Chilperic I, roi des Francs (c.523 - 584) MP

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Nicknames: "Chilpérico da Néustria", "King of Soissons", "King Chilperic I of the /Franks/", "Chilperich", "/Chilperic/", "Chilperic King /De Burgundy/", "King of Burgundy"
Birthplace: Soissons, Aisne, Picardie, France
Death: Died in St Vincent Abbey, Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Occupation: King of Neustria (or Soissons) from v.561 to his death., koning van Neustrië (of Soissons) vanaf 561, King of Neustria or Soissons, Rei da Neustria, king of Neustria (or Soissons) from 561 to his death., Konge av Frankrike, Rei de Neustrie (561-584), Kin
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Chilperic I, roi des Francs

Chilperic I (c. 539 – September 584) was the king of Neustria (or Soissons) from 561 to his death. He was one of the sons of Clotaire I, sole king of the Franks, and Aregund.

Chilperic I's first marriage was to Audovera. They had four children:

   * Theudebert, died in the war of 575
   * Merovech of Soissons (d.578), married the widow Brunhilda and became his father's enemy
   * Clovis of Soissons, assassinated by Fredegund in 580
   * Basina, nun, led a revolt in the abbey of Poitiers

His short second marriage to Galswintha produced no children.

His concubinage and subsequent marriage to Fredegund produced four more legitimate offspring:

   * Samson, died young
   * Rigunth, betrothed to Reccared but never married
   * Theuderic, died young
   * Clotaire, his successor in Neustria, later sole king of the Franks

Sources

   * Sérésia, L'Eglise el l'Etat sous les rois francs au VI siècle (Ghent, 1888).
   * Dahmus, Joseph Henry. Seven Medieval Queens. 1972.
   * This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

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http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperik_I

Chilperik I (539 - september 584) was de koning van Neustrië (of Soissons) vanaf 561 tot zijn dood. Hij was de jongste zoon van Chlotarius I. Hij regeerde vanuit Soissons van 561 tot 584 over Picardië, Vlaanderen en Henegouwen. Van zijn broer Charibert I erfde hij Parijs en Normandië met de steden Maine, Anjou en Rennes. Heel dit gebied noemde men Neustrië. Daarenboven veroverde hij enkele steden in het zuiden (Toulouse, Bordeaux) en was de meest gewetenloze van de vier broers, waarvan hij halfbroer was. De grenzen van zijn rijk poogde hij voortdurend te verleggen. Samen met zijn zonen voerde hij oorlog tegen de legers van zijn broers.

Van zijn eerste vrouw Audovera kreeg hij vijf kinderen: Theodebert, Merovech, Clovis, Basina en Childeswindis. Hoewel hij ook met zijn bijzit Fredegonde leefde - zij was van lagere afkomst en tevens zijn boze geest - wou hij, zoals zijn broer Sigebert I, ook met een prinses trouwen. Het werd Galswintha, de oudere halfzus van Brunhilde van Austrasië. Toen deze zag dat haar man Fredegonde niet kon loslaten, wou zij haar man verlaten en naar haar vaderland Spanje terugkeren. De bruidsschat mocht hij behouden. Op een morgen vond men Galswintha gewurgd in bed. Wie was de dader? Volgens Brunhilde was het Fredegonde, en vanaf dat moment ontstond tussen beiden een onverzoenlijke haat, die ruim veertig jaar zou aanslepen.

De oudste zoon Theodebert sneuvelde in de strijd tegen het leger van Sigebert I. Merovech werd in Austrasië (575) om het leven gebracht. Twee zoontjes van Fredegonde waren reeds in de kinderjaren gestorven. Basina ging naar het klooster in Poitiers en was betrokken in de opstand der nonnen aldaar. Chilperik I, opgestookt door Fredegonde, liet Clovis gevangen nemen. Clovis werd zonder wapens en kleren aan Fredegondes trawanten overgeleverd, die hem met messteken om het leven brachten. Na Childeswindis doopsel verstootte Chilperik I zijn vrouw Audovera en trouwde met Fredegonde. Uit dit huwelijk werden vier jongens geboren die nog kind zijnde stierven. Hun dochter, Rigundis, werd door haar moeder vermoord na Chilperiks dood.

Chilperik werd na een jachtpartij met messteken omgebracht in hetzelfde jaar waarin zijn laatste zoon en erfgenaam, Chlotharius II, geboren werd (584).

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Chilperic I (c. 539 – September 584) was the king of Neustria (or Soissons) from 561 to his death. He was one of the sons of Clotaire I, sole king of the Franks, and Aregund.

Immediately after the death of his father in 561, he endeavoured to take possession of the whole kingdom, seized the treasure amassed in the royal town of Berny and entered Paris. His brothers, however, compelled him to divide the kingdom with them, and Soissons, together with Amiens, Arras, Cambrai, Thérouanne, Tournai, and Boulogne fell to Chilperic's share. His eldest brother Charibert received Paris, the second eldest brother Guntram received Burgundy with its capital at Orléans, and Sigebert received Austrasia. On the death of Charibert in 567, his estates were augmented when the brothers divided Charibert's kingdom among themselves and agreed to share Paris.

Not long after his accession, however, he was at war with Sigebert, with whom he would long remain in a state of—at the very least—antipathy. Sigebert defeated him and marched to Soissons, where he defeated and imprisoned Chilperic's eldest son, Theudebert. The war flared in 567, at the death of Charibert. Chilperic immediately invaded Sigebert's new lands, but Sigbert defeated him. Chilperic later allied with Guntram against Sigebert (573), but Guntram changed sides and Chilperic again lost the war.

When Sigebert married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic sovereign in Spain (Athanagild), Chilperic also wished to make a brilliant marriage. He had already repudiated his first wife, Audovera, and had taken as his concubine a serving-woman called Fredegund. He accordingly dismissed Fredegund, and married Brunhilda's sister, Galswintha. But he soon tired of his new partner, and one morning Galswintha was found strangled in her bed. A few days afterwards Chilperic married Fredegund.

This murder was the cause of more long and bloody wars, interspersed with truces, between Chilperic and Sigebert. In 575, Sigebert was assassinated by Fredegund at the very moment when he had Chilperic at his mercy. Chilperic then made war with the protector of Sigebert's wife and son, Guntram. Chilperic retrieved his position, took from Austrasia Tours and Poitiers and some places in Aquitaine, and fostered discord in the kingdom of the east during the minority of Childebert II.

