John Carter (1613 - 1669) MP

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Birthplace: Christ Church Parish, Newgate, London, Middlesex, England
Death: Died in Lancaster Co, Virginia
Occupation: House of Burgess, emigrated to America; ca 1649/50, Immigrated in 1649, colonel, Plantation Owner
Managed by: stanley w. duke, jr.
Last Updated:

About John Carter

Immigrated to Virginia in 1635 at age 22 on ship Safety.

http://www.christchurch1735.org/history/john_carter.html

This website will give you background data on John, as well as information about his plantation Corotoman.

http://arlisherring.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I042634&tree=Herring

"John, the emigrant, was not commonplace or inert. He came to Virginia and settled in upper Norfolk (now Nansemond County), which he represented as Burgess in 1649. He removed to Lancaster, and represented it in 1654. He was a vestryman (the most prominent men in the community always were), and the power of these Colonial vestries was enormous. He built a church where old Christ Church, in Lancaster, now stands. The vestry received it complete from his son, John, six months after the emigrant's deat

"John Carter's estate lay upon the Rappahannock, and he, indeed, chose the 'pick' of Tidewater Virginia. The house faced the Rappahannock where it is nine miles wide, full in sight of Chesapeake Bay. On one side is Carter's Creek, a veritable little bay itself, and on the other is Corotoman River; so 'Corotoman,' this lordly estate, striking over an area of nine miles, was bounded on three sides by salt water. What a chance for fish, crabs and oysters--to be sure! From this spacious mansion house a line of cedars stretched to the parish church, about two miles distant, on the 'Corotoman' land, and these cedars (thinned, of course, by time) may be seen to-day. In themselves they are full of suggestion of the power and lordly ideas of our early planters. 'Corotoman,' builded by John Carter, passed to his oldest son, John, who dying early, and without issue, the estate passed from him to John Carter's second son, Robert. From Robert it went to Robert's oldest son, John, who married Elizabeth Hill, of 'Shirley,' John3 left 'Corotoman' to his son, Charles4, who lived there until the death of his mother, who had married, second, Bowler Cocke, and continued to live at 'Shirley.' At her death Charles4 Carter removed to 'Shirley.' At his death he left 'Shirley' to his oldest son, John5, and 'Corotoman' to his second son, George. 'Corotoman' was burned about this time.

"George married Lelia Skipwith, and had Dr. George, of 'Corotoman,' and one daughter, Polly Carter, who married Dr. Joseph C. Cabell. Dr. George Carter married a Miss Corbin, and had one daughter, Parke, who inherited 'Corotoman.' She died unmarried, and left 'Corotoman' to her aunt, Polly Cabell. This Mrs. Polly Cabell died possessed of a very large estate, and her will is one of the most remarkable Virginia documents. The motif' of her will is the ever recurrent injunction that no lawyer should have anything to do with any part of her estate, but by the perversity of fate it is said the lawyer got three-fourths of it.

"George Carter, the last male Carter who owned 'Corotoman,' died before his wife, Lelia Skipwith, and she married, secondly, Judge St. George Tucker. He was one of the lawyers who directed the sale of 'Corotoman' after Mrs. Cabell's death. She left no issue. Mrs. Polly Carter Cabell was the last Carter to own this famous estate. The house evidently was never rebuilt, an outhouse, probably a negro quarter, was there a few years ago. The magnificent site is now but a cornfield, and nothing in Lancaster, but the ragged cedars, the church and the tombs, toll of the magnificent estate of the Carters.

The Armistead Family

Virginia Armistead Garber

_____________________________________________________________

Was the first of the well known Virginia family of that name to come from England. He settled in Upper Norfolk which he represented in the house of burgesses in March, 1642-43. He was a burgess for Nansemond in Oct., 1649 and for Lancaster from 1654 to 1660. He was justice in Lancaster in 1653 and, at the division of the county on Dec. 13, 1656, he was appointed presiding justice and colonel commandant of Lancaster. In Nov., 1654, the assembly directed that an attack be made upon the Rappahanock Indians and that Maj. John Carter be appointed commander-in-chief. He was elected to the council on March 13, 1657-58, but was not sworn until the assembly adjourned. On March 8, 1659, Gov. Matthews issued an order to the sheriff of Lancaster to arrest Col. John Carter "for conternpt of the late commission of Government sent out by his Highness (Cromwell) and the lords of the Council, to appear before the Governor and Council at Jamestown." He was one of the commissioners appointed in 1663, by the governor of Virginia to confer with the commissioners from Maryland as to a restriction of tobacco planting. He was a vestryman of Christ Church Parish in Lancaster and the original church there was built under his direction. The present edifice, one of the finest specimens of colonial architecture standing, was built by the councillor's son, Robert Carter. He died on the 10 of June, 1669, as stated on his tomb in Christ Church.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I III--Colonial Councillors of State

