Colonel Richard "the Immigrant" Lee I

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Richard Henry Lee, I

Also Known As: "Richard the Immigrant", "Richard /Lee/", "Richard Henry /Lee/ I", "The Immagrant", "Secy of state http://www.ericjames.org/html/fam/fam07051.htm", ""The Immigrant"", "The Immigrant"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Nordley Regis Cocton Hal, Coton, Shropshire, England
Death: Died in Dividing Creek, Northumberland, Virginia
Place of Burial: Lee Family Graveyard, Divided Creek, Northumberland, Virginia, British Amercia
Immediate Family:

Son of John Lee, Sr.; John Lee; Jane Lee and Jane Hancock
Husband of Ann Constable and Anne Owen Lee
Father of Hon. Hancock Lee, of Ditchley; John Constable Lee; Col. Richard Henry "the Scholar" Lee II, Esq.; Francis Lee; Ann Lee and 5 others
Brother of John Lee, Il; Edward Lee; Henry Lee and Thomas Lee

Occupation: Colonel, Secretary of State, "the immigrant", Business man & Farmer, Secretary of the Colony of Virginia
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Colonel Richard "the Immigrant" Lee I

Additional Curator's Note: I regret the need to lock this profile, but there are so many Lees in early Virginia history, with repeating given names, that it is very easy to merge the wrong profiles. Just initiate the merge, send me an inbox message, and I will review it and put it through. Feel free to contact me regarding this profile with any questions you may have. Maria Edmonds-Zediker, curator, 11 May 2011.

  • Born in 1613, Nordley Regis, Coton, County Shropshire, England
  • Parents are John Lee and Jane Hancock
  • Baptized on March 22, 1617, Saint Martin's, Worcestershire, England
  • Married Anne Constable, 1641, Jamestown, Virginia
  • Died on March 1, 1664, Cobb's Hall, "Dividing Creek", Northumberland County, Virginia
  • Will probated in London and estate settled in 1665

Children of Colonel Richard "Immigrant" Lee I and Anne Constable:

  1. John Lee(1645-1673)
  2. Richard Lee(1647-1714) - The Stratford Hall Lees
  3. Francis Lee(1648-1714)
  4. William Lee(1651-1697) - The Bedford, Virginia Lees
  5. Hancock Lee(1653-1709)
  6. Elizabeth Lee(1653)
  7. Anne Lee(1645-1701)
  8. Charles C. Lee(1656-1701)
=====
====

NOTES from Jacqueli Charlene Finney

There are errors on the master profile for Col. Richard Lee I (The Immigrant) regarding his parentage (please note the date ranges with the data on MP - 2 different versions managed by 2 curators Jenna and K. Anderson). Here is the correct version ( I included past research notes also):

Ancestors of Richard Lee I

Generation No. 1

1. Richard Lee I1, born 1613 in Nordley Regis, Coton, Schrops, England1; died 01 Mar 1664 in Dividing Creek, Northumberland, Virginia, USA1. He was the son of 2. John Lee or Lyes Clothier and 3. Jane HANCOCK. He married (1) Anne Constable1 1661 in Virginia, USA1. She was born 1615 in London, England1, and died 06 Oct 1706 in Dividing Creek, Northumberland, Virginia, USA1. She was the daughter of Francis Constable and Alice Owen.

Notes for Richard Lee I: deposition May 1641 Norfolk Co gives age as 32, hence born 1608/9

Depositoin London 1654 Admiralty Court. Richard Lee Gentleman age 34 or thereabouts deposes of things seen on York River in Virgina the prior January. (pub 1984) hence born 1618

Coton Hall lies on main road between Shrewsbury and Brostol. Along that road going south you find Coton Hall, then Worcester, then Twining. Starting from the south, Twining in Worcestershire is about 12 miles north of Worcester, and it is another 20 miles from Worcester to Coton Hall.

Richard baptized 22 march 1617/1618 ST Martin's Worcester England

Will says"of Virginia, late of Stratford-Langton in the County of Essex" this was part of the Abby of Stratford-Langthorne founded 1135 disbanded 1539 and Westsham Mannor or Parish was divided into four parts one of which was Stratford-Langton, or one ward of the parish/mannor.

  • ****************

Subj:Re: Lee Date:11/6/2005 9:08:33 AM Central Standard Time From: dnca2@earthlink.net Reply-to: dnca2@earthlink.net To: Jhlawr@wmconnect.com (Jhlawr@wmconnect.com)

  • ****************

New Research on the Wraysbury Deeds by Alan Nicholls. In 1999 I gave a presentation to the Lee Society of Virginia at their AGM concerning the English ancestry of Colonel Richard Lee, the founder of the Virginia Lee family. This presentation was placed on my webpage on 24th May 1999. In that presentation I included evidence that Colonel Richard Lee had signed a series of three indentures relating to a purchase by John Lee of Coton of a property at Wraysbury in Buckinghamshire, England in 1652. Colonel Richard's signature on these deeds had been used by all previous researchers, with other evidence, to show a direct connection between the Lee family of Virginia and the Coton Lee family of Alveley, Shropshire. However since the 1999 presentation my research has revealed evidence using only original contemporary documents that these indentures were in fact signed by Richard Lee, fishmonger, son of Lancelot Lee of Coton. This Richard was the apprentice of John Lee, fishmonger, citizen of London and gentleman. I have shown previously that this John Lee (1600-1682), son of Thomas Lee of Coton (1560-1620) was mistakenly identified as a saddler by all earlier researchers. As I reported in the 1999 presentation the signatures on the Wraysbury deeds seemed to match extremely well with those few other original signatures of Colonel Richard Lee that I had found. He signed himself Rich: Lee in all cases and I found these signatures the most persuasive evidence to authenticate his claim to a Coton ancestry. However this new evidence has overturned those conclusions. The new research is detailed below. The research undertaken since the 1999 presentation has not found the English ancestor of Colonel Richard Lee but it is challenging the fundamental assumptions made by earlier researchers. I am continuing to follow my lines of research and hopefully will carry it through to a successful conclusion. I will post articles on my webpage as I complete each phase of the research. As with all research of this nature there are gains and losses but I view each reversal with a positive attitude that will propel me forward with new knowledge to more gains and, hopefully, less losses.

  • ***************************************

Jim, I have not done English research on Richard and Henry Lee of York. They were obviously related, probably brothers. Since Richard was born c. 1619, and appears to have been the older, it would appear that Henry was born c. 1620. Since his first child was b. 1645, this fits well. There were several Richard Lees and several Henry Lees on the early emigration records. To my knowledge, no one has proven whence they came or which county they settled in. The first problem in research is that there is no proof that Richard Lee of York was the same person as Col. Richard. The research that has been done has been aimed at the origin of Col. Richard Lee. Two of the most recognized articles are: Article by Wm. Thorndale, National Genealogical Society Qtrly, Dec 1988 Article by Ludwell Lee Montague, Va. Magazine, Jan. 1954. The descendants of Col. Richard have not enthusiastically accepted any of the research done. One of them has recently engaged an English researcher, Alan Nicholls. Nicholls has a web page which you can Google up. Hope this helps. Will send another message on the Henry Lee descendants. Cary Adams

  • **************my replyThis one got settled very well William and Mary Quarterly about 25 yrs ago sorry exact ref not in hand -it took some doing by the way very good work.. but they found Col. Richard baptized 22 march 1617/1618 ST Martin's Worcester England, d 1 MArch 1664 Northumberland Co Va but will probate London andhis papa was John /Lee or Lyes/ Clothier b 1588 of, Nordley Regis, Coton Hall, Salop, England burried 23 Feb 1629/1630 St Martin parish, Worcestershire, Englandwife Jane Hancock (hence all the Hancocks in his line).Grandfather Col Richard was RIchard Lee 1564-1621 md Elizabeth BentleyGGfather John Lee 1528 - will 14 May 1605 will proven, Shropshire, Englandburried Chesham, Buckinghamshire, , England wife Joyce or Jocota /ROMNEY/ b abt 1533 died 4 Dec 1609 Alveley Parish, Shropshire, England (burr same place)and finally GGG was Humphrey 1506 wife Katherine /Blount/ and this is the common link to Henry of York.They were cousins to be precise Henry Jr 1627 was 3rd cousin to Col Richard.Jim Lawler
    • ************

More About Richard Lee I: Burial: Jan 1665, will probate, London, , England Christening: 1640, to, Va, from, Straford-Langston, Co Essex, England Record Change: 29 Jun 2005

-------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Lee_I

Event(s) Birth: 22 Mar 1616/17 *Double Relative on Lee Line: Occup: COLONELl/War: Shropshire, England to Jamestown, Virginia (See Notes/History) Death: 1 Mar 1664/65 Jamestown, Virginia, Cobbs Hall, Dividing Creek, VA Burial: Northumberland, VA "Lee Family Home/Cemetery"

--------------------

Colonel Richard Henry Lee I 1

   * Born: 1597, Shropshire, England
   * Wifr: Anne Constable in 1641 in North Cumberland, Virginia
   * Died: 1 Mar 1665, Jamestown, Virginia, Cobbs Hall, Dividing Creek, VA at age 68
   * Buried: Northumberland, VA

--------------------

www.leearchive.info

Sheriff of Shropshire, England

He was a good friend of the Queen, and when his home in the American Colonies was burned out by natives, she replaced it, and everything in it including 'The Plate' (The silver).