In 578, Chilperic sent an army to fight the Breton ruler Waroch of the Vannetais along the Vilaine. The Frankish army consisted of units from the Poitou, Touraine, Anjou, Maine, and Bayeux. The Baiocassenses (men from Bayeux) were Saxons and they in particular were routed by the Bretons.[1] The armies fought for three days before Waroch submitted, did homage for Vannes, sent his son as a hostage, and agreed to pay an annual tribute. He subsequently broke his oath, but Chilperic's dominion over the Bretons was relatively secure, as evidence by Venantius Fortunatus celebration of it in a poem.

He was detested by Gregory of Tours, who dubbed him as the Nero and Herod of his time (History of the Franks book vi.46): he had provoked Gregory's wrath by wresting Tours from Austrasia, seizing of ecclesiastical property, and appointing as bishops counts of the palace who were not clerics. His reign in Neustria also saw the introduction of the Byzantine punishment of eye-gouging. Yet, he was also a man of culture: he was a musician of some talent, and his verse (modeled on that of Sedulius) is well-regarded; he reformed the Germanic alphabet; and he worked to reduce the worst effects of Salic law upon women.

It was one day in September of 584, while returning from the chase to his royal villa of Chelles, that Chilperic was stabbed to death.

Chilperic may be regarded as the type of Merovingian sovereigns. He was exceedingly anxious to extend the royal authority. He was jealous of the royal treasury, levied numerous imposts, and his fiscal measures provoked a great sedition at Limoges in 579. When his daughter Rigunth was sent to the Visigoths as a bride for King Reccared, laden with wagonloads of showy gifts, the army that went with her lived rapaciously off the land as they travelled to Toledo. He wished to bring about the subjection of the church, and to this end sold bishoprics to the highest bidder, annulled the wills made in favour of the bishoprics and abbeys, and sought to impose upon his subjects a unique conception of the Trinity, as Gregory of Tours here relates:

   At the same time king Chilperic wrote a little treatise to the effect that the holy Trinity should not be so called with reference to distinct persons but should merely have the meaning of God, saying that it was unseemly that god should be called a person like a man of flesh; affirming also that the Father is the same as Son and that the Holy Spirit also is the same as the Father and the Son. "Such," said he, "was the view of the prophets and patriarchs and such is the teaching the law itself has given." When he had had this read to me he said: "I want you and the other teachers of the church to hold this view." But I answered him: "Good king, abandon this belief; it is your duty to follow the doctrine which the other teachers of the church left to us after the time of the apostles, the teachings of Hilarius and Eusebius which you professed at baptism." [1]

Family

Chilperic's first marriage was to Audovera. They had four children:

   * Theudebert, died in the war of 575
   * Merovech (d.578), married the widow Brunhilda and became his father's enemy
   * Clovis, assassinated by Fredegund in 580
   * Basina, nun, led a revolt in the abbey of Poitiers

His short second marriage to Galswintha produced no children.

His concubinage and subsequent marriage to Fredegund produced four more legitimate offspring:

   * Samson, died young
   * Rigunth, betrothed to Reccared but never married
   * Theuderic, died young
   * Clotaire, his successor in Neustria, later sole king of the Franks

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_I

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Chilperic I (c. 539 – September 584) was the king of Neustria (or Soissons) from 561 to his death. He was one of the sons of Clotaire I, sole king of the Franks, and Aregund.

Chilperic I's first marriage was to Audovera. They had four children:

   * Theudebert, died in the war of 575
   * Merovech of Soissons (d.578), married the widow Brunhilda and became his father's enemy
   * Clovis of Soissons, assassinated by Fredegund in 580
   * Basina, nun, led a revolt in the abbey of Poitiers

Originally a servant, Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife and queen, Galswintha (c. 568). But Galswintha's sister, Brunhilda, in revenge against Chilperic, began a feud which lasted more than 40 years.

His short second marriage to Galswintha produced no children.

His concubinage and subsequent marriage to Fredegund produced four more legitimate offspring:

   * Samson, died young
   * Rigunth, betrothed to Reccared but never married
   * Theuderic, died young
   * Clotaire, his successor in Neustria, later sole king of the Franks

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Chilperic I

Main

Merovingian king

born c. 539

died , September or October 584, Chelles, France

Merovingian king of Soissons whom Gregory of Tours, a contemporary, called the Nero and the Herod of his age.

Son of Chlotar I by Aregund, Chilperic shared with his three half brothers (sons of Ingund, Aregund’s sister) in the partition that followed their father’s death in 561, receiving the poorest region, the kingdom of Soissons. To this was added, however, the best part of Charibert’s lands on the latter’s death in 567 or 568, so that Chilperic’s kingdom corresponded in large part to that later known as Neustria. In 568 he repudiated his wives in order to marry Galswintha, sister of the Visigothic princess, Brunhild, who had herself recently married his half brother, Sigebert I; but he soon had Galswintha murdered and immediately married Fredegund, an earlier mistress. The consequences of this crime constitute virtually the only clearly discernible thread in the tangled skein of Frankish history over the next four decades, as first Sigebert, whose relations with Chilperic had in fact been bad from the start, and then his descendants, incited by Brunhild, sought revenge for Galswintha’s murder upon the persons of Chilperic, Fredegund, and their family.

Saved from apparent disaster by the assassination of Sigebert I in 575, Chilperic was prevented from seizing the lands of the dead king’s young heir, Childebert II, by the action of Guntram, his third half brother and the king of Burgundy. Although Chilperic succeeded in forming an alliance with Childebert against Guntram by recognizing the young king as his heir (581), this was short-lived; in 583 Childebert and Guntram again came to terms. A year later Chilperic fell victim to an unknown assassin, leaving a four-month-old son, Chlotar II.

Ambitious, brutal, and debauched, Chilperic nevertheless had pretensions to being a man of learning; he wrote poor poetry, became involved in theological matters, and ordered four letters to be added to the alphabet. Regarding the church as a major rival to his wealth, he treated the bishops with hostility and contempt; at the same time, he had a reputation for injustice toward his subjects at large and imposed heavy taxes.

Forrás / Source:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/111525/Chilperic-I

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Assassinated

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http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperico_I

Chilperico I (539-584). Rey de Neustria, hijo de Clotario I y Arnegonda en el 561 a la muerte de su padre Clotario I, rey de los francos, el cual divide el reino entre sus cuatro hijos.

