Benjamin Cleveland (1738 - 1806)

‹ Back to Cleveland surname

Is your surname Cleveland?

Research the Cleveland family

Colonel Benjamin Cleveland (North Carolina militia)'s Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Bull Run or Culpeper, VA, USA
Death: Died in Oconee, SC, USA
Occupation: Colonel, surveyor
Managed by: Shanon Marie Turner
Last Updated:

About Benjamin Cleveland

  • Daughters of American Revolution Ancestor #: A023058
  • Service: NORTH CAROLINA Rank(s): CIVIL SERVICE, PATRIOTIC SERVICE, COLONEL
  • Birth: 5-26-1738 ORANGE CO VIRGINIA
  • Death: 10-15-1806 PENDLETON DIST SOUTH CAROLINA
  • Service Source: DRAPER, KING'S MOUNTAIN & ITS HEROES, PP 432-451
  • Service Description: 1) ALSO CAPT, MILITIA, BATTLE OF KING'S MOUNTAIN; JUSTICE OF COUNTY COURT, COMMISSIONER, 2) FOR SEIZING CONFISCATED ESTATES; MEM HOUSE OF COMMONS, STATE SENATE
  • Notes: WILL BENJ CLEVELAND NOT NAME DAU JEMIMA. SEE WILLS PENDLETON DIST, SC, P35. Created: 2002-03-27 23:23:50.97, Updated: , By: Conversion REF TO PROVE JEMIMA,DAU BEN CLEVELAND IS CLEVELAND GEN.SEE CRITIC NGSQ, Created: 2002-03-27 23:23:50.97, Updated: , By: Conversion V46,#3,P152.JOHN M.MARY MCCAU,SON JOHN CLEVELAND-CLEVELAND GEN V3,P2056. Created: 2002-03-27 23:23:50.97, Updated: , By: Conversion DATACF.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Cleveland


Benjamin Cleveland (May 28, 1738–1806) was an American pioneer and soldier in North Carolina. He is best remembered for his service as a colonel in the North Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War, and in particular for his role in the American victory at the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780.


Early life


Benjamin Cleveland was born in Orange County, Virginia, the fourth child of John and Elizabeth Coffee Cleveland. He moved to what became Wilkes County, North Carolina in 1769. He built his famous estate, "Roundabout," near what is today Ronda, North Carolina in eastern Wilkes County. Cleveland was very active in the early history of Wilkes County; he worked as a hunter, trapper, farmer, carpenter, and surveyor. By the time of the American Revolution, Cleveland was the wealthiest and most prominent citizen in Wilkes. A large, heavy set man - around six feet tall and weighing over 300lbs in his prime, he was called "Old Roundabout."


Cleveland married Mary Graves, a sister of Susannah Graves, the wife of Revolutionary War patriot and frontiersman, General Joseph Martin, for whom Martinsville, Virginia, is named.


Revolutionary War


At the beginning of the American Revolution, Cleveland was commissioned a colonel in the North Carolina militia. He was elected to the North Carolina House of Commons in 1778 and to the North Carolina Senate in 1779. Until Lord Cornwallis invaded in 1780, the fighting in North Carolina consisted of guerilla warfare between patriots and Tories. Cleveland became known as the "Terror of the Tories" for his treatment of Loyalists. In 1779, two Tories looted the home of George Wilfong, a patriot and friend of Cleveland. The Tories used Wilfong's clothes line to chase away his horses. The marauders were captured by Cleveland's men, who had them hanged using the clothes line they had stolen. In revenge, a group of Tories led by Captain William Riddle kidnapped Cleveland. Cleveland's men rescued him and he captured Riddle and two others. All three were hanged from the same tree, which became known as the "Tory Oak" and was an historic landmark behind the old Wilkes County courthouse (now the Wilkes Historical Museum).


In 1780, General Lord Cornwallis led a British army into the Carolinas, and won several victories over the Patriots. Major Patrick Ferguson, one of Cornwallis's most daring commanders, led an army of Tories into the North Carolina mountains to crush the rebels there. A large force of mountain men attacked Ferguson at King's Pinnacle, an isolated ridge on the North Carolina-South Carolina border. Cleveland played a key role in the ensuing Battle of Kings Mountain'. According to legend, Cleveland climbed up Rendezvous Mountain and blew his horn to summon some 200 Wilkes County militiamen. He led them in the battle. Cleveland's horse was shot from under him, and Major Ferguson was himself killed in the battle. Cleveland's brother, Captain Robert Cleveland, is said to haved rallyed the militiamen during the heat of the battle of King's Mountain, contributing to the Patriot victory. Cleveland claimed Ferguson's white stallion as a "war prize", and rode it home to his estate of Roundabout.


Later years


After the war, Cleveland moved to the South Carolina frontier and was a commissioner in the Pendleton District.


He died at his home in Oconee County, South Carolina in 1806 of heart dropsy. An obelisk monument to him stands on private property just north of U.S. Route 123 about 160 yds (145 m) east of the Madison Baptist Church in the Madison Community of Oconee County. He was buried about 1 mi (1.6 km) away in a private cemetery.


