Colonel Richard Richardson (1704 - 1780) Icn_world

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About Colonel Richard Richardson

Will of General Richard Richardson

In the name of God, Amen. This the second day of September, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty, I Richard Richardson, of Saint Mark’s Parish, Craven County in South Carolina, being weak of body, but of perfect mind and memory for which I think my God; nevertheless calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all Men once to die, do make and ordain this my lat Will and Testament. Principally and first of all I give an recommend my immortal Soul into the hands of God that gave it and my Body I recommend it to the Earth to be buried in a decent Christian like manner at the discretion of my Executors. (or others wheresoever I may be) nothing doubting but at the general Resurrection I shall receive the same again by the might power of God, through Jesus Christ our Lord, whereby he is able to do all things. And as touching my worldly Goods wherewith it has pleased God of his great bounty to bless me in this life: I give, bequeath and dispose of in the following Manner and Form

IN PRIMUS, I give and bequeath to my well beloved wife, Dorothy Richardson, the thirty-four following Slaves or Negroes (vis) Tom the Carpenter, Judy, Ned & Agar, his wife & 2 children, Tommy, Thisby, Tommy & Fally, Devonshire, Nanny, Paul, Qui, London, Silcey, Moses, Fam, Tohan, Kate, Peter, Peggy, Jack, Pollipus, Balliss, Billy, Stump, Phebe, Gabriel, Phebe, Rachel, John, Priscilla, Fusy, Judah, Balina with their and each of their Issue & Increase; her riding Chair, three feather beds & furniture, also I give her one purse of Hold, seven hundred pounds more or less, now in the house in mill’d doubloons: and also I leave her the use of my Manor Plantation whereon I now live containing three hundred acres of land, one other tract of land joining below of two hundred acres, and the use of all the land between the Manor Plantation and Half Way Swamp, the use of that part of my River Plantation on the Swamp left to my Children, by her, till they may one of them come of age, (the others during her natural life or Widowhood) as also all of my stock of horses, mares & black cattle left, between her and her four children, (except four cows and calves, which I gave to my daughter, Susannah, with hose of her own mark) also the stock of sheep, hogs, fowls & C&C and also the use of my wagons and Plantation tools, household furniture that’s remaining after what I may hereafter dispose of.


Item. I give and bequeath to my beloved daughter, Susannah , my beloved sons—James Burchell, John Peter, Charles and Thomas Richardson, ten Negroes each, to be of equal value and worth with the use given to my other children, and the remaining part of my Negroes to be equally divided between my nine children and that my beloved daughter, Susannah, have the following ten Negroes, being the Tenth part allotted as above (viz) Sarah, Cyrus, Peter, Juky, Jefe, Hancel, Nill Beck, Home, Toby and Jack’s Creek Betty with their future Increase.

Item. I give and bequeath to my beloved son, Richard Richardson , one tract of land containing one thousand three hundred acres, joining a tract of twelve hundred acres of his and his brother Edward’s, on the Main Road, one tract of three hundred acres whereon he now lives; one large Silver Tankard, my watch, Sword, Buckles and my wearing apparel.

Item. I give and bequeath to my beloved son, Edward Richardson , one tract of eight hundred acres river swamp, one tract Swindles of one hundred acres, one tract of four hundred acres whereon he now lives called Scipio’s and joining the other two, also all the land bought of Doctor Farrar, beginning from Sabbifield and upward to Mr. Sinclair’s line.


Item. I give and bequeath to my beloved Grandson, Richard Richardson, one tract of land on Puller’s Earth Creek granted to Benj. Singleton, as also two hundred and fifty acres of land joining granted to myself.

Item. I give and bequeath to my sons by my last wife as follows….

Item. I give and bequeath to my beloved son, James Burchell Richardson, the Manor Plantation whereon I now live, one other tract or plantation adjoining containing two hundred acres, one other tract or plantation containing One thousand acres joining, and one other tract joining the aforesaid Half Way Swamp, called Sabbifield containing one thousand acres…

Item. I give and bequeath the rest and residue of my lands to my beloved sons, John Peter, Charles, and Thomas Richardson, to be divided in equal valuation between them, unless my wife should prove pregnant , in such case (if it should prove a Son) then he shall be entitled to an equal part of lands with the three last mentioned and ten Negroes & an equal part of the Surplus, and if either of my three last sons mentioned should die, before they come of age, then that part shall be divided between the surviving ones-------------*************-------------“*************

Item. I give and bequeath to my beloved daughter, Susannah, one feather bed & furniture, one riding horse, saddle & bridle for herself, and one horse, saddle & bridle for her Waiting Boy.