Chilperico se apodera del tesoro de Soissons y ocupa París. Pero sus hermanos le obligan a respetar ea reparto.

Repudia a su primera esposa, Audovera.

En el 566, se casa con Galswinta, hija del rey visigodo Atanagildo y hermana de Brunegilda, esposa de Sigeberto I, su hermano, que había heredado Austrasia.

En el 567, Galswinta fue asesinada (estrangulada en su cama). Sigiberto decide vengar a su cuñada y es el comienzo de la guerra entre Neustria y Austrasia, que durará mucho tiempo. Fue continuada por sus descendientes.

Se casa con Fredegunda. Y el mismo año, la muerte de Cariberto I le hace ganar el reino de París. En 582 ordena el bautismo a todos los judíos que habitaban en su reino.

Batido por su hermano Sigeberto, debe su trono al asesinato de éste en el año 575.

En el 584, fue muerto durante una cacería. Su hijo Clotario II hereda el reino a la edad de cuatro meses, bajo la tutela de su madre Fredegunda y la protección de su tío Gontrán I, rey de Borgoña, que así recupera el reino de París.

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In English:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_I

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Chilperic I

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chilperic I (c. 539 – September 584) was the king of Neustria (or Soissons) from 561 to his death. He was one of the sons of Clotaire I, sole king of the Franks, and Aregund.

Immediately after the death of his father in 561, he endeavoured to take possession of the whole kingdom, seized the treasure amassed in the royal town of Berny and entered Paris. His brothers, however, compelled him to divide the kingdom with them, and Soissons, together with Amiens, Arras, Cambrai, Thérouanne, Tournai, and Boulogne fell to Chilperic's share. His eldest brother Charibert received Paris, the second eldest brother Guntram received Burgundy with its capital at Orléans, and Sigebert received Austrasia. On the death of Charibert in 567, his estates were augmented when the brothers divided Charibert's kingdom among themselves and agreed to share Paris.

Not long after his accession, however, he was at war with Sigebert, with whom he would long remain in a state of—at the very least—antipathy. Sigebert defeated him and marched to Soissons, where he defeated and imprisoned Chilperic's eldest son, Theudebert. The war flared in 567, at the death of Charibert. Chilperic immediately invaded Sigebert's new lands, but Sigbert defeated him. Chilperic later allied with Guntram against Sigebert (573), but Guntram changed sides and Chilperic again lost the war.

When Sigebert married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic sovereign in Spain (Athanagild), Chilperic also wished to make a brilliant marriage. He had already repudiated his first wife, Audovera, and had taken as his concubine a serving-woman called Fredegund. He accordingly dismissed Fredegund, and married Brunhilda's sister, Galswintha. But he soon tired of his new partner, and one morning Galswintha was found strangled in her bed. A few days afterwards Chilperic married Fredegund.

This murder was the cause of more long and bloody wars, interspersed with truces, between Chilperic and Sigebert. In 575, Sigebert was assassinated by Fredegund at the very moment when he had Chilperic at his mercy. Chilperic then made war with the protector of Sigebert's wife and son, Guntram. Chilperic retrieved his position, took from Austrasia Tours and Poitiers and some places in Aquitaine, and fostered discord in the kingdom of the east during the minority of Childebert II.

In 578, Chilperic sent an army to fight the Breton ruler Waroch of the Vannetais along the Vilaine. The Frankish army consisted of units from the Poitou, Touraine, Anjou, Maine, and Bayeux. The Baiocassenses (men from Bayeux) were Saxons and they in particular were routed by the Bretons.[1] The armies fought for three days before Waroch submitted, did homage for Vannes, sent his son as a hostage, and agreed to pay an annual tribute. He subsequently broke his oath, but Chilperic's dominion over the Bretons was relatively secure, as evidence by Venantius Fortunatus celebration of it in a poem.

He was detested by Gregory of Tours, who dubbed him as the Nero and Herod of his time (History of the Franks book vi.46): he had provoked Gregory's wrath by wresting Tours from Austrasia, seizing of ecclesiastical property, and appointing as bishops counts of the palace who were not clerics. His reign in Neustria also saw the introduction of the Byzantine punishment of eye-gouging. Yet, he was also a man of culture: he was a musician of some talent, and his verse (modeled on that of Sedulius) is well-regarded; he reformed the Germanic alphabet; and he worked to reduce the worst effects of Salic law upon women.

It was one day in September of 584, while returning from the chase to his royal villa of Chelles, that Chilperic was stabbed to death.

Chilperic may be regarded as the type of Merovingian sovereigns. He was exceedingly anxious to extend the royal authority. He was jealous of the royal treasury, levied numerous imposts, and his fiscal measures provoked a great sedition at Limoges in 579. When his daughter Rigunth was sent to the Visigoths as a bride for King Reccared, laden with wagonloads of showy gifts, the army that went with her lived rapaciously off the land as they travelled to Toledo. He wished to bring about the subjection of the church, and to this end sold bishoprics to the highest bidder, annulled the wills made in favour of the bishoprics and abbeys, and sought to impose upon his subjects a unique conception of the Trinity, as Gregory of Tours here relates:

At the same time king Chilperic wrote a little treatise to the effect that the holy Trinity should not be so called with reference to distinct persons but should merely have the meaning of God, saying that it was unseemly that god should be called a person like a man of flesh; affirming also that the Father is the same as Son and that the Holy Spirit also is the same as the Father and the Son. "Such," said he, "was the view of the prophets and patriarchs and such is the teaching the law itself has given." When he had had this read to me he said: "I want you and the other teachers of the church to hold this view." But I answered him: "Good king, abandon this belief; it is your duty to follow the doctrine which the other teachers of the church left to us after the time of the apostles, the teachings of Hilarius and Eusebius which you professed at baptism." [1]

Family

Chilperic's first marriage was to Audovera. They had four children:

Theudebert, died in the war of 575

Merovech (d.578), married the widow Brunhilda and became his father's enemy

Clovis, assassinated by Fredegund in 580

Basina, nun, led a revolt in the abbey of Poitiers

His short second marriage to Galswintha produced no children.

His concubinage and subsequent marriage to Fredegund produced four more legitimate offspring:

Samson, died young

Rigunth, betrothed to Reccared but never married

Theuderic, died young

Clotaire, his successor in Neustria, later sole king of the Franks

References

^ Howorth, 309.

Sérésia, L'Eglise el l'Etat sous les rois francs au VI siècle (Ghent, 1888).

