John Hardin (1753 - 1792)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Fauquier County, Virginia
Death: Died in Hardin, Ohio
Cause of death: Killed by Indians or renegade whites on the Brandenburg Road about a mile from Hardinsburg, Kentucky
Occupation: He was a noted hunter and frontiersman and enrolled in Dunmore’s division during the Indian war in 1774. He was a lieutenant in Morgan’s rifle corps during the Revolution
Managed by: Karen Richardson
Last Updated:

About John Hardin

DAR Ancestor #: A050267

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hardin

John J. Hardin (1 Oct 1753–circa May 1792) was a soldier, farmer, rancher, noted marksman and hunter. He was wounded fighting in Lord Dunmore's War; served as a Continental Army officer in the American Revolutionary War and as a Kentucky Co., Virginia militia commander in the Northwest Indian War. He was a member of the Methodist church and one of the first judges in the original Washington County, Virginia (later to become Washington County, KY). John Hardin was killed in an ambush while acting as a peace emissary (under the direction of the President, George Washington) to the Shawnee Indian people.

Info added per the DAR's "Lineage Book of the Charter Members" by Mary S Lockwood published in 1895 stating "he was lieutenant in Morgan's Rifle Corps, colonel in Wayne's campaign, etc At the battle of Saratoga he performed distinguished services and received the public thanks of Gen Gates. In 1792 he was sent from Kentucky by special order of Gen Washington on a mission of peace to the Indians in Northern Ohio and was massacred by them."

Early life

Born in Prince William County, Virginia (in a section that is now Fauquier County), Hardin was the first son and fifth child of Martin Hardin (1716–1778), an owner of an "ordinary" and member of the Virginia militia, and Lydia [nee Waters] Hardin (1721–1800). He married Jane Daviess (died 31 May 1829) and together they had seven children, with future Kentucky senator, Martin D. Hardin, their youngest. Martin married Ann Logan, daughter of General Benjamin Logan. Their second oldest son, Mark, married Mary Adair, daughter of Kentucky Governor John Adair.

Military life

Lord Dunmore's War

Due to his reputation as a marksman, Hardin was asked in 1774 to join Capt. Zack Moran's troop, mustering in as an ensign, fighting Indians in Lord Dunmore's War. Hardin's exploits in this war led to him becoming popularly known on the frontier as "The Indian Killer". It was in a battle that same year, while firing on an adversary, that Hardin received a ball to the groin. He carried that bullet in him for life.

Revolutionary War

In the War of Independence, John Hardin was a 2nd Lieutenant in the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment, better known as "The Provisional Rifle Corps" (or Morgan's Rifles), and fought at Saratoga, while serving directly under Colonel Morgan.

Later life

In 1786, the Hardin family settled on a large parcel of land in Washington County, Virginia (now Washington County, Kentucky), where they farmed and raised stock. They also joined the Methodist church in that area. Hardin had some success as a rancher, continually adding acreage to his original tract.

Later militia service

As a militia captain in 1786, John Hardin led a successful attack on a Piankeshaw village near present day Vincennes, Indiana which, unfortunately, belonged to a tribe that had been colonial American allies. In August 1789, he led another militia expedition to the Terre Haute, Indiana area where he attacked a Shawnee village and returned to Kentucky with twelve scalps.

Hardin was promoted to colonel and repeatedly engaged Indians during the Northwest Indian War in the Ohio Territory. In 1790, he led the Kentucky militia on the disastrous Harmar Campaign, also known as Hardin's Defeat. Their rout began a long succession of American losses to Miami chief Little Turtle. In 1791, Hardin led a force of 60 Kentucky mounted militia in the destruction of a large Kickapoo village near the mouth of the Big Pine Creek, as part of General Charles Scott's campaign to destroy Ouiatenon.

Final service

In April 1792, President George Washington sent word to Hardin asking him to negotiate a peace with the Shawnee. Soon thereafter, in the area that is now Shelby County, Ohio, John Hardin met with a party of the Shawnee, who offered to escort him to their village. Instead, they attacked him and murdered him as he slept. Also killed was a servant of Hardin's, known simply as Freeman. Another of the party, a guide named John Flinn - who had lived among the Indians after being captured by them as a boy - survived to tell the tale, later settling in Miami County, Ohio.

John J. Hardin

October 1, 1753 – May 1792

Nickname The Indian Killer

Place of birth Prince William County, Virginia

Place of death The modern Turtle Creek, Ohio area

Allegiance French-Indian War (or Seven Years' War)

   *  Kingdom of Great Britain

Lord Dunmore's War

   *  Kingdom of Great Britain

War of Independence

   *  United States

Service/branch Before 1775

   * Kentucky County, Virginia Militia

1777-1778

   * Continental Army

1780-1792

   * Washington County, Virginia Militia

Commands held Against Native Americans:

   * 1774 ensign, sharpshooter, in Capt. Zack Moran's band

Against the British

   * 1777 2nd Lieutenant, 8th Pennsylvania ("The Provisional Rifle Corps"), under Colonel Daniel Morgan

Battles/wars Important Battles (against Britain):

   * 1st Battle at Saratoga, Sept. 19, 1777

Relations Spouse

   * Jane Daviess

Children

   * Daviess Hardin
   * Lydia Ann Hardin
   * Mark Hardin
   * Mary Hardin
   * Rosanna Hardin
   * Sarah Hardin
   * Martin D. Hardin

Other work Civic:

   * Judge of Washington County, Virginia

————————————————————— NOTES:

   * Hardin County, KY,
   * Hardin County, OH, and
   * Hardin County, IL are named for him

http://mykindred.com/cloud/TX/getperson.php?personID=I53084&tree=mykindred01

Prefix Col.

