Charles II "le Boiteux" d'Anjou, Re di Napoli

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Charles II "le Boiteux" d'Anjou, Re di Napoli

Nicknames: "The Lame", "King Charles II of /Naples/", "le Boiteux", "le Boîteux", "Charles II", "known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux", "Italian lo Zoppo)", "Italian lo Zoppo", "King of Naples"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Napoli, Campania, Italia
Death: Died in Napoli, Campania, Italia
Place of Burial: Notre Dame de Nazareth, Aix en Provence
Immediate Family:

Son of Charles I, King of Sicily and Beatrice di Provenza, regina consorte di Sicilia
Husband of Elizabeta and ÁRPÁD(házi) Mária
Father of Éléonore d'Anjou, regina consorte di Trinacria; Charles I Martel d'Anjou; Marguerite d'Anjou, comtesse d'Anjou et du Maine; Louis d'Anjou, Évêque de Toulouse; Robert I le Sage, re di Napoli and 10 others
Brother of Louis De Sicile, Prince of Sicily; Blanche d'Anjou; Beatrice, principessa de Sicily; Robert de Sicile; Isabel ►Elizabeth of Sicily, Queen consort of Hungary and 2 others

Occupation: King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno, Roi de Naples, KING OF NAPLES AND SICILY, King of Naples, Kung av Neapel från 1285, and Prince of Salerno., неаполитански крал, Prince of Achaea and Andravida
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Charles II "le Boiteux" d'Anjou, Re di Napoli

Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo) (1254 – 5 May 1309) was; King of Naples (7 Jan 1285 - 5 May 1309); King of Albania (1285 - 1294); Prince of Salerno, Prince of Achaea Count of Anjou (1254 - 1290)

Charles II surrendered his rights to Albania to his son Philip II in 1294. Philip II reigned as "Lord of the Kingdom of Albania".

Predecessor: Charles I Successor: Robert Spouse: Maria of Hungary

Issue: Charles Martel of Anjou Saint Louis of Toulouse Robert of Naples Philip I of Taranto Raymond Berengar John of Anjou Tristan of Anjou Peter Tempesta John of Gravina Marguerite of Anjou Blanche of Anjou Eleanor of Anjou Maria of Anjou Beatrice of Anjou

Father Charles I of Naples Mother Beatrice of Provence

Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno.

Biography

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

He died in Naples in August 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

Family

In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:

  1. Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary
  2. Saint Louis of Toulouse (9 February 1275, Nocera Inferiore – 19 August 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse
  3. Robert the Wise, King of Naples
  4. Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople
  5. Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria
  6. John (1283 – aft. 16 March 1308), a priest
  7. Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)
  8. Peter (1291 – 29 August 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina
  9. John of Gravina (1294 – 5 April 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainaut (29 November 1293–1336), married 14 November 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)
 10. Marguerite (1273– 31 December 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil 16 August 1290 to Charles of Valois
 11. Blanche of Anjou (1280 – 14 October 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran 1 November 1295 James II of Aragon
 12. Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – 9 August 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina 17 May 1302 Frederick III of Sicily
 13. Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca 20 September 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)
 14. Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_II_of_Naples

--------------------

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

He died in Naples in August 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

[edit] Family

In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – March 25, 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary. They had fourteen children:

Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary

Saint Louis of Toulouse (February 9, 1275, Nocera Inferiore – August 19, 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse

Robert the Wise, King of Naples

Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople

Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria

John (1283 – aft. March 16, 1308), a priest

Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)

Peter (1291 – August 29, 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina

John of Gravina (1294 – April 5, 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainault (November 29, 1293–1336), married November 14, 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)

Marguerite (1273– December 31, 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil August 16, 1290 Charles of Valois

Blanche of Anjou (1280 – October 14, 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran November 1, 1295 James II of Aragon

Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – August 9, 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene), married at Messina May 17, 1302 Frederick III of Sicily

Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca September 20, 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)

Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_II_of_Naples

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Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno.