Dahmus, Joseph Henry. Seven Medieval Queens. 1972.

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

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Assassinated

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Assassinated

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Chilperic I (c. 539 – September 584) was the king of Neustria (or Soissons) from 561 to his death. He was one of the sons of Clotaire I, sole king of the Franks, and Aregund.

Immediately after the death of his father in 561, he endeavoured to take possession of the whole kingdom, seized the treasure amassed in the royal town of Berny and entered Paris. His brothers, however, compelled him to divide the kingdom with them, and Soissons, together with Amiens, Arras, Cambrai, Thérouanne, Tournai, and Boulogne fell to Chilperic's share. His eldest brother Charibert received Paris, the second eldest brother Guntram received Burgundy with its capital at Orléans, and Sigebert received Austrasia. On the death of Charibert in 567, his estates were augmented when the brothers divided Charibert's kingdom among themselves and agreed to share Paris.

Not long after his accession, however, he was at war with Sigebert, with whom he would long remain in a state of—at the very least—antipathy. Sigebert defeated him and marched to Soissons, where he defeated and imprisoned Chilperic's eldest son, Theudebert. The war flared in 567, at the death of Charibert. Chilperic immediately invaded Sigebert's new lands, but Sigbert defeated him. Chilperic later allied with Guntram against Sigebert (573), but Guntram changed sides and Chilperic again lost the war.

When Sigebert married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic sovereign in Spain (Athanagild), Chilperic also wished to make a brilliant marriage. He had already repudiated his first wife, Audovera, and had taken as his concubine a serving-woman called Fredegund. He accordingly dismissed Fredegund, and married Brunhilda's sister, Galswintha. But he soon tired of his new partner, and one morning Galswintha was found strangled in her bed. A few days afterwards Chilperic married Fredegund.

This murder was the cause of more long and bloody wars, interspersed with truces, between Chilperic and Sigebert. In 575, Sigebert was assassinated by Fredegund at the very moment when he had Chilperic at his mercy. Chilperic then made war with the protector of Sigebert's wife and son, Guntram. Chilperic retrieved his position, took from Austrasia Tours and Poitiers and some places in Aquitaine, and fostered discord in the kingdom of the east during the minority of Childebert II.

In 578, Chilperic sent an army to fight the Breton ruler Waroch of the Vannetais along the Vilaine. The Frankish army consisted of units from the Poitou, Touraine, Anjou, Maine, and Bayeux. The Baiocassenses (men from Bayeux) were Saxons and they in particular were routed by the Bretons.[1] The armies fought for three days before Waroch submitted, did homage for Vannes, sent his son as a hostage, and agreed to pay an annual tribute. He subsequently broke his oath, but Chilperic's dominion over the Bretons was relatively secure, as evidence by Venantius Fortunatus celebration of it in a poem.

He was detested by Gregory of Tours, who dubbed him as the Nero and Herod of his time (History of the Franks book VI.46): he had provoked Gregory's wrath by wresting Tours from Austrasia, seizing of ecclesiastical property, and appointing as bishops counts of the palace who were not clerics. His reign in Neustria also saw the introduction of the Byzantine punishment of eye-gouging. Yet, he was also a man of culture: he was a musician of some talent, and his verse (modeled on that of Sedulius) is well-regarded; he reformed the Germanic alphabet; and he worked to reduce the worst effects of Salic law upon women.

It was one day in September of 584, while returning from the chase to his royal villa of Chelles, that Chilperic was stabbed to death.

Chilperic may be regarded as the type of Merovingian sovereigns. He was exceedingly anxious to extend the royal authority. He was jealous of the royal treasury, levied numerous imposts, and his fiscal measures provoked a great sedition at Limoges in 579. When his daughter Rigunth was sent to the Visigoths as a bride for King Reccared, laden with wagonloads of showy gifts, the army that went with her lived rapaciously off the land as they travelled to Toledo. He wished to bring about the subjection of the church, and to this end sold bishoprics to the highest bidder, annulled the wills made in favour of the bishoprics and abbeys, and sought to impose upon his subjects a unique conception of the Trinity, as Gregory of Tours here relates:

   At the same time king Chilperic wrote a little treatise to the effect that the holy Trinity should not be so called with reference to distinct persons but should merely have the meaning of God, saying that it was unseemly that god should be called a person like a man of flesh; affirming also that the Father is the same as Son and that the Holy Spirit also is the same as the Father and the Son. "Such," said he, "was the view of the prophets and patriarchs and such is the teaching the law itself has given." When he had had this read to me he said: "I want you and the other teachers of the church to hold this view." But I answered him: "Good king, abandon this belief; it is your duty to follow the doctrine which the other teachers of the church left to us after the time of the apostles, the teachings of Hilarius and Eusebius which you professed at baptism." 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_I

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Assassinated

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Assassinated

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Assassinated

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Assassinated -------------------- Merovingisk kung i Soissons som Gregorius av Tours, en samtida, kallas Nero och Herodes sin ålder.

Son till Chlotar jag av Aregund delade Chilperik med sina tre halvbröder (söner Ingund, Aregund syster) på den partition som följde sin fars död 561, fick den fattigaste regionen, Konungariket Soissons. Till detta lades dock den bästa delen av Charibert s landar på dennes död 567 eller 568, så att Chilperik rike motsvarade till stor del som senare känt som Neustrien. I 568 han förkastat sin fruar för att gifta sig Galswinthia, syster till den visigotiske prinsessan,

Brunhilde, som hade själv gift nyligen sin halvbror, Sigibert jag, men han hade snart Galswinthia mördat och omedelbart gifta Fredegund, en tidigare älskarinna. Konsekvenserna av detta brott är praktiskt taget det enda klart urskiljbara tråd i trassliga nystan frankiska historia under de kommande fyra decennierna, i första Sigibert, vars förbindelser med Chilperik faktiskt hade dålig från början, och sedan hans efterkommande, uppeggade av Brunhilde försökte hämnd för Galswinthia mord på personer Chilperik, Fredegund, och deras familj.

Räddas från uppenbara katastrofen mordet på Sigibert jag i 575, var Chilperik

hindras från att ta till vara de länder de döda kungens yngre arvtagare, Childebert II, genom inverkan av Guntram, hans tredje halvbror och kungen av Burgund. Även Chilperik lyckats bilda en allians med Childebert mot Guntram genom att erkänna den unge kungen som sin arvinge (581) var detta kortlivade, i 583 Childebert och Guntram åter kom till villkor. Ett år senare Chilperik föll offer för en okänd lönnmördare, vilket ger en fyra månader gammal son, Chlotar II.