Item. I give and bequeath to my dearly beloved wife, Dorothy Richardson, one more Slave, named Mulattoe Bob, the weaver, besides those before mentioned…

And Lastly, I do nominate and appoint my loving wife, Dorothy Richardson, my Executrix, Richard Richardson and my beloved friend Peter Sinkler, Esqr. , my Executors, of this my last Will and Testament. And I do hereby revoke and utterly disannul and disallow all and every other Testaments, Wills, Legacys, and Bequests, Executors, (also my Executrix is hereby appointed my children’s Guardian & Trustee, during their Minority, or her remaining my Widow; together with my Son, Richard Richardson and Peter Sinkler, Esqr. My Executors above named) by me in any wise before this named will’d and bequeathed ratifying and confirming and constituting this and no other to be my LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT to be taken in the Literal Sense and Meaning of the same.

IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal, the day and year first above written…

SIGNED, SEALED, Published, pronounced, and declared by the Said Richard Richardson as his LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT in the presence of—

Thos. M. Jenkins

Joseph Terry

J. Mason

Notes:

There were four children born of Richard’s second wife, Dorothea/Dorothy Sinkler: James Burchell, John Peter, Charles and Thomas. Since they were born between 1770 and circa 1775, they all would have been minor children at the time of the writing of his will.

"He was Colonel of Militia as early as 1757 and was in the Cherokee War of 1760 - 1761. He quelled the Insurrection at Ninety-Six. He assisted in the defeat of the British Fleet at Charelston in 1776 and was appointed Brigadier General March 25, 1778. He was taken prisoner at the surrender of Charleston and paroled. Later, his health failing, he was sent home and soon died."

Few men played a more important part in the provincial history of South Carolina. He was repeatedly a member of Assembly, a delegate to the Provincial Congress of Jan 1775, a member of the Legislative Council in Mar 1776, etc.; he was Colonel of the militia as early as 1757; was in the Cherokee wars of 1760 and 1761, in command of a regiment, was in command of the militia and regulars in the famous "Snow campaign" against the Tories at Ninety-Six, in the winter of 1775; assisted at the defeat of the British fleet at Charleston, in June 1776, and commanded the State militia at Purrysburg, in Dec. 1778, having been appointed Brigadier General 25 Mar 1778. At the surrender of Charleston in 1780 he was taken prisoner and paroled. Later he was imprisoned, and his health failing he was sent home and soon died.

SOURCES:

"The Cantey Family, SC History and Genealogy" magazine #1910.

"The Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Books", Vol. 9 p. 23:

"Jane M. Burgess, Chronicles of St. Mark Parrish, Santee County and Williamsburg Township, SC (Cola. 1888)".

"South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research", Vol. R.

Commanded Regiment in Cherokee Wars 1760-61.

Representative to assy from St. Marks.St. Marks est 1757.

Richard Richardson built a church and managed affairs of church.

"A certain tract of Land containing One Hundred & Fifty Acres, situate in St. Marks Parish, which Land was conveyed by Lease and Release on or about the 18th April 1764 by Richard Richardson deceased to the Vestry..being in a remote part of the Parish, thinly inhabited by members of the Episcopal Church of Claremont...pray that Your Honorable House will pass a Law to impower them to dispose of said Land, in order that they might be enabled to purchase a more convenient Glebe for the use of a Minister of said Church."

Richard Richardson was a Colonel and Brigadier-General South Carolina Militia, 1775. Though an old man, he was in the battle of Fort Moultrie; taken prisoner at Charleston and released only when death seemed inevitable.