--------------------

Richard was born at Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England, which is a county bordering Wales. He emigrated from England in 1639, becoming Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office. In the year 1640; Richard Henry Lee married at Jamestown Anne Constable(c. 1621-1666) , daughter of Francis Constable and a ward of Sir John Thoroughgood, a personal attendant of Charles I, King of England (1600-1649). She had accompanied the family of Virginia Governor Sir Francis Wyatt (1575-1644), and at the time of her marriage to Richard, she was residing at the Wyatt household in Jamestown. This affiliation soon helped Richard move socially upward within the Colony. In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677) appointed Richard Attorney General of the Colony. In addition he served as High Sheriff and was Colonel in the Militia. Richard was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Richard took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on August 10, 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Richard’s first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall’s Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on April 18, 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcomers to the area, led by Chief Opchanacanough. They killed 300, but were driven back by a successful counterattack. As a result the English abandoned the north side of the river. Richard and his family escaped and settled at New Poquoson on the lower peninsula between the York River and the James River, where it was safer from attack. He was said to have been the first white man to have settled in the northern neck of Virginia. They resided upon this land for the next nine years, which consisted of 90 acres and was a comfortable ride from Jamestown. On August 20, 1646 he took out a patent for 1,250 acres (5 km²) on the Pamunkey River in York, later New Kent County, at the spot “where the foot Company met with the Boats when they went Pamunkey March under ye command of Capt. William Claiborne” during the counteroffensive against the Indians after the massacre of 1644. He did not develop these lands, but exchanged them in 1648 for a tract of the same land along the north side of the York near the present Capahosic, retaining the 400 acres (1.6 km2) he called “War Captain’s Neck” and selling the other 850 acres (3.4 km2)

Lee became a Burgess of York County from 1647-1651, and in 1649 he was appointed a member of the King’s Council, and a Justice. In 1651 he became Colonial Secretary of State. With the title of Secretary of State, he was next in authority to the Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677). That same year, Charles I, King of England (1600-1649), was beheaded and Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658) began his control. Since the people in the distant colonies could not believe the incredible news from England, they remained loyal to the Crown and to Charles II (1630-1685), heir to the throne. In 1650, Richard made a voyage to the Netherlands to report Virginia’s loyal adherence to Charles II. However, this does not necessarily mean that he was a devout royalist. It turns out that two years later, he negotiated the capitulation of Virginia to the Commonwealth of England, and was satisfied with the terms that were laid out. At this time, he retired from public office, but continued to represent the interests of Virginia in London.

Richard began to acquire many land grants on the peninsula between the York and the Rappahannock River. After peace with the Indians had been concluded and the lands north of the York reopened for settlement in 1649, Richard was issued a patent of 500 acres (2 km²) on May 24, 1651, on land adjacent to “War Captain’s Neck”. That same year he also acquired an additional 500 acres (2 km²) on Poropotank Creek. He sold 150 acres (0.6 km2) of his original grant, the tract on Poropotank Creek. This left 850 acres (3.4 km2) at the original site, to which he later gave the name “Paradise”, and resided from 1653-1656 in the newly created Gloucester County. He became a part owner of a trading ship, whose cargoes brought indentured servants with headrights that Richard used to enlarge his Virginia property. He spent nearly as much of his time from 1652 to his death in 1664, in London, as he did in Virginia. In about 1656 Richard moved the family to Virginia’s Northern Neck, the peninsula formed by the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers. Leaving the “Paradise” tract to overseers, they resettled on a spot acquired from the Wicomico Indians, which consisted of 1,900 acres (8 km2). This new land was termed “Dividing Creek”, near what is today the town of Kilmarnock. This tract in later generations became known as that of “Cobbs Hall”. Early colonial map of Maryland and Virginia (from Ogilby, 1671). The map is oriented with north on the right, reflecting its original purpose as a port-finding chart for ship captains approaching the entrance of the Chesapeake Bay. Early colonial map of Maryland and Virginia (from Ogilby, 1671). The map is oriented with north on the right, reflecting its original purpose as a port-finding chart for ship captains approaching the entrance of the Chesapeake Bay.

He later purchased another 2,600 acres (11 km2) in Northumberland County at Machodoc Creek, which empties into the Potomac River. This tract was patented on October 18, 1657, and repatented the following year on June 5, 1658 as 2,000 acres (8 km²). Upon this tract became what was known in later generations as the estates “Mount Pleasant” and “Lee Hall”. He then acquired 4,000 acres (16 km²) farther up the Potomac, near where the city of Washington, D.C., would rise, in what was then Westmoreland, now Fairfax County. One of these would eventually become the site of Mount Vernon.

Disposing of several lesser properties he had obtained, Lee was able to consolidate and develop four major plantations. He had two in Gloucester County: “War Captain’s Neck” and “Paradise”, and two in Northumberland County: “Dividing Creek” and “Machodoc”. He also acquired a plantation called “Lee’s Purchase”, located across the Potomac in Maryland.

In 1658 Richard acquired a residence at Stratford Langthorne, in the County of Essex, then a pleasant suburb of London, and in 1661 he moved his family there. Essex borders London on the east, and the village of Stratford Langthorne was a resort for persons of means who found London unhealthy. It is located about a mile from Stratford-at-Bow on the north side of the Thames in West Ham Parish, until recently the site of great wharves, docks, and the congestion of east London. He did that so that his younger children would have a proper education, seeing as his oldest two sons, John and Richard II, were already students at Oxford. Nevertheless, he eventually wanted his children to reside in Virginia. Though now a resident of England, he continued in his role as a Virginia planter and merchant. On March 1, 1664, Richard died at "Dividing Creek", Northumberland Co., Virginia, while overseeing his interest in the Colony. As a result, and in accordance to his wishes in his will, his family returned to Virginia.

Richard Lee’s will directed that his property at Stratford in England be sold, and that all but the two oldest sons, who were still finishing school, were to return to America. Richard I left property to each of his eight children. Anne married again before September 24, 1666, Edmund Lister. The date of her death is unknown, although legend has it that she was buried beside Richard near the house at Dividing Creek.

Richard Henry Lee died 24 April 1664 at Cobbs Hall, in Northumberland, Virginia [3]

Col. Richard Lee I, Esq., “the Immigrant” (1618-1664), was a planter, trader, Attorney General of the Colony of Virginia, colonial Secretary of State, and member of the King's Council. Contents [hide]

   * 1 Biography
         o 1.1 Colonial politics
         o 1.2 Land holdings
   * 2 Family legacy
   * 3 Children
   * 4 Ancestry
   * 5 References
Biography

Richard was born at Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England, which is a county bordering Wales. [1] He emigrated from England in 1639, becoming Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office.

In the year 1640 [2]Richard Lee married at Jamestown Anne Constable (c. 1621-1666) , daughter of Francis Constable and a ward of Sir John Thoroughgood, a personal attendant of Charles I, King of England (1600-1649). She had accompanied the family of Virginia Governor Sir Francis Wyatt (1575-1644), and at the time of her marriage to Richard, she was residing at the Wyatt household in Jamestown. This affiliation soon helped Richard move socially upward within the Colony. In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677) appointed Richard Attorney General of the Colony. In addition he served as High Sheriff and was Colonel in the Militia. Anne (Constable) Lee (c. 1621-1666)

Richard was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Richard took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on August 10, 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Richard’s first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall’s Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on April 18, 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcomers to the area, led by Chief Opchanacanough. They killed 300, but were driven back by a successful counterattack. As a result the English abandoned the north side of the river.

Richard and his family escaped and settled at New Poquoson on the lower peninsula between the York River and the James River, where it was safer from attack. He was said to have been the first white man to have settled in the northern neck of Virginia. They resided upon this land for the next nine years, which consisted of 90 acres (360,000 m2) and was a comfortable ride from Jamestown.

On August 20, 1646 he took out a patent for 1,250 acres (5 km²) on the Pamunkey River in York, later New Kent County, at the spot “where the foot Company met with the Boats when they went Pamunkey March under ye command of Capt. William Claiborne” during the counteroffensive against the Indians after the massacre of 1644. He did not develop these lands, but exchanged them in 1648 for a tract of the same land along the north side of the York near the present Capahosic, retaining the 400 acres (1.6 km2) he called “War Captain’s Neck” and selling the other 850 acres (3.4 km2). William Berkeley (1606-1677)

Colonial politics

Lee became a Burgess of York County from 1647-1651, and in 1649 he was appointed a member of the King’s Council, and a Justice. In 1651 he became Colonial Secretary of State. With the title of Secretary of State, he was next in authority to the Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677). That same year, Charles I, King of England (1600-1649), was beheaded and Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658) began his control. Since the people in the distant colonies could not believe the incredible news from England, they remained loyal to the Crown and to Charles II (1630-1685), heir to the throne. In 1650, Richard made a voyage to the Netherlands to report Virginia’s loyal adherence to Charles II. However, this does not necessarily mean that he was a devout royalist. It turns out that two years later, he negotiated the capitulation of Virginia to the Commonwealth of England, and was satisfied with the terms that were laid out. At this time, he retired from public office, but continued to represent the interests of Virginia in London.

Land holdings

Richard began to acquire many land grants on the peninsula between the York and the Rappahannock River. After peace with the Indians had been concluded and the lands north of the York reopened for settlement in 1649, Richard was issued a patent of 500 acres (2 km²) on May 24, 1651, on land adjacent to “War Captain’s Neck”. That same year he also acquired an additional 500 acres (2 km²) on Poropotank Creek. He sold 150 acres (0.6 km2) of his original grant, the tract on Poropotank Creek. This left 850 acres (3.4 km2) at the original site, to which he later gave the name “Paradise”, and resided from 1653-1656 in the newly created Gloucester County. He became a part owner of a trading ship, whose cargoes brought indentured servants with headrights that Richard used to enlarge his Virginia property. He spent nearly as much of his time from 1652 to his death in 1664, in London, as he did in Virginia. In about 1656 Richard moved the family to Virginia’s Northern Neck, the peninsula formed by the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers. Leaving the “Paradise” tract to overseers, they resettled on a spot acquired from the Wicomico Indians, which consisted of 1,900 acres (8 km2). This new land was termed “Dividing Creek”, near what is today the town of Kilmarnock. This tract in later generations became known as that of “Cobbs Hall”. Early colonial map of Maryland and Virginia (from Ogilby, 1671). The map is oriented with north on the right, reflecting its original purpose as a port-finding chart for ship captains approaching the entrance of the Chesapeake Bay.