--------------------

Born: 1613 Christ Church Parish, Newgate Street, London

Died: January 10, 1669/70 Corotoman plantation

Buried: Christ Church with four of his five wives and two infant children

Marriages:

  • Jane Glyn--Married ca. 1637. Died 1652. Mother of John Carter II, George and Elizabeth
  • Eleanor Eltonhead--Married 1655. Died 1656
  • Anne Carter--Distant cousin. Married ca. 1657
  • Sarah Ludlow--Born in England. Married ca. 1662. Mother of Robert Carter
  • Elizabeth Sherley--Married 1668. Widow from Gloucester County, Virginia. Went to England with her son Charles shortly after John Carter I's death

Chi ldren: George--born ca. 1638; died in infancy Elizabeth--born ca. 1639; married 1) Nathaniel Utie of Maryland 2) Henry Johnson John II--born ca. 1640; died 1690 Sarah--born ca. 1661; died in infancy Robert--born 1663; died 1732 Charles--born 1669; went to England with mother

Histor y: Immigrated to Virginia in 1635 at age 22 on ship Safety First settled in Upper Norfolk County (later became Nansemond County) Traveled several times between England and Virginia in trade Served seven terms in House of Burgesses Upper Norfolk County 1641/42; 1642/43 Nansemond County 1649 Lancaster County 1654-1655; 1657/58-1658; 1658/59; 1659/60 Served on Governor's Council (1657 and ca. 1664-1667) Patented 6,160 acres of land in Lancaster County between 1642-1665 In 1652-53 moved to Lancaster County and established Corotoman plantation on Rappahannock River between Carter's Creek and Corotoman River Served as Justice, Lancaster County (1653-1669) Served as Vestryman, Christ Church Parish (ca. 1661-1669/70) Served as undertaker, or builder, of first Christ Church, a frame structure completed in July 1670 six months after his death

Immigrated to Virginia in 1635 at age 22 on ship Safety First settled in Upper Norfolk County (later became Nansemond County) Traveled several times between England and Virginia in trade Served seven terms in House of Burgesses Upper Norfolk County 1641/42; 1642/43 Nansemond County 1649 Lancaster County 1654-1655; 1657/58-1658; 1658/59; 1659/60 Served on Governor's Council (1657 and ca. 1664-1667) Patented 6,160 acres of land in Lancaster County between 1642-1665 In 1652-53 moved to Lancaster County and established Corotoman plantation on Rappahannock River between Carter's Creek and Corotoman River Served as Justice, Lancaster County (1653-1669) Served as Vestryman, Christ Church Parish (ca. 1661-1669/70) Served as undertaker, or builder, of first Christ Church, a frame structure completed in July 1670 six months after his death From another source:

. John Carter, Col., b. 1613, Edmonton, Middlesex, England, d. 10 Jan 1669, Corotoman, Lancaster Co., VA, m. (4) ca. 1650, in Lancaster Co., VA, Sarah Ludlow b. ca. 1629, d. 1668, Corotoman, Lancaster Co., VA, (daughter of Gabriel and Phillis (?) Ludlow). John was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses 1642-49, 1653-58; member of the Council of Virginia, 1658-59; commanded against Rappahannock Indians, 1654; Colonel of Lancaster County in 1656. . (Horace Edwin Hayden, Virginia Genealogies, [Wilkes-Barre, PA, 1891], .225). Clifford Dowdey, The Virginia Dynasties, [Boston: Little, Brown, n.d.], p.18). (One ref. states he was b. Garston, Hertford, England). Virginia Lineages, Letters & Memories, by Alice Nelson, 1984;p.194) Anne: Her father was of Ratcliffe Highway, St. Dunstans, Stepney, England. Sarah: The Colonial Genealogist, vol.8, no.2 [Apr 1976],pp.65-66: by Dom W. Wilfrid Bayne, O.S.B., of Portsmouth Priory, RI). (A History of the Carter Family, Copyright 1972 by Amer. Gen. Research Inst., Wash., DC). John first settled in Upper Norfolk, now Nansemond County, and later Lancaster Co., VA. Both himself and his eldest son, John appear on the vestry book as members of the vestry in the year 1666, the father having been acting in that capacity before – how long not known. The father, who died in 1669, had previously built by contract, the first church standing on the spot where Christ Church now is, and the vestry received it at the hands of his son John, in six months after the father’s death. John Carter, Sr., was buried with his 5 wives, near the chancel, in the church which he built, and the tombstone covers all of them, being still in the same position in the present church. [Old Churches, Families, II, 110, et seq.]. The epitaph from his stone, which lies on the right hand of the chancel, reads: Here lyeth buried ye body of John Carter, Esq., who died ye 10th of June, Anno Domini 1669; and also Jane, ye daughter of Mr. Morgan Glyn, and George her son, and Elenor Carter, and Ann, ye daughter of Mr. Cleave Carter, and Sarah, ye daughter of Mr. Gabriel Ludlow, and Sarah her daughter, which were all his wives successively, and died before him.