Few men played a more important part in the provincial history of South Carolina. He was repeatedly a member of Assembly, a delegate to the Provincial Congress of January 1775, a member of the Legislative Council in March 1776, etc. He was Colonel of the militia as early as 1757; was in the Cherokee Wars of 1760 and 1761, in command of a regiment, was in command of the militia and regulars in the famous "Snow Campaign" against the Tories at Ninety-Six, in the winter of 1775; assisted at the defeat of the British Fleet at Charleston in June 1776, and commanded the State militia at Purrysburg in December 1778, having been appointed Brigadier General March 25, 1778. At the surrender of Charleston in 1780 he was taken prisoner (12th May 1780) and paroled. Later he was imprisoned at St. Augustine, and his health failing he was sent home and soon died (September 1780).

"Richard Richardson commanded the expedition that quelled the insurrection at Ninety-Six for which he received the thanks of the Provincial Congress. This insurrection was accomplished with such hardships that it was called the "Snow Campaign". He was a delegate to the Convention that framed the State Constitution an a member of the Legislative Council. He served under Lincoln until captured at Charleston, when Cornwallis offered him titles and offices under the Crown, or close confinement. He was seventy-six, and his imprisonment caused his death in 1781."

"Richard Richardson was over seventy when war was declared, and was elected member of the Council of Safety. He served in the Provincial Congress and assisted in framing the State Constitution."

"Richard Richardson, (1705-1781), commanded the expedition that quelled the insurrection at Ninety-Six. He was first State Senator, 1778."

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Transcribed by Lonne Stone Heath

From the private collection of A. S. Salley, Jr. (The Sunday News, Charleston, SC, March 12, 1899):

(Col Richard Richardson to the Council of Safety)

From the SC Historical and Genealogical Magazine, page 262, #1901:

Addressed: To

The Honorable Council of Safety Chas Town -

M.Moore

Gentlemen

Mr. Isham Moore first Lieut of Capt Matt Singletons Company, Troops of Light horse; wait on You, by whom I transmit the Return made to Me by Capt Singleton. They were Embodied sometime before I was call'd out by the Hon Mr Drayton; and was on Service at their Own Expence the time Specified in the Inclosed Return: You will no Doubt make such provission for the Return as are agreeable to the Resolutions and if the Officers and Company meet with Your Approbation will Comission them Accordingly - I shall take the Liberty of Transmitting Such Other Returns of Some other Troop of Light horse and militia as Make Returns to me; the Expence Upon the Whole will be Very Trifileing - I have Honour to be. Gentlemen Your Most Obedient Hble Serv. Rich'd. Richardson

Council of Safety } St. Marks 7th Oct 1775

Endorsed: Collo. Richardson

7th October 1775

Reed 12th & offered

Read the 13th & Answ¡d. 93

(The accompanying return.)

A true Roll of the Company or Troop of Light-Horse Embodied under the Command of Captain Matthew Singleton, of Saint Mark's Parish, on the High Hills of Santee, which was Out on the Provincial Service of South Carolina: under the Command of Colonel Richard Richardson: Commencing the 13th day of September 1775; and Discharged the 22nd Day of the said Instant.

Isham Moore(lieut) Wm. Brunson James McCormack

John Singleton(lieut) Peter Matthews Zack Harrel

Joseph Hill (srgt) Jesse Temples Josiah Wheet

Caleb Gayle (srgt) Alexr. Holliday Issac Jackson

Richd. Wells..Drumr. Ephraim Poole Thos. Jackson

Thos. Morget Jacob Brigman Drewry Fletcher

Josiah Gayle Charles Goodwin Edd. Hill

Willis Ramsey Henry Wheeler Samuel Devise

Richd. Harvin Hope Ridgway Sabe Stone

Saml. Tines James Allen Thomas Neil

Robt. Tines Joseph Rogers David Neil

The above return of Two Lieutenants Two Sergeants one Drum and Twenty Eight Privates- Capt. Mat Singleton made oath to be just & True 27th Sept 1775 before Wm. Richardson J P

Endorsed: Capt. M. Singleton's

Company of Horse [1,2,6] Occupation

Gen during Rev. War Royal Assembly- 1754-60 And 1762-65, The Provencial Congress - 1775-76, General Assembly - 1776 - 1780

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Colonel Richard Richardson's Timeline

1704
1704
1730
1730
Age 26
1741
1741
Age 37
1746
1746
Age 42
1747
1747
Age 43
1752
1752
Age 48
1754
1754
Age 50
1758
1758
Age 54
1767
1767
Age 63
1770
October 28, 1770
Age 66