Contents [hide]

1 Biography

2 Family

3 Ancestry

4 External links


[edit] Biography

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Eleanor and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

He died in Naples in May 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

[edit] Family


Charles and his wife MariaIn 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:

1.Charles Martel of Anjou, titular King of Hungary

2.Margaret (1273– 31 December 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil 16 August 1290 to Charles of Valois

3.Saint Louis of Toulouse (9 February 1275, Nocera Inferiore – 19 August 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse

4.Robert the Wise, King of Naples

5.Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople

6.Blanche of Anjou (1280 – 14 October 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran 1 November 1295 James II of Aragon

7.Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria

8.John (1283 – aft. 16 March 1308), a priest

9.Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)

10.Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – 9 August 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina 17 May 1302 Frederick III of Sicily

11.Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca 20 September 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)

12.Peter (1291 – 29 August 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina

13.John of Gravina (1294 – 5 April 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainaut (29 November 1293–1336), married 14 November 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)

14.Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

[edit] Ancestry

[show]v • d • eAncestors of Charles II of Naples

                                 

 16. Louis VII of France 
 
         

 8. Philip II of France   
 
               

 17. Adèle of Champagne 
 
         

 4. Louis VIII of France   
 
                     

 18. Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut 
 
         

 9. Isabelle of Hainaut   
 
               

 19. Margaret I, Countess of Flanders 
 
         

 2. Charles I of Naples   
 
                           

 20. Sancho III of Castile 
 
         

 10. Alfonso VIII of Castile   
 
               

 21. Blanca of Navarre 
 
         

 5. Blanche of Castile   
 
                     

 22. Henry II of England 
 
         

 11. Leonora of England   
 
               

 23. Eleanor of Aquitaine 
 
         

 1. Charles II of Naples   
 
                                 

 24. Alfonso II of Aragon 
 
         

 12. Alfonso II, Count of Provence   
 
               

 25. Sancha of Castile 
 
         

 6. Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence   
 
                     

 26. Rainou, Count of Forcalquier 
 
         

 13. Gersenda II of Sabran   
 
               

 27. Gersend of Forcalquier 
 
         

 3. Beatrice of Provence   
 
                           

 28. Humbert III of Savoy 
 
         

 14. Thomas I of Savoy   
 
               

 29. Beatrice of Viennois 
 
         

 7. Beatrice of Savoy   
 
                     

 30. William I of Geneva 
 
         

 15. Marguerite of Geneva   
 
               

 31. Beatrice de Valperge 
 
         


[edit] External links

Armorial of the House Anjou-Sicily (French)

Preceded by

Charles I King of Naples

1285–1309 Succeeded by

Robert

King of Albania

1285–1301 Succeeded by

Philip I

Prince of Achaea

1285–1289 Succeeded by

Isabella

Count of Anjou

1285–1290 Succeeded by

Charles III

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_II_of_Naples"

Categories: Roman Catholic monarchs | 1254 births | 1309 deaths | Capetian House of Anjou | Monarchs of Naples | Albanian monarchs | Claimant Kings of Jerusalem | Princes of Achaea | Counts of Anjou | Princes of Salerno | Counts of Provence

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Wikipedia:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_II._%28Neapel%29

Karl II. (Neapel)

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Karl II. von Anjou (frz.: Charles d'Anjou, ital.: Carlo d'Angiò; * 1254; † 6. Mai 1309 in Neapel), genannt der Lahme (franz.:le Boiteux; ital.: lo zoppo), war seit 1285 ein König von Neapel aus dem älteren Haus Anjou.