John, the emigrant, was not commonplace or inert. He came to Virginia and settled in upper Norfolk (now Nansemond County), which he represented as Burgess in 1649. He removed to Lancaster, and represented it in 1654. He was a vestryman (the most prominent men in the community always were), and the power of these Colonial vestries was enormous. He built a church where old Christ Church, in Lancaster, now stands. The vestry received it complete from his son, John, six months after the emigrant's deat

"John Carter's estate lay upon the Rappahannock, and he, indeed, chose the 'pick' of Tidewater Virginia. The house faced the Rappahannock where it is nine miles wide, full in sight of Chesapeake Bay. On one side is Carter's Creek, a veritable little bay itself, and on the other is Corotoman River; so 'Corotoman,' this lordly estate, striking over an area of nine miles, was bounded on three sides by salt water. What a chance for fish, crabs and oysters--to be sure! From this spacious mansion house a line of cedars stretched to the parish church, about two miles distant, on the 'Corotoman' land, and these cedars (thinned, of course, by time) may be seen to-day. In themselves they are full of suggestion of the power and lordly ideas of our early planters. 'Corotoman,' builded by John Carter, passed to his oldest son, John, who dying early, and without issue, the estate passed from him to John Carter's second son, Robert. From Robert it went to Robert's oldest son, John, who married Elizabeth Hill, of 'Shirley,' John3 left 'Corotoman' to his son, Charles4, who lived there until the death of his mother, who had married, second, Bowler Cocke, and continued to live at 'Shirley.' At her death Charles4 Carter removed to 'Shirley.' At his death he left 'Shirley' to his oldest son, John5, and 'Corotoman' to his second son, George. 'Corotoman' was burned about this time.

"George married Lelia Skipwith, and had Dr. George, of 'Corotoman,' and one daughter, Polly Carter, who married Dr. Joseph C. Cabell. Dr. George Carter married a Miss Corbin, and had one daughter, Parke, who inherited 'Corotoman.' She died unmarried, and left 'Corotoman' to her aunt, Polly Cabell. This Mrs. Polly Cabell died possessed of a very large estate, and her will is one of the most remarkable Virginia documents. The motif' of her will is the ever recurrent injunction that no lawyer should have anything to do with any part of her estate, but by the perversity of fate it is said the lawyer got three-fourths of it.

"George Carter, the last male Carter who owned 'Corotoman,' died before his wife, Lelia Skipwith, and she married, secondly, Judge St. George Tucker. He was one of the lawyers who directed the sale of 'Corotoman' after Mrs. Cabell's death. She left no issue. Mrs. Polly Carter Cabell was the last Carter to own this famous estate. The house evidently was never rebuilt, an outhouse, probably a negro quarter, was there a few years ago. The magnificent site is now but a cornfield, and nothing in Lancaster, but the ragged cedars, the church and the tombs, toll of the magnificent estate of the Carters.

The Armistead Family

Virginia Armistead Garber

____________________________________________________________________________________

Was the first of the well known Virginia family of that name to come from England. He settled in Upper Norfolk which he represented in the house of burgesses in March, 1642-43. He was a burgess for Nansemond in Oct., 1649 and for Lancaster from 1654 to 1660. He was justice in Lancaster in 1653 and, at the division of the county on Dec. 13, 1656, he was appointed presiding justice and colonel commandant of Lancaster. In Nov., 1654, the assembly directed that an attack be made upon the Rappahanock Indians and that Maj. John Carter be appointed commander-in-chief. He was elected to the council on March 13, 1657-58, but was not sworn until the assembly adjourned. On March 8, 1659, Gov. Matthews issued an order to the sheriff of Lancaster to arrest Col. John Carter "for conternpt of the late commission of Government sent out by his Highness (Cromwell) and the lords of the Council, to appear before the Governor and Council at Jamestown." He was one of the commissioners appointed in 1663, by the governor of Virginia to confer with the commissioners from Maryland as to a restriction of tobacco planting. He was a vestryman of Christ Church Parish in Lancaster and the original church there was built under his direction. The present edifice, one of the finest specimens of colonial architecture standing, was built by the councillor's son, Robert Carter. He died on the 10 of June, 1669, as stated on his tomb in Christ Church.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I

