Col. Robert Coleman, of Mobjack Bay, Virginia

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Robert Coleman, Sr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Braxton,Mango,Essex,England
Death: Died in Tindall's Point, Gloucester, Virginia
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Richard Coleman and Lady Rebecca Coleman (Claiborne)
Husband of Elizabeth Coleman
Father of Joseph Coleman; Elizabeth Frances Tucker (Coleman); Capt. Robert Coleman; Daniel Coleman, Sr.; Grizelle Coleman Clement and 2 others
Brother of William Coleman; Nicholas Coleman and Thomas Coleman

Occupation: Sailed to America in 1637, headright, Sheriff
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Col. Robert Coleman, of Mobjack Bay, Virginia

Please Note: The father of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay, Virginia is not known with any certainty at this time. Please see: http://genforum.genealogy.com/coleman/messages/4715.html

Known as Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay, Virginia. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mobjackbaycolemans/index.html

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Useful webpages about his ancestors: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=norvan&id=I72853&style=TEXT

  • Death also reported as 1680, 1682
  • Birth also reported as 1619, 1620, 1630
  • Birthplace also reported as Suffolk, UK
  • See summary of sources on birth and death at end of this article.

Robert COLEMAN came to Virginia about 1638. He was named as head right in a grant to Thomas SYMONS, March 2,1638. Patent Book I, Part II, Page 624. It is to be noted that Thomas SYMONS, by grant dated October 10, 1642, received a tract of land in that part of the Colony which was to become Gloucester County.Patent Book I, Part II, Page 830.

Robert was born in England c1620 and married Elizabeth GRIZZELL, daughter of William c1655 in Virginia. She was born in England c1622. Robert died in Gloucester County, VA c1680. His descendants relocated throughout the United States. Those remaining in Virginia included many politicians and judges in Pittsylvania County, VA. Some of his descendants still reside in Southwest Virginia.

Robert COLEMAN was settled in Gloucester County in 1658, for by deed dated August 2, 1658, Francis CARPENTER conveyed a tract of land in Westmoreland County to "Robert COLEMAN of Mobjack Bay, Gloucester County". D.& W. Book I, Page 103, Westmoreland County Records.

Thereafter he acquired by grant a tract of land on Burnt Creek in Gloucester County, adjoining lands of Daniel CLARK, Richard FOSTER "and another development of his own." This grant is dated March 18, 1662.Patent Book 5, Page 352. By grant dated March 10, 1672, he acquired two hundred acres more adjoining CLARK and other.Patent Book 6, Page 34.

His neighbors and adjoining landowners were, among other, Captain Lawrence SMITH, Daniel CLARK, Daniel LAUGHAM, Thomas and Jeffrey GRAVES. See Patent Book 5, Page 240; Patent Book 6, Page 560: Patent Book 7, Page 163.

From the location of the lands described in the various grants, the property of Robert COLEMAN can be said to have been situated near “The Great Road leading to Tindall’s Point” (now Gloucester Point) in Gloucester County, VA. No activity can be found for Robert after 1680.

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Robert Coleman was born in the county of Essex, England in 1622. He married Elizabeth Grizzell, daughter of William Grizzell about 1650 in Rappahannock, Essex, VA. Robert Coleman died in 1689 at Tyndalls Point, Gloucester, VA. Robert arrived in America on 2 March 1648 as a headright of Thomas Symons. Robert landed in upper Norfolk County in VA and later settled near Mobjack Bay in Gloucester County, VA by 1658 whereupon he entered into a deed with Francis Carpenter for land in Westmoreland County. He made several other land purchases in Virginia. from http://genealogical-gleanings.com/Early%20Virginia.htm

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Name: Robert COLEMAN

Surname: Coleman

Given Name: Robert

Sex: M

Birth: ABT 1630

Death: 1689 in Gloucester Co., VA

Notes:

Sherry Nicols emphatically stated in her research that Robert's father was not Richard or Henry. She wrote a book about the Colemans.

Sir James Coleman of Braxton Mango, Sussex, England was not the ancestor of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay. Henry Coleman of Elizabeth City, VA was not the ancestor of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay. Richard Coleman was not the father of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay. There is no evidence (yet) that a descendant of Col. Nicholas Spencer of Westmoreland Co. VA married into the Mobjack Bay Colemans. (Col. Spencer's wife was Frances Mottram, not Mothan.)