Birth 1 Oct 1753 Fauquier county, Virginia, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location

Gender Male

Residence VA, PA, and Washington county, Kentucky, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location

Died May 1792 Hardin, Ohio, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location

Person ID I53084 mykindred

Last Modified 10 Jun 2003

Father Martin "Ruffled Shirt" Hardin, b. Abt 1716, Prince William county, Virginia, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1780, Monongahela county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location

Mother Lydia Waters, b. 16 Apr 1720, Stafford county, Virginia, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Bef 1780

Married 1740

Family ID F18701 Group Sheet

Family Jane Daviess, d. Yes, date unknown

Married 1 Jan 1776

Children

1. Martin D. Hardin, b. 21 Jun 1780, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 8 Oct 1823

	2. Davis Hardin,   d. Yes, date unknown
	3. Sarah Hardin,   b. 1774,   d. Yes, date unknown

4. John Hardin, d. Bef 1807

Family ID F18713 Group Sheet

Notes

   * He was an American Army officer in the Revolutionary War and in later Indian wars. He grew to manhood in the wilderness of southwestern Pennsylvania, becoming a skilled woodsman and marksman. At the start of the American Revolution he became a second lieutenant in the Continental
     Army and joined Daniel Morgan's famous corps of riflemen. He served with distinction in many missions and engagements, notably at the Battle of Saratoga but resigned from the Army in 1779.
         In 1786 he settled in Nelson (later Washington County Kentucky) and took part in the campaigns against the Indians in the Northwest Territory under George Rogers Clark and other leaders. He was murdered in 1792 while trying to negotiate a truce with the Indians in what is now the city of Hardin, Ohio. Counties in Kentucky and Ohio were named in his honor.
         He was a personal friend of George Washington and attended many parties at Mt. Vernon.
     Source of Information: Clinton Murphy; Daisy Decker George; Encyclopedia; Bartina Peoples; Alan Eckert; Entered 12 July 1995

-------------------- http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=71816379&ref=wvr

John L. Hardin (b. Oct. 1, 1755; d. May 1792) was a soldier, farmer, rancher, noted marksman and hunter. He was wounded fighting in Lord Dunmore's War; served as a Continental Army officer in the American Revolutionary War and as a Kentucky Co., Virginia militia commander in the Northwest Indian War. He was a member of the Methodist church and one of the first judges in the original Washington County, Virginia (later to become Washington County, KY). John Hardin was killed in an ambush while acting as a peace emissary (under the direction of President, George Washington) to the Shawnee Indian people.

EARLY LIFE Born in Prince William County, Virginia (in a section that is now Fauquier County), Hardin was the first son and fifth child of Martin Hardin (1716–1778), an owner of an "ordinary" and member of the Virginia militia, and Lydia [nee Waters] Hardin (1721–1800). He married Jane Daviess (died 31 May 1829) and together they had seven children, with future Kentucky senator, Martin D. Hardin, their youngest. Martin married Ann Logan, daughter of General Benjamin Logan. Their second oldest son, Mark, married Mary Adair, daughter of Kentucky Governor John Adair.

MILITARY LIFE Lord Dunmore's War: due to his reputation as a marksman, Hardin was asked in 1774 to join Capt. Zack Moran's troop, mustering in as an ensign, fighting Indians in Lord Dunmore's War. Hardin's exploits in this war led to him becoming popularly known on the frontier as "The Indian Killer". It was in a battle that same year, while firing on an adversary, that Hardin received a ball to the groin. He carried that bullet in him for life.

Revolutionary War In the War of Independence, John Hardin was a 2nd Lieutenant in the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment, better known as "The Provisional Rifle Corps" (or "Morgan's Rifles"), and fought at Saratoga, while serving directly under Colonel Morgan.

Later life In 1786, the Hardin family settled on a large parcel of land in Washington County, Virginia (now Washington County, Kentucky), where they farmed and raised stock. They also joined the Methodist church in that area. Hardin had some success as a rancher, continually adding acreage to his original tract.

Later militia service As a militia captain in 1786, John Hardin led a successful attack on a Piankeshaw village near present day Vincennes, Indiana which, unfortunately, belonged to a friendly tribe that had been colonial American allies. In August 1789, he led another militia expedition to the Terre Haute, Indiana area where he attacked a Shawnee village and returned to Kentucky with twelve scalps.

Hardin was promoted to colonel and repeatedly engaged Indians during the Northwest Indian War in the Ohio Territory. In 1790, he led the Kentucky militia on the disastrous Harmar Campaign, also known as Hardin's Defeat. Their rout began a long succession of American losses to Miami chief Little Turtle. In 1791, Hardin led a force of 60 Kentucky mounted militia in the destruction of a large Kickapoo village near the mouth of the Big Pine Creek, as part of General Charles Scott's campaign to destroy Ouiatenon.

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Col. John Hardin II (Cont. Army)'s Timeline

1753
October 1, 1753
Fauquier County, Virginia
1774
1774
Age 20
1776
January 1, 1776
Age 22
1780
June 21, 1780
Age 26
1782
1782
Age 28
1791
1791
Age 37
Fauquier, , Virginia, USA
1792
May 2, 1792
Age 38
Hardin, Ohio
1792
Age 38
Grove Hill Cemetery Shelbyville Shelby County Kentucky
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