III--Colonial Councillors of State

John Carter, born in England, came to Virginia on the ship "Prosperous". He first married one of the Eltonhead sisters (Eleanor). The 5 Eltonhead sisters came to America (Virginia) in 1640's. Possible the same boat as Carter. ANother Eltonhead sister Alice married the Honerable Henry Corbin. Their great great grandchild, Nathaniel Burwell, was the son of Carter Burwell of WIliamsbrug VA.

Colonel John Carter, Esq. was born in 1613.

John Carter, Esq. first came to Virginia in 1635 as a merchant traveling for a few years in that capacity between England and the Colony. By 1640 he had settled in Upper Norfolk County, Virginia and was elected to the House of Burgesses from the Upper Norfolk County (which later changed to Nansemond County).

In 1642, John Carter obtained title to 1300 acres of the north side of the Rappahannock River (in what is now the community of Weems in Lancaster County), on the peninsula between the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers (known as the Northern Neck). It was not until 1654 that John settled on this new land and the Carter dominance and legacy on the Northern Neck began.

John Carter built his first house on a piece of land between what we now call Carter’s Creek and the Crotoman River. He began planting tobacco which was a thriving crop in Virginia.

He also built Christ Church in 1669. Christ Church was rebuilt and relocated in 1730 by Robert “King” Carter, John’s son. Robert offered to bear the cost of rebuilding the new church if it were kept at the same site, and “provided always the Chancel be preserved as a burial place for my family as the present Chancel is.” The rebuilding gift was accepted by the vestry.

The gravestones of John Carter, four of his five (5) wives and two (2) children, are embraced by the present church and they lie to the north of the chancel. John died June 10, 1669 in Lancaster, VA. His fifth (5) wife, Elizabeth Shirley of Gloucester, returned to England after his death, along with their youngest son, Charles.

John had five wives: Jane Glynn, Elenor Eltonhead (Widow Brocas), Anne Carter, Sarah Ludlow (Married 1662) and Elizabeth Shirley.

-------------------- "John, the emigrant, was not commonplace or inert. He came to Virginia and settled in upper Norfolk (now Nansemond County), which he represented as Burgess in 1649. He removed to Lancaster, and represented it in 1654. He was a vestryman (the most prominent men in the community always were), and the power of these Colonial vestries was enormous. He built a church where old Christ Church, in Lancaster, now stands. The vestry received it complete from his son, John, six months after the emigrant's deat

"John Carter's estate lay upon the Rappahannock, and he, indeed, chose the 'pick' of Tidewater Virginia. The house faced the Rappahannock where it is nine miles wide, full in sight of Chesapeake Bay. On one side is Carter's Creek, a veritable little bay itself, and on the other is Corotoman River; so 'Corotoman,' this lordly estate, striking over an area of nine miles, was bounded on three sides by salt water. What a chance for fish, crabs and oysters--to be sure! From this spacious mansion house a line of cedars stretched to the parish church, about two miles distant, on the 'Corotoman' land, and these cedars (thinned, of course, by time) may be seen to-day. In themselves they are full of suggestion of the power and lordly ideas of our early planters. 'Corotoman,' builded by John Carter, passed to his oldest son, John, who dying early, and without issue, the estate passed from him to John Carter's second son, Robert. From Robert it went to Robert's oldest son, John, who married Elizabeth Hill, of 'Shirley,' John3 left 'Corotoman' to his son, Charles4, who lived there until the death of his mother, who had married, second, Bowler Cocke, and continued to live at 'Shirley.' At her death Charles4 Carter removed to 'Shirley.' At his death he left 'Shirley' to his oldest son, John5, and 'Corotoman' to his second son, George. 'Corotoman' was burned about this time.

