Robert King Carter, I (1663 - 1732) MP

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Nicknames: "King Carter", "King", "/King/"
Birthplace: Corotoman, Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies
Death: Died in Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies
Occupation: One of wealthest men in colonies - Virginia, Rector of William & Mary College; Speaker of House of Burgess, VA, Speaker, Councillor & Acting Governor of Virginia, acting Govenor, colonel, Plantation Owner
Managed by: Peter James Herbert
Last Updated:

About Robert King Carter, I

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Carter_I

Robert Carter also known as King Carter (1663 – August 4, 1732) of Lancaster County was a colonist in Virginia and became one of the wealthiest men in the colonies.

As President of the Governor's Council of the Virginia Colony, he was acting Governor of Virginia in Williamsburg from 1726-1727 after the death in office of Governor Hugh Drysdale. He acquired the moniker "King" from his wealth and autocratic business methods.

Biography

Robert Carter was born at Corotoman Plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia, to John Carter (1620-1669) of London, England, and Sarah Ludlow (1635-1668) of Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. In 1668, he married Judith Armistead of Hesse in Gloucester County, an area which was included in the formaton of Mathews County in 1691. After her death in 1699, he married Elizabeth Landon in 1701.

At the age of 28, Robert entered the General Assembly of Virginia as a Burgess from Lancaster County, serving five consecutive years. In 1726, as President of the Governor's Council, he served as acting Governor of Virginia after the death of Governor Hugh Drysdale.

As an agent of Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, better known in Virginia as Lord Fairfax, he served two terms as agent for the Fairfax proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia. During his first term, 1702-1711, he began to acquire large tracts of land for himself in the Rappahannock River region of Virginia. acquiring some 20,000 acres.

When he became representative of Fairfax’s interests again in 1722, and served from 1722-32, he succeeded in securing for his children and grandchildren some 110,000 acres in the Northern Neck, as well as additional acquisitions in Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000,000 British pounds in cash.

Descendants

Anne Carter (1702-1745), who married Benjamin Harrison IV and died on August 12, 1745; (parents of Benjamin Harrison V and grandparents of President William Henry Harrison).

Robert Carter II (1704-1734), who married Priscilla Churchill;

Elizabeth Carter (1705-1706);

Sarah Carter (1705-1705);

Charles Carter (1707-1764), who married Anne Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Ludlow Carter (b. 1709);

Landon Carter (1710-1778), who married Maria Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Mary Carter (1712-1736); who married George Braxton; {parents of Carter Braxton}.

Lucy Carter (1715-1763); and

George Carter (1718-1742).

See also

Robert Carter III

Carter's Grove Plantation

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http://www.christchurch1735.org/history/robert_carter.html

http://arlisherring.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I042629&tree=Herring

President of the council and acting governor from the death of Drysdale, July 22, 1726, till the arrival of William Gooch about October, 1727, was born in Virginia in 1663, son of Colonel John and Sarah (Ludlow) Carter. His father had been prominent in the colony as lieutenant-colonel, burgess and councillor. His mother was a daughter of Gabriel Ludlow, a nephew of General Edmund Ludlow, one of Cromwell's generals. Robert Carter was for many years the agent of Lord Fairfax, the proprietor of the Northern Neck grant. He was treasurer of the colony, speaker of the house of burgesses 1694-99, and member of the council for twenty-seven years (1699-1726). He became president of the council, and as such succeeded as acting governor. His great possessions earned him the name of "King" Carter. His residence was in Lancaster county. at Corotoman, on the Rappahannock river, and there is still standing nearby a church that he built shortly before his death, which occurred August 4, 1732. His splendid tomb in a rather shattered condition is still to be seen in the yard of the church. He was twice married, first to Judith, eldest daughter of John Armistead, Esq., a member of the council, and (second) to Elizabeth Willis, daughter of Thomas Landon, of an ancient family in Hereford county, England. By these wives he had numerous children, who have many influential descendants in Virginia and the south.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I

Robert Carter was born at Corotoman Plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia, to John Carter (1620-1669) of London, England, and Sarah Ludlow (1635-1668) of Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. In 1688, he married Judith Armistead of Hesse in Gloucester County, an area which was included in the formation of Mathews County in 1691. After her death in 1699, he married Elizabeth Landon in 1701.