Robert Coleman's name appeared on a list of headrights on 2 Mar 1638 in Upper Norfolk Co., meaning he was in VA by that date. His name later appeared as a witness to York Co. records between 1646-48. Robert Coleman was among the early colonists in Gloucester Co., which was opened for white settlement on 1 Sep 1649. Robert died in Gloucester Co. sometime after 6 May 1682, the last mention of him in any existing record. During the War Between The States, Gloucester Co. records were taken to Richmond for safekeeping and were destroyed when Richmond was evacuated and burned. But the few records in existence are evidence that Robert Coleman lived in Abingdon Parish, Gloucestor Co. VA.

When Robert and his wife, Elizabeth Grizzell (marriage date unknown), crossed the York River to Tindall's Point in what became Gloucester Co., they probably settled along the Severne River between Tindall's Point and Mobjack Bay. In the early days of the colony, rivers and tidal streams provided the easiest means of transportation for settlers. The waterways also provided a source of food and a means of shipping tobacco, Virginia's major exportable commodity.

During Bacon's Rebellion in 1676, the Abingdon Parish Register was destroyed, forever denying us the facts about any children born to Robert Coleman and Elizabeth Grizzell. (VA law required that all births and deaths be reported to the parish minister.) Based on available evidence, the six known surviving children of Robert and Elizabeth Coleman were Thomas, Robert, Joseph, Grizzell, Daniel and John.

There is no evidence anywhere of Robert Coleman's birth year. However, he was not born in 1620 and did not marry Elizabeth Mott in Ireland or anywhere else. Records from Brent-Eleigh Parish in Suffolk, England prove this and are reprinted on pgs. 15-17 in my book.

The birth year of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay was more likely ca. 1630, and he was brought to VA as a young boy. He may have been a son of the Edward Coleman whose name appeared on a Lower Norfolk Co. headright list in 1637, and on a 1638 list of ages of people residing in that county. But this is only speculation. For anyone interested in pursuing the ancestry of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay, they should start with the Edward Colman of Suffolk, England whose will was proved in 1596. (See p. 15 of my book.)

Coleman genealogy by Emily Anne Croom is the most authoritative.

Marriage 1 Elizabeth GRIZZELL b: 1632 in Rappahannock, Essex Co., VA

   Married: ABT 1650 in Rappahannock, Essex Co., VA

Children

  1. Robert COLEMAN b: 1656 in Abington Parish, Gloucester Co., VA
  2. Grizzell COLEMAN

from internet - http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=coleman&id=I35882

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Robert Coleman Sr. came to America on 2 May 1638

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•Name: Robert COLEMAN Sr.

•Surname: Coleman

•Given Name: Robert

•Suffix: Sr.

•Sex: M

•Birth: ABT 1616 in prob, Essex, , England

•Death: AFT May 1682 in , Gloucester, Virginia, USA

Robert Coleman, Sr. came to Colony on March 2, 1638 as headright of Thomas Symons.

He settled in close proximity to Tindall's Point near the South Branch of the Severne River at Mobjack Bay, later Gloucester Co. Va. (Patent Bk 1 Pt 2, pg 624, 250 acres)

Known as Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay, Virginia.

In a grant dated 18 Mar 1662, Robert acquired 110 acres on Burnt Creek in Gloucester Co adjoining lands of Daniel Clark, Richard Foster and "another development of his own". (Patent Bk 5, pg. 352/369, for transporting 3 people)

A similar deed on 18 March 1672 for 200 acres for transporting 4 people.

Robert was still alive on 6 May 1682 when he was mentioned in a deed transaction of Abraham Bradley. (Deed Bk 7, pg 163 Abingdon Parish, Gloucester, Va)

Marriage 1 Elizabeth GRIZZELL b: in prob, Essex, , England

•Married: ABT 1653 in , Gloucester, Virginia, USA

Children

1. Thomas COLEMAN b: ABT 1654 in , Gloucester, Virginia, USA c: in Abington Par, Gloucester, Virginia, USA

2. ROBERT COLEMAN Jr. b: ABT 1656 in of, Gloucester, Virginia, USA

3. Grizzell COLEMAN b: ABT 1658 in , Gloucester, Virginia, USA

4. Joseph COLEMAN b: ABT 1660 in , Gloucester, Virginia, USA

5. Daniel COLEMAN b: ABT 1662 in , Gloucester, Virginia, USA

6. John COLEMAN b: ABT 1666 in of, Gloucester, Virginia, USA

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Robert married Elizabeth Grizzell, although no records exist as proof. Very little is known about Elizabeth, other than the name "Grizzell" is a Scottish form of "Grace". There were at least two men in the colony at that time with the surname of Grizzell: Humphrey and William. Nothing further is known about either man. Robert and Elizabeth had six known surviving children: Thomas, ROBERT, Joseph, Grizzell, Daniel and John.