He later purchased another 2,600 acres (11 km2) in Northumberland County at Machodoc Creek, which empties into the Potomac River. This tract was patented on October 18, 1657, and repatented the following year on June 5, 1658 as 2,000 acres (8 km²). Upon this tract became what was known in later generations as the estates “Mount Pleasant” and “Lee Hall”. He then acquired 4,000 acres (16 km²) farther up the Potomac, near where the city of Washington, D.C., would rise, in what was then Westmoreland, now Fairfax County. One of these would eventually become the site of Mount Vernon.

Disposing of several lesser properties he had obtained, Lee was able to consolidate and develop four major plantations. He had two in Gloucester County: “War Captain’s Neck” and “Paradise”, and two in Northumberland County: “Dividing Creek” and “Machodoc”. He also acquired a plantation called “Lee’s Purchase”, located across the Potomac in Maryland.

In 1658 Richard acquired a residence at Stratford Langthorne, in the County of Essex, then a pleasant suburb of London, and in 1661 he moved his family there. Essex borders London on the east, and the village of Stratford Langthorne was a resort for persons of means who found London unhealthy. It is located about a mile from Stratford-at-Bow on the north side of the Thames in West Ham Parish, until recently the site of great wharves, docks, and the congestion of east London. He did that so that his younger children would have a proper education, seeing as his oldest two sons, John and Richard II, were already students at Oxford. Nevertheless, he eventually wanted his children to reside in Virginia. Though now a resident of England, he continued in his role as a Virginia planter and merchant. On March 1, 1664, Richard died at "Dividing Creek", Northumberland Co., Virginia, while overseeing his interest in the Colony. As a result, and in accordance to his wishes in his will, his family returned to Virginia.

Richard Lee’s will directed that his property at Stratford in England be sold, and that all but the two oldest sons, who were still finishing school, were to return to America. Richard I left property to each of his eight children. Anne married again before September 24, 1666, Edmund Lister. The date of her death is unknown, although legend has it that she was buried beside Richard near the house at Dividing Creek.

Richard Lee died 24 April 1664 at Cobbs Hall, in Northumberland, Virginia [3]

Family legacy

Lee Family Coat of Arms

Today the different branches of the Lee family are known as: "Cobb's Hall", "Mount Pleasant", "Ditchley", "Lee Hall", “Blenheim”, “Leesylvania”, “Dividing Creek”, and "Stratford". These were the estate names of the descendants of Richard Lee I that are still referred to today when talking of Lee descendancy. An interesting note is that Richard had patented somewhere in the neighborhood of 15,000 acres (61 km²) on both sides of the Potomac, in Maryland and in Virginia. Part of this land later became George Washington’s Mount Vernon. When he divided his estate among his children, he also left them the products of the several plantations including white indentured servants, Negro slaves, livestock, household furnishings, silver, and many other luxuries.

Notable descendants of Richard Lee I include signers of the Declaration of Independence Francis Lightfoot Lee and Richard Henry Lee, Revolutionary War general Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, Confederate Civil War generals Robert E. Lee, Richard Taylor, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee and George Washington Custis Lee, President of the United States Zachary Taylor, Chief Justice of the United States Edward Douglass White, Governor of Maryland Thomas Sim Lee.

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Col. Richard Lee I, Esq., “the Immigrant” (1618-1664), was a planter, trader, Attorney General of the Colony of Virginia, colonial Secretary of State, and member of the King's Council.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Lee_I

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Richard was born at Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England, which is a county bordering Wales. He emigrated from England in 1639, becoming Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office.

In the year 1640 Richard Henry Lee married at Jamestown Anne Constable (c. 1621-1666) , daughter of Francis Constable and a ward of Sir John Thoroughgood, a personal attendant of Charles I, King of England (1600-1649). She had accompanied the family of Virginia Governor Sir Francis Wyatt (1575-1644), and at the time of her marriage to Richard, she was residing at the Wyatt household in Jamestown. This affiliation soon helped Richard move socially upward within the Colony. In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677) appointed Richard Attorney General of the Colony. In addition he served as High Sheriff and was Colonel in the Militia.

Richard was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Richard took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on August 10, 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Richard’s first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall’s Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on April 18, 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcomers to the area, led by Chief Opchanacanough. They killed 300, but were driven back by a successful counterattack. As a result the English abandoned the north side of the river.

Richard and his family escaped and settled at New Poquoson on the lower peninsula between the York River and the James River, where it was safer from attack. He was said to have been the first white man to have settled in the northern neck of Virginia. They resided upon this land for the next nine years, which consisted of 90 acres (360,000 m2) and was a comfortable ride from Jamestown.

On August 20, 1646 he took out a patent for 1,250 acres (5 km²) on the Pamunkey River in York, later New Kent County, at the spot “where the foot Company met with the Boats when they went Pamunkey March under ye command of Capt. William Claiborne” during the counteroffensive against the Indians after the massacre of 1644. He did not develop these lands, but exchanged them in 1648 for a tract of the same land along the north side of the York near the present Capahosic, retaining the 400 acres (1.6 km2) he called “War Captain’s Neck” and selling the other 850 acres (3.4 km2).

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Planter-Merchant. Owned 16,000 acres northern Virginia bordering the Potomac. He was justice, burgess, secretary of state for the colony and a member of the council of Virginia.

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Colonel Richard Lee, also known as "the Immigrant" was the founder of the Lee family in Virginia. A member of the Coton branch of the Lees of County Shropshire, England, he immigrated to Virginia circa. 1640, settling first in York County and later in Northumberland County. A tobacco planter, Lee became wealthy and was an important figure in Virginia, being at various times justice, burgess, member of the council, attorney general, and secretary of state.

About Richard Lee BORN: 1613, Nordley Regis, Coton, County Shropshire, England PARENTS: John Lee and Jane Hancock BAPTIZED: March 22, 1617, Worcester, Saint Martin, Worcester MARRIED: Anne Constable Owen, 1641, Jamestown, Virginia CHILDREN: John Lee(1645-1673) Richard Lee(1647-1714) - The Stratford Hall Lees Francis Lee(1648-1714) William Lee(1651-1697) - The Bedford, Virginia Lees Hancock Lee(1653-1709) Elizabeth Lee(1653) Anne Lee(1645-1701) Charles C. Lee(1656-1701)DIED: March 1, 1664, Cobb's Hall, "Dividing Creek", Northumberland County, Virginia

More About Richard Lee

There are many records about Richard Lee, who beside being the emigrant and ancestor to a number of historical figures, he was also a prominent and distinguished colonist. He apparently came to Virginia from England in about 1640. He apparently was settled in York County in about 1642. He became a significant land owner, a member of the House of Burgesses, and a Justice of the court while he lived in York County. He is described a s a planter, and with the title of Colonel. He apparently was fairly wealthy. He traveled back and forth between England and Virginia, and maintained connections in England until his death. He apparently moved to Northumberland County in about 1654, where he died in 1663/64. His estate remained in his family for many years, known as "Cobbs Hall," although that home was not built until about 1720.


An early account of Richard Lee is given in Lees of VA, p. 49, in a passage written by William Lee in 1771

Richard Lee, of a good family in Shropshire (and whose Picture I am told is now at Coton, near Bridgenorth, the seat of Launcelot Lee, Esq.), some time in the Reign of Charles the first, went over to the Colony of Virginia, as Secretary, and one of the King's Privy Council.

He was a man of good Stature, comely visage, and enterprising genius, a sound head, vigorous spirit and generous nature. When he got to Virginia, which was at that time not much cultivated, he was so pleased with the Country that he made large settlements there with the servants he had carried over; after some years, he returned to England, and gave away all the lands he had taken up, and settled at his own expense, to those servants he had fixed on them; some of whose descendants are now possessed of very considerable Estates in that Colony. After staying some Time in England, he returned again to Virginia, with a fresh band of Adventurers, all of whom he settled there.

In 1646, Richard Lee sat on the York bench as a magistrate, with a Dr. Henry Lee, who married Marah Adkins. Richard patented 1,250 acres in York Co., VA in 1648, and named, amongst his head rights, Henry, Matthew, and George Lee, who may have been his relatives. That Richard settled first in York Co., is proven by the grant of 1,000 acres, dated 10 Aug 1642; the patent states that his land was due unto the said Richard Lee by and for his own personal Adventure, his wife Ann, and John Francis and by assignment from Mr. Thomas Hill, Florentine Paine and William Freeman of their right of land due for the transportation of Seaventeene persons.

This land was the plantation, Paradise in his will, and bequeathed to his second son, Richard . This name is frequently applied to subsequent records to this plantation; as on the 22n d of July, 1674, in a patent issued to Major Richard Lee for 1,140 acres in Gloster, called Paradise, on a branch of Poropotank Creek; 1,000 thereof being due to said Richard Lee by two former patents, and the residence now found to be within the bounds. 94 Richard represented York County as Burgess in 1647, and in 1651 Mr. Lee was paid for services as Burgess of Northumberland County. It seems possible that Richard Lee was engaged in commerce as well as agriculture, and that he had an interest in vessels trading between England and Virginia, as had many of the large planters. In his will, he bequeathed to his son, Francis, his interest in two ships, which was 1/8th part in each vessel. He appears to have made frequent voyages to and fro; being in England in 1654-55, again in 1659, and later in 1661 and in 1663.