At the age of 28, Robert entered the General Assembly of Virginia as a Burgess from Lancaster County, serving five consecutive years. In 1726, as President of the Governor's Council, he served as acting Governor of Virginia after the death of Governor Hugh Drysdale.

As an agent of Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, better known in Virginia as Lord Fairfax, he served two terms as agent for the Fairfax proprietary of the Northern Neck of Virginia. During his first term, 1702-1711, he began to acquire large tracts of land for himself in the Rappahannock River region of Virginia. acquiring some 20,000 acres (81 km2), a large part of which was the 6,000-acre (24 km2) Nomini Hall plantation which Carter acquired in 1709 from the heirs of Col. Nicholas Spencer, cousin of the Lords Culpepper, from whom the Fairfaxes had inherited their Virginia holdings.

When he became representative of Fairfax’s interests again in 1722, and served from 1722-32, he succeeded in securing for his children and grandchildren some 110,000 acres (450 km2) in the Northern Neck, as well as additional acquisitions in Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000 British pounds in cash.

--------------------

Robert Carter died on August 4, 1732, in Lancaster County, Virginia and was buried in Christ Church, Lancaster County, Virginia. He left behind 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) of land, 1,000 slaves and 10,000,000 British pounds in cash.

Marriages

Judith Armistead of Hesse, Gloucester County in 1688. She died in 1699. Mother of five children.

Betty Landon (widow of Richard Willis) in 1701. She died in 1719. Mother of ten children.

Descendants

Anne Carter (1702-1745), who married Benjamin Harrison IV and died on August 12, 1745; (parents of Benjamin Harrison V and grandparents of President William Henry Harrison).

Robert Carter II (1704-1734), who married Priscilla Churchill;

Elizabeth Carter (1705-1706);

Sarah Carter (1705-1705);

Charles Carter (1707-1764), who married Anne Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Ludlow Carter (b. 1709);

Landon Carter (1710-1778), who married Maria Byrd, daughter of Col. William Byrd II;

Mary Carter (1712-1736); who married George Braxton; {parents of Carter Braxton}.

Lucy Carter (1715-1763); and

George Carter (1718-1742).

See also

Robert Carter III

-------------------- http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0007/g0000062.html#I38986

"Colonial official, landowner; born in Lancaster County, Va. He served in the Virginia Assembly (1691--92, 1695--99) and the Council (1699--1732). A large landowner himself, he became the agent for the wealthy Fairfax family in 1702 and used his position to become one of the wealthiest men in the colonies. His political and economic position earned him the title of "King Carter" or "King Robin." (see Glenn's 'Some Colonial Mansions')" - p. 182."

Children: Anne (Anna) Carter, b. 1702, Corotoman, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. betw. 1743-1745, +Benjamin Harrison Robert Carter II, b. 1704, Corotoman, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. May 12, 1732, Nomin, Westmoreland County, Virginia; + Priscilla Bladen Churchill, 1725 Sarah Carter, b. 1705, d. 1705 Betty Carter, b. 1706, d. 1706 Charles Carter, b. 1707 Ludlow Carter, b. 1708, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. bef. 1719

Landon Carter, b. 1710, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. Mar. 3, 1778; + 1) Elizabeth Wormely, 1732, + 2) Maria Bryd, 1742, + 3) Elizabeth Beale, 1746 Mary Carter, b. 1712, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. 1736 Lucy Carter, b. 1715, d. 1763, + Col. Henry Fitzhugh George Carter, b. 1718, Lancaster County, Virginia, d. 1742, England

