Charles Hutchins (1742 - c.1834)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: York, York, Maine, United States
Death: Died in Penobscot, Maine, United States
Managed by: Patty Horridge
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About Charles Hutchins

Charles Hutchings was born on 10 Oct 1742 in York, York Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. He was a farmer in 1768 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. He died on either 3 Jun in 1834 or 1835 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine and was buried at Wardwell Point there.

Charles and his family came to Penobscot, Maine in a schooner in 1768, clearing a farm and residing on Wardwell Point on the Bagaduce estuary in the town of Penobscot. When the American forces were defeated at Castine in 1779, Charles went to Damariscotta to escape capture. He served in the French and Indian War of 1759 according to George A. Wheeler's "History of Castine" (Bangor, Maine: Burr & Robinson, 1875, p. 362-also see pp. 202-03). "Jacob Perkins and his decendants," pp.2, 3, 11 includes a report that Charles and several Perkins men lay in ambush on Charles' property and fired on a British guard boat, 1779, during the siege of the Bagaduce (Castine); Charles then walked with his wife and eight children through the wilderness to Damariscotta, returning to Penobscot in 1783. Charles lost his parents early in childhood, and was brought up by his sister Edith (who married Averill/Avery, the first settler in Penobscot on the NW shore of Northern Bay near Jacob Perkins). Charles was part of the expedition to Louisburg, Nova Scotia when age 16, and was shipwrecked on the "Londoner" off Cape Ann while returning to Boston. Afterwards he resided at Albany, New York where he was noted for his diminutive size and great strength. He then returned to York, Maine where he married Mary Perkins (1764) and moved to Penobscot (1768) with her and their three children.

CHARLES HUTCHINGS A soldier in the French and Indian Wars, a settler in Penobscot, where he lived on the west side of the Bagaduce River. He married (1), int. Feb. 8, 1764, Mary Perkins, born Apr. 3, 1745, daughter of Joseph and Abigail (Wardwell) Perkins; died May 6, 1797, married (2) Nov. 10, 1797, Mrs. Nellie Bowles of Marblehead, Mass., born July 10, 1754; died Dec. 5, 1838.

The Charles Hutchings family lived in the Joseph Banks house in York on Scituate Men's Row before moving to Penobscot in 1768. The house was built by Joseph Banks in 1696 on land that was part of his father's farm. It is in fine condition at the present time (1982). Charles cleared a farm in Penobscot near the Bagaduce River and made his home there the rest of his life, except for the four years that he lived in Newcastle, Maine.

Charles was one of the first settlers of Plantation No. 3, now known as the town of Penobscot. His son William, a veteran of the Revolutionary War, lived to be 101 years old.

Charles enlisted in the army raised under Lord Louden of Halifax in 1758, for the reduction of Louisburg, Cape Breton. After the failure of this expedition he boarded a schooner and sailed for Boston. The ship encountered a terrific hurricane off Cape Ann and was wrecked on "Londoner Ledge." Charles escaped with a few others in a lifeboat and came ashore at Gloucester, Mass. He walked from there to Boston. He was afterward at Albany, New York, where he was noted for his diminutive size and great strength. He was honorably discharged at the close of the war, and returned to York, where he soon after married Mary Perkins.

Woodsmen and trappers brought to York encouraging stories of the great fertility of the region on Penobscot Bay. In 1768 the Hutchings family packed their few belongings and set sail in a schooner for Penobscot. Arriving there Charles took up a farm of more than one hundred acres and with the help of his wife he built a sturdy log cabin.

Charles and his wife accepted all the bitter hardships of the period with cheerful fortitude. When he built the cellar wall for his house, he carried the stones in his arms, a distance of nearly a quarter of a mile, from the shore of the Bagaduce River. He obtained glass, nails and hinges by cutting 40 cord of wood, which he sold in Castine for fifty cents a cord.

When the British took over Castine in June,1779, Charles was one of the first Patriots to join the land forces under General Wadsworth. Most of the time he was stationed at a place then known as Hainey's Point in Brooksville, across the bay from Castine. During the siege of Bagaduce (Castine) in 1779, Charles Hutchings, with Daniel, Isaac and Jacob Perkins, lay in ambush on Hainey's Point, and fired into an English guard boat as it approached. They were informed against by a Tory, and Charles was obliged to take his family, and flee for his life. Charles Hutchings' second shot had apparently killed an English soldier. He took a canoe at West Penobscot, and with his wife and eight children, crossed the Penobscot River to Fort Pownal, and walked through the wilderness to Damariscotta, where he lived until the peace Df 1783. Two of the children were so small they had to be carried all the way. Their only cooking utensil was a camp kettle holding about two gallons, in which Mary stewed birds and rabbits, which Charles brought down with his flintlock. They found living quarters at a trading post in what is now Newcastle and lived there until the end of the war in 1783.