Richard's first home in Virginia was on the York River, near the head of Poropotank Creek, where he had a store or warehouse. His next home was located on the Dividing Creeks in Northumberland, which afforded a very safe harbor. The main creek is only a mile or two long; then it divides into branches, which makes several small peninsulas or necks as they were formerly called. On two of these necks Richard Lee located his two plantations, where we can find grants for 800 and 600 acres in 1651 and 1656 respectively. Richard was not only Burgess for several counties, but served in several capacities, having been Justice, member of the Council and Secretary of State. He also served on various commissions. While in England in 1663, his wife and children being there also, Richard made his will; the wording of this will indicates that he had given up his intention of settling permanently in England. For he ordered that his estate there should be sold, gave minute directions for the payment of his debts, and closing up of his interests in that country, and made arrangements for the settlement of his children in Virginia. The account of his property given in his will shows him to have been possessed of considerable wealth for that day. If his tobacco crop was actually worth L2000 a year, as Gibbon estimated, and his estate at Stratford-Langton, L800 a year, as stated by William Lee, then Richard Lee must have enjoyed an income larger than most of the early planters.


From Virginia Vital Records, The Grave of Richard Lee, the Emigrant, by Ludwell Lee Montague

"The Grave of Richard Lee, The Emigrant- In March 1664 Colonel Richard Lee, then of London and Stratford Langton in Essex, died at his plantation on Dividing Creek in Northumberland County, Virginia, and was buried in the garden of his home there. As late as 1798 his tombstone was still to be seen at the site. Pursuant to Richard Lee's will, his widow (nee Anne Constable) and younger children returned from England to live at the Dividing Creek plantation, which was eventually inherited by his youngest son, Charles (1656-1701). In the course of time, Anne Constable, Charles Lee, and Charles' wife, Elizabeth Medstrand, were in their turn buried near the grave of Richard Lee. About 1720 Charles Lee II (1684-1734) abandoned the original Lee home in Dividing Creek and built "Cobbs Hall" at a site about a half mile to the east. However, the "Cobbs Hall" family continued to use the burying ground at the original site. Thus Charles Lee II (but not his widow, Elizabeth Pinckard, who remarried and lived and died elsewhere), Charles Lee III (1722-1747), and the latter's two wives, Mary Lee of " Ditchley" and Leeanna Jones of "Hickory Neck, " were also buried there. This Leeanna Jones was herself a great-granddaughter of Richard Lee and granddaughter of Charles Lee I.

In her will, probated in 1761, she ordered the erection of "a proper brick wall round the Burying place of myself, and ancestors on this plantation." In 1923 Cazenove Lee undertook to find the grave of the emigrant Richard Lee. At the "Cobbs Hall" burying ground the only evidence above ground was the tombstone of Susan Lee (1802-1852), the wife of William Harvey. Probing in the vicinity, however, Cazenove Lee discovered the foundations of the wall erected pursuant to the will of Leeanna Lee. (Cazenove Lee, "Locating the Grave of Colonel Richard Lee, " Magazine of the Society of the Lees of Virginia, V, 43-49.) The grave of the emigrant Richard Lee was certainly within that enclosure. In 1956 E. Walter Harvey, Sr. the present master of "Cobbs Hall, " presented the old family burying ground to the Society of the Less of Virginia, which undertook to clear the site, to restore Leeanna Lee's wall, and to erect a suitable marker. This work has now been accomplished. On May 3, 1958, with appropriate ceremony, the site was rededicated to the memory of the first Richard Lee, of Anne Constable, his wife, and of their "Cobbs Hall" descendants buried there."


Richard Lee's Will

In the Name of God, Amen. I, Richard Lee, of Virginia and lately of Stratford Langton, in the county of Essex , Esquire being bound upon a voyage to Virginia afore said, and not knowing how it may please God to dispose of me in so long a voyage, utterly renouncing, disclaiming, disannulling, and revolking[sic] all former wills, either script, nuncupative or parol, and schedules or codicils of wills whatsoever, do make, ordain and declare this my last will and Testament in manner and form following, first: I give and bequeath my soul to that good and gracious God that gave it me and to my Blessed Redeemer Jesus Christ, assuredly trusting in and by his meritorious death and passion to receiving salvation and my body to be disposed of whether by land or sea or according to the opportunity of the place, not doubting but at the last day both body and soul shal[sic] be reunited and glorified. Next, my will and desire is that all my estate aforesaid, both lease land, freeland and copyhold land, and houses be, with all convenient speed that may be, sold for the payment of my debts to John Jeffries Eqs. and what the sale of that shall fall short of, to be made good out of my crops in Virginia, to be consigned to my good friends Mr Thomas Griffith and John Lockey, or one of them in that behalf, and in case the estate of Stratford be not as speedily sold as I desire, that then the best improvement possible may be made from year to year of my said plantation, and my servants labour with such directions and appointments as the said Griffith and Lockey, or one of them, for the better managing and effecting thereof. Also my will and earnest desire is that my good friends will with all convenient speed cause my wife and chldren (all except Francis if he be pleased) to be transported to Virginia, and to provide all necessary for the voyage, and from time to time till my estate be disentangled and free of all my debts, to provide and allow for them, and everyone of them, a competent and convenient maintenance according as the product of the estate will bear, relation being had to the payment of my debts and the annual supply of my several plantations, all of which I absolutely refer to the said Thomas Griffith and John Lockey and after my debts are paid, I give and bequeath my estate as followeth:

To my wife, during her life, I give the plantation whereon I now dwell, ten English servants , five negroes, 3 men and 2 women, 20 sows and corn proportionable to the servants: the said negroes I give to her during her widowhood and no longer, and then presently to return to those of the five youngest children, also the plantation Mocke Nock.

Item. My will and earnest desire is the my household staff at Stratford be divided into three parts, two of which I give to my son John, and bind him to give to every one of his brothers a bed and the other part I give to my wife Anna Lee.

Item. I give all my plate to my three oldest sons, or the survivor of survivors of them, each to have his part delivered to him when he comes to the age of 18 years.

Item. I give to my son John and his heirs forever, when he comes to the age of 18 years, all my land and plantation at Machotick, all of the stock of cattle and hogs thereupon, also 10 negroes, viz., five men and five women, and 10 English servants for their times, all the corn that shall be found there, all tools, household stuff, and utensils thereupon.

Item. To Richard and his heirs forever, when he comes to the age aforesaid, I give my plantation called Paradise, with all my servants thereupon, all my stock of cattle and hogs, all working tools and utensils, and corn that shall be found thereupon to be for the provision of the said servants.

Item. To Francis and his heirs forever, when he comes to the age aforesaid, I give the Papermakers Neck and the War Captains Neck with five negroes, three men and two women, and 10 English servants, and the stock of cattle and hogs, corn, and tools, and utensils upon the said several Necks.

Item. I give and bequeath to the five younger children, viz.: William, Hancock, Betsey, Anne , and Charles, the plantation whereon John Baswell now lives and so all along including Biship's Neck and to the utmost extent of my land towards Brewer's and also 4,000 acres upon Potomac, also the two plantations before bequeathed to my wife, after her death to be divided between them or their survivors or survivor of them, also all the rest of my cattle, hogs, corn, household stuffs, tools, or whatsoever is or shall be found upon the said plantations at the time of my death, all which said estate so bequeathed to my younger children, after my debt s are paid. I desire may be employed upon said plantation for a joint stock to raise portions of the said children against they come of age aforesaid or the females married. The said servants and what other products of their labours whether moendy or whatsoever, to be equally divided between them or their survivors or survivor of them, but the said land only to be divided between the male children.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my eldest son, John, three islands lying in the Bay of Chesapeake, the great new bed that I brought over in the Duke of York, and the furniture thereunto belonging.

Item. My will is that my horses, mares, and colts be equally divided in two parts, one where of to be and belonging to my three eldest children, and the other to my five youngest and shall be sold as they increase toward raising money for their portions, and in case of any of the three eldest children die before they come to the age of 18 years that then his or their portion come to the survivors or survivor of them and in case they all dies that the whole personal estate equally to return to the five youngest children, but the land only to the male children, and if the five younger children die before they come to the age aforesaid, of the females married, then their parts to be divide among the three eldest or survivors or survivor of them.

Item. My will is that my son William Lee have all that land on the Maryland side, where George English is now seated, when he comes to the age aforesaid; also my will is that goods sufficient be set apart for the maintenance of the gangs of each plantation for the space of two years and all the rest of my goods to be sold to the best advantage and the tobacco shipped here to Mr Lockey and Mr Griffith toward the payment of my debts.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Francis after my debts are paid, my whole interest in the ship called Elizabeth and Mary, being one-eigth part also one-eighth part in the ship called The Susan and in case of the death of Francis, I give the same to Charles, and in the case of his death to the two girls Elizabeth and Anne. But in case that by the blessing of Go upon the industry and labour of my people upon the several plantations, my said debts be fully satisfied before the said land at Stratford be sold, nevertheless, I will and entreat my good friends, Mr Griffith and Mr Lockey, on one of them [that] it may be sold to the most and best advantage, and the produce thereof put out at interest, and the interest thereof be employed for and towards the education of John and Richard, equally, to assist the one of his travels for attainment of reasonable perfection in the knowledge of Physic's, the other at the Unveirstity or the inns of Corut which he shall be most fit for, and the principal money to be equally divided between the two daughters when they come to age or be married, and that the said daughters be utterly debarred from all former legacies given to them as foresaid, but in case of their death then the sale and produce of said estate at Stratford to be equally divided between my eldest son, John, and my youngest son Charles. Also I desire and order that my wife, my son John, and all my overseares[sic], that either all or one, shall from time to time keep a correspondence with the said Griffith and Lockey, and order all my affairs in Virginia to the best advantage, as they or one of them shall direct them, and ship all my tobacco and what else shall be raised upon the said plantations to the said Griffith and Lockey f or satisfaction of my debt and advantage of my children and do yearly give them an account of all horses, mares, negroes, goods and all other things according as they shall receive directions and instructions from the said Mr Thomas Griffith and Mr Lockey.

