourth husband and his second wife,[11] Peter Montague of Lancaster County, VA, whose 1659 will mentioned a wife named Cicely.[12] No evidence has emerged to substantiate this theory. John Frederick Dorman suggests it is "More likely, but unproved, that ... [Cicely Montague] was Cicely, widow of Robert Jadwin, who later married Nicholas Jernew and left will dated 30 Jan. 1667/8 (Westmoreland Co. Deeds, Patents &c 1665-77,pp.32-32a) naming her Jadwin children, including son John [who married Peter Montague's daughter Anne] and grandson Bartholomew Jadwin [son of John Jadwin and Anne Montague]."[13] Descendants

Cicely Jordan had one child, Temperance Baley, from her first (presumed) marriage; two children, Mary and Margaret Jordan, from her marriage to Samuel Jordan; and three children, Cicely, William and John, from her marriage to William Farrar. There are many proven descendants from Cicely's presumed daughter Temperance Baley,[4] and from her son William Farrar.[1] Nothing is known of her daughters Mary and Margaret Jordan after their appearance in the 1624 Muster. References

   ^ a b c d e f Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, 4th ed., v1 pp926-929
   ^ "The Living and Dead in Virginia, Feb. 16, 1623" http://files.usgwarchives.net/va/jamestown/census/1623cens.txt
   ^ a b Nugent, Cavaliers and Pioneers, 226
   ^ a b Dorman, op.cit. p120
   ^ Virginia: the First Seventeen Years, Charles E. Hatch Jr, U. of VA Press, 1957, p67
   ^ In The Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500-1800, Penguin, 1979, Lawrence Stone writes that "the critical change under consideration is that from distance, deference and patriarchy to what I have chosen to call Affective Individualism," -- a change Stone described as "the most important change in mentalite to have occurred in the Early Modern period, indeed possibly in the last thousand years of Western history." (Quoted in Safley, Thomas Max, untitled book review, The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Autumn, 1996), pp. 895-898)
   ^ a b Kingsbury, Records of the Virginia Company of London, Vol. 4, pp218-220]
   ^ Safley, op.cit., p.895
   ^ "Minutes of the Council and General Court 1622-24 (Continued)", Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Jul., 1911),pp231-232
   ^ Henrico Co. Minute Book 1710-14, p51
   ^ A court record of Sep 12 1660 mentions "Cicily Montague, widdow, & Peter Montague, her sonne in law [stepson], both Executors of the Last Will & Testamt. of Mr. Peter Montague, dec'd". Lancaster Co., VA Ct. Orders 1656-1666, p. 12.
   ^ Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, 4th ed., v.2, p.653
   ^ Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, 4th ed., v.2, p.653, n.15.

-------------------- In August of 1610, the ship 'Swan' arrived at Jamestown from London. The Swan was about the seventeenth ship to bring settlers to Jamestown, Virginia. A young girl named Cecily was one of the passengers. She was about ten years old. When Cecily was about 16 years old, she married a man named Baley. They had a daughter named Temperance Baley near 1617. Cecily’s husband died within the next few years.

Life in early Jamestown was harsh. As previously mentioned, many colonists died from starvation, disease, or Indian attacks. Any woman needed a husband to provide protection and food. Cecily married for a second time to Samuel Jordan. It was in 1620 that Samuel was recognized for 10 years and Cecily was recognized for nine years in Virginia. Cecily was about 20 years old. This would have been young in England, but was not young in Jamestown. Any person who had lived 10 years in Jamestown had survived through difficult trials. Both Samuel and Cecily were given the titles of "Ancient Planters" and granted land. Samuel was granted 450 acres of land and Cecily was granted 100 acres of land. This was just outside of Jamestown at the confluence of the James and Appotomattox Rivers. Samuel named his land "Jordan’s Journey".

The document that granted land to Samuel and Cecily Jordan (in 1620) noted that it was adjacent to land owned by Temperance Baley (Cecily’s daughter) who would have been only 3 years old at the time. Temperance had inherited her land from her father. On March 22, 1622, the Pohatan Indians launched a massacre killing 347 of the settlers at and near Jamestown. One survivor rowed out to Jordan’s Journey providing a warning that the Indians were coming. This gave time to prepare and few lives were lost at Jordan’s Journey. It seems a horrible reality that if Cecily’s first husband had not died, it is likely that Cicely and Temperance would not have survived the Indian massacre.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/d/a/y/Steven-Day-Mukilteo/FILE/0002page.html

view all 19

Cecily Reynolds's Timeline

1601
1601
Dorset, England
1610
1610
Age 9
Virginia
1610
Age 9
London, Greater London, United Kingdom

in the "Swan" arrived at colony on the James River

1611
1611
Age 10
From Dorsetshire,England
1611
Age 10
1615
1615
Age 14
Jamestown, VA, USA
1617
December 28, 1617
Age 16
Middlesex, England
1617
Age 16
Baileys Point, Henrico, Virginia
1620
December 1, 1620
Age 19
Jamestown, James City, Virginia
1620
Age 19
Jamestown, Virginia