Rabbi David Pardo Chief Rabbi of Sarajevo

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Chaim David Samuel Pardo

Hebrew: חיים דוד שמואל פארדו
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Venice, Italy
Death: Died in Jerusalem, Israel
Immediate Family:

Son of Yaakov Pardo and Yustina Pardo
Husband of Zipora Pardo
Father of Avraham Pardo; ? Pinso; Yitzchak Pardo and Yaakov Pardo

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Immediate Family

About Rabbi David Pardo Chief Rabbi of Sarajevo

R. David Samuel ben Jacob Pardo, (1718–1790), a famed Italian rabbinical author and poet, was born in Venice. He went to Sarajevo for a time as a result of a dispute over an inheritance, and from there to Spalato, in Dalmatia. From approximately 1738 he was a teacher of children, at the same time studying under the local rabbi, R. Abraham David Papo. Eventually R. Pardo was appointed rabbi of the town. From 1760 he was rabbi of Sarajevo. From 1776 to 1782 he traveled to Ereẓ Israel, settling in Jerusalem where he served as head of the yeshivah Ḥesed le-Avraham u-Vinyan Shelomo. Pardo was regarded as one of Jerusalem's great rabbis. Of his many works his series of commentaries and novellae on tannaitic literature are especially original. His first work was Shoshannim le-David (Venice, 1752), a commentary on the Mishnah. The somewhat sharp language he employed in the first part in criticizing contemporary scholars gave rise to friction between him and David Corinaldi and Mas'ud Rokeaḥ in Leghorn. But after he mitigated his language in the second part and published an apology, a reconciliation took place. R. Pardo's Ḥasdei David (Leghorn, 1776–90; Jerusalem, 1890) on the Tosefta is considered the most important commentary on this work (the portion on Tohorot, the manuscript of which is in the National Library of Jerusalem, has not been published). He completed the work in Jerusalem on his 68th birthday. Portions of it were published in the Romm Vilna edition of the Talmud with the text of the Tosefta. Similarly, his Sifrei de-Vei Rav (Salonika, 1799), which he commenced in 1786 and was published by his son Abraham after his death, is the most important commentary on the Sifrei. In it he makes use of commentaries of R. Hillel b. Eliakim, R. Solomon ibn Okhana, and R. Eliezer ibn Nahum, all of which he had in manuscript. Other works he wrote are Mikhtam le-David (Salonika, 1772), halakhic decisions and responsa; Maskil le-David (Venice, 1761), a supercommentary on Rashi's biblical commentary; La-Menaẓẓe'aḥ le-David (Salonika, 1765), on those talmudic passages where alternative explanations are given; and Mizmor le-David (Leghorn, 1818), notes on the Perot Ginnosar of Hezekiah da Silva and Ḥayyim ibn Attar on Shulḥan Arukh, Even ha-Ezer. Pardo's liturgical poems and prayers are included in the Sephardi daily and festival prayer books. His arrangement of the Avodah for the Day of Atonement, which was adopted in the Sephardi rite, appeared in his Shifat Revivim (Leghorn, 1788).

Of his sons, R. Jacob Pardo became chief rabbi of Ragusa and died in Jerusalem. He was a noted talmudist and well versed in Kabbalah. His chief works were Kohelet Ya'akov (Venice, 1784), a commentary on the early prophets; Appe Zutre (ibid., 1797), on Hilkhot Ishut of the Shulḥan Arukh Even ha-Ezer; and Minḥat Aharon (ibid., 1809), which deals mainly with the laws of prayer. A second son, Isaac, was rabbi of Sarajevo, while a third, Abraham, who married the daughter of R. Ḥ.J.D. Azulai , became head of the yeshivah Ḥesed le-Avraham u-Vinyan Shelomo after his father-in-law's death.R. Pardo's disciples included Shabbetai b. Abraham Ventura, who succeeded him as rabbi of Spalato, R. David Pinto, and R. Abraham Penso.