Lastly: For the use aforesaid I make and ordain my everloving friends, Mr Thomas Griffith and Mr Lockey, merchants, John and Richard Lee, my full and sole Executors of this my Last Will and Testament, but in respect to my son Richard, till he cometh of age, I do absolutely place all management of my will upon the care and trust of first mentioned executors till my said son, Richard Lee, comes to age as aforesaid, hoping the same friendship to mine after my death which they have always done unto me. In witness thereof I have heresoto set my hand and seal this the sixth day of February in the 16th year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord Charles II King of Great Britain, & c, & c, and in they year of our Lord 1664.

This will was probated in London, the next year: 1664-5 Richardus Lee. January. Decimo die p robatum fuit Testamentum Richardi Lee nup de Stratford Langton in Com Essexine sed apud Virgi nia in ptibus transmarinus ar defunct hents, &c. Jurament Thomae Griffith et Johis Lockey duo r Execut, & c, guih. & c., de bene & c. Jurat. Reservata ptate Similem Comnem faciend Johi e t Richo Lee alt Execut & c." Johis P C C Probate Act Book fo 3.

Notable descendants of Richard Lee I include signers of the Declaration of Independence Francis Lightfoot Lee and Richard Henry Lee, Revolutionary War general Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, Confederate Civil War generals ROBERT E. LEE, Richard Taylor, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee and George Washington Custis Lee, President of the United States Zachary Taylor, Chief Justice of the United States Edward Douglass White, Governor of Maryland Thomas Sim Lee.

Source 1: www.ancestry.com Source 2: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Lee_I

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The Lees of Virginia The Society of the Lees of Virginia is comprised of descendents of Richard Lee, The Emigrant. Richard Lee came to Virginia in 1639 to be Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown.

Richard Lee emigrated from England to Virginia 1639-1640. Records show that he was holding office soon after his arrival. He acquired much land, held many high offices and in 1651 was elevated to the Council, the supreme governing body of Virginia. Not long after his arrival he married Anne Constable, a ward of the Governor, Sir Francis Wyatt.

Richard and Anne Lee raised eight children: John, Richard II, Francis, William, Hancock, Elizabeth, Anne, and Charles.

Richard Lee’s will directed that his property at Stratford, England be sold, and that the proceeds be used to discharge his debts, to complete the education of John and Richard at Oxford, and to provide dowries for his daughters, Elizabeth and Anne. In Virginia, he left the Machodoc plantation to his son John, the Paradise plantation to Richard, "War Captain’s Neck" to Francis, and the Maryland plantation to William. The Dividing Creek plantation he left to his widow for her lifetime and afterwards to be divided among his younger sons, William, Hancock, and Charles.

John Lee died unmarried, in 1673. The Machodoc plantation then passed to his brother Richard, as their father’s heir-at-law.

Hancock was married to Mary Kendall and secondly to Sarah Allerton. He inherited the southern third of the Dividing Creek plantation and became the progenitor of the Ditchley branch of the family.

Charles Lee, the youngest son, married Elizabeth Medstand and inherited the middle third of Dividing Creek plantation, including his parents’ home there. His descendants make up the Cobbs Hall branch of the family.

Richard Lee II married Letitia Corbin. Four of their sons – Richard, Philip, Thomas, and Henry – became, respectively, are the progenitors of the Mount Pleasant, Maryland, Stratford, and Lee Hall branches of the family. Their only daughter, Ann, married William Fitzhugh. She also has many descendants. Richard and Letitia are buried at the Burnt House Cemetery near Hague in Westmoreland County, Virginia.

Thomas Lee married Hannah Ludwell and in addition to building Stratford Hall, raised a remarkable family of eleven children. On June 7, 1776, the most famous of this family, Richard Henry Lee rose in the Continental Congress and moved:

   "That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved."

Henry Lee, the youngest son of Richard and Letitia Lee, married Mary Bland and their youngest son, Henry II, as legend has it, won the hand of the "Lowland Beauty", Lucy Grymes away from his friend, George Washington. In any event, they remained close friends throughout their lives. Henry and Lucy Lee made their home at Leesylvania, near Dumfries, Virginia and their descendants are known as the Leesylvania Line of the family.

The eldest son of Henry II and Lucy Lee, Henry III earned the nickname of Light Horse Harry, for his exploits during the Revolutionary War. After his first wife Matilda died, Henry III married Anne Hill Carter. Together they had six children: Algernon Sidney who died at 15 months old, Charles Carter, Anne Kinloch, Sidney Smith, Robert Edward and Catherine Mildred.

Source: http://www.thesocietyoftheleesofva.org/index.php?c=2&kat=The+Lees+Of+Virginia

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According to records (Burke’s Peerage and English Families), the Lees of Shropshire and Sussex, England were of the gentlemen and professional class being identified as loyal soldiers, as jurists, as landowners, and statesmen.

Colonel Richard Henry Lee of this family emigrated from England to Virginia arriving prior to May 22, 1638 on which day he was signing official documents. Records show that he was holding office soon after his arrival eventually rising to the top of Virginia business, society, and politics. He held many high offices including Clerk of the Quarter Court, High Sheriff and Burgess for York County, Attorney General, Secretary of State, and, in 1651, became a member of the Virginia Council (The supreme governing body of the Virginia colony). It is estimated that he owned in the neighborhood of fifteen thousand acres when he died in 1664 including land in Maryland plus York County, Westmoreland County, Northumberland County, Orange County, Fauquier County, and Prince William County in Virginia. He also continued to hold property in England.

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Event(s) Birth: 22 Mar 1616/17 *Double Relative on Lee Line: Occup: COLONELl/War: Shropshire, England to Jamestown, Virginia (See Notes/History) Death: 1 Mar 1664/65 Jamestown, Virginia, Cobbs Hall, Dividing Creek, VA Burial: Northumberland, VA "Lee Family Home/Cemetery"

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Colonel Richard Henry Lee I 1

  • Born: 1597, Shropshire, England * Wifr: Anne Constable in 1641 in North Cumberland, Virginia * Died: 1 Mar 1665, Jamestown, Virginia, Cobbs Hall, Dividing Creek, VA at age 68 * Buried: Northumberland, VA

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www.leearchive.info

Sheriff of Shropshire, England

He was a good friend of the Queen, and when his home in the American Colonies was burned out by natives, she replaced it, and everything in it including 'The Plate' (The silver).

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Richard was born at Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England, which is a county bordering Wales. He emigrated from England in 1639, becoming Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office. In the year 1640; Richard Henry Lee married at Jamestown Anne Constable(c. 1621-1666) , daughter of Francis Constable and a ward of Sir John Thoroughgood, a personal attendant of Charles I, King of England (1600-1649). She had accompanied the family of Virginia Governor Sir Francis Wyatt (1575-1644), and at the time of her marriage to Richard, she was residing at the Wyatt household in Jamestown. This affiliation soon helped Richard move socially upward within the Colony. In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677) appointed Richard Attorney General of the Colony. In addition he served as High Sheriff and was Colonel in the Militia. Richard was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Richard took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on August 10, 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Richard’s first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall’s Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on April 18, 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcomers to the area, led by Chief Opchanacanough. They killed 300, but were driven back by a successful counterattack. As a result the English abandoned the north side of the river. Richard and his family escaped and settled at New Poquoson on the lower peninsula between the York River and the James River, where it was safer from attack. He was said to have been the first white man to have settled in the northern neck of Virginia. They resided upon this land for the next nine years, which consisted of 90 acres and was a comfortable ride from Jamestown. On August 20, 1646 he took out a patent for 1,250 acres (5 km²) on the Pamunkey River in York, later New Kent County, at the spot “where the foot Company met with the Boats when they went Pamunkey March under ye command of Capt. William Claiborne” during the counteroffensive against the Indians after the massacre of 1644. He did not develop these lands, but exchanged them in 1648 for a tract of the same land along the north side of the York near the present Capahosic, retaining the 400 acres (1.6 km2) he called “War Captain’s Neck” and selling the other 850 acres (3.4 km2)

Lee became a Burgess of York County from 1647-1651, and in 1649 he was appointed a member of the King’s Council, and a Justice. In 1651 he became Colonial Secretary of State. With the title of Secretary of State, he was next in authority to the Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677). That same year, Charles I, King of England (1600-1649), was beheaded and Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658) began his control. Since the people in the distant colonies could not believe the incredible news from England, they remained loyal to the Crown and to Charles II (1630-1685), heir to the throne. In 1650, Richard made a voyage to the Netherlands to report Virginia’s loyal adherence to Charles II. However, this does not necessarily mean that he was a devout royalist. It turns out that two years later, he negotiated the capitulation of Virginia to the Commonwealth of England, and was satisfied with the terms that were laid out. At this time, he retired from public office, but continued to represent the interests of Virginia in London.

Richard began to acquire many land grants on the peninsula between the York and the Rappahannock River. After peace with the Indians had been concluded and the lands north of the York reopened for settlement in 1649, Richard was issued a patent of 500 acres (2 km²) on May 24, 1651, on land adjacent to “War Captain’s Neck”. That same year he also acquired an additional 500 acres (2 km²) on Poropotank Creek. He sold 150 acres (0.6 km2) of his original grant, the tract on Poropotank Creek. This left 850 acres (3.4 km2) at the original site, to which he later gave the name “Paradise”, and resided from 1653-1656 in the newly created Gloucester County. He became a part owner of a trading ship, whose cargoes brought indentured servants with headrights that Richard used to enlarge his Virginia property. He spent nearly as much of his time from 1652 to his death in 1664, in London, as he did in Virginia. In about 1656 Richard moved the family to Virginia’s Northern Neck, the peninsula formed by the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers. Leaving the “Paradise” tract to overseers, they resettled on a spot acquired from the Wicomico Indians, which consisted of 1,900 acres (8 km2). This new land was termed “Dividing Creek”, near what is today the town of Kilmarnock. This tract in later generations became known as that of “Cobbs Hall”. Early colonial map of Maryland and Virginia (from Ogilby, 1671). The map is oriented with north on the right, reflecting its original purpose as a port-finding chart for ship captains approaching the entrance of the Chesapeake Bay. Early colonial map of Maryland and Virginia (from Ogilby, 1671). The map is oriented with north on the right, reflecting its original purpose as a port-finding chart for ship captains approaching the entrance of the Chesapeake Bay.

