Col. Daniel Parke, Jr. (1669 - 1710) MP

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Place of Burial: Antigua and Barbuda
Birthplace: Williamsburg, VA, USA
Death: Died in Antigua and Barbuda
Occupation: British Govenor of Leeward Islands 1706-1710 and Virginia's governer's council
Managed by: James Hutchison
Last Updated:

About Col. Daniel Parke, Jr.

Children of Col. Daniel Parke, Jr./II and Jane Ludwell: Frances and Lucy Parke.

Daniel Parke, II/Jr. also had 2 illegitimate children prior to his marriage to Jane Ludwell:

  • Julius Caesar Parke, born c. 1692 (perhaps the son of a Mrs. Brown (alias Berry) referred to by Parke as a cousin who came to Virginia with Parke in 1692 and lived with him until 1697). The boy was brought up by Jane Ludwell Parke and was given an inheritance by Parke as "my godson".
  • Lucy (daughter of Mrs. Katherine Chester of Antigua) was the principal legatee of Daniel Parke' estate. She married, apparently at age 11, Thomas Dunbar of the Leeward Islands, who took the name of Parke. They had three children: Daniel, Lucy and Elizabeth.

Col. Parke abandoned his wife Jane and their two daughters, Frances and Lucy, and returned to England where he managed to get elected to Parliament and to rise in prominence during the war with France of the early 1700s. Eventually he was appointed Governor of Antigua, in the Leeward Islands, and was killed during an uprising in 1710.

Colonel Daniel Parke, Jr., son of Colonel Daniel Parke, Sr., Secretary of State of Virginia, and Rebecca Evelyn, was for a time a member of the Virginia Council; was an aide to Marlborough at Blenheim and carried the first news of the victory to England, and as a reward was given the governorship of the Leeward Islands. He left a considerable estate, but it was for years the subject of great trouble and loss to his two daughters, the wives of John Custis and William Byrd. Daniel, Jr. sat on the colonial Virginia Governor's Council from 1695 until 1697. His elder legitimate daughter married John Custis, and his younger married William Byrd, II. Parke served as an aide to John Churchill, 1st duke of Marlborough, and after the Battle of Blenheim carried news of Marlborough's victory to Queen Anne. Winning the queen's favor, Parke was the British Governor of Antigua, in the Leeward Islands, from 1706 to 1710. He was assassinated during a mutiny triggered by his self-enriching enforcement of Stuart imperialism.

Letter to Capt. Daniel Parke from William Byrd II:

"To Captain Parke

Westover

Febr'y 3rd, 1735. (Capt. Parke is possilbly a descendant of Col. Parke?

Dear Sir:

Surely I must have been very unlucky in the miscarriage of so many of your letters. I can recollect no more than two that I have had the pleasure to receive & neither of them from England, so I am quite in the dark, whether that which I directed thither came to your hand. But altho I had not the sad news from yourself, yet I was sensibly toucht with the account of your Shipwreck which I had from other People. The Sea owes you a great deal for what it has robbed you of & I wish with all my soul that Element may make you reparation some time or other. However I must own 'tis a comfort to understand that you bear your misfortunes so much like a Hero. If you can't perswade your Stars to prosper your worthy endeavours yet you support their Sullen Influence with cheerfulness, while others sink under such pressures you bear them with an elevation of spirit that makes you a gainer by your losses. For 'tis really worth while to suffer the worse spite the Devil can show you, to endure it with so much true philosophy.

I have maturely considered your project of coming hither with a large Ship the latter end of May. That will certainly be much too late for a young Interest that has most of its friends to make, especially when many accidents may fall out to make your arrival later. Besides our crop is so short that I am confident many old standers must go home dead freighted. These things duly considered, make me even against my own wishes, advise you sincerely not to come hither so late. I would by no means have you bawlkt in your first attempt lest you might determine never to make a second. In case you can Order your matters so as to come early next year, and declare for liberty of consignment you may trust your friends and your own perswading address to lead you.

If you could prevail with Mrs. Dunbar to side against her righteous brother Charles, it would be knights service, she may certainly release the debt if she pleases, because if it be due at all, 'tis due to Her, & as it was not recovered in her husband's life time, it can be no part of his Estate, & consequently can't go to his Executor. Besides it will make the suit appear much more monstrous and unnatural (to have one of Col'o Parke's murderers claim in his own right any part of his Estate). If Mrs. Dunbar will do so generous an act, I should be so far from grutching her any part of her good fortune that I should think she merited all Col. Parke did for her. I am no Prophet nor the son of a Prophet & yet I have a very strong impression that whoever brings so cruel a suit as this would be against Col. Parke's children (who would not gain one farthing by their Father's will if they must pay his West India debt), will never live to see the end of it. This I said of the late Mr. Dunbar, and I say it of all other such inhuman people who tread in his steps.

As for any papers that may of use in the causes, you are as good a Judge as I, which of them may be serviceable, and altho Col. Custice may not have deserved so much at your hands, yet it will be the more generous in you to benefit the Family in this particular, who will all think themselves highly obliged to you.