"George married Lelia Skipwith, and had Dr. George, of 'Corotoman,' and one daughter, Polly Carter, who married Dr. Joseph C. Cabell. Dr. George Carter married a Miss Corbin, and had one daughter, Parke, who inherited 'Corotoman.' She died unmarried, and left 'Corotoman' to her aunt, Polly Cabell. This Mrs. Polly Cabell died possessed of a very large estate, and her will is one of the most remarkable Virginia documents. The motif' of her will is the ever recurrent injunction that no lawyer should have anything to do with any part of her estate, but by the perversity of fate it is said the lawyer got three-fourths of it.

"George Carter, the last male Carter who owned 'Corotoman,' died before his wife, Lelia Skipwith, and she married, secondly, Judge St. George Tucker. He was one of the lawyers who directed the sale of 'Corotoman' after Mrs. Cabell's death. She left no issue. Mrs. Polly Carter Cabell was the last Carter to own this famous estate. The house evidently was never rebuilt, an outhouse, probably a negro quarter, was there a few years ago. The magnificent site is now but a cornfield, and nothing in Lancaster, but the ragged cedars, the church and the tombs, toll of the magnificent estate of the Carters.

The Armistead Family

Virginia Armistead Garber

____________________________________________________________________________________

Was the first of the well known Virginia family of that name to come from England. He settled in Upper Norfolk which he represented in the house of burgesses in March, 1642-43. He was a burgess for Nansemond in Oct., 1649 and for Lancaster from 1654 to 1660. He was justice in Lancaster in 1653 and, at the division of the county on Dec. 13, 1656, he was appointed presiding justice and colonel commandant of Lancaster. In Nov., 1654, the assembly directed that an attack be made upon the Rappahanock Indians and that Maj. John Carter be appointed commander-in-chief. He was elected to the council on March 13, 1657-58, but was not sworn until the assembly adjourned. On March 8, 1659, Gov. Matthews issued an order to the sheriff of Lancaster to arrest Col. John Carter "for conternpt of the late commission of Government sent out by his Highness (Cromwell) and the lords of the Council, to appear before the Governor and Council at Jamestown." He was one of the commissioners appointed in 1663, by the governor of Virginia to confer with the commissioners from Maryland as to a restriction of tobacco planting. He was a vestryman of Christ Church Parish in Lancaster and the original church there was built under his direction. The present edifice, one of the finest specimens of colonial architecture standing, was built by the councillor's son, Robert Carter. He died on the 10 of June, 1669, as stated on his tomb in Christ Church.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I

III--Colonial Councillors of State -------------------- COLONIAL FAMILIES OF THE Southern States of America CARTERS OF COROTOMAN page 109-114: [p.109] COL. JOHN CARTER, of England and Virginia, was the son of Hon. William Carter, of "Casstown," Hereford Co., and the Middle Temple, England.

Col. John Carter was b. 1620, in England; d. 1669, at "Corotoman," Lancaster Co., Va.; he came to the Colony in 1649, and located in lower Norfolk, which he represented as Burgess, 1649; he later removed to Lancaster Co., where he built the ancestral home of "Corotoman." He served as a Burgess from Lancaster, 1653-58, and was an influential member of the King's Council, 1658-59; Commander against the Rappahannock Indians, 1654; Col. of Lancaster, 1656; liberal supporter of the Established Church, he gave the first Church which stood on the land where Christ Church was later built, and was a Vestryman.

He made will in 1669; m. (first) Jane Glyn, dau. of Morgan Glyn, of England; (second) Eleanor (Eltonhead) Brocas, wid. of Hon. William Brocas, and dau. of Richard and Ann (Sutton) Eltonhead, of England; (third) Anne Carter, dau. of Cleave Carter, of England; (fourth) Sarah Ludlow dau. of Gabriel Ludlow, of "Dinton;" (fifth Elizabeth Sherley, of Gloucester Co., Va.

"Col. of "Carotoman", Lancaster Co. came to VA about 1643, probably from Middlesex 1643-4 - became member of VA house of Burgesses from Lower Norfolk Co. county justice and member of the Governor's council, 1657."

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0033/g0000097.html

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John Carter's Timeline

1613
October 7, 1613
Christ Church Parish, Newgate, London, Middlesex, England
1638
1638
Age 24
Norfolk, New Kent, VA
1639
1639
Age 25
Lancaster Co, Va
1639
Age 25
VA, USA
1640
1640
Age 26
Gloucester, Virginia, United States
1643
1643
Age 29
1656
April 1656
Age 42
Va
1661
1661
Age 47
1663
August 4, 1663
Age 49
Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies
1668
October 24, 1668
Age 55
Gloucester Co, Va