Ambitiös, brutal och sedeslösa hade Chilperik ändå anspråk på att vara man för lärande, han skrev dålig poesi, blev inblandad i teologiska frågor, och beställde fyra bokstäver som ska läggas till i alfabetet. När det gäller kyrkan som en stor rival till sin rikedom, behandlade han biskoparna med fientlighet och förakt, samtidigt hade han ett rykte om orättvisa mot sina undersåtar i stort och införde höga skatter.

För att nämna denna sida: "Chilperik I" Encyclopædia Britannica

<http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=24471&tocid=0&query=chilperic>

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy -------------------- ID: I6527 Name: Chilperic II of Burgundy Prefix: King Given Name: Chilperic II Surname: of Burgundy Sex: M _UID: 5B0A2AFA5118D811BE490080C8C142CCF943 Change Date: 20 Aug 2004 Birth: 448 Death: 491

Father: Childeric I Merovingian b: 436 in Westfalen, Germany

Marriage 1 Agrippine of Burgundy b: 467 Children

Clothilde of Bergundy b: ABT 475 in Bourgogne, France

Forrás / Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jdp-fam&id=I6527 -------------------- ID: I5447Ch91a Name: Chilperic Burgundians,king-of-the Given Name: Chilperic Surname: Burgundians,king-of-the Sex: M Death: 0491A Note: OTHER RELATIONSHIPS: - His father was NOT Nascien of Septimania, II [437A-486A]. - His father was NOT Childeric Merovingian, I [437A-482A]. - His mother was NOT Basina - [448A-509A]. - TITLES: - king of the Bergundians - king of the Burgundians - Burgundian king ; 0473A - 86 - magister militum - COMMENTS: - "one of the four kings ('tetrarchs') of the Burgundians" [Dalton1915] - SOURCES: - Pittman1970 "Manson-Moore" - Tapsell1983 "Burgundian Kings 411 - 532":table#23-a:p#202 - Wagner1975 "Burgundians, Visigoths, Franks and Lombards":ped#27:p#186 - Dalton1915 - Gregory0594 - WNBD1983:"Clotilda" - wCharlemagne - wDKBingham - wHBradley - wMG/Stave - PKD RUO-5447Ch91a 2008Oc13 Copyright (c) 2009 Paul K Davis [paulkdavis@earthlink.net] Fremont CA

Father: Gundevech Burgundians,king-of-the Mother: ? Suevi,of-the

Marriage 1 Caretene - Children -1. Clotilda Burgundian,the

Forrás / Source: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pkd&id=I5447Ch91a -------------------- Chilperic II (c. 450 – 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel, Godomar, and Gundobad; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva, Vienne, and Lyon. They were all sons of Gundioch.

Sometime in the early 470s Chilperic was forced to submit to the authority of the Roman Empire by the magister militum Ecdicius Avitus. In 475 he probably sheltered an exiled Ecdicius after the Visigoths had obtained possession of the Auvergne.

After his brother Gundobad had removed his other brother Godomar (Gundomar) in 486, he turned on Chilperic. In 493 Gundobad assassinated Chilperic and drowned his wife, Caretena, then exiled their two daughters, Chroma, who became a nun, and Clotilda, who fled to her uncle, Godegisel. When the Frankish king, Clovis I, requested the latter's hand in marriage, Gundobad was unable to decline. Clovis and Godegisel allied against Gundobad in a long, drawn out civil war.

Sources

   * Gregory of Tours. Historia Francoru

-------------------- Chilperic II (c. 450 – 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel, Godomar, and Gundobad; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva, Vienne, and Lyon. They were all sons of Gundioch.

Sources

   * Gregory of Tours. Historia Francorum. Earnest Brehaut, trans. 1916.

-------------------- Name Chilperic II of Burgundy Birth abt 450 Death 486 Father Gundachar (Gundioc) King of Burgundy (~430-~473) Mother Carstamena Misc. Notes

Chilperic de Bourogne was King of Geneva and later King of Lyon. He is known to history as a king of the Franks. Spouses Children Clothilda (475-548)

============

Chilperic II (c. 450 – 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel, Godomar, and Gundobad; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva, Vienne, and Lyon. They were all sons of Gundioch.

Sometime in the early 470s Chilperic was forced to submit to the authority of the Roman Empire by the magister militum Ecdicius Avitus. In 475 he probably sheltered an exiled Ecdicius after the Visigoths had obtained possession of the Auvergne.

After his brother Gundobad had removed his other brother Godomar (Gundomar) in 486, he turned on Chilperic. In 493 Gundobad assassinated Chilperic and drowned his wife, Caretena, then exiled their two daughters, Chroma, who became a nun, and Clotilda, who fled to her uncle, Godegisel. When the Frankish king, Clovis I, requested the latter's hand in marriage, Gundobad was unable to decline. Clovis and Godegisel allied against Gundobad in a long, drawn out civil war. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy

===================

Chilperic II Burgundy Chilperic II was born in 0445 in Bourgogne, France.1 Birth Notes B: Abt. 445

Chilperic II's father was Gondioc de Burgundy and his mother was Caratena. His paternal grandparents were Gunther de Burgundy and <Unknown>. He was an only child. He died due to murder / assassination, Killed by his brother Gundobad, at the age of 29 in 0474.1 -------------------- King of Burgundy from 473 till his death. He was assassinated by his brother.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy -------------------- Killed by his brother Gundobad.

Sources:

1. Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet & Cecily de Neville, chart 1778s of Gondioc King of Burgundy (Bourgogne).

2. The Family of John Perkins of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Part III Sergeant Jacob, Date of Import: Aug 7, 2000. -------------------- Chilperic II (c. 450 – 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel, Godomar, and Gundobad; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva, Vienne, and Lyon. They were all sons of Gundioch.

Sometime in the early 470s Chilperic was forced to submit to the authority of the Roman Empire by the magister militum Ecdicius Avitus. In 475 he probably sheltered an exiled Ecdicius after the Visigoths had obtained possession of the Auvergne.