The Hutchings family returned to Penobscot to find their buildings burned and their fences destroyed. He rebuilt his house on the same foundation and lived there the rest of his life. He died June 3, 1835 at the age of 92. At the time of his death he had 350 descendants Living; 10 children, 88 grandchildren, 235 great grandchildren, and 17 great-great grandchildren.

He was married to Mary Perkins on 8 Feb 1764 in York, York Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts.

Mary Perkins was born on either 3 Apr or 14 Apr in 1745 in York, York Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. She died on 6 May 1797 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. Children were:

i. Capt. William Hutchings Sr.. 
ii. Abigail Hutchings was born on 19 Apr 1766 in York, York Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. 
iii. Joanna Hutchings. 
iv. Mary Hutchings was born on 14 Oct 1770 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. She died on 25 Jan 1835 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine. She was married to Capt. Daniel Wardwell Jr. about 1788 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. 
v. Judith Hutchings was born on 9 Nov 1772 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. She died on 20 Apr 1862 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine and was buried in the Snowman Cemetery there. She was married to William Snowman on 30 Dec 1789 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. 
vi. Charles Hutchings Jr. was born on 22 Jun 1774 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. He died on 20 Jul 1784 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine. 
vii. Deborah Hutchings was born on 28 Jul 1776 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. She died on 3 Dec 1865 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine. 
viii. Daniel Hutchings was born on 19 Jun 1778 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. He died on 1 Apr 1863 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine. 
ix. Temperance Hutchings was born on either 2 Jul 1780 in Newcastle, Lincoln Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts or on 25 Jul 1780 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. 
x. James Hutchings was born on 22 Aug 1782 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. He died on 2 Dec 1860 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine and was buried in the William Hutchings farm cemetery. He was a farmer. 
xi. Sarah Hutchins was born on 16 Mar 1785 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. She died on 14 Dec 1866 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine. 
xii. Capt. Ebenezer O. Hutchins was born on 12 Aug 1787 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. He died on 13 Apr 1881 and was buried in Charles Hutchings farm cemetery. He was a farmer, a part owner of the schooner "Coral", and a representative of Penobscot, Hancock Co., Maine. 
xiii. Samuel Hutchings was born on 18 Aug 1792 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts. He died on 13 Aug 1802 in Penobscot, Hancock Co., Province of Maine, Massachusetts.

Charles Hutchings married second Nellie Bowler on 10 Nov 1797 in Marblehead, Essex Co., Massachusetts.

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HUTCHINGS, CHARLES.

Mr. Charles Hutchings was born in York, Maine, October 10, 1742. His mother dying during his infancy, he was brought up by his elder sister, until he was seventeen years old, when he enlisted in the army raised for the reduction of Louisburg, Cape Breton. He was with Lord Loudon, at

Halifax. After the failure of this expedition, he sailed for Boston, and was wrecked on the Londoner, off Cape Ann. He was afterward at Albany, New York, where he was noted for his diminutive size, and great strength. He was honorably discharged at the close of the war, and returned to York, where he soon after married Miss Mary Perkins. He moved to Penobscot, in 1768, and took up the farm now owned and occupied by his son, Eben Hutchings, who is now in his eighty-sixth year.

During the siege of Bagaduce, in 1779, he with Daniel, Isaac and Jacob Perkins, lay in ambush on Hainey’s Point, and fired into the English guardboat as it passed. They were informed against by a Tory, and Mr. Hutchings was obliged to take his family, consisting of his wife and

eight children, and flee for his life. He took a canoe, crossed the Penobscot river to Fort Pownal, and walked through the wilderness to Damariscotta, where he resided until the peace of 1783. In this journey through the woods, two of the children were so small that he and his wife were obliged to carry them all the way in their arms. They lodged on the bare ground. Their only cooking utensil was a camp kettle, holding about two gallons. Their only means of obtaining food, was afforded by his gun.