Source:http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mobjackbaycolemans/index.html

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Birth abt 1625, England Death aft May 1682, Tindalls Point, Gloucester Co, VA, reported by http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps13/ps13_201.htm

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Robert died in Gloucester Co. sometime after 6 May 1682, the last mention of him in any existing, record. During the War Between The States, Gloucester Co. records were taken to Richmond for safekeeping and were destroyed when Richmond was evacuated and burned. But the few records in existence are evidence that Robert Coleman lived in Abingdon Parish, Gloucestor Co. VA, reported by http://genforum.genealogy.com/coleman/messages/4715.html

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Robert was born in England c1620. No activity can be found for Robert after 1680, reported by http://personal.linkline.com/xymox/roh/coleman.htm

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Robert Coleman [a] b abt 1620, prob Wales, d 1689, Gloucester, VA, reported by http://www.geneajourney.com/coleman.html

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ROBERT2 COLEMAN (UNKNOWN1) was born Abt. 1620 in Essex England, and died 1675 in Tyndalls Point, Glouchester, Virginia, reported by http://www.kykinfolk.com/henry/coleman.htm

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From Cavaliers and Pioneers, we find Robert Coleman granted 110 acres in Gloucester County, 18 Mar 1662, for the transportation of 3 persons. From Charles City County Court Orders and Fragments 1664-1696, p 309, is recorded a Deed of Gift, dated 20 May 1663, in which Robt Coleman Senr of "Apamatick" in C.C. Co. gives "unto my sonne Robt Coleman now Jun'r", part of "my land" on the Southside of Apamatuck River "I know not the quantity of it". "bounded as foll the bredth of it upon the River shall be from the Land of Robt Burgesse down the River side to two marked oakes w'ch stand at the West end of my now dwelling house." This was signed "RC" and witnessed by Thomas Batte and Thomas Daulby, and "Sworne in Court by Robt Coleman sen'r" 3 June 1663. From Cavaliers & Pioneers, Patent Book 5, p 508, is a grant for "ROBT. COLEMAN, 110 acs. Gloster Co., 18 Mar 1662, p. 352 (369). On main branch of Burts Cr., beg. at Danll Clarkes land, running N.W. by N. &c. to Richard Fosters land, then N. &c. to another devdt. of his own &c. Trans. of 3 pers: Gabriell Bradmeed, Tho. Follit, Ann Madden."

Source: http://www.geneajourney.com/coleman.html

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Almost 22 years have passed since I began the search for the ancestors of my Revolutionary War grandfather, Spencer Coleman. During those years, I've seen a lot of strange theories regarding our immigrant ancestor, Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay, Gloucester Co. VA. With so many people posting their Coleman family tree on the Internet, it's important to get the facts straight. (Please refer to Judge Solon B. Coleman's 1959 Coleman family manuscript and my 1998 book "The Coleman Family of Mobjack Bay, VA", both available through the inter-library loan program from the VA State Library.) I hope the information from this posting will be helpful.

Sir James Coleman of Braxton Mango, Sussex, England was not the ancestor of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay. Henry Coleman of Elizabeth City, VA was not the ancestor of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay. Richard Coleman was not the father of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay. There is no evidence (yet) that a descendant of Col. Nicholas Spencer of Westmoreland Co. VA married into the Mobjack Bay Colemans. (Col. Spencer's wife was Frances Mottram, not Mothan.)

Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay did not live in Fairfax Co. VA. That county was not formed until 1742, many years after his death.

In all existing records, our immigrant ancestor is listed as ROBERT COLEMAN, not Robert Edward Coleman. No middle name, no middle initial. (This is also true of his son Robert.)

If you see any of the above information posted on the Internet or on someone's family tree, request the sources and verify them.