After his brother Gundobad had removed his other brother Godomar (Gundomar) in 486, he turned on Chilperic. In 493 Gundobad assassinated Chilperic and drowned his wife, Caretena, then exiled their two daughters, Chroma, who became a nun, and Clotilda, who fled to her uncle, Godegisel. When the Frankish king, Clovis I, requested the latter's hand in marriage, Gundobad was unable to decline. Clovis and Godegisel allied against Gundobad in a long, drawn out civil war. -------------------- Chilperic II (c. 450 – 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel, Godomar, and Gundobad; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva, Vienne, and Lyon. They were all sons of Gundioch. Sometime in the early 470s Chilperic was forced to submit to the authority of the Roman Empire by the magister militum Ecdicius Avitus.

In 475 he probably sheltered an exiled Ecdicius after the Visigoths had obtained possession of the Auvergne. After his brother Gundobad had removed his other brother Godomar (Gundomar) in 486, he turned on Chilperic. In 493 Gundobad assassinated Chilperic and drowned his wife, Caretena, then exiled their two daughters, Chroma and Clotilda. Chroma became a nun and Clotilda fled to her uncle, Godegisel. When the Frankish king, Clovis I, requested the latter's hand in marriage, Gundobad was unable to decline. Clovis and Godegisel allied against Gundobad in a long, drawn out civil war.

--------------------

Chilperic II (c. 450 – 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel, Godomar, and Gundobad; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva, Vienne, and Lyon. They were all sons of Gundioch. Sometime in the early 470s Chilperic was forced to submit to the authority of the Roman Empire by the magister militum Ecdicius Avitus.

In 475 he probably sheltered an exiled Ecdicius after the Visigoths had obtained possession of the Auvergne. After his brother Gundobad had removed his other brother Godomar (Gundomar) in 486, he turned on Chilperic. In 493 Gundobad assassinated Chilperic and drowned his wife, Caretena, then exiled their two daughters, Chroma and Clotilda. Chroma became a nun and Clotilda fled to her uncle, Godegisel. When the Frankish king, Clovis I, requested the latter's hand in marriage, Gundobad was unable to decline. Clovis and Godegisel allied against Gundobad in a long, drawn out civil war. -------------------- Chilperic was forced in 561 at his father’s death to divide the kingdom with his brothers. He was chronically at war with brother Sigebert (especially after second wife’s death by strangulation [since she was the sister of Sigebert’s wife Brunhilde])

Chilperic wrote halting verse.

Chilperic was stigmatized by Gregory of Tours as another Nero or Herod because he sold bishoprics to the highest lay bidder. Here is what Gregory wrote about King Chilperic’s views on the Trinity: “At the same time king Chilperic wrote a little treatise to the effect that the holy Trinity should not be so called with reference to distinct persons but should merely have the meaning of God, saying that it was unseemly that God should be called a person like a man of flesh; affirming also that the Father is the same as Son and that the Holy Spirit also is the same as the Father and the Son. ‘Such,’ said he, ‘was the view of the prophets and patriarchs and such is the teaching the law itself has given.’ When he had had this read to me he said: ‘I want you and the other teachers of the church to hold this view.’ But I answered him: ‘Good king, abandon this belief; it is your duty to follow the doctrine which the other teachers of the church left to us after the time of the apostles, the teachings of Hilarius and Eusebius which you professed at baptism.’”

Chilperic was first married to Audovera, but he repudiated her in 567 to marry in Rouen to Galswintha (daughter of Athanagild, King of Visigothic Spain and sister of Brunhilde, wife of Chilperic’s brother Sigebert). This new bride was soon was murdered (strangled) at the instigation of Chilperic’s concubine Fredegund, our ancestor, who then became Chilperic’s third wife, at the beginning of 40 years of brutal warfare with Brunhilde.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_I for lots more information. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy --------------------

   d. 584, Frankish king of Neustria (561–84), son of Clotaire I. He feuded bitterly with his brother Sigebert I, who had inherited the E Frankish kingdom that came to be known as Austrasia. Their struggle became savage after Chilperic and his
   mistress and future wife, Fredegunde, murdered (567) Chilperic’s second wife, Galswintha; she was the sister of Sigebert’s wife, Brunhilda. In the wars between the two brothers, Sigebert overran Neustria before his death (575). Later, Chilperic
   was murdered, probably at the instigation of Brunhilda. The feud was inherited by Chilperic’s son and successor, Clotaire II.
The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001.

-------------------- Killed by his brother Gundobad, at the age of 29 in 0474 -------------------- Roi des Burgondes de Lyon -

Koning der Bourgondiërs van Lyon -

King of the Burgundians of Lyon

---------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_II_of_Burgundy II (c. 450 – 493) was the King of Burgundy from 473 until his death, though initially co-ruler with his father from 463. He began his reign in 473 after the partition of Burgundy with his brothers Godegisel, Godomar, and Gundobad; he ruled from Valence and his brothers ruled respectively from Geneva, Vienne, and Lyon. They were all sons of Gundioch.

Sometime in the early 470s Chilperic was forced to submit to the authority of the Roman Empire by the magister militum Ecdicius Avitus. In 475 he probably sheltered an exiled Ecdicius after the Visigoths had obtained possession of the Auvergne.

After his brother Gundobad had removed his other brother Godomar (Gundomar) in 486, he turned on Chilperic. In 493 Gundobad assassinated Chilperic and drowned his wife, Caretena, then exiled their two daughters, Chroma, who became a nun, and Clotilda, who fled to her uncle, Godegisel. When the Frankish king, Clovis I, requested the latter's hand in marriage, Gundobad was unable to decline. Clovis and Godegisel allied against Gundobad in a long, drawn out civil war. -------------------- Roi de Neustrie (561-584)

Roi de Paris (568-584) -------------------- Chilperico I

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Dinastia Merovíngia Rei de todos os francos

Reis da Nêustria

Reis da Austrásia

Faramundo 410-426

Clódio 426-447

Meroveu 447-458

Childerico I 458-481

Clóvis I 481 - 511

 Childeberto I 511-558 
 Clotário I 511-561 
 Clodomiro 511-524 
 Teodorico I 511-534 
   Teodeberto I 534-548 
   Teodebaldo 548-555 

Clotário I 558-561

 Cariberto I 561-567 
 Chilperico I 561-584 
   Clotário II 584-629 
 Guntram 561-592 
   Childeberto II 592-595 
   Teodorico II 595-613 
   Sigeberto II 613 
 Sigeberto I 561-575 
   Childeberto II 575-595 
   Teodeberto II 595-612 
   Teodorico II 612-613 
   Sigeberto II 613 