Hearing no further from your Friend Mr. Freeman about Westover, I have offered it to my old acquaintance Mr. Peter Beckford, of Jamaica, and expect his answer. I must dispose therefore to make myself easy & emancipate my self from that slavery to which all debtors are subject. The truth of it is this habitation lys at such a distance from the Bulk of my Estate, that I should get more than price by disposing of it.

All this Family join with me in wishing you all manner of Success in your affairs and hope providence will please to reward the Fortitude with which you bear adversity with a long train of good fortune & let us see with how much moderation you can flow in the Full tide of Prosperity. I am very affectionately, Your..."

Daniel Parke, II/Jr. also had 2 other children:

  • Julius Caesar Parke, born c. 1692 (perhaps the son of a Mrs. Brown (alias Berry) referred to by Parke as a cousin who came to Virginia with Parke in 1692 and lived with him until 1697). The boy was brought up by Jane Ludwell Parke and was given an inheritance by Parke as "my godson".
  • Lucy (daughter of Mrs. Katherine Chester of Antigua) was the principal legatee of Daniel Parke' estate. She married, apparently at age 11, Thomas Dunbar of the Leeward Islands, who took the name of Parke. They had three children: Daniel, Lucy and Elizabeth.

Captain Parke was doubtless a kinsman of Col. Daniel Parke. father of William Byrd's first wife, who while Governor of the Leeward Islands, was killed during an insurrection. This Colonel Daniel Parke, Jr., was son of Colonel Daniel Parke, Sr., Secretary of State of Virginia, and Rebecca Evelyn, his wife; was himself for a time a member of the Virginia Council; was an aide to Marlborough at Blenheim and carried the first news of the victory to England, and as a reward was given the governorship of the Leeward Islands. He left a considerable estate, but it was for years the subject of great trouble and loss to his two daughters, the wives of John Custis and William Byrd.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Parke -------------------- Birth: 1664 Williamsburg Williamsburg City Virginia, USA Death: Dec. 7, 1710

There is no inscription on this monument; however it was identified by Doctor Goodwin as belonging to Col Daniel Parke, in "Historical Sketch of Bruton Church, Williamsburg, Virginia", 1903. He returned to England where he managed to get elected to Parliament and to rise in prominence during the war with France of the early 1700s. Eventually appointed Governor of Antigua, in the Leeward Islands, Parke was killed in an uprising by island natives in 1710. His daughter, Frances, married John Custis, and their son, Daniel Parke Custis, was the first husband of Martha Dandridge Custis Washington.


-------------------- Daniel Parke (5 September 1664 – 7 December 1710) sat on the colonial Virginia Governor's Council from 1695 until 1697. Life[edit source | editbeta]

During the War of the Spanish Succession, Parke served as an aide to John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, and after the Battle of Blenheim carried news of Marlborough's victory to Queen Anne. Having won the queen's favour, Parke was the British governor of the Leeward Islands from 1706 to 1710. He was disliked by his subjects, and was accused of corruption and immorality. On 7 December 1710, the citizens rebelled; Parke was dragged from his home in Antigua and murdered.[1] He was succeeded in the post of Governor by Walter Douglas. Family[edit source | editbeta]

Parke's elder legitimate daughter married John Custis, and his younger married William Byrd II. His descendants include Daniel Parke Custis, first husband of Martha Washington, and Mary Custis Lee, wife of General Robert E Lee. References[edit source | editbeta]

^ Knight, Thomas Daniel. "Daniel Parke (1669–1710)". Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved 17 June 2013. Miller, Helen Hill (1989). Colonel Parke of Virginia: "The Greatest Hector in the Town". Chapel Hill: Algonquin Books. ISBN 9780912697871.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Parke

Daniel Parke was a Virginia politician who gained his first public office at age nineteen, when he was elected to the House of Burgesses for James City County (1688). By age twenty-six, he had acquired a seat on the governor's Council (1695–1697). He relocated to England in 1697. He served as an aide-de-camp to John Churchill, duke of Marlborough, during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714), and carried news of Marlborough's victory at the Battle of Blenheim to Queen Anne in 1704. The queen rewarded Parke with a governorship in the Leeward Islands, a small island chain in the Caribbean, which he assumed in 1706. But Parke's accomplishments masked a darker side. Arrogant and at times violent, he became estranged from his wife and children in Virginia, had a number of extramarital relationships, and fathered offspring out of wedlock. Ultimately, Parke's sexual improprieties contributed to his political undoing. Residents of the Leeward Islands complained that he had "debauched" many of their wives and daughters, in addition to exceeding his authority as their governor; a bloody riot ended Parke's governorship, and his life, on December 7, 1710, when an angry mob pulled him from his home and murdered him

http://encyclopediavirginia.org/parke_daniel_1669-1710#start_entry

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Col. Daniel Parke, Jr.'s Timeline

1669
1669
Williamsburg, VA, USA
1675
1675
Age 6
St Peters Parish, Kent, , England
1685
1685
Age 16
Henrico Cty., VA
1688
1688
Age 19
James City, Virginia
1692
1692
Age 23
1710
December 7, 1710
Age 41
Antigua and Barbuda
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Antigua and Barbuda
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