Christian L. Stauffer, 1579-1671 (1589 - 1671) MP

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Birthplace: Luchsmatt, Eggiwil, Signau District, Canton of Bern, Switzerland
Death: Died in Ibersheim, Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
Managed by: Myron Lewis McGahan
Last Updated:

About Christian L. Stauffer, 1579-1671

The Relations of Milton Snavely Hershey by Lawrence Berger-Knorr (online on Google Books) includes this Stauffer tree. Berger-Knorr lists Christian as being the son of Hans (b 1534) and grandson of Hans (b. 1500). However, other research (see Davis, below) indicates that Christian was more likely the son of Nicklaus (Claus) of Luchsmatt in Eggiwil, Switzerland.

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Taken from: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=stauffer6348&id=I547

  1. Name: Christian STAUFFER
  2. Birth: 1580 in Luchsmatt Farm, Eggiwil, Switzerland
  3. Death: 1675 in Ibersheim, Alzey, West Palatinate, Germany

Note: (DAVIS, pp.23 & 357, Vol I) Christian, a fugitive Anabaptist preacher, may have been part of a great "Taufer hunt" along with Uli Zaugg and Uli Neuhaus in 1644. They were all captured and placed in jail in Thun, where the authorities there were warned to keep these obstinate preachers out of the Emmenthal Valley.

Christian Stauffer lived at Luchsmatt farm in his early married life and then probably at Glashutte, both in Eggiwil and located west of the Eggiwil village proper on the road to Rothenbach.

He was exiled with his second wife [Adelheid Oppliger] from Glashutte farm in Eggiwil in the fall of 1671. He was living in Dirmstein, Germany, in December of 1671 and by January 1, 1672 in Ibersheim, Germany, where he probably died.

His children were christened at Röthenbach, but were probably all born at Luchsmatt farm in Eggiwil which lies near the border of Eggiwil and Röthenbach parishes.

The Emmenthal Valley was a hotbed of Anabaptist activity and their numbers were growing, which greatly alarmed the authorities in Bern. By 1671, Eggiwil had a large group of Anabaptists, numbering about 40 adults, which when you add in their children probably totaled over 100 people.

On May 3, 1671, the magistrate of Signau received orders from Bern to seize the Anabaptists of Eggiwil and bring them to the prison in Bern, where they would then be led out of Switzerland. The village community of Eggiwil refused to permit this, probably because so many of them had relatives who were Anabaptists and also because many themselves had leanings toward the Mennonite faith. Shortly thereafter twelve of the wealthiest residents of Eggiwil were sent to the city of Bern as hostages until the Anabaptists agreed to be delivered to the Bern prison or to leave the land. They agreed to the latter.

On October 16, 1671, the Reformed pastor of Eggiwil was able to report that the Anabaptists had left of their own accord. They were not allowed to take much and probably had some of their possessions and lands confiscated as an emigration tax, as well as having their citizenship taken away. They would become refugees without a county.

According to Valentine Hutwohl, a Mennonite Minister in the Pfalz, on December 14, 1671, 450 Anabaptists from Bern had recently arrived in the Pfalz. "These are scattered among the fellow believers throughout the region over a twelve-mile territory. Among these you will find those who need canes, being 70, 80, and 90 years old. On the whole they need clothing sorely; they didn't take more along than what they had on their backs. With little bedding, we don't know how to keep them warm. Some amongst us have seven, eight or nine living with them. When you speak of their property, they sigh, wishing that they had their houses and farm land here as before. There are men who left their wives and children, and women, older as well as younger, who have left husbands and children; others who brought along some, leaving the rest with the husbands, also expectant mothers; also children who left father, mother, brothers and sisters behind".

Included in the Hutwohl letter was a list of the Swiss refugees. Many were members of Christian Stauffer's family. All lived together, having 21 children. They had left large possessions in Switzerland. They had a large debt with a merchant. They brought along 100 Reichsthalers and were given 250 to pay the debt. They were living at Dirmstein.

Born: about 1579 in Luchsmatt farm, Eggilwil, Bern, SWITZERLAND

Died: after 1671 in Ibersheim, Rheinland-Pfalz, GERMANY

He married first Adelheid Oppliger,daughter of Peter Opliger and Adelheid Blonier on 18 Jun 1610 at Röthenbach. He married secondly Asenath Friedrich. Adelheid his first wife died in May 1656 and in July 1656, Christian lived together with Asenath Friedrich either at Glashütte or at Hinten in Eggiwil.3 Christian and Asenath were not married at the state church, which would probably indicate an Anabaptist marriage.

On 6 Nov 1611, Christian was called son of Claus of Luchsmatt farm when he baptized his daughter Madlena at Röthenbach.

In 1618 he appears on the Eggiwil tax rolls as living at Gläshutte farm in Eggiwil for the first time.

On 28 Apr 1622 he was called a "public Taüffer" when his brother Uli Stauffer brought Christen's son Peter from Eggiwil to be baptized at Röthenbach.