Clotário II 613-629

 Dagoberto I 623-629 

Dagoberto I 629-639

 Cariberto II 629-632 
   Chilperico 632 
 Clóvis II 639-658 
   Clotário III 658-673 
   Teodorico III 673 
   Childerico II 673-675 
   Teodorico III 675-691 
 Sigeberto III 634-656 
    Childeberto o Adotado      656-661 
   Clotário III 661-662 
    Childerico II 662-675 
    Clóvis III 675-676 
    Dagoberto II 676-679 

Teodorico III 679-691

Clóvis IV 691-695

Childeberto III 695-711

Dagoberto III 711-715

 Chilperico II 715-721 
 Clotário IV 717-718 

Chilperico II 718-721

Teodorico IV 721-737

Childerico III 743-751


Chilperico I

Rei da Nêustria (561-584)

Nascimento 539

Morte Setembro de 584 (juliano), Chelles

Chilperico I (◊ c. 539 † Setembro de 584) foi rei da Nêustria (ou Soissons) de 561 até sua morte. Era um dos filhos de Clotário I, rei de todos os francos, e Aregund.

Índice [esconder]

1 Vida

2 Pais

3 Casamentos e filhos

4 Referências

5 Ligações externas

6 Ver também


[editar] Vida


Retrato de Chilperico I numa medalha de bronze1720.Imediatamente após a morte de seu pai, em 561, ele se empenhou em tomar posse de todo o reino, seqüestrando o tesouro acumulado na cidade real de Berny e entrando em Paris. Seus irmãos, no entanto, forçaram-no a dividir o reino com eles, e Soissons, junto com Amiens, Arras, Cambrai, Thérouanne, Tournai e Bolonha ficaram com Chilperico I. Seu irmão mais velho Cariberto recebeu Paris, Guntram recebeu a Borgonha com sua capital em Orleães e Sigeberto I recebeu a Austrásia.À morte de Cariberto em 567, suas posses foram aumentadas quando seus irmãos dividiram o reino de Cariberto entre eles e combinaram compartilhar Paris.

Não muito após sua acessão, no entanto, ele entrou em guerra com Sigeberto, com quem ficaria num longo estado de antipatia. Sigeberto o derrotou e marchou para Soissons, onde ele derrotou e aprisionou o primogênito de Chilperico, Teodeberto. A guerra ampliou-se em 567, com a morte de Cariberto. Chilperico imediatamente invadiu as novas terras de Sigeberto, mas Sigeberto novamente o derrotou. Chilperico, então, aliou-se a Guntram contra Sigeberto (573), mas Guntram mudou de lado e Chilperico sofreu mais uma derrota.

Quando Sigeberto desposou Brunilda, filha do soberano visigodo da Espanha, Atanagildo, Chilperico também quis realizar um grande casamento. Ele já havia repudiado sua primeira esposa, Audovera, e tinha tomado como concubina uma serviçal chamada Fredegunda. Conseqüentemente, ele dispensou Fredegunda e se casou com a irmã de Brunilda, Galswintha. Mas ele logo se cansaria de sua nova parceira, e numa manhã Galswintha foi encontrada estrangulada em sua cama. Em poucos dias Chilperico casou-se com Fredegund.

Esse assassinato foi a causa da mais longa e sangrenta guerra, intercalada de armistícios, entre Chilperico e Sigeberto. Em 575, Sigeberto foi assassinado por Fredegunda no momento que ele tinha Chilperico sob misericórdia. Chilperico então declarou guerra ao protetor da esposa e do filho de Sigeberto, Guntram. Chilperico retomou sua posição, conquistando da Austrásia Tours e Poitiers e alguns locais na Aquitânia, e estimulou a discórdia no reino oriental durante a minoridade de Childeberto II.

Ele aparentava alguma cultura literária, e foi autor de algumas posias, tomando Sedúlio como modelo. Ele inclusive acrescentou letras ao alfabeto latino, ordenando que os manuscristos fossem reescritos com os novos caracteres. A captura de Tours da Austrásia e o seqüestro das propriedades eclesiásticas, além do hábito de Chilperico de apontar como bispos nobres do palácio que não eram clérigos, o que provocou o ódio amargo de Gregório de Tours, por quem Chilperico foi estigmatizado como Nero e Herodes de sua época.

Num dia de setembro de 584, enquanto retornava de uma caçada para sua vila real de Chelles, Chilperico foi apunhalado até a morte.

Chilperico deve ser considerado um soberano merovíngio típico. Ele era excessivamente ansioso em ampliar sua autoriade real. Ele era zeloso com o tesouro real, cobrando numerosos impostos, e suas medidas fiscais provocaram uma grande revolta em Limoges em 579. Quando sua filha Rigunth foi enviada aos visigodos como noiva para o rei Recaredo I, carregada de presentes esplendorosos, o exército que a acompanhou sobreviveu de modo voraz da terra no caminho até Toledo. Ele desejava a submissão da igreja, e para isso acabou vendendo bispados pela maior oferta, anulando os testamentos em favor dos bispados e abadias, e tentando impor sobre seus súditos uma concepção única da Santíssima Trindade, como Gregório de Tours relata:

Ao mesmo tempo que o rei Chilperico escrevia um pequeno exame sobre o efeito que a Santíssima Trindade não deveria ser assim chamada com referência a pessoas distintas mas deveria simplesmente ter o significado de Deus, dizendo que não era adequado que Deus fosse comparado a um homem de carne; afirmamdo também que o Pai, o Filho e o Espírito Santo são a mesma coisa. "Igual", disse ele, "era a visão dos profetas e patriarcas e assim era ensinada a lei". Quando ele havia lido isso para mim, disse: "Eu quero que você e os outros educadores da igreja apóiem este ponto de vista". Mas eu respondi: "Bom rei, abandone esta crença; é sua obrigação seguir a doutrina que os outros educadores da igreja nos deixou após o tempo dos apóstolos, os ensinamentos de Hilário e Eusébio que você professou no batismo". [1]

[editar] Pais

♂ Clotário I (◊ c. 498 † 561)

♀ Aregunda da Turíngia (◊ c. 510 † ?)

[editar] Casamentos e filhos

em 549 com Audovera (◊ 533 † c. 580)

♂ Teodeberto (◊ c. 550 † 575)

♂ Meroveu (◊ 552 † 577)

♂ Clóvis (◊ 555 † 580), assassinado por Fredegunda.

♀ Basina (◊ c. 565 † ?), freira, liderou uma revolta na abadia de Poitiers.