COL. ROBERT CARTER, King Carter (3--7), of "Corotoman," Lancaster Co., Va., b. 1663; d. Aug. 4, 1732; he served as a Burgess, 1695-99, and as Speaker of the House; as Treasurer of the Colony, 1694-1732; an influential [p.110] member of the King's Council, 1699-1732, and its President; acting Governor, 1726-27. On account of his great prominence and wealth, he was called "King Carter." His estate consisted of 300,000 acres of land, 1,000 slaves and 10, 100 pounds Sterling; he was also a prominent and active member of the Established Church; served as Vestryman of Christ Church, Lancaster Co., and built the present Church, which is one of the prettiest and most interesting in Colonial Virginia; he is buried just outside of this old Church. He m. (first) Judith Armistead, d. 1699; dau. of Col. John and Judith (Bowles) Armistead, of "Hesse," Gloucester Co., Va.; (second) Elizabeth (Landon) Willis, dau. of Thomas Landon, of "Grednal," Hereford Co., England. (See Armistead lineage.) Issue by first marriage: 4--1. Elizabeth, b. 1688; d. 1721; (death date error) 4--2. JOHN, b. 1690; of whom later. 4--3. Judith, b. 1693; m. 1718, Hon. Mann Page, of "Roswell,"Gloucester Co., Va., son of Col. Matthew and Mary (Mann) Page, and had issue. 4--4. Ann, b. 1696; m. Hon. Benjamine Harrison, of "Berkeley," Charles City Co., Va., son of Hon. Benjamine and Elizabeth (Burwell) Harrison, and had issue. (See Harrison and Burwell lineage.) Issue by second marriage: 4--5. ROBERT, b. 1705; of whom later. [p.111] 4--6.CHARLES, b. 1707; of whom later. 4--7.George, of the Middle Temple, London, England, b. 1709;d. unm. 4--8.Sarah, b. 1711; d. unm. 4--9.Mary, b. 1712; d. 1736; m. 1732, Hon. George Braxton, of "Newington," King and Queen Co., Va., and had issue.(See Braxton lineage.) 4--10. LANDON, b. 1713; of whom later. 4--11. Ludlow, b. 1714; d. unm. page 111 4--12. Lucy, m. (first) 1730, Col. Henry Fitzhugh, of "Eagle's Nest," King George Co., Va., son of Hon. William and Ann (Lee) Fitz-hugh, of "Eagle's Nest;" (second) Hon. Nathaniel Harrison, of "Brandon," Surry Co., Va., son of Hon. Nathaniel and Mary (Cary) Harrison, of "Wakefield," and had issue. (See Fitzhugh, Lee, Harrison and Cary lineage.)

"The following translation of Mr. Robert Carter's epitaph may be a help to some of our readers:--

"Here lies buried Robert Carter, Esq., an honourable man, who by noble endowments and pure morals gave lustre to his gentle birth.

"Rector of William and Mary, he sustained that institution in its most trying times. He was Speaker of the House of Burgesses, and Treasurer under the most serene Princes William, Anne, George I. and II.

"Elected by the House its Speaker six years, and Governor of the Colony for more than a year, he upheld equally the regal dignity and the public freedom.

"Possessed of ample wealth, blamelessly acquired, he built and endowed, at his own expense, this sacred edifice,--a signal monument of his piety toward God. He furnished it richly.

"Entertaining his friends kindly, he was neither a prodigal nor a parsimonious host.

"His first wife was Judith, daughter of John Armistead, Esq.; his second Betty, a descendant of the noble family of Landons. By these wives he had many children, on whose education he expended large sums of money.

"At length, full of honours and of years, when he had well performed all the duties of an exemplary life, he departed from this world on the 4th day of August, in the 69th year of his age.

"The unhappy lament their lost comforter, the widows their lost protector, and the orphans their lost father."

From four sons of Robert Carter are descended the later generations of this family. These four were: John, Robert, Charles, Landon.

Robert Carter I

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corotoman

Portrait of Robert "King" Carter

Corotoman was then inherited by Carter's son Robert Carter I (whose wealth and autocratic business methods led to his becoming known by the nickname "King") in 1690.[2] Under Robert Carter I's ownership, Corotoman became the center of what developed into a 300,000-acre (1,200 km2) estate of 48 plantations and farms including places such as Indian Town and Hills Quarters.[2]


Construction


Robert Carter began construction of the large Georgian mansion at Corotoman around 1720.[2][5][6] The mansion was completed in 1725, and introduced a new era for early 18th century architecture in Virginia.[2][6] Corotoman also set the pattern for 18th century architectural patronage.[5] The mansion at Corotoman rivaled the other important Colonial mansions of Virginia, and affirmed Robert Carter I's status as the most powerful planter in the aristocracy of the Tidewater region.[2] Carter's correspondences and diary revealed that the construction of the mansion at Corotoman was a lengthy, complex, and frustrating endeavor.[5] Construction materials for the mansion included paving stones from England, lumber from his plantation saw mills and from neighboring plantations, and oyster shells for mortar.[5] For some of the mansion's windows, Carter used iron casement frames for quarrel glass.[5] To undertake the mansion's construction, Carter imported skilled indentured servants from England and hired local craftsmen.[5]