Source: http://www.virtualjudaica.com/Item/25096/Orazione_Funebre_per_R._David_Samuel_Pardo

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R. David Samuel ben Jacob Pardo (Hasdei David, 1718–1790), rabbinical author and poet. Born in Venice, he went to Sarajevo for a time as a result of a dispute over an inheritance, and from there to Spalato, in Dalmatia. From approximately 1738 he was a teacher of children, at the same time studying under the local rabbi, R. Abraham David Papo. Eventually R. Pardo was appointed rabbi of the town. From 1760 he was rabbi of Sarajevo. From 1776 to 1782 he traveled to Erez Israel, settling in Jerusalem where he served as head of the yeshivah Hesed le-Avraham u-Vinyan Shelomo. R. Pardo was regarded as one of Jerusalem’s great rabbis. Of his many works his series of commentaries and novellae on tannaitic literature are especially original. His first work was Shoshannim le-David (Venice, 1752), a commentary on the Mishnah. R. Pardo is best known for his Hasdei David (Leghorn, 1776–90; Jerusalem, 1890) on the Tosefta; it is considered the most important commentary on this work. Other works he wrote are Mikhtam le-David (Salonika, 1772), halakhic decisions and responsa; La-Menazze’ah le-David (Salonika, 1765), on those talmudic passages where alternative explanations are given; Mizmor le-David (Leghorn, 1818), notes on the Perot Ginnosar of R. Hezekiah da Silva and R. Hayyim ibn Attar on Shulhan Arukh, Even ha-Ezer. Pardo's liturgical poems and prayers are included in the Sephardi daily and festival prayer books. His arrangement of the Avodah for the Day of Atonement, which was adopted in the Sephardi rite, appeared in his Shifat Revivim (Leghorn, 1788). One of R. Pardo’s sons married the daughter of the Hida.

Source: http://www.virtualjudaica.com/Item/26174/Maskil_le-David

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David Pardo was an 18th century Italian rabbi who lived for some time in Sarajevo and Jerusalem. Among other things, he authored a commentary on the Sifra on Leviticus.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Pardo

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http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/11906-pardo#anchor1

David Pardo:

Rabbinical commentator and liturgical poet; born at Venice March 29, 1719; died at Jerusalem 1792; son of Jacob Pardo of Ragusa, rabbi in Venice. After finishing his studies, Pardo left Venice and went to Ragusa. He then lived for some years in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where he engaged in teaching. From Sarajevo he went to Spalato, Dalmatia, where the rabbi, Abraham David Papo, engaged him as teacher at the yeshibah. After the death of Papo's successor, Isaac Ẓedaḳah, Pardo was elected chief rabbi of the city. Among his disciples were Shabbethai Ventura, David Pinto, and Abraham Curiel. In 1752 Pardo began to publish, his first work being "Shoshannim le-Dawid" (Venice, 1752), a commentary on the Mishnah.

In 1764 Pardo accepted the position of chief rabbi at Sarajevo, where he succeeded Joshua Isaac Maggioro. He employed his leisure time in writing and publishing various works. Toward the end of his life he went to Jerusalem, where he died.

Besides the above-mentioned commentary on the Mishnah, Pardo wrote the following works: "Maskil le-Dawid" (Venice, 1760), supercommentary on Rashi's commentary on the Pentateuch; "Miktam le-Dawid" (Salonica, 1769), responsa; "Ḥasde Dawid" (part i., Leghorn, 1776; part ii., ib. 1790), commentary on the Tosefta; "Ḥuḳḳat ha-Pesaḥ" (Leghorn, 1796), a ritual for the Passover season; "La-Menaẓẓeaḥ le-Dawid" (Salonica, 1795), novellœ on various Talmudic topics; "Sifre debe-Rab" (ib. 1804), commentary on Sifre. Among his liturgical works are the following: "Sekiyyot ha-Ḥemdah" (Salonica, 1756; often reprinted), ritual for the first day of Nisan; "Shirah Ḥadashah" (Amsterdam, 1776 [?]), the history of Esther in verse; "Mizmor le-Dawid" (Leghorn, 1818), notes on Shulḥan 'Aruk, Eben ha'Ezer; "Shif'at Rebibim" (Leghorn, 1788, and often reprinted), prayers for holy days, with a poetical presentation of the Temple service on the Day of Atonement and other piyyuṭim, published by his disciple Elisha Ḥabillo, called also "Mercado." Notes of Pardo's on the Talmud are found in the Vienna edition of 1860-72, and on Alfasi in the Wilna edition of 1881-86. The library of the Jewish community at Rustchuk owns a "Miktam le-Dawid" bearing the author's signature.