He later purchased another 2,600 acres (11 km2) in Northumberland County at Machodoc Creek, which empties into the Potomac River. This tract was patented on October 18, 1657, and repatented the following year on June 5, 1658 as 2,000 acres (8 km²). Upon this tract became what was known in later generations as the estates “Mount Pleasant” and “Lee Hall”. He then acquired 4,000 acres (16 km²) farther up the Potomac, near where the city of Washington, D.C., would rise, in what was then Westmoreland, now Fairfax County. One of these would eventually become the site of Mount Vernon.

Disposing of several lesser properties he had obtained, Lee was able to consolidate and develop four major plantations. He had two in Gloucester County: “War Captain’s Neck” and “Paradise”, and two in Northumberland County: “Dividing Creek” and “Machodoc”. He also acquired a plantation called “Lee’s Purchase”, located across the Potomac in Maryland.

In 1658 Richard acquired a residence at Stratford Langthorne, in the County of Essex, then a pleasant suburb of London, and in 1661 he moved his family there. Essex borders London on the east, and the village of Stratford Langthorne was a resort for persons of means who found London unhealthy. It is located about a mile from Stratford-at-Bow on the north side of the Thames in West Ham Parish, until recently the site of great wharves, docks, and the congestion of east London. He did that so that his younger children would have a proper education, seeing as his oldest two sons, John and Richard II, were already students at Oxford. Nevertheless, he eventually wanted his children to reside in Virginia. Though now a resident of England, he continued in his role as a Virginia planter and merchant. On March 1, 1664, Richard died at "Dividing Creek", Northumberland Co., Virginia, while overseeing his interest in the Colony. As a result, and in accordance to his wishes in his will, his family returned to Virginia.

Richard Lee’s will directed that his property at Stratford in England be sold, and that all but the two oldest sons, who were still finishing school, were to return to America. Richard I left property to each of his eight children. Anne married again before September 24, 1666, Edmund Lister. The date of her death is unknown, although legend has it that she was buried beside Richard near the house at Dividing Creek.

Richard Henry Lee died 24 April 1664 at Cobbs Hall, in Northumberland, Virginia [3]

Col. Richard Lee I, Esq., “the Immigrant” (1618-1664), was a planter, trader, Attorney General of the Colony of Virginia, colonial Secretary of State, and member of the King's Council. Contents [hide]

  • 1 Biography o 1.1 Colonial politics o 1.2 Land holdings * 2 Family legacy * 3 Children * 4 Ancestry * 5 References

[edit] Biography

Richard was born at Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England, which is a county bordering Wales. [1] He emigrated from England in 1639, becoming Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office.

In the year 1640 [2]Richard Lee married at Jamestown Anne Constable (c. 1621-1666) , daughter of Francis Constable and a ward of Sir John Thoroughgood, a personal attendant of Charles I, King of England (1600-1649). She had accompanied the family of Virginia Governor Sir Francis Wyatt (1575-1644), and at the time of her marriage to Richard, she was residing at the Wyatt household in Jamestown. This affiliation soon helped Richard move socially upward within the Colony. In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677) appointed Richard Attorney General of the Colony. In addition he served as High Sheriff and was Colonel in the Militia. Anne (Constable) Lee (c. 1621-1666)

Richard was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Richard took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on August 10, 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Richard’s first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall’s Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on April 18, 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcomers to the area, led by Chief Opchanacanough. They killed 300, but were driven back by a successful counterattack. As a result the English abandoned the north side of the river.

Richard and his family escaped and settled at New Poquoson on the lower peninsula between the York River and the James River, where it was safer from attack. He was said to have been the first white man to have settled in the northern neck of Virginia. They resided upon this land for the next nine years, which consisted of 90 acres (360,000 m2) and was a comfortable ride from Jamestown.

On August 20, 1646 he took out a patent for 1,250 acres (5 km²) on the Pamunkey River in York, later New Kent County, at the spot “where the foot Company met with the Boats when they went Pamunkey March under ye command of Capt. William Claiborne” during the counteroffensive against the Indians after the massacre of 1644. He did not develop these lands, but exchanged them in 1648 for a tract of the same land along the north side of the York near the present Capahosic, retaining the 400 acres (1.6 km2) he called “War Captain’s Neck” and selling the other 850 acres (3.4 km2). William Berkeley (1606-1677)

[edit] Colonial politics

Lee became a Burgess of York County from 1647-1651, and in 1649 he was appointed a member of the King’s Council, and a Justice. In 1651 he became Colonial Secretary of State. With the title of Secretary of State, he was next in authority to the Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677). That same year, Charles I, King of England (1600-1649), was beheaded and Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658) began his control. Since the people in the distant colonies could not believe the incredible news from England, they remained loyal to the Crown and to Charles II (1630-1685), heir to the throne. In 1650, Richard made a voyage to the Netherlands to report Virginia’s loyal adherence to Charles II. However, this does not necessarily mean that he was a devout royalist. It turns out that two years later, he negotiated the capitulation of Virginia to the Commonwealth of England, and was satisfied with the terms that were laid out. At this time, he retired from public office, but continued to represent the interests of Virginia in London.

Land holdings

Richard began to acquire many land grants on the peninsula between the York and the Rappahannock River. After peace with the Indians had been concluded and the lands north of the York reopened for settlement in 1649, Richard was issued a patent of 500 acres (2 km²) on May 24, 1651, on land adjacent to “War Captain’s Neck”. That same year he also acquired an additional 500 acres (2 km²) on Poropotank Creek. He sold 150 acres (0.6 km2) of his original grant, the tract on Poropotank Creek. This left 850 acres (3.4 km2) at the original site, to which he later gave the name “Paradise”, and resided from 1653-1656 in the newly created Gloucester County. He became a part owner of a trading ship, whose cargoes brought indentured servants with headrights that Richard used to enlarge his Virginia property. He spent nearly as much of his time from 1652 to his death in 1664, in London, as he did in Virginia. In about 1656 Richard moved the family to Virginia’s Northern Neck, the peninsula formed by the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers. Leaving the “Paradise” tract to overseers, they resettled on a spot acquired from the Wicomico Indians, which consisted of 1,900 acres (8 km2). This new land was termed “Dividing Creek”, near what is today the town of Kilmarnock. This tract in later generations became known as that of “Cobbs Hall”. Early colonial map of Maryland and Virginia (from Ogilby, 1671). The map is oriented with north on the right, reflecting its original purpose as a port-finding chart for ship captains approaching the entrance of the Chesapeake Bay.

He later purchased another 2,600 acres (11 km2) in Northumberland County at Machodoc Creek, which empties into the Potomac River. This tract was patented on October 18, 1657, and repatented the following year on June 5, 1658 as 2,000 acres (8 km²). Upon this tract became what was known in later generations as the estates “Mount Pleasant” and “Lee Hall”. He then acquired 4,000 acres (16 km²) farther up the Potomac, near where the city of Washington, D.C., would rise, in what was then Westmoreland, now Fairfax County. One of these would eventually become the site of Mount Vernon.

Disposing of several lesser properties he had obtained, Lee was able to consolidate and develop four major plantations. He had two in Gloucester County: “War Captain’s Neck” and “Paradise”, and two in Northumberland County: “Dividing Creek” and “Machodoc”. He also acquired a plantation called “Lee’s Purchase”, located across the Potomac in Maryland.

In 1658 Richard acquired a residence at Stratford Langthorne, in the County of Essex, then a pleasant suburb of London, and in 1661 he moved his family there. Essex borders London on the east, and the village of Stratford Langthorne was a resort for persons of means who found London unhealthy. It is located about a mile from Stratford-at-Bow on the north side of the Thames in West Ham Parish, until recently the site of great wharves, docks, and the congestion of east London. He did that so that his younger children would have a proper education, seeing as his oldest two sons, John and Richard II, were already students at Oxford. Nevertheless, he eventually wanted his children to reside in Virginia. Though now a resident of England, he continued in his role as a Virginia planter and merchant. On March 1, 1664, Richard died at "Dividing Creek", Northumberland Co., Virginia, while overseeing his interest in the Colony. As a result, and in accordance to his wishes in his will, his family returned to Virginia.

Richard Lee’s will directed that his property at Stratford in England be sold, and that all but the two oldest sons, who were still finishing school, were to return to America. Richard I left property to each of his eight children. Anne married again before September 24, 1666, Edmund Lister. The date of her death is unknown, although legend has it that she was buried beside Richard near the house at Dividing Creek.

Richard Lee died 24 April 1664 at Cobbs Hall, in Northumberland, Virginia [3]

Family legacy Lee Family Coat of Arms

Today the different branches of the Lee family are known as: "Cobb's Hall", "Mount Pleasant", "Ditchley", "Lee Hall", “Blenheim”, “Leesylvania”, “Dividing Creek”, and "Stratford". These were the estate names of the descendants of Richard Lee I that are still referred to today when talking of Lee descendancy. An interesting note is that Richard had patented somewhere in the neighborhood of 15,000 acres (61 km²) on both sides of the Potomac, in Maryland and in Virginia. Part of this land later became George Washington’s Mount Vernon. When he divided his estate among his children, he also left them the products of the several plantations including white indentured servants, Negro slaves, livestock, household furnishings, silver, and many other luxuries.