Karl II. von Anjou-Neapel

(Illustration von Bastian Biancardi, Le vite dei re di Napoli, Venedig 1737)

Inhaltsverzeichnis

[Anzeigen]

   * 1 Leben
         o 1.1 Prinz von Salerno
         o 1.2 König von Neapel
   * 2 Ehe und Nachkommen
   * 3 Literatur
   * 4 Weblinks

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Prinz von Salerno [Bearbeiten]

Er war ein Sohn Karls I. von Anjou und dessen erster Ehefrau Beatrix von der Provence († 1267). Nachdem sein Vater 1266 das Königreich Sizilien übernommen hatte erhielt Karl den Titel eines „Fürsten von Salerno“ (Prince de Salerne). 1283 wurde Karl von seinem Vater mit der Regentschaft des Königreiches betraut und war mit der Verteidigung des festländischen Besitzes um Kalabrien und Apulien gegen den König Peter III. von Aragon beschäftigt, der die Insel Sizilien nach dem Ausbruch der sizilianischen Vesper 1282 besetzt hatte. Beim Versuch am 5. Juni 1284 die Seeblockade des Hafens von Neapel durch die aragonesische Flotte unter Ruggiero di Lauria zu beenden, geriet Karl in Gefangenschaft. Er wurde zuerst nach Cefalù und anschließend nach Katalonien gebracht, wo er noch beim Tod seines Vaters 1285 eingekerkert war. Die Regentschaft in Neapel übernahm für ihn Graf Robert II. von Artois.

König von Neapel [Bearbeiten]

Erst nach dem Scheitern des aragonesischen Kreuzzuges seines Cousins König Philipp III. von Frankreich und der darauf folgenden Friedensinitiative Philipps des Schönen wurde Karl 1288, unter Vermittlung König Eduards I. von England, freigelassen. Er wurde unter der Auflage freigelassen, 30.000 Mark zu zahlen und in Gefangenschaft zurückzukehren, wenn die Bedingungen - Aussöhnung Aragons mit Frankreich und dem Papst - nicht innerhalb von drei Jahren erfüllt würden, und ließ dabei drei seiner Söhne und sechzig provenzalische Adlige als Geiseln zurück. Auch musste er seinen Vetter Karl von Valois dazu bringen gegen 20.000 Pfund Silber auf das Königreich Aragón zu verzichten, das Papst Martin IV. diesem im Vorfeld des aragonesischen Kreuzzuges zugesprochen hatte, im Gegenzug erhielt der Valois eine Tochter Karls mit den Grafschaften Anjou und Maine als Mitgift.

Karl ging nach Rieti, wo ihn der neue Papst Nikolaus IV. sofort von allen Verpflichtungen entband, ihn 1289 zum König der beiden Sizilien krönte und Alfons III. von Aragón exkommunizierte. Karl von Valois bereitete sich in einer Allianz mit Kastilien darauf vor, Aragón in Besitz zu nehmen, während Alfons unter dem starken Druck zusagen musste, seine Truppen zurück zu holen, mit denen er seinem Bruder Jakob II. auf Sizilien half, alle Rechte an der Insel aufzugeben und einen Tribut an den Papst zu zahlen. Alfons starb 1291 kinderlos, bevor der Vertrag ausgeführt werden konnte. Jakob nahm Aragón in Besitz und überließ die Regierung in Sizilien dem dritten Bruder, Friedrich II. (der sich selbst als Friedrich III. bezeichnete).

Königin Maria und König Karl II. von Neapel. (Darstellung aus dem 14. Jahrhundert)

Der neue Papst Bonifatius VIII., der 1294 unter der Schirmherrschaft Karls in Neapel gewählt worden war, vermittelte 1295 zwischen Jakob II. von Aragon und Philipp IV. von Frankreich den Frieden von Anagni der auch eine höchst eigenwillige Lösung des Konfliktes um Neapel – Sizilien hervorbrachte: Jakob sollte Karls Tochter Bianca heiraten und bekam vom Papst die Investitur in Korsika und Sardinien zugesagt, wohingegen er Anjou freie Hand in Sizilien lassen und ihn sogar bei eventuellem sizilianischem Widerstand unterstützen sollte.