Pardo married a young woman of Spalato, who aided him in literary labors. She bore him three sons, named Jacob, Isaac, and Abraham, and one daughter. The last-named married Abraham Penso, author of the "Appe Zuṭre" (Salonica, 1798). Abraham Pardo married a daughter of the bibliographer Ḥayyim Joseph David Azulai.

Bibliography:

  • Miktam le-Dawid, part i., pp. 1, 207;
  • part ii., Nos. 2, 10, 12, 21, 31; part iii., Nos. 2, 5; part iv., p. 207;
  • Maskil le-Dawid, Preface;
  • Shoshannim le-Dawid, Preface;
  • Shif'at Rebibim, title-page.

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http://rabbibitton.blogspot.com.au/2012/05/sephardic-rabbis-rabbi-david-pardo-1718.html

SEPHARDIC RABBIS: Rabbi David Pardo (1718-1790)

Rabbi David Pardo, (1718-1790) was a famous Sephardic Rabbi, a prolific author and a poet. He was born in Venice, Italy. At a young age he went to Sarajevo where he studied under Rabbi Abraham David Papo. Eventually R. Pardo was appointed rabbi of Sarajevo. In 1776 he traveled to Eretz Israel, settling in Jerusalem, where he served as head of the Yeshiba Chesed leAbraham uBinyan Shelomo. Rabbi Pardo was regarded in his time as Jerusalem's greatest Rabbi.

 

Many of his works deal mainly with Tannaitic Rabbinic literature, and are an original commentary--not necessarily dependent on the Amoraitic interpretations.

His first famous work was Shoshannim le-David , an independent commentary on the Mishna.

He also wrote Chasde David a commentary on the Tosefta, which is considered one of the most important commentary on the Tosefta.

And Sifre deBeRab which he commenced in 1786 and was published by his son Abraham after his death. This work is considered the most important commentary on the Sifre.

He also wrote Mikhtam le-David a book where he records his numerous halakhic decisions and responsa.

Maskil le-David a commentary on Rashi's Biblical commentary.

LaMnatzeach leDavid, a book on those Talmudic passages where alternative explanations are given.

Mizmor le-David notes on the Perot Ginnosar of Rabbi Chizekiyah da Silva.

Rabbi Pardo's liturgical poems and prayers are included in the Sephardic daily and festival prayer books.

He died in Yerushalaim.

 

Of his sons, R. Jacob Pardo became chief Rabbi of Ragusa. A second son, Isaac, was the Rabbi of Sarajevo, while a third, Abraham, who married Lebana, the daughter of Rabbi Chayim Yosef David Azulai (Chida), became head of the Yeshiba Chesed leAbraham uBinyan Shelomo after his father-in-law's death.

Rabbi Pardo's disciples included Shabbetai ben Abraham Ventura, Rabbi David Pinto, and Rabbi Abraham Penso.

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http://www.scribd.com/doc/60280592/Eliezer-Papo-The-Life-Story-of-Ribi-Dawid-Ben-Ya-Aqov-Pardo

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Rabbi David Pardo Chief Rabbi of Sarajevo's Timeline

1719
March 29, 1719
Venice, Italy
1792
June 2, 1792
Age 73
Jerusalem, Israel
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