Gardens

Carter employed an English gardener, whom he instructed "to bring the yards around the mansion into closer accord with the architectural rhythms of the mansion.[7] Little is currently known of the garden's contents and design.[7]

Brick House Store

At Corotoman, Carter maintained a building known as the "Brick House Store" where he kept imported goods that he sold and bartered to local planters.[8] In 1730, an inventory of items at the Brick House Store included essential supplies such as cloths, tools, and gunpowder and luxury items such as spices, ivory combs, and brass candlesticks.[8]

Spinster's House

The "Spinster's House" at Corotoman in the early 20th century. Another supporting structure at Corotoman was known as the "Spinster's House."[9] The house was constructed in either the late 17th century or the early 18th century.[9] The "Spinster's House" was a one-story and a half frame house adorned with a gabled roof with large end chimneys.[9] It lay in ruins for years before finally disappearing around 1930.[9] Before its disappearance, the "Spinster's House" was the last remaining supporting structure of the original Corotoman plantation.


Destruction


In 1729, four years after "King" Carter's mansion was completed, a fire destroyed it.[2][5][6][9] Carter made little mention of the mansion fire in his diary, but did lament the total destruction of his wine cellar.[10] Carter died three years later and the mansion was not rebuilt.[2][9] An inventory taken in 1732 after Carter's death implies that after the fire, Carter resided in either the "Old House" or the "Spinster's House" at Corotoman rather than rebuild it because of fiscal difficulties or ill health.[7][9] In the mid-19th century, Corotoman and its adjacent lands passed out of the Carter family when they were sold by a granddaughter of Charles Carter.[2][

-------------------- By Henry Robert Burke


Robert Carter III (1728-1804) was a very rich plantation owner in Colonial Virginia and in the early state of Virginia. His paternal great-grandfather John Carter (1613-1669) had come from England to Jamestown in 1635. By 1650 John Carter had some African slaves and was on his way to developing a large tobacco plantation in Lancaster County, Virginia called Corotomon.

When John Carter died he left Corotomon Plantation to his oldest son John Carter II (1640-1690). When John II, who had no [1]“white” sons, died he left Corotoman Plantation to his younger brother Robert "King” Carter (1663-1732).

Robert “King” Carter had an illustrious life, holding the post of appointed Governor of Virginia in 1726 and also by acquiring over 300,000 acres of land in Virginia, making him the richest man in all of North America.

While Robert Carter III was indeed rich and privileged, he was not immune to tragedy. Both his father, Robert Carter II (1704-1732) and his grandfather, Robert “King” Carter (1663-1732), died when Robert Carter III was only four years old.

Robert Carter III’s uncles, Landon and Charles Carter managed his inherited 6000 acre Nomini Hall Plantation in Westmoreland County, Virginia until Robert had grown up and completed his education. By the time of the American Revolution Robert Carter III owned 17 separate tobacco plantations located in several Virginia Counties that totaled 78,000 acres. Nomini Hall was the main plantation; Old Ordinary, Mitchells Spread, Forest Quarter and Coles Point were twelve other plantations named after the signs of the Zodiac.

In 1791 Robert Carter III began a process to emancipate his 500 slaves. This is the largest number of slaves emancipated by an individual slave owner in the history of the United States

-------------------- Robert King Carter was Speaker of the House of Burgesses and treasurer of the colonies and a land baron

view all 25

Col. Robert "King" Carter's Timeline

1663
August 4, 1663
Lancaster, Virginia, American Colonies
1689
1689
Age 25
Lancaster, Virginia
1690
1690
Age 26
"Corotoman", Lancaster Co., VA
1692
1692
Age 28
Lancaster, Virginia
1694
1694
Age 30
1695
1695
Age 31
Corotoman, Lancaster Co, Virginia
1701
April 9, 1701
Age 37
Herefordshire, England
1704
1704
Age 40
Lancaster, Virginia, Colonial America
1704
Age 40
Corotoman, Lancaster, VA
1704
Age 40
Lancaster, Virginia, Colonial America