Es wurde ein Versuch gemacht Friedrich, dessen Zustimmung vonnöten war, zu bestechen in dieses Arrangement einzuwilligen. Der aber widersetzte sich mit dem Rückhalt, den er im sizilianischen Volk hatte und wurde zum König von Sizilien gekrönt. Karl, der ein fast schon anachronistisch scheinendes Ehrgefühl besaß, begab sich nach Scheitern seiner Bemühungen um Aussöhnung der Konfliktparteien vier Monate nach seiner Königskrönung zurück zur Grenze von Aragon, um sich wieder in die Gefangenschaft führen zu lassen. Da dort sich niemand an seiner erneute Gefangennahme interessierte, war seine Ehre gerettet und er begab sich zunächst nach Frankreich. Dort gelang ihm der Friedensschluß von Senlis am 19. Mai 1290, in dem Karl von Valois auf alle seine Ansprüche auf Aragon verzichtete. Dafür verzichtete der französische König zugunsten von Karl von Valois auf die Grafschaften Anjou und Maine, die Stammlande seines Hauses. Mit dem Einverständnis des Papstes Nikolaus IV. bekam Karl von Valois Marguerite von Anjou-Sizilien, die Tochter von Karl II., am 16. August 1290 zur Frau.

Danach eröffnete Karl sogleich einen Krieg gegen Friedrich, war aber trotz der Hilfe durch den Papst, Karls von Valois und auch Jakobs von Aragón, nicht in der Lage, die Insel zu erobern. Sein Sohn Philipp I. von Tarent geriet 1299 in der Schlacht von La Falconara in Gefangenschaft. Auf Betreiben des Papstes vernichtete Karl im Jahr 1300 mit Lucera (bei Foggia) das letzte Zentrum des Islam in Italien, die muslimischen Einwohner wurden massakriert oder versklavt. 1302 wurde mit dem Vertrag von Caltabellotta Frieden geschlossen. Karl gab darin endgültig seine Ansprüche auf Sizilien auf und stimmte der Hochzeit zwischen seiner Tochter Leonora mit Friedrich zu. Damit wurde die Teilung des alten normannisch-staufischen Königreichs von Sizilien in ein festländisches (Mezzogiorno/Neapel) und ein insulares (Trinacria/Sizilien) Königreich besiegelt, das erst 1816 mit der Gründung des Königreichs beider Sizilien wieder vereint werden sollte. Karl verbrachte seine letzten Jahre ruhig in Neapel und befasste sich mit der Verschönerung seiner Stadt. Er konnte seine Herrschaft gegenüber der italienischen Bevölkerung stabilisieren, indem er sie im größeren Maße an der Macht beteiligte als sein Vater und senkte zudem die Steuerlast. In den politischen Wirren des Kirchenstaates und Norditaliens hielt er sich weitestgehend heraus und konnte somit auch nicht die Überführung des Papsttums nach Avignon durch Philipp dem Schönen verhindern. 1307 unterstützte er die Zerschlagung des Templerordens, dessen Vereinigung mit den Johannitern er zuvor gefordert hatte. Er starb 1309 und wurde in San Domenico beerdigt. Sein Sohn ließ den Leichnam später nach Aix-en-Provence überführen, wo er in der Kirche Saint-Barthélemi bestattet wurde.

Ehe und Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

Karl war seit 1270 mit Maria von Ungarn († 1323) verheiratet, einer Tochter König Stephans V. von Ungarn und der Elisabeth von Cumania. Diese Ehe leitete den Erbgang des Hauses Anjou in Ungarn ein, das dort von 1308 bis 1395 herrschte. Die Kinder des Paares waren:

   * Karl Martell (* September 1271; † 12. August 1295), Titularkönig von Ungarn
   * Margarete (* 1273; † 31. Dezember 1299), Gräfin von Anjou und Maine
         o ∞ 1290 mit Graf Karl I. von Valois († 1325)
   * Ludwig (* 1274 in Nocera die Pagani; † 19. August 1297 in Brignoles), Erzbischof von Toulouse, 1317 heilig gesprochen
   * Robert der Weise (* 1278; † 20. Januar 1343), König von Neapel
   * Philipp (* 1278; † 26. Dezember 1332), Fürst von Tarent, Achaia und Albanien
   * Blanche (* 1280; † 14. October 1310)
         o ∞ 1295 mit König Jakob II. von Aragon († 1327)
   * Raimund Berengar (* 1281; † Oktober 1305), Graf von Provence, Piemont und Andria
   * Johann (* 1283; † 1308), Geistlicher
   * Tristan (1284; † 1284/88), Fürst von Salerno
   * Leonore (* 1289; † 9. August 1341)
         o ∞ 1299 mit Philipp von Toucy, Titularfürst von Antiochia
         o ∞ 1303 mit König Friedrich II. von Sizilien († 1337)
   * Marie (* 1290; † 1346/47)
         o ∞ 1304 mit König Sancho I. von Mallorca († 1324)
         o ∞ 1326 mit Don Jaime III. de Ejérica († 1335)
   * Pietro Tempesta (* 1292; † gefallen am 29. August 1315 in der Schlacht bei Montecatini), Graf von Gravina
   * Johann (* 1294; † 1336), Graf von Gravina, Fürst von Achaia, Herzog von Durazzo
   * Beatrix (* 1295; † 1335), Gräfin von Andria
         o ∞ 1305 mit Azzo VIII. d'Este († 1308), Herzog von Ferrara
         o ∞ 1309 mit Bertrand des Baux († 1351), Graf von Montescaglioso, Großjustiziar von Neapel

Siehe auch: Geschichte von Tarent

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Andreas Kiesewetter: Die Anfänge der Regierung König Karls II. von Anjou (1278–1295). Das Königreich Neapel, die Grafschaft Provence und der Mittelmeerraum zu Ausgang des 13. Jahrhunderts. Matthiesen, Husum 1999, ISBN 3-7868-1451-1. (Dissertation Würzburg 1993)

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * genealogie-mittelalter.de

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger

Karl I. König von Neapel

1285–1309 Robert der Weise

Beatrix Graf von Provence

1267–1309

Karl I. Fürst von Tarent

1285–1294 Philipp I.

König von Albanien

Fürst des Königreichs Albanien

1285–1294

Graf von Anjou

Graf von Maine

1285–1290 Margarete

Fürst von Achaia

1285–1289 Isabella von Villehardouin

König von Jerusalem (Gegenkönig)

1285–1286 Heinrich II. von Lusignan

Normdaten: PND: 118898434 – weitere Informationen | VIAF: 37714744

--------------------

Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno.

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – March 25, 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:

Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary

Saint Louis of Toulouse (February 9, 1275, Nocera Inferiore – August 19, 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse

Robert the Wise, King of Naples

Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople

Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria

John (1283 – aft. March 16, 1308), a priest

Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)

Peter (1291 – August 29, 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina

John of Gravina (1294 – April 5, 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainault (November 29, 1293–1336), married November 14, 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)

Marguerite (1273– December 31, 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil August 16, 1290 to Charles of Valois

Blanche of Anjou (1280 – October 14, 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran November 1, 1295 James II of Aragon

Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – August 9, 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina May 17, 1302 Frederick III of Sicily

Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca September 20, 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)

Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

--------------------

Charles II of Naples

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno.

Biography

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

He died in Naples in August 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

[edit]Family

In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – March 25, 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:

Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary

Saint Louis of Toulouse (February 9, 1275, Nocera Inferiore – August 19, 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse

Robert the Wise, King of Naples

Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople

Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria

John (1283 – aft. March 16, 1308), a priest

Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)

Peter (1291 – August 29, 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina

John of Gravina (1294 – April 5, 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainault (November 29, 1293–1336), married November 14, 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)

Marguerite (1273– December 31, 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil August 16, 1290 to Charles of Valois

Blanche of Anjou (1280 – October 14, 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran November 1, 1295 James II of Aragon

Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – August 9, 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina May 17, 1302 Frederick III of Sicily

Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca September 20, 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)

Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

--------------------

Charles II of Naples

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno.