Davis p. 24

  1. Note: (Research):C: and Settings Documents Stauffer.htm

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Christian lived at Luchsmatt farm in Eggiwil where he was born. He was the first of ten children. After his marriage in 1610, he remained there, but by 1618 he and his wife and children were living at Glashutte farm in Eggiwil. They had ten children. By 1671, Eggiwil had a large group of Anabaptists including Christian and his family. They were threatened with imprisonment and requested to leave the country. By October 16, 1671, they had left the country. They were not allowed to take much and probably had some of their land and possessions confiscated as an emigration tax, as well as having their citizenship taken away. They would become refugees without a country. By December, 1671 450 Anabaptists from Bern had arrived in the Pfalz area of Germany where they were scattered among fellow Anabaptists. Christian was part of this group. A Mennonite minister in the area documented their arrival. On 1 Jan 1672 Christian was listed as a Swiss Anabaptist refugee, age over 90 years old living at Ibersheim, Germany with his second wife, age 70 years. It was stated that he wass the father, grandfather, and great grandfather of 94, of whom 16 were dead and 78 living. By April he was living at Dirmstein, Germany with his wife, several of his sons and their wives. It was stated that "they live together and have altogether 21 children of whom many were left in Switzerland. They said they have debts to repay, and cows and tools to buy and would manage with 100 Reich dollars. They were given 250 florins.

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Anabaptist in Switzerland and Germany, evicted from Switzerland and fled to Germany.

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From Davis, p. 363:

"Christian Stauffer, b. c 1580, Luchsmatt farm, Eggiwil, Bern, Switzerland. He was the son of Niclaus. Christian married Adelheid Oppliger on 18 Jun 1610 at Röthenbach. He married second Asenath Frederich of Eggiwil. He was an Anabaptist and was exiled with his second wife from Glashütte farm in Eggiwil in the fall of 1671. He was living at Dirmstein, Germany in December 1671 and at Ibersheim, Germany in January 1672. Some of his children and grandchildren were exiled with him. He may have been the Christian Stauffer who was an Anabaptist preacher who with Uli Zaugg and Uli Neuhaus were being hunted by the government in 1644. His children were christened at Röthenbach, but were probably all born at Luchsmatt farm in Eggiwil which lies near the border of Eggiwil and Röthenbach parishes."

Also on p. 363:

Christian was an Anabaptist. At the baptism record at Röthenbach of his daughter Madlena in 1610, it stated that Christain was the son of "Claus of Luchsmatten" [Niclaus]

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Michael James Arrison's gedcom file cites Christian's death as "After 1671" (Frank J. Arrison 11/11/2008)

Luchsmatt Farm Eggiwill, Switzerland

http://www.stauffer1710.com/phpbb2/index.php?sid=96a98bf8fc9ae389f0e813b3bbba4343

Luchsmatt Farm, Eggiwil, Switzerland 	

Reply with quote

"Our" Hans Stauffer is widely believed to be the Hans Stauffer who was exiled from Switzerland with his grandfather Christian in 1671. It may be impossible to ever prove or disprove whether they are the same Hans Stauffer. But most likely they are. On Jan 7, 1672 Hans and Christian were included in a list drawn up by Valentyn Huetwohl and Georg Liechte at the request of the Dutch Mennonites, who were providing aid and assistance to the exiled Swiss Mennonites. This list is now in the Amsterdam Municipal Archives. Christian was a 90 year old Mennonite preacher and Hans was 27 and unmarried.

Much more can be written about the Stauffers during this period, but it will have to wait until another time. This was just an introduction to link Hans and his family to the Stauffer family of Eggiwil, Switzerland, where they had a long history.

For many years the family owned Luchsmatt Farm in Eggiwil. According to the book Stauffer/Stouffer/Stover by Richard Davis, it was bought by the Stauffers in 1485. Luchsmatt and the Stauffers can be linked to Luchsmatt by tax and baptism records until well into the 1600's.

Another Eggiwil farm, Glashutte Farm, was owned by Christian in 1618 (or at least he was "taxed" there). His son, also named Christian, lived there at the time of his marriage in 1659.

Both of these farms may be seen from the following image:

http://map.search.ch/3537%20Eggiwil/Luchsmatt.en.html

The red circle, which should highlight the Luchsmatt Farm, is not quite in the correct spot. Just above and to the left of the circle (on the other side of the road) is Luchsmatt. If you zoom out on the map a bit and look below and to the right of the circle you will see Glashutte. While there does not seem to be a farm at Glashutte anymore (there are several houses in the area), Luchsmatt is still a farm. A local newspaper recently ran a story about Luchmatt - it has been owned by the Rindisbacher family for over 200 years. The article said the barn is over 350 years old.

Stauffer's build them to last!