♀ Childesinta (◊ c. 567 † ?)

em Março de 567, Rouen, com Galswintha (◊ c. 540 † 568) filha de Atanagildo I, rei dos visigodos da Espanha. Sem filhos.

depois de 568 com Fredegunda (◊ 545 † 597) filha de Brunulfo, conde de Cambrai

♀ Rigonta (◊ 569 † ?) foi noiva de Recaredo I, rei dos visigodos da Espanha, mas não chegou a se casar.

♂ Sansão (◊ c. 573 † 577)

♂ Clodeberto (◊ 575 † 580)

♂ Dagoberto (◊ 578 † 580)

♂ Teoderico (◊ 582 † 584)

♂ Clotário II (◊ 584 † 629) seu sucessor na Nêustria e depois rei único dos francos.

[editar] Referências

Sérésia, L'Eglise el l'Etat sous les rois francs au VI siècle (Gante, 1888).

Dahmus, Joseph Henry. Seven Medieval Queens ("Sete Rainhas Medievais"). 1972.

Este artigo incorpora textos da Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, uma publicação agora de domínio público.

-------------------- Chilperic Of Neustria I 1 2 •Sex: M •Birth: ABT 538 in Soissons, Aisne, France 3 2 •Death: 584 in Chelles, France 1 2 •Burial: UNKNOWN Saint Vincent Abbey, Paris, Seine, France 3 •Note: [benbrink.FTW]

CHILPERIC I [d. 584], was one of the sons of Clotaire I. On his father's death in 561, fearing that, as he was illegitimate, his brothers would deprive him of his share of the patrimony, he seized the royal treasury and entered Paris, prepared to bargain. The resulting division of the patrimony gave Chilperic the old Salian terrirories of the modern Picardy, Flanders and Hainault; this included Soissons. When Charibert died in 567, Chilperic's share of his property included lands and cities in the west and in Aquitaine. Distrust of his brothers, fear for his unsecured eastern frontier and the perpetual need of land and treasure for his followers caused Chilperic to attack Sigebert's town of Reims. There followed a series of campaigns in which Reims and Soissons were the key points. Sigebert's marriage to the Visigothic princess Brunhilda (Brunechildis), daughter of King Athanagild, seemed to endanger Chilperic's possessions in Aquitaine; so Chilperic put away his wife and married Galswintha, Athanagild's elder daughter. This prudent step angered his followers, who hated the Arian Visigoths. Galswintha was shortly murdered, to be replaced by Chilperic's former mistress, Fredegond. This lady was Gregory of Tours's pet aversion, but Chilperic's subjects seemed to prefer her to her predecessor. The consequent vendetta with Sigebert and Brunhilda, in which Guntram of Burgundy acted occasionally as arbitrator, lasted, almost without pause, for 40 years and was castigated by Gregory of Tours as 'bella civilia,' After Sigebert's murder in 575, Chilperic became effectively master of the 'regnum Francorum.' The Visigothic king Leovigild sought the hand of his daughter Rigunthis for his heir Reccared. Chilperic was assassinated near Chelles in 584. Chilperic was naturally ferocious and appeared to Gregory of Tours as the Nero and the Herod of his time. But he was the ablest and most interesting of the grandsons of Clovis. As a bastard he had to fight for his existence; yet, a builder of circuses, he seems to have had ideas about a king's duties that were Roman or Byzantine rather than Germanic. His fiscal measures were vigorous and provoked the hatred of the church (which suffered from them). His court circle had something more than pretensions to culture; it appreciated poetry and even theological discussion. Chilperic held his own views on the doctrine of the Trinity and revised the Latin alphabet to suit his tastes. It is a pity that our sources allow us to get no nearer to the motives of his wild, unhappy career. [Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1961 ed., Vol. 5, pg. 501, CHILPERICI]

Father: Charibert I Of Paris b: ABT 497 in Rheims, Marne, Loire-Alantique, France Mother: Radegonda Of Thuringia b: ABT 500 in Thuringia, Germania (Germany)

Marriage 1 Fredegonda b: 543 •Married: 567 4 2 •Marriage Beginning Status: Partners Children 1. Clothaire II Of Franks b: 584

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=monicap&id=I00233

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilperic_I

-------------------- BIOGRAPHY: b. c. 539

d. , September or October 584, Chelles, France

Merovingian king of Soissons whom Gregory of Tours, a contemporary, called the Nero and the Herod of his age.

Son of Chlotar I by Aregund, Chilperic shared with his three half brothers (sons of Ingund, Aregund's sister) in the partition that followed their father's death in 561, receiving the poorest region, the kingdom of Soissons. To this was added, however, the best part of Charibert's lands on the latter's death in 567 or 568, so that Chilperic's kingdom corresponded in large part to that later known as Neustria. In 568 he repudiated his wives in order to marry Galswintha, sister of the Visigothic princess, Brunhild, who had herself recently married his half brother, Sigebert I; but he soon had Galswintha murdered and immediately married Fredegund, an earlier mistress. The consequences of this crime constitute virtually the only clearly discernible thread in the tangled skein of Frankish history over the next four decades, as first Sigebert, whose relations with Chilperic had in fact been bad from the start, and then his descendants, incited by Brunhild, sought revenge for Galswintha's murder upon the persons of Chilperic, Fredegund, and their family.

Saved from apparent disaster by the assassination of Sigebert I in 575, Chilperic was prevented from seizing the lands of the dead king's young heir, Childebert II, by the action of Guntram, his third half brother and the king of Burgundy. Although Chilperic succeeded in forming an alliance with Childebert against Guntram by recognizing the young king as his heir (581), this was short-lived; in 583 Childebert and Guntram again came to terms. A year later Chilperic fell victim to an unknown assassin, leaving a four-month-old son, Chlotar II.

Ambitious, brutal, and debauched, Chilperic nevertheless had pretensions to being a man of learning; he wrote poor poetry, became involved in theological matters, and ordered four letters to be added to the alphabet. Regarding the church as a major rival to his wealth, he treated the bishops with hostility and contempt; at the same time, he had a reputation for injustice toward his subjects at large and imposed heavy taxes.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc

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Chilpéric I, King of the Franks at Soissons's Timeline

473
473
523
523
Soissons, Aisne, Picardie, France
549
549
Age 26
Neustrie, France
552
552
Age 29
France
555
555
Age 32
France
557
557
Age 34
France
559
559
Age 36
560
560
Age 37
567
567
Age 44
Neustria, France
568
568
Age 45
France