The known facts about our immigrant ancestor (supported by records) are:

Robert Coleman's name appeared on a list of headrights on 2 Mar 1638 in Upper Norfolk Co., meaning he was in VA by that date. His name later appeared as a witness to York Co. records between 1646-48. Robert Coleman was among the early colonists in Gloucester Co., which was opened for white settlement on 1 Sep 1649. Robert died in Gloucester Co. sometime after 6 May 1682, the last mention of him in any existing record. During the War Between The States, Gloucester Co. records were taken to Richmond for safekeeping and were destroyed when Richmond was evacuated and burned. But the few records in existence are evidence that Robert Coleman lived in Abingdon Parish, Gloucestor Co. VA.

When Robert and his wife, Elizabeth Grizzell (marriage date unknown), crossed the York River to Tindall's Point in what became Gloucester Co., they probably settled along the Severne River between Tindall's Point and Mobjack Bay. In the early days of the colony, rivers and tidal streams provided the easiest means of transportation for settlers. The waterways also provided a source of food and a means of shipping tobacco, Virginia's major exportable commodity.

During Bacon's Rebellion in 1676, the Abingdon Parish Register was destroyed, forever denying us the facts about any children born to Robert Coleman and Elizabeth Grizzell. (VA law required that all births and deaths be reported to the parish minister.) Based on available evidence, the six known surviving children of Robert and Elizabeth Coleman were Thomas, Robert, Joseph, Grizzell, Daniel and John.

There is no evidence anywhere of Robert Coleman's birth year. However, he was not born in 1620 and did not marry Elizabeth Mott in Ireland or anywhere else. Records from Brent-Eleigh Parish in Suffolk, England prove this and are reprinted on pgs. 15-17 in my book. I'll be happy to e-mail a copy of this information to anyone who is interested.

The birth year of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay was more likely ca. 1630, and he was brought to VA as a young boy. He may have been a son of the Edward Coleman whose name appeared on a Lower Norfolk Co. headright list in 1637, and on a 1638 list of ages of people residing in that county. But this is only speculation and should not be posted on the Internet as fact. For anyone interested in pursuing the ancestry of Robert Coleman of Mobjack Bay, they should start with the Edward Colman of Suffolk, England whose will was proved in 1596. (See p. 15 of my book.)

There has also been a lot of misinformation posted on the Internet and on family trees regarding the descendants of Robert Coleman and Elizabeth Grizzell. If anyone is interested in what is curently known (until evidence proves otherwise) about their descendants, I would be willing to post separate messages to this forum.

The most ideal situation when trying to solve any genealogy puzzle would be to find exact answers that would enable us to fill in gaps on our family tree. In reality, that situation almost never happens. And if it did, genealogy would be a lot less interesting. The lack of answers does not mean it's okay to "make up" names or dates regarding an ancestor, and doing so truly defies logic. If you see anything posted on the Internet or on family trees that you do not know from personal knowledge is supported by evidence, request a source and verify it.

Source: http://genforum.genealogy.com/coleman/messages/4715.html

-------------------- It is believed by some that Robert Coleman's parents were Sir James Coleman and Mary Spencer of England (skipping a generation here). Mary Spencer was the daughter of Colonel Nicholas Spencer and Frances Mathon. -------------------- ROBERT COLEMAN, THE IMMIGRANT, OF MOBJACK BAY, GLOUCESTER COUNTY, VIRGINIA

   Robert’s name first appeared in the records of the colony on a headright list from Upper Norfolk County on 2 Mar 1638.  He was listed as a headright of Thomas Symons.  Although the headright list was dated 1638, Robert was probably in the colony at least by 1637 (see Headright information\).
   The Coleman brothers made their way to York County before 1645.  They may have traveled overland, but more likely went by boat.  Virginia was a true wilderness in those days, heavily forested and occupied by Indians and wild animals.  Traveling in small parties would have been safe enough by boat.  Larger groups of settlers could travel overland with relative safety, depending on their number.
   York County is likely where the Coleman brothers met and married their wives.  Settlers throughout the Virginia colony had crowded into York in anticipation of the eventual opening of Indian lands to the north.  Neither Gloucester nor Lancaster counties were open for white settlement until 1649, and all three brothers appear to have been married by that year.
   York County is also where Robert Coleman became good friends with Thomas Ray, although the strong possibility exists that Thomas Ray was a cousin of the Colemans (see will of Edward Coleman\).  Thomas Ray was named Godfather to Robert’s oldest surviving son, Thomas Coleman.
   Very few deeds or court actions still exist regarding Robert’s activities in the new colony, but those records are noted on page Unknown.  

