Cleopatra Selene II, Queen of Mauretania (-40 - 6) MP

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Birthplace: الاسكندرية Egypt
Death: Died
Occupation: Ptolemaic Princess
Managed by: Sveneric Rosell
Last Updated:

About Cleopatra Selene II, Queen of Mauretania

ID: I62178

Name: Cleopatra Selene

Given Name: Cleopatra

Surname: Selene

Sex: F

_UID: C7792C4011728442A404135B896B178AA0ED

Change Date: 29 Jul 2005

Birth: 40 BC

Death: 6

Father: MARC @ ANTHONY OF ROME b: 83 BC

Mother: CLEOPATRA @ VII OF EGYPT b: 69 BC

Marriage 1 Juba II of Mauretania b: 52 BC

Married:

Children

Ptolemy II of Mauretania b: 1 BC

Forrás / Source:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jdp-fam&id=I62178

Cleopatra Selene II

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This article is about the daughter of Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman Triumvir Mark Antony. For the daughter of Ptolemy VIII Physcon and Cleopatra III of Egypt, see Cleopatra Selene I.

Cleopatra Selene II (Greek:η Κλεοπάτρα Σελήνη, 25 December 40 BC-6), also known as Cleopatra VIII of Egypt or Cleopatra VIII was a Ptolemaic Princess and was the only daughter to Greek Ptolemaic queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman triumvir Mark Antony. She was the fraternal twin of Ptolemaic prince Alexander Helios. Her second name in ancient Greek means "moon", being the counterpart of her twin brother‘s second name Helios, meaning "sun". She was of Greek and Roman heritage. Cleopatra was born, raised and educated in Alexandria, Egypt. In late 34 BC, during the Donations of Alexandria, she was made ruler of Cyrenaica and Libya (Roller, pp. 76–81).

Her parents were defeated by Octavian (future Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus), during a naval battle at Actium, Greece in 31 BC. In 30 BC, her parents committed suicide as Octavian and his army invaded Egypt. Octavian took Cleopatra and her brothers from Egypt to Italy. Octavian celebrated his military triumph in Rome by parading the three orphans in heavy golden chains in the streets. The chains were so heavy that they couldn’t walk. Octavian gave the siblings to Octavia Minor to be raised in her household in Rome. Octavia Minor became their guardian, was Octavian's second eldest sister and was their father's former wife (Roller, pp. 82–5).

Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for Cleopatra to marry African King Juba II of Numidia in Rome. The Emperor gave to Cleopatra as a wedding present a huge dowry and she became an ally to Rome. By then her brothers, Alexander Helios and Ptolemy Philadelphus had died, probably from illness. When Cleopatra married Juba, she was the only surviving member of the Ptolemaic dynasty (Roller, pp. 84–9).

Juba and Cleopatra could not return to Numidia as it had been provincialized in 46 BC. The couple was sent to Mauretania, an unorganized territory that needed Roman supervision. They renamed their new capital Caesarea (modern Cherchell, Algeria), in honor of the Emperor (Roller, pp. 98–100).

Cleopatra is said to have exercised great influence on policies that Juba created. Through her influence, the Mauretanian Kingdom flourished. Mauretania exported and traded well throughout the Mediterranean. The construction and sculptural projects at Caesaea and at another city Volubilis, were built and display a rich mixture of Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman architectural styles (Roller, pp. 91–162). The children of Cleopatra and Juba were Ptolemy of Mauretania (1 BC-40) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born 5), although she may have been a granddaughter. Queen of Syria, Zenobia of Palmyra claimed descent from Cleopatra, although this is unlikely (Roller, pp. 244–56).

There are few surviving written sources on the life of Cleopatra. Surviving coins and monuments suggest that Cleopatra inherited the iron will and perseverance of the Ptolemaic women. Her various titles on surviving coinage are in Greek: ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΑ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑ or ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑ, which means Queen Cleopatra. These titles were also used on coinage by her late mother. Another title she used on coinage was CΕΛΕNΕ or Selene (Roller, pp. 151–2). Cleopatra seemed to have been religious, patriotic of her Egyptian Greek heritage, though she ignored her Roman heritage. She wanted to retain and continue the Ptolemaic Legacy.

When Cleopatra died, she was placed in the Royal Mausoleum of Mauretania east of Caesarea that was built by her and Juba, which is still visible. A fragmentary inscription was dedicated to Juba and Cleopatra, as the King and Queen of Mauretania. The following epigram by Greek Epigrammatist Crinagoras of Mytilene is considered to be Cleopatra’s eulogy (Roller, pp. 249–51):

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,

Covering her suffering in the night,

Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,

Breathless, descending to Hades,

With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,

And mingled her own darkness with her death.

Forrás / Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleopatra_Selene_II

Kleopátra Szeléné [szerkesztés]

Megtekintett lap (+/-)

A Wikipédiából, a szabad enciklopédiából.

Kleopátra Szeléné (Kr. e. 40. – ?) Marcus Antonius római hadvezér, politikus és VII. Kleopátra egyiptomi királynő gyermeke volt. Ikertestvérével, Alexandrosz Héliosszal együtt Kr. e. 40-ben született, és apja önkényesen a Szeléné címmel ruházta fel.

Kr. e. 30-ban Octavianus meghagyta Antonius és Kleopátra gyermekeinek életét, akiket nővére, Octavia vett magához féltestvérükkel, a Fulvia Antonia és Antonius házasságából született Iullus Antoniusszal együtt. Ezek után együtt nevelkedett Octavia gyermekeivel. Később hozzáadták II. Juba numidiai majd mauretaniai királyhoz, akit még gyermekként hoztak Rómába Kr. e. 46-ban. Jubától két gyermeke született: Ptolemaiosz nevű fia örökölte a trónt, Drusilla nevű lánya pedig Antonius Felix, Iudaea helytartójának felesége lett.