Notable descendants of Richard Lee I include signers of the Declaration of Independence Francis Lightfoot Lee and Richard Henry Lee, Revolutionary War general Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, Confederate Civil War generals Robert E. Lee, Richard Taylor, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee and George Washington Custis Lee, President of the United States Zachary Taylor, Chief Justice of the United States Edward Douglass White, Governor of Maryland Thomas Sim Lee.

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Col. Richard Lee I, Esq., “the Immigrant” (1618-1664), was a planter, trader, Attorney General of the Colony of Virginia, colonial Secretary of State, and member of the King's Council.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Lee_I

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Richard was born at Nordley Regis, Shropshire, England, which is a county bordering Wales. He emigrated from England in 1639, becoming Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office.

In the year 1640 Richard Henry Lee married at Jamestown Anne Constable (c. 1621-1666) , daughter of Francis Constable and a ward of Sir John Thoroughgood, a personal attendant of Charles I, King of England (1600-1649). She had accompanied the family of Virginia Governor Sir Francis Wyatt (1575-1644), and at the time of her marriage to Richard, she was residing at the Wyatt household in Jamestown. This affiliation soon helped Richard move socially upward within the Colony. In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606-1677) appointed Richard Attorney General of the Colony. In addition he served as High Sheriff and was Colonel in the Militia.

Richard was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Richard took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on August 10, 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Richard’s first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall’s Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on April 18, 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcomers to the area, led by Chief Opchanacanough. They killed 300, but were driven back by a successful counterattack. As a result the English abandoned the north side of the river.

Richard and his family escaped and settled at New Poquoson on the lower peninsula between the York River and the James River, where it was safer from attack. He was said to have been the first white man to have settled in the northern neck of Virginia. They resided upon this land for the next nine years, which consisted of 90 acres (360,000 m2) and was a comfortable ride from Jamestown.

On August 20, 1646 he took out a patent for 1,250 acres (5 km²) on the Pamunkey River in York, later New Kent County, at the spot “where the foot Company met with the Boats when they went Pamunkey March under ye command of Capt. William Claiborne” during the counteroffensive against the Indians after the massacre of 1644. He did not develop these lands, but exchanged them in 1648 for a tract of the same land along the north side of the York near the present Capahosic, retaining the 400 acres (1.6 km2) he called “War Captain’s Neck” and selling the other 850 acres (3.4 km2).

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Planter-Merchant. Owned 16,000 acres northern Virginia bordering the Potomac. He was justice, burgess, secretary of state for the colony and a member of the council of Virginia.
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Colonel Richard Lee, also known as "the Immigrant" was the founder of the Lee family in Virginia. A member of the Coton branch of the Lees of County Shropshire, England, he immigrated to Virginia circa. 1640, settling first in York County and later in Northumberland County. A tobacco planter, Lee became wealthy and was an important figure in Virginia, being at various times justice, burgess, member of the council, attorney general, and secretary of state.

About Richard Lee BORN: 1613, Nordley Regis, Coton, County Shropshire, England PARENTS: John Lee and Jane Hancock BAPTIZED: March 22, 1617, Worcester, Saint Martin, Worcester MARRIED: Anne Constable Owen, 1641, Jamestown, Virginia CHILDREN: John Lee(1645-1673) Richard Lee(1647-1714) - The Stratford Hall Lees Francis Lee(1648-1714) William Lee(1651-1697) - The Bedford, Virginia Lees Hancock Lee(1653-1709) Elizabeth Lee(1653) Anne Lee(1645-1701) Charles C. Lee(1656-1701)DIED: March 1, 1664, Cobb's Hall, "Dividing Creek", Northumberland County, Virginia

More About Richard Lee

There are many records about Richard Lee, who beside being the emigrant and ancestor to a number of historical figures, he was also a prominent and distinguished colonist. He apparently came to Virginia from England in about 1640. He apparently was settled in York County in about 1642. He became a significant land owner, a member of the House of Burgesses, and a Justice of the court while he lived in York County. He is described a s a planter, and with the title of Colonel. He apparently was fairly wealthy. He traveled back and forth between England and Virginia, and maintained connections in England until his death. He apparently moved to Northumberland County in about 1654, where he died in 1663/64. His estate remained in his family for many years, known as "Cobbs Hall," although that home was not built until about 1720.

An early account of Richard Lee is given in Lees of VA, p. 49, in a passage written by William Lee in 1771

Richard Lee, of a good family in Shropshire (and whose Picture I am told is now at Coton, near Bridgenorth, the seat of Launcelot Lee, Esq.), some time in the Reign of Charles the first, went over to the Colony of Virginia, as Secretary, and one of the King's Privy Council.

He was a man of good Stature, comely visage, and enterprising genius, a sound head, vigorous spirit and generous nature. When he got to Virginia, which was at that time not much cultivated, he was so pleased with the Country that he made large settlements there with the servants he had carried over; after some years, he returned to England, and gave away all the lands he had taken up, and settled at his own expense, to those servants he had fixed on them; some of whose descendants are now possessed of very considerable Estates in that Colony. After staying some Time in England, he returned again to Virginia, with a fresh band of Adventurers, all of whom he settled there.

In 1646, Richard Lee sat on the York bench as a magistrate, with a Dr. Henry Lee, who married Marah Adkins. Richard patented 1,250 acres in York Co., VA in 1648, and named, amongst his head rights, Henry, Matthew, and George Lee, who may have been his relatives. That Richard settled first in York Co., is proven by the grant of 1,000 acres, dated 10 Aug 1642; the patent states that his land was due unto the said Richard Lee by and for his own personal Adventure, his wife Ann, and John Francis and by assignment from Mr. Thomas Hill, Florentine Paine and William Freeman of their right of land due for the transportation of Seaventeene persons.

This land was the plantation, Paradise in his will, and bequeathed to his second son, Richard . This name is frequently applied to subsequent records to this plantation; as on the 22n d of July, 1674, in a patent issued to Major Richard Lee for 1,140 acres in Gloster, called Paradise, on a branch of Poropotank Creek; 1,000 thereof being due to said Richard Lee by two former patents, and the residence now found to be within the bounds. 94 Richard represented York County as Burgess in 1647, and in 1651 Mr. Lee was paid for services as Burgess of Northumberland County. It seems possible that Richard Lee was engaged in commerce as well as agriculture, and that he had an interest in vessels trading between England and Virginia, as had many of the large planters. In his will, he bequeathed to his son, Francis, his interest in two ships, which was 1/8th part in each vessel. He appears to have made frequent voyages to and fro; being in England in 1654-55, again in 1659, and later in 1661 and in 1663.

Richard's first home in Virginia was on the York River, near the head of Poropotank Creek, where he had a store or warehouse. His next home was located on the Dividing Creeks in Northumberland, which afforded a very safe harbor. The main creek is only a mile or two long; then it divides into branches, which makes several small peninsulas or necks as they were formerly called. On two of these necks Richard Lee located his two plantations, where we can find grants for 800 and 600 acres in 1651 and 1656 respectively. Richard was not only Burgess for several counties, but served in several capacities, having been Justice, member of the Council and Secretary of State. He also served on various commissions. While in England in 1663, his wife and children being there also, Richard made his will; the wording of this will indicates that he had given up his intention of settling permanently in England. For he ordered that his estate there should be sold, gave minute directions for the payment of his debts, and closing up of his interests in that country, and made arrangements for the settlement of his children in Virginia. The account of his property given in his will shows him to have been possessed of considerable wealth for that day. If his tobacco crop was actually worth L2000 a year, as Gibbon estimated, and his estate at Stratford-Langton, L800 a year, as stated by William Lee, then Richard Lee must have enjoyed an income larger than most of the early planters.

From Virginia Vital Records, The Grave of Richard Lee, the Emigrant, by Ludwell Lee Montague

"The Grave of Richard Lee, The Emigrant- In March 1664 Colonel Richard Lee, then of London and Stratford Langton in Essex, died at his plantation on Dividing Creek in Northumberland County, Virginia, and was buried in the garden of his home there. As late as 1798 his tombstone was still to be seen at the site. Pursuant to Richard Lee's will, his widow (nee Anne Constable) and younger children returned from England to live at the Dividing Creek plantation, which was eventually inherited by his youngest son, Charles (1656-1701). In the course of time, Anne Constable, Charles Lee, and Charles' wife, Elizabeth Medstrand, were in their turn buried near the grave of Richard Lee. About 1720 Charles Lee II (1684-1734) abandoned the original Lee home in Dividing Creek and built "Cobbs Hall" at a site about a half mile to the east. However, the "Cobbs Hall" family continued to use the burying ground at the original site. Thus Charles Lee II (but not his widow, Elizabeth Pinckard, who remarried and lived and died elsewhere), Charles Lee III (1722-1747), and the latter's two wives, Mary Lee of " Ditchley" and Leeanna Jones of "Hickory Neck, " were also buried there. This Leeanna Jones was herself a great-granddaughter of Richard Lee and granddaughter of Charles Lee I.

In her will, probated in 1761, she ordered the erection of "a proper brick wall round the Burying place of myself, and ancestors on this plantation." In 1923 Cazenove Lee undertook to find the grave of the emigrant Richard Lee. At the "Cobbs Hall" burying ground the only evidence above ground was the tombstone of Susan Lee (1802-1852), the wife of William Harvey. Probing in the vicinity, however, Cazenove Lee discovered the foundations of the wall erected pursuant to the will of Leeanna Lee. (Cazenove Lee, "Locating the Grave of Colonel Richard Lee, " Magazine of the Society of the Lees of Virginia, V, 43-49.) The grave of the emigrant Richard Lee was certainly within that enclosure. In 1956 E. Walter Harvey, Sr. the present master of "Cobbs Hall, " presented the old family burying ground to the Society of the Less of Virginia, which undertook to clear the site, to restore Leeanna Lee's wall, and to erect a suitable marker. This work has now been accomplished. On May 3, 1958, with appropriate ceremony, the site was rededicated to the memory of the first Richard Lee, of Anne Constable, his wife, and of their "Cobbs Hall" descendants buried there."