Biography

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

He died in Naples in August 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

[edit]Family

In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – March 25, 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:

Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary

Saint Louis of Toulouse (February 9, 1275, Nocera Inferiore – August 19, 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse

Robert the Wise, King of Naples

Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople

Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria

John (1283 – aft. March 16, 1308), a priest

Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)

Peter (1291 – August 29, 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina

John of Gravina (1294 – April 5, 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainault (November 29, 1293–1336), married November 14, 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)

Marguerite (1273– December 31, 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil August 16, 1290 to Charles of Valois

Blanche of Anjou (1280 – October 14, 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran November 1, 1295 James II of Aragon

Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – August 9, 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina May 17, 1302 Frederick III of Sicily

Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca September 20, 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)

Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

--------------------

Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno.

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – March 25, 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:

Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary

Saint Louis of Toulouse (February 9, 1275, Nocera Inferiore – August 19, 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse

Robert the Wise, King of Naples

Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople

Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria

John (1283 – aft. March 16, 1308), a priest

Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)

Peter (1291 – August 29, 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina

John of Gravina (1294 – April 5, 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainault (November 29, 1293–1336), married November 14, 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)

Marguerite (1273– December 31, 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil August 16, 1290 to Charles of Valois

Blanche of Anjou (1280 – October 14, 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran November 1, 1295 James II of Aragon

Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – August 9, 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina May 17, 1302 Frederick III of Sicily

Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca September 20, 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)

Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

--------------------

Charles II, known as "the Lame" (French le Boiteux, Italian lo Zoppo; 1254 – 5 May 1309), was King of Naples and Sicily, titular King of Jerusalem, and Prince of Saler.

Biography

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

He died in Naples in August 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

Family

In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257 – 25 March 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and Elizabeth the Cuman. They had fourteen children:

  1. Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary
  2. Saint Louis of Toulouse (9 February 1275, Nocera Inferiore – 19 August 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse
  3. Robert the Wise, King of Naples
  4. Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople
  5. Raymond Berengar (1281–1307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria
  6. John (1283 – aft. 16 March 1308), a priest
  7. Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)
  8. Peter (1291 – 29 August 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina
  9. John of Gravina (1294 – 5 April 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainaut (29 November 1293–1336), married 14 November 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)
 10. Marguerite (1273– 31 December 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil 16 August 1290 to Charles of Valois
 11. Blanche of Anjou (1280 – 14 October 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran 1 November 1295 James II of Aragon
 12. Eleanor of Anjou, (August 1289 – 9 August 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene, Elis), married at Messina 17 May 1302 Frederick III of Sicily
 13. Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca 20 September 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)
 14. Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII d'Este, marchese of Ferrara etc. (d. 1308); she married secondly 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)

--------------------

He was the son of Charles I of Anjou, who had conquered the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily in the 1260s. His mother was Beatrice of Provence.

During the Sicilian Vespers, he had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died in 1285, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon.

In 1288, King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated on the condition that he was to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce, for twenty thousand pounds of silver, the kingdom of Aragon, which had been given to him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.

Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon, reopening the Aragonese Crusade. Alfonso, being hard pressed, agreed to the conditions of the Treaty of Tarascon: he had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See.

Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick.

The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and the dishonourable Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.

An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned King of Sicily. The ensuing war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished.

He died in Naples in August 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_II_of_Naples -------------------- Hiša


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Charles II "le Boiteux" d'Anjou, Re di Napoli's Timeline

1254
January 1, 1254
Napoli, Campania, Italia
1270
1270
Age 16
Naples, Napoli, Campania, Italy
1271
September 8, 1271
Age 17
Napoli, Napoli, Italy
1273
1273
Age 19
Napoli, Province of Naples, Campania, Italy
1274
February 9, 1274
Age 20
Nocera, Salerno, Campania, Italy
1277
1277
Age 23
Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain
1278
November 10, 1278
Age 24
Naples, Napoli, Campania, Italy
1280
1280
Age 26
Italia
1281
1281
Age 27
Napoli, Napoli, Italy
1283
1283
Age 29
Napoli, Napoli, Italy