   Note: (DAVIS, pp.23 & 357, Vol I) Christian, a fugitive Anabaptist preacher, may have been part of a great "Taufer hunt" along with Uli Zaugg and Uli Neuhaus in 1644. They were all captured and placed in jail in Thun, where the authorities there were warned to keep these obstinate preachers out of the Emmenthal Valley. Christian Stauffer lived at Luchsmatt farm in his early married life and then probably at Glashutte, both in Eggiwil and located west of the Eggiwil village proper on the road to Rothenbach. He was exiled with his second wife [Adelheid Oppliger] from Glashutte farm in Eggiwil in the fall of 1671. He was living in Dirmstein, Germany, in December of 1671 and by January 1, 1672 in Ibersheim, Germany, where he probably died. His children were christened at Röthenbach, but were probably all born at Luchsmatt farm in Eggiwil which lies near the border of Eggiwil and Röthenbach parishes. The Emmenthal Valley was a hotbed of Anabaptist activity and their numbers were growing, which greatly alarmed the authorities in Bern. By 1671, Eggiwil had a large group of Anabaptists, numbering about 40 adults, which when you add in their children probably totaled over 100 people. On May 3, 1671, the magistrate of Signau received orders from Bern to seize the Anabaptists of Eggiwil and bring them to the prison in Bern, where they would then be led out of Switzerland. The village community of Eggiwil refused to permit this, probably because so many of them had relatives who were Anabaptists and also because many themselves had leanings toward the Mennonite faith. Shortly thereafter twelve of the wealthiest residents of Eggiwil were sent to the city of Bern as hostages until the Anabaptists agreed to be delivered to the Bern prison or to leave the land. They agreed to the latter. On October 16, 1671, the Reformed pastor of Eggiwil was able to report that the Anabaptists had left of their own accord. They were not allowed to take much and probably had some of their possessions and lands confiscated as an emigration tax, as well as having their citizenship taken away. They would become refugees without a county. According to Valentine Hutwohl, a Mennonite Minister in the Pfalz, on December 14, 1671, 450 Anabaptists from Bern had recently arrived in the Pfalz. "These are scattered among the fellow believers throughout the region over a twelve-mile territory. Among these you will find those who need canes, being 70, 80, and 90 years old. On the whole they need clothing sorely; they didn't take more along than what they had on their backs. With little bedding, we don't know how to keep them warm. Some amongst us have seven, eight or nine living with them. When you speak of their property, they sigh, wishing that they had their houses and farm land here as before. There are men who left their wives and children, and women, older as well as younger, who have left husbands and children; others who brought along some, leaving the rest with the husbands, also expectant mothers; also children who left father, mother, brothers and sisters behind". Included in the Hutwohl letter was a list of the Swiss refugees. Many were members of Christian Stauffer's family. All lived together, having 21 children. They had left large possessions in Switzerland. They had a large debt with a merchant. They brought along 100 Reichsthalers and were given 250 to pay the debt. They were living at Dirmstein.
   Born: about 1579 <http://www.gentree.com/cgi-bin/igmget/n=Stauffer?ID1491> in Luchsmatt farm, Eggilwil, Bern, SWITZERLAND
   Died: after 1671 <http://www.gentree.com/cgi-bin/igmget/n=Stauffer?ID1491> in Ibersheim, Rheinland-Pfalz, GERMANY
   He married first Adelheid Oppliger,daughter of Peter Opliger and Adelheid Blonier on 18 Jun 1610 at Röthenbach. He married secondly Asenath Friedrich. Adelheid his first wife died in May 1656 and in
   July 1656, Christian lived together with Asenath Friedrich either at Glashütte or at
   Hinten in Eggiwil.3 Christian and Asenath were not married at the state church,
   which would probably indicate an Anabaptist marriage. On 6 Nov 1611, Christian
   was called son of Claus of Luchsmatt farm when he baptized his daughter Madlena at
   Röthenbach. In 1618 he appears on the Eggiwil tax rolls as living at Gläshutte farm
   in Eggiwil for the first time. On 28 Apr 1622 he was called a "public Taüffer" when
   his brother Uli Stauffer brought Christen's son Peter from Eggiwil to be baptized at
   Röthenbach.
   Davis p. 24
  1. Note: (Research):C: and Settings Documents Stauffer.htm

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=stauffer6348&id=I547

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Christian L. Stauffer, 1579-1671's Timeline

1576
May 4, 1576
1589
1589
Eggiwil, Signau District, Canton of Bern, Switzerland
1610
June 18, 1610
Age 21
Rothenbach, Bern, , Switzerland
1611
October 6, 1611
Age 22
Rothenbach, Canton Bern, SWITZERLAND
1613
April 18, 1613
Age 24
Röthenbach im Emmental, Signau District, Canton of Bern, Switzerland
1615
March 19, 1615
Age 26
Eggiwil, Signau District, Canton of Bern, Switzerland
1617
April 13, 1617
Age 28
Eggiwil,Bern,Switzerland
1620
1620
Age 31
Luchsmatt farm, Eggilwil, Bern, SWITZERLAND
1622
April 28, 1622
Age 33
Eggiwil,Bern,Switzerland
1622
Age 33
Switzerland