The daughter of Mary, is said to have been the first white female child, born of English parents, within the present limits of the town of Penobscot.
Mr. Hutchings died in Penobscot, in June, 1835, aged 92 years and 8 months.
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Charles and his family came to Penobscot in a schooner in 1768, clearing a farm and residing on Wardwell Point on the Bagaduce estuary in the town of Penobscot. As shown on Peter's survey in 1787, Charles' land included all of Wardwell point and a swath half-way to the Penobscot River, a total of 280 acres. When the American forces were defeated at Castine in 1779, Charles went to Damariscotta to escape capture. He served in the French and Indian War of 1759 according to George A. Wheeler's "History of Castine" (Bangor, ME: Burr & Robinson, 1875, p.362 - also see pp. 202-03). "Jacob Perkins and His Descendants," pp.2,3,11 includes a report that Charles and several Perkins men lay in ambush on Charles' property and fired on a British guard boat, 1779, during the siege of the Bagaduce (Castine); Charles then walked with his wife and eight children through the wilderness to Damariscotta, returning to Penobscot in 1783. Charles lost his parents in early childhood, and was brought up by his sister, Edith (who m. Samuel Averill/Avery, the first settler in Penobscot on the NW shore of Northern Bay near Jacob Perkins). Charles was part of the expedition to Louisburg, Nova Scotia when age 16, and was shipwrecked on the "Londoner" off Cape Ann while returning to Boston. Afterwards he resided at Albany, NY where he was noted for his diminuitive size and great strength. He then returned to York, Maine where he married Mary Perkins (1764) and moved to Penobscot (1768) with her and their three children. {A son William is listed in "Maine Families in 1790" (Camden: Picton Press, 1988, p. 158.) Also see "Hugh Hutchins of Old England," Jack Randolph Hutchins and Richard Jasper Hutchings (Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1984, pp.698-9; Wheeler, George A., "History of Castine... [1922 edition], pp. 169-170.} Charles m. (2) Mrs. Nelly Bowles (b. 10 July 1754 at Marblehead, MA, d. 5 Dec 1838 at Penobscot, ME) per Penobscot VR. "The Folks of Majorbigwaduce," Grace Limeburner (N. Brooksville, ME - typescript in Bangor Public Library), p. 174, reports that Charles m. (2) Mrs. Nellie Bowles (b. 10 July 1754 at Marblehead, MA, d. 5 Dec 1838).

-------------------- Charles Hutchings Cemetery, Penobscot, ME

[1666] Charles and his family came to Penobscot in a schooner in 1768, clearing a

farm and residing on Wardwell Point on the Bagaduce estuary in the town of

Penobscot. When the American forces were defeated at Castine in 1779,

Charles went to Damariscotta to escape capture. He served in the French

and Indian War of 1759 according to George A. Wheeler's "History of

Castine"(Bangor, ME: Burr & Robinson, 1875,p.362 - also see pp. 202-03).

"Jacob Perkins and His Descendants," pp.2,3,11 includes a report that

Charles and several Perkins men lay in ambush on Charles' property and

fired on a British guard boat, 1779, during the siege of the Bagaduce

(Castine); Charles then walked with his wife and eight children through the

wilderness to Damariscotta, returning to Penobscot in 1783. Charles lost

his parents in early childhood, and was brought up by his sister, Edith

(who m. Samuel Averill/Avery, the first settler in Penobscot on the NW

shore of Northern Bay near Jacob Perkins). Charles was part of the

expedition to Louisburg, Nova Scotia when age 16, and was shipwrecked on

the "Londoner" off Cape Ann while returning to Boston. Afterwards he

resided at Albany, NY where he was noted for his diminuitive size and great

strength. He then returned to York, Maine where he married Mary Perkins

(1764) and moved to Penobscot (1768) with her and their three children. {A

son William = listed in "Maine Families in 1790" (Camden: Picton Press,

1988, p. 158.) Also see "Hugh Hutchins of Old England," Jack Randolph

Hutchins and Richard Jasper Hutchings (Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1984,

pp.698-9).}

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Charles Hutchins's Timeline

1742
October 10, 1742
York, York, Maine, United States
1764
March 7, 1764
Age 21
October 6, 1764
Age 21
York, York, ME, USA
1766
April 19, 1766
Age 23
York, York, Maine, United States
1770
October 11, 1770
Age 28
Penobscot, Hancock, Me, United States
1834
June 3, 1834
Age 91
Penobscot, Maine, United States