Forrás / Source:

http://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kleop%C3%A1tra_Szel%C3%A9n%C3%A9

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Cleopatra Selene II, Cleopatra VIII, Princess of Egypt, Ruler of Cyrenaica and Libya, was the fraternal twin to Alexander Helios, Prince of Egypt, born December 25, 40 BC, Alexandria, Egypt; died 6 AD.

She married Juba II, King of Numidia, circa 26 BC.

Cleopatra Selene II/Cleopatra VIII, Princess of Egypt, Ruler of Cyrenaica and Libya's eulogy by Epigrammatist Crinagoras of Mytilene:

"The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,

Covering her suffering in the night,

Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,

Breathless, descending to Hades,

With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,

And mingled her own darkness with her death."

Source: D. W. Roller, The World of Juba II and Kleopatra Selene (London 2003).

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleopatra_Selene_II

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleopatra_Selene_II

Cleopatra Selene II (Greek:η Κλεοπάτρα Σελήνη, 25 December 40 BC-6), also known as Cleopatra VIII of Egypt or Cleopatra VIII was a Ptolemaic Princess and was the only daughter to Greek Ptolemaic queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt and Roman triumvir Mark Antony. She was the fraternal twin of Ptolemaic prince Alexander Helios. Her second name in ancient Greek means "moon", being the counterpart of her twin brother‘s second name Helios, meaning "sun". She was of Greek and Roman heritage. Cleopatra was born, raised and educated in Alexandria, Egypt. In late 34 BC, during the Donations of Alexandria, she was made ruler of Cyrenaica and Libya.

Her parents were defeated by Octavian (future Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus), during a naval battle at Actium, Greece in 31 BC. In 30 BC, her parents committed suicide as Octavian and his army invaded Egypt. Octavian took Cleopatra and her brothers from Egypt to Italy. Octavian celebrated his military triumph in Rome by parading the two orphans in heavy golden chains in the streets. The chains were so heavy that they couldn’t walk. Octavian gave the siblings to his sister, Octavia Minor, to be raised in her household in Rome. Octavia Minor became their guardian. She was their father's former wife.

Marriage

Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for Cleopatra to marry African King Juba II of Numidia in Rome. The Emperor gave to Cleopatra as a wedding present a huge dowry and she became an ally to Rome. By then her brothers, Alexander Helios and Ptolemy Philadelphus had died, probably from illness. When Cleopatra married Juba, she was the only surviving member of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Juba and Cleopatra could not return to Numidia as it had been provincialized in 46 BC. The couple was sent to Mauretania, an unorganized territory that needed Roman supervision. They renamed their new capital Caesarea (modern Cherchell, Algeria), in honor of the Emperor.

Cleopatra is said to have exercised great influence on policies that Juba created. Through her influence, the Mauretanian Kingdom flourished. Mauretania exported and traded well throughout the Mediterranean. The construction and sculptural projects at Caesarea and at another city Volubilis, were built and display a rich mixture of Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman architectural styles. The children of Cleopatra and Juba were:

Ptolemy of Mauretania born in ca 10 BC-5 BC

A daughter of Cleopatra and Juba, whose name has not been recorded, is mentioned in an inscription. It has been suggested that Drusilla of Mauretania was a daughter, but she may have been a granddaughter instead. Drusilla is described as a granddaughter of Antony and Cleopatra, and may have been a daughter of Ptolemy of Mauretania.

Queen of Syria, Zenobia of Palmyra claimed descent from Cleopatra, although this is unlikely.

Historical evidence

There are few surviving written sources on the life of Cleopatra. Surviving coins and monuments suggest that Cleopatra inherited the iron will and perseverance of the Ptolemaic women. Her various titles on surviving coinage are in Greek: ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΑ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑ or ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑ, which means Queen Cleopatra. These titles were also used on coinage by her late mother. Another title she used on coinage was CΕΛΕNΕ or Selene.

Cleopatra seemed to have been religious, patriotic of her Egyptian Greek heritage, though she ignored her Roman heritage. She wanted to retain and continue the Ptolemaic Legacy.

When Cleopatra died, she was placed in the Royal Mausoleum of Mauretania in actual Algeria east of Caesarea that was built by her and Juba, which is still visible. A fragmentary inscription was dedicated to Juba and Cleopatra, as the King and Queen of Mauretania. The following epigram by Greek Epigrammatist Crinagoras of Mytilene is considered to be Cleopatra’s eulogy.

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,

Covering her suffering in the night,

Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,

Breathless, descending to Hades,

With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,

And mingled her own darkness with her death.

In fiction

Cleopatra is mentioned in the novels by Robert Graves, I, Claudius and Claudius the God.

Cleopatra is a significant character in Wallace Breem's historical novel The Legate's Daughter (1974), Phoenix/Orion Books Ltd. ISBN 0 75381 895 7

Cleopatra's Daughter by Michelle Moran tells the story of Cleopatra's early life; from the demise of her parents until her marriage to Juba II of Numidia.

Querida Alejandría by María García Esperón (Bogotá 2007: Norma, ISBN 9580498458), a novel in the form of a letter by Cleopatra to the people of Alexandria.

Cleopatra's Daughter written by Andrea Ashton (1979) also tells the story of Cleopatra Selene's early life.

view all

Cleopatra Selene II, Queen of Mauretania's Timeline

-40
December 25, -40
الاسكندرية Egypt
-40
(Twin) (Moon)
-29
-29
Age 10
-5
-5
Age 34
-1
-1
Age 38
6
6
Age 45
????