John Addison (1630 - c.1706) MP

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Westmoreland, England
Death: Died in England
Occupation: merchant, planter
Managed by: Marsha Gail (Kamish) Veazey
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Immediate Family

About John Addison

The Addison family has a rich history in Maryland dating back to the 17th century.

Colonel John Addison, son of The Reverend Launcelot Addison (1633-1703) and Dorothy (Danvers) Addison, was born in Westmoreland County, England, on the border of Scotland. He had three brothers. Thomas and Henry Addison were merchants; Anthony Addison was rector of Abingdon, Oxford, England, and Chaplain to the Duke of Marlborough.

John Addison emigrated from England in the early 1670's. On May 21, 1677, John Addison married Rebecca (Wilkinson) Dent, (daughter of the Reverend William Wilkinson, and widow of Thomas Dent). With the exception of her youngest child, Barbara, who was only an infant when her mother remarried, Rebecca's marriage to John Addison alienated the Dent children: William, Peter, George, Thomas, and Margaret Dent. There is no doubt that Colonel Addison profited from his marriage to the widow Dent and obtained a great deal of Thomas Dent's property. John and Rebecca had one child: Thomas.

John Addison established a powerful family in Prince George County politics. He was a merchant, Indian trader, and owned extensive land. He was also part owner of the ship "Liverpool Merchant", which was seized along with its cargo for violations of the navigation acts. Addison took a leading role in the Maryland Protestant Revolution of 1689. The Revolution lasted only a short time and ended in July, 1690. John Addison served as a member of the Associator's Convention (the Assembly elected under their regime) and the Grand Committee of Twenty (their executive committee). The goal of the Protestant Associators was the overthrow of the proprietary officers (Calverts). From 1690 to May 1692 there was an interim government of Protestant Associators. From1692 to 1715, Maryland was under crown rule (as King William and Queen Mary had declared it a royal colony) with Sir Lionel Copley as governor, thus ending Maryland's status as a proprietary province.

John Addison later returned to England, leaving his wife and son in America, and died there around 1706. He passed on to his son, Thomas, his large estate acquired in England and America. Rebecca survived her husband by 20 years. -------------------- The Addison family has a rich history in Maryland dating back to the 17th century.

Colonel John Addison, son of The Reverend Launcelot Addison (1633-1703) and Dorothy (Danvers) Addison, was born in Westmoreland County, England, on the border of Scotland. He had three brothers. Thomas and Henry Addison were merchants; Anthony Addison was rector of Abingdon, Oxford, England, and Chaplain to the Duke of Marlborough.

John Addison emigrated from England in the early 1670's. On May 21, 1677, John Addison married Rebecca (Wilkinson) Dent, (daughter of the Reverend William Wilkinson, and widow of Thomas Dent). With the exception of her youngest child, Barbara, who was only an infant when her mother remarried, Rebecca's marriage to John Addison alienated the Dent children: William, Peter, George, Thomas, and Margaret Dent. There is no doubt that Colonel Addison profited from his marriage to the widow Dent and obtained a great deal of Thomas Dent's property. John and Rebecca had one child: Thomas.

John Addison established a powerful family in Prince George County politics. He was a merchant, Indian trader, and owned extensive land. He was also part owner of the ship "Liverpool Merchant", which was seized along with its cargo for violations of the navigation acts. Addison took a leading role in the Maryland Protestant Revolution of 1689. The Revolution lasted only a short time and ended in July, 1690. John Addison served as a member of the Associator's Convention (the Assembly elected under their regime) and the Grand Committee of Twenty (their executive committee). The goal of the Protestant Associators was the overthrow of the proprietary officers (Calverts). From 1690 to May 1692 there was an interim government of Protestant Associators. From1692 to 1715, Maryland was under crown rule (as King William and Queen Mary had declared it a royal colony) with Sir Lionel Copley as governor, thus ending Maryland's status as a proprietary province.

John Addison later returned to England, leaving his wife and son in America, and died there around 1706. He passed on to his son, Thomas, his large estate acquired in England and America. Rebecca survived her husband by 20 years.