................ The separate, blue tinted map shows the Mobjack Bay and Gloucester County region as it was divided about the time Robert arrived. .............

  Robert married Elizabeth Grizzell, although no records exist as proof.  Very little is known about Elizabeth, other than the name "Grizzell" is a Scottish form of "Grace".  There were at least two men in the colony at that time with the surname of Grizzell: Humphrey and William.  Nothing further is known about either man.  Robert and Elizabeth had six known surviving children: Thomas, Robert, Joseph, Grizzell, Daniel and John.  These children and their descendants are the subjects of this book.
   The Abingdon Parish Register was destroyed in 1676, and without those records it is nearly impossible to determine how many children Robert and Elizabeth Coleman actually had.   It is credible to assume they had more daughters in addition to Grizzell, but if those daughters survived to adulthood and married, their existence has been lost to researchers.
   Son Thomas, born before 1654, was the oldest surviving child of Robert and Elizabeth and would have inherited most of his father’s Gloucester County land.  He and his wife Rebecca Claiborne left many descendants, although a good portion of them migrated to other parts of Virginia and points west.  After decades of tobacco and other crops had drawn nutrients from the land, Gloucester County soil would have deteriorated.  Early Virginians exhibited little hesitation, and indeed were eager, to migrate to areas with fertile, virgin soil.  The name Richard Coleman appears often in the line of Thomas and Rebecca.
   The next surviving child of Robert and Elizabeth was son Robert, born in 1656.  Perhaps the law of inheritance was the impetus which prompted Robert to leave Gloucester County and settle first in New Kent County which, at that time, bordered Gloucester.  Robert and his wife, Ann Spilsbe, were living in New Kent County until King & Queen County was formed from that area in 1691.  The land on which Robert had settled then became part of King & Queen.  Robert and Ann had many children who in turn had many children of their own.  Their blood flows through thousands of Coleman descendants all across America and around the world.  The names of Edward and Richard Coleman were given to sons in the early generations of this line.
  Joseph Coleman was the next child of Robert and Elizabeth.  He and his wife, Agnes Adelston, had two children, one of whom did not survive childhood.  Joseph owned land in Abingdon Parish, probably given to him by his father.  He also acquired land in adjoining Petsworth Parish.  The male line of Joseph and Agnes evidently died out.
   Grizzell Coleman was the only known surviving daughter of Robert and Elizabeth.  It is known that she married Benjamin Clements and that they had a number of children.  Unfortunately, many of their descendants have been reticent about sharing their family lines; therefore, little is known about the Coleman-Clements descendancy.
   Daniel was as prolific and adventuresome as his brother Robert.  Daniel also left Gloucester and settled in New Kent County.  After that county was divided, Daniel’s homestead became part of King & Queen County, but he also owned land in adjoining King William County.  Daniel lived in King & Queen until his death in 1722.  He and his wife, Miss Darby, had several children.
   John Coleman was the youngest surviving child of Robert and Elizabeth.  He had two wives, Margaret and Ann, and children by both wives.  John remained in Gloucester County, owniaang land in Abingdon and Petsworth parishes.  Three of his four children left Gloucester and settled elsewhere in Virginia and North Carolina, one of whom was a Richard Coleman.
   A wife and children were valuable assets during the difficult days of establishing colonies in a new world.  Wives were needed to help clear the land, plant and harvest crops, fight Indians, and bear children who would, at a young age, be required to work the fields and care for the farm animals.  Love or passion probably played a minor role in the choosing of a mate, with colonists opting instead to marry for practicality.  Living conditions were harsh, and survival was a priority.  Most of the colonists were experiencing a sense of new-found freedom and they were determined to succeed in the new world.  The possibility of amassing land and establishing homes to leave to their descendants was a new and heady experience for the pioneers.  They were ready and eager to take advantage of every opportunity offered them.
   The year Robert Coleman settled in Gloucester County is unknown, but he was certainly among its first colonists.  If the Coleman brothers and other migrating settlers crossed the York River to what became Gloucester County, they would have built rafts to ferry themselves, their families, supplies and farm stock to Tyndall’s Point.  An alternate route would have meant traveling by boat down the York to Chesapeake Bay, northward to Mobjack Bay and up the Severne River.  Doing so, however, would have been a monumental task considering the sheer numbers of people and animals who made the migration.