Cleveland County, North Carolina, Cleveland, Tennessee, and Cleveland, Georgia are named in his honor.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

May have been born on his father’s plantation on Blue Run, Orange Co, VA for the Orange County Records show a deed for 600 acres of land from Prince Curtis to John Cleveland 1734, about the commencement of the records. THis was in all probability the plantation, and John may have removed to Orange Co even earlier.

See notes about burial under brother Larkin Cleveland.

Cleveland County (formed in 1841) North Carolina was named in his honor. He is one of the most prominent members of the Cleveland family. Mentioned in "History of the United States". Was the hero of the Battle of Kings Mountain (Revolutionary War) in North Carolina.

Ben moved to Georgia and ran for the Legislature. Cleveland, Georgia is named for Ben. Died on October 1896 at his plantation at the junction of the Tugaloo River and Chauga creek in Pendelton District Oconee, Co, SC and is buried there (sometimes called Fort Madison, 1899) on his farm. Married in Orange Co, VA before 1764 Miss Mary Graves of an excellent family of Culpeper Co, VA. She died probably on their farm too.

He commanded a regiment of North and South Carolina Troops at the battle of Kings Mountain October 7, 1780. There's a monument erected where Col. Cleveland is buried by members of the Cleveland family in Georgia, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The monument was unveiled July 25, 1887.

By trade was a house carpenter and builder. After the Revolution he was the surveyor of Wilkes County. He became corpulent. An impediment in his speech prevented him from entering political life (

(Lots of information on him in Geneology of Cleveland & Cleaveland Family, left off on page 2067.) -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Cleveland

Benjamin Cleveland (May 28, 1738–1806) was an American pioneer and soldier in North Carolina. He is best remembered for his service as a colonel in the North Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War, and in particular for his role in the American victory at the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780.


Early life


Benjamin Cleveland was born in Orange County, Virginia, the fourth child of John and Elizabeth Coffee Cleveland. He moved to what became Wilkes County, North Carolina in 1769. He built his famous estate, "Roundabout," near what is today Ronda, North Carolina in eastern Wilkes County. Cleveland was very active in the early history of Wilkes County; he worked as a hunter, trapper, farmer, carpenter, and surveyor. By the time of the American Revolution, Cleveland was the wealthiest and most prominent citizen in Wilkes. A large, heavy set man - around six feet tall and weighing over 300lbs in his prime, he was called "Old Roundabout."


Cleveland married Mary Graves, a sister of Susannah Graves, the wife of Revolutionary War patriot and frontiersman, General Joseph Martin, for whom Martinsville, Virginia, is named.


Revolutionary War


At the beginning of the American Revolution, Cleveland was commissioned a colonel in the North Carolina militia. He was elected to the North Carolina House of Commons in 1778 and to the North Carolina Senate in 1779. Until Lord Cornwallis invaded in 1780, the fighting in North Carolina consisted of guerilla warfare between patriots and Tories. Cleveland became known as the "Terror of the Tories" for his treatment of Loyalists. In 1779, two Tories looted the home of George Wilfong, a patriot and friend of Cleveland. The Tories used Wilfong's clothes line to chase away his horses. The marauders were captured by Cleveland's men, who had them hanged using the clothes line they had stolen. In revenge, a group of Tories led by Captain William Riddle kidnapped Cleveland. Cleveland's men rescued him and he captured Riddle and two others. All three were hanged from the same tree, which became known as the "Tory Oak" and was an historic landmark behind the old Wilkes County courthouse (now the Wilkes Historical Museum).


In 1780, General Lord Cornwallis led a British army into the Carolinas, and won several victories over the Patriots. Major Patrick Ferguson, one of Cornwallis's most daring commanders, led an army of Tories into the North Carolina mountains to crush the rebels there. A large force of mountain men attacked Ferguson at King's Pinnacle, an isolated ridge on the North Carolina-South Carolina border. Cleveland played a key role in the ensuing Battle of Kings Mountain'. According to legend, Cleveland climbed up Rendezvous Mountain and blew his horn to summon some 200 Wilkes County militiamen. He led them in the battle. Cleveland's horse was shot from under him, and Major Ferguson was himself killed in the battle. Cleveland's brother, Captain Robert Cleveland, is said to haved rallyed the militiamen during the heat of the battle of King's Mountain, contributing to the Patriot victory. Cleveland claimed Ferguson's white stallion as a "war prize", and rode it home to his estate of Roundabout.


Later years


After the war, Cleveland moved to the South Carolina frontier and was a commissioner in the Pendleton District.


He died at his home in Oconee County, South Carolina in 1806 of heart dropsy. An obelisk monument to him stands on private property just north of U.S. Route 123 about 160 yds (145 m) east of the Madison Baptist Church in the Madison Community of Oconee County. He was buried about 1 mi (1.6 km) away in a private cemetery.


Cleveland County, North Carolina, Cleveland, Tennessee, and Cleveland, Georgia are named in his honor.

view all

Colonel Benjamin Cleveland (North Carolina militia)'s Timeline

1738
May 26, 1738
VA, USA
1759
February 24, 1759
Age 20
Albermarle Co. Va
1768
1768
Age 29
1806
October 15, 1806
Age 68
Oconee, SC, USA
????
????
Madison, Oconee, South Carolina, United States