-------------------- John emigrated in 1667 and settled in Charles County, Maryland. He married Rebecca Dent, daughter of the Rev. William Wilkinson (Cong. Lib.E. 186, 3, M 25) and widow of Thomas Dent, Esq.; they had issue, one son. At the formation of Prince George's County in 1695, his estates were included in the new county.

He was member of the Council of Maryland, 1692-93; Chancellor and Keeper of the Great Seal of the Province, 1696-99; Captain 1692; Commissioned July 30, 1694 Colonel, commanding the Militia of Charles County and placed in command of Militia of Prince George's County, Aug.17, 1695. (Service of Ancestors, Colonial Wars.).

-------------------- Lineage information at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~paxson/southern/addison.html

slave holdings

The Addison Family Norbeck, Montgomery County Maryland

For as long as any living relative can remember, the Addison family has lived near Norbeck, which is a small town 15 miles north of Washington DC in Montgomery County, Maryland. The Norbeck region was first settled by freedmen and run-away slaves. Here they cleared the trees and started small farms. They lived in harmony with the few Indians who still hunted in the wilderness north of the nation's capital during the 19th century. After the Civil War, the former slaves were allowed to apply for the deed of the property they were living on. This is how the Addison family obtained their property in Norbeck.

Although there are no written records, it is believed that the Addisons from Norbeck are direct relatives of the slaves from the Addison Plantations in Prince George's County, Maryland. In 1675, John Addison came to America from England. He settled in Maryland and acquired large holdings of land from Lord Baltimore. On these lands he planted tobacco which he exported to England at a great profit. In order to grow more tobacco, he needed a large work force. He bought many Africans to work his plantation. In 1700, slaves were 11 percent of the population of Prince George's County and by 1790 they comprised 52 percent of the population. John Addison's son, Thomas, expanded the Addison plantations to become the largest land holders in the county. But by the turn of the century in 1800, the large plantations were sold off and became small farms. An owner of a small plot only used one or two slaves to work the land. As a result, many slaves either were freed or ran away from the plantation.

These former slaves moved to the wilder regions of Maryland and intermingled with the native Indians. The Addison Plantations were only 10 miles south of what would become the District of Columbia. Even until the mid-1800's, the area north of the District remained wooded and uninhabited. It was this remote area of Maryland where the freedmen and run-away slaves migrated and where they could live off the land and be free.

Many of the former slaves took their master's name since they had no family name that could be remembered from when they lived in Africa. It is believed that the Addisons of Norbeck left the Addison plantations sometime in the late 1700's. The family roots probably started here in America in the late 1600's as slaves of the Addison family as they built their large land holdings. The Addison Plantations are long gone, the family home burned down and only Addison Road in Prince George's County reminds us of the Addisons from England. But in Montgomery County, the Addsion family from Norbeck is still alive and well! They have endured.

Reference: Along the Potomac Shore in Prince George's County, Tanta-Cove garden club, 1992.

A button, a bottle, a toothbrush and 300,000 other ordinary relics from colonial-era plantation life on the banks of the Potomac are now historical artifacts, to be examined, admired and cataloged by those who take stock of bygone days.

The items are coming home to the place where they were discovered more than two decades ago, the spot beside the river once known as Oxon Hill Manor or the Addison plantation.

Marveling at the preservation of some of the items, Samford held up an onion-shaped glass bottle, dating to the early 1700s. Next to it was a piece of a metal bottle cap inscribed with the letter "A." Another bottle seal plainly reads "Addison."

The Addisons, apparently wealthy English merchants, used slave labor to grow tobacco, oats and corn on property beside the Potomac that John Addison bought and began expanding in 1687. His descendants sold the land to Zahariah Berry in 1810, and it passed through various hands before the manor house burned down in 1895.

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Col. John Addison's Timeline

1630
1630
Westmoreland, England
1663
1663
Age 33
St. Mary's, Maryland, USA
1677
May 21, 1677
Age 47
1679
1679
Age 49
St Mary's, MD
1706
1706
Age 76
England