   Tyndall’s Point was named for Robert Tyndall who explored the area in 1608 as a mapmaker for Captain John Smith.  That area became the major migration route to Gloucester County and the former Indian lands to the north.  The "Great Road" leads northward through Gloucester and was probably first forged by the Powhatan Indians.
   The exact Gloucester County location where Robert Coleman settled is unknown, but it would have been along the Severne River, which empties into Mobjack Bay, which in turn empties into Chesapeake Bay.  The waterways were the easiest means of transportation in the early days of the colony; they also provided a source of food and a means of shipping tobacco and other exportable goods.
   Historical references indicate "Mock Jack Bay" was the original name of the area in which Robert Coleman settled.  As the story was told, in the early years of the colony, a ship sailed into the bay while on an exploratory expedition.  The sailors, called "jacks", began calling out greetings to the then uninhabited wilderness.  Echoes of their greetings reverberated across the water, thus the name "Mock Jack Bay".
   By January 1663, John Coleman was deceased, Richard Coleman lived in Rappahannock County, and Robert Coleman was firmly established in Gloucester.  Robert also owned land in Northumberland County, a fact that has caused one of the longest-running Coleman puzzles, that being the mystery of the origins of Thomas Coleman whose wife was Elizabeth Connelly.
   On 22 Aug 1659, "Francis Carpenter of Cherry Point Neck in the County of Northumberland unto Robert Coleman of Mock Jack Bay in the County of Gloucester, for a valuable consideration, 200 acres in Potomack freshes land of Mr. Randolp...along the river side...into the woods for length of two miles...granted unto Francis Carpenter by patent 5 Jun 1658." \(Westmoreland Co. VA Records 1658-1661, abstracted and compiled by John F. Dorman (1970), pp. 107-108)
   The acreage Robert Coleman purchased at Cherry Point Neck was an excellent piece of real estate.  The "freshes" would have been a swift-running stream of fresh water that flowed into the larger, picturesque Potomac River.  The swift-running stream was most likely the Yeocomico River, with both John and Robert Coleman owning river land.
   No evidence has been found in existing records to indicate Robert ever lived on, or sold, the 200 acres at Cherry Point Neck he purchased in 1659.  He was apparently well satisfied with his home in Gloucester County, and probably purchased the Northumberland County land at the urging of his brother John.  More than 100 years after Robert purchased the acreage at Cherry Point Neck, one of his descendants, Thomas Coleman, was living in Northumberland County and paid a tithe on himself and three other men.  The land Thomas lived on at the time could very well have been the same 200 acres purchased by Robert Coleman in 1659.
   Robert Coleman may have been one of the planters of mulberry trees in Gloucester County.  The trees had been imported from Italy to enable the planters and farmers of the county to compete in the worldwide silk-producing market.  Historians believe that Gloucester County silk was used to weave the coronation robes worn by King Charles II. Two years after he took the throne in 1660, Charles wrote that the silks from Virginia "were as fine a quality as any other in British possession".  Descendants of those mulberry trees still grow in Gloucester soil today.
   Gloucester residents lived according to the traditions of their forefathers.  Although well known for their hospitality, they were little influenced by the outside world, being somewhat isolated from the more populous settlements.  The reasons Robert Coleman chose to settle in Gloucester County will never be known, but there is no doubt he and his wife were among Gloucester’s earliest settlers, and were the progenitors of the majority of Colemans in Virginia.  
   Historians and researchers can debate the issue of whether or not Edward, John, Richard and Robert Coleman were in fact brothers.  More than 365 years have passed since the first mention of Edward Coleman’s name in early Virginia records.  Unfortunately, the possibility of finding additional evidence as proof of their relationship is slim.  

Additional sources: Connie Ausec of Houston, TX Marjorie Watts of James H. Brown of Hurst, TX.

view all 11

Col. Robert Coleman, of Mobjack Bay, Virginia's Timeline

1632
1632
Braxton,Mango,Essex,England
1637
1637
Age 5
1654
1654
Age 22
Gloucester, Gloucester, Virginia, United States
1655
1655
Age 23
Rappahannock, VA, USA
1656
1656
Age 24
Abingdon Parish, Gloucester, Virginia
1657
1657
Age 25
Charles City County, Virginia Colony
1658
1658
Age 26
1660
1660
Age 28
Gloucester Co, Virginia
1662
1662
Age 30
Gloucester, Virginia, United States
1665
1665
Age 33
Gloucester, Virginia