Richard Lee's Will

In the Name of God, Amen. I, Richard Lee, of Virginia and lately of Stratford Langton, in the county of Essex , Esquire being bound upon a voyage to Virginia afore said, and not knowing how it may please God to dispose of me in so long a voyage, utterly renouncing, disclaiming, disannulling, and revolking[sic] all former wills, either script, nuncupative or parol, and schedules or codicils of wills whatsoever, do make, ordain and declare this my last will and Testament in manner and form following, first: I give and bequeath my soul to that good and gracious God that gave it me and to my Blessed Redeemer Jesus Christ, assuredly trusting in and by his meritorious death and passion to receiving salvation and my body to be disposed of whether by land or sea or according to the opportunity of the place, not doubting but at the last day both body and soul shal[sic] be reunited and glorified. Next, my will and desire is that all my estate aforesaid, both lease land, freeland and copyhold land, and houses be, with all convenient speed that may be, sold for the payment of my debts to John Jeffries Eqs. and what the sale of that shall fall short of, to be made good out of my crops in Virginia, to be consigned to my good friends Mr Thomas Griffith and John Lockey, or one of them in that behalf, and in case the estate of Stratford be not as speedily sold as I desire, that then the best improvement possible may be made from year to year of my said plantation, and my servants labour with such directions and appointments as the said Griffith and Lockey, or one of them, for the better managing and effecting thereof. Also my will and earnest desire is that my good friends will with all convenient speed cause my wife and chldren (all except Francis if he be pleased) to be transported to Virginia, and to provide all necessary for the voyage, and from time to time till my estate be disentangled and free of all my debts, to provide and allow for them, and everyone of them, a competent and convenient maintenance according as the product of the estate will bear, relation being had to the payment of my debts and the annual supply of my several plantations, all of which I absolutely refer to the said Thomas Griffith and John Lockey and after my debts are paid, I give and bequeath my estate as followeth:

To my wife, during her life, I give the plantation whereon I now dwell, ten English servants , five negroes, 3 men and 2 women, 20 sows and corn proportionable to the servants: the said negroes I give to her during her widowhood and no longer, and then presently to return to those of the five youngest children, also the plantation Mocke Nock.

Item. My will and earnest desire is the my household staff at Stratford be divided into three parts, two of which I give to my son John, and bind him to give to every one of his brothers a bed and the other part I give to my wife Anna Lee.

Item. I give all my plate to my three oldest sons, or the survivor of survivors of them, each to have his part delivered to him when he comes to the age of 18 years.

Item. I give to my son John and his heirs forever, when he comes to the age of 18 years, all my land and plantation at Machotick, all of the stock of cattle and hogs thereupon, also 10 negroes, viz., five men and five women, and 10 English servants for their times, all the corn that shall be found there, all tools, household stuff, and utensils thereupon.

Item. To Richard and his heirs forever, when he comes to the age aforesaid, I give my plantation called Paradise, with all my servants thereupon, all my stock of cattle and hogs, all working tools and utensils, and corn that shall be found thereupon to be for the provision of the said servants.

Item. To Francis and his heirs forever, when he comes to the age aforesaid, I give the Papermakers Neck and the War Captains Neck with five negroes, three men and two women, and 10 English servants, and the stock of cattle and hogs, corn, and tools, and utensils upon the said several Necks.

Item. I give and bequeath to the five younger children, viz.: William, Hancock, Betsey, Anne , and Charles, the plantation whereon John Baswell now lives and so all along including Biship's Neck and to the utmost extent of my land towards Brewer's and also 4,000 acres upon Potomac, also the two plantations before bequeathed to my wife, after her death to be divided between them or their survivors or survivor of them, also all the rest of my cattle, hogs, corn, household stuffs, tools, or whatsoever is or shall be found upon the said plantations at the time of my death, all which said estate so bequeathed to my younger children, after my debt s are paid. I desire may be employed upon said plantation for a joint stock to raise portions of the said children against they come of age aforesaid or the females married. The said servants and what other products of their labours whether moendy or whatsoever, to be equally divided between them or their survivors or survivor of them, but the said land only to be divided between the male children.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my eldest son, John, three islands lying in the Bay of Chesapeake, the great new bed that I brought over in the Duke of York, and the furniture thereunto belonging.

Item. My will is that my horses, mares, and colts be equally divided in two parts, one where of to be and belonging to my three eldest children, and the other to my five youngest and shall be sold as they increase toward raising money for their portions, and in case of any of the three eldest children die before they come to the age of 18 years that then his or their portion come to the survivors or survivor of them and in case they all dies that the whole personal estate equally to return to the five youngest children, but the land only to the male children, and if the five younger children die before they come to the age aforesaid, of the females married, then their parts to be divide among the three eldest or survivors or survivor of them.

Item. My will is that my son William Lee have all that land on the Maryland side, where George English is now seated, when he comes to the age aforesaid; also my will is that goods sufficient be set apart for the maintenance of the gangs of each plantation for the space of two years and all the rest of my goods to be sold to the best advantage and the tobacco shipped here to Mr Lockey and Mr Griffith toward the payment of my debts.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Francis after my debts are paid, my whole interest in the ship called Elizabeth and Mary, being one-eigth part also one-eighth part in the ship called The Susan and in case of the death of Francis, I give the same to Charles, and in the case of his death to the two girls Elizabeth and Anne. But in case that by the blessing of Go upon the industry and labour of my people upon the several plantations, my said debts be fully satisfied before the said land at Stratford be sold, nevertheless, I will and entreat my good friends, Mr Griffith and Mr Lockey, on one of them [that] it may be sold to the most and best advantage, and the produce thereof put out at interest, and the interest thereof be employed for and towards the education of John and Richard, equally, to assist the one of his travels for attainment of reasonable perfection in the knowledge of Physic's, the other at the Unveirstity or the inns of Corut which he shall be most fit for, and the principal money to be equally divided between the two daughters when they come to age or be married, and that the said daughters be utterly debarred from all former legacies given to them as foresaid, but in case of their death then the sale and produce of said estate at Stratford to be equally divided between my eldest son, John, and my youngest son Charles. Also I desire and order that my wife, my son John, and all my overseares[sic], that either all or one, shall from time to time keep a correspondence with the said Griffith and Lockey, and order all my affairs in Virginia to the best advantage, as they or one of them shall direct them, and ship all my tobacco and what else shall be raised upon the said plantations to the said Griffith and Lockey f or satisfaction of my debt and advantage of my children and do yearly give them an account of all horses, mares, negroes, goods and all other things according as they shall receive directions and instructions from the said Mr Thomas Griffith and Mr Lockey.

Lastly: For the use aforesaid I make and ordain my everloving friends, Mr Thomas Griffith and Mr Lockey, merchants, John and Richard Lee, my full and sole Executors of this my Last Will and Testament, but in respect to my son Richard, till he cometh of age, I do absolutely place all management of my will upon the care and trust of first mentioned executors till my said son, Richard Lee, comes to age as aforesaid, hoping the same friendship to mine after my death which they have always done unto me. In witness thereof I have heresoto set my hand and seal this the sixth day of February in the 16th year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord Charles II King of Great Britain, & c, & c, and in they year of our Lord 1664.

This will was probated in London, the next year: 1664-5 Richardus Lee. January. Decimo die p robatum fuit Testamentum Richardi Lee nup de Stratford Langton in Com Essexine sed apud Virgi nia in ptibus transmarinus ar defunct hents, &c. Jurament Thomae Griffith et Johis Lockey duo r Execut, & c, guih. & c., de bene & c. Jurat. Reservata ptate Similem Comnem faciend Johi e t Richo Lee alt Execut & c." Johis P C C Probate Act Book fo 3.

Notable descendants of Richard Lee I include signers of the Declaration of Independence Francis Lightfoot Lee and Richard Henry Lee, Revolutionary War general Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, Confederate Civil War generals ROBERT E. LEE, Richard Taylor, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee and George Washington Custis Lee, President of the United States Zachary Taylor, Chief Justice of the United States Edward Douglass White, Governor of Maryland Thomas Sim Lee.

Source 1: www.ancestry.com Source 2: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Lee_I

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The Lees of Virginia The Society of the Lees of Virginia is comprised of descendents of Richard Lee, The Emigrant. Richard Lee came to Virginia in 1639 to be Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown.

Richard Lee emigrated from England to Virginia 1639-1640. Records show that he was holding office soon after his arrival. He acquired much land, held many high offices and in 1651 was elevated to the Council, the supreme governing body of Virginia. Not long after his arrival he married Anne Constable, a ward of the Governor, Sir Francis Wyatt.

Richard and Anne Lee raised eight children: John, Richard II, Francis, William, Hancock, Elizabeth, Anne, and Charles.

Richard Lee’s will directed that his property at Stratford, England be sold, and that the proceeds be used to discharge his debts, to complete the education of John and Richard at Oxford, and to provide dowries for his daughters, Elizabeth and Anne. In Virginia, he left the Machodoc plantation to his son John, the Paradise plantation to Richard, "War Captain’s Neck" to Francis, and the Maryland plantation to William. The Dividing Creek plantation he left to his widow for her lifetime and afterwards to be divided among his younger sons, William, Hancock, and Charles.

John Lee died unmarried, in 1673. The Machodoc plantation then passed to his brother Richard, as their father’s heir-at-law.

Hancock was married to Mary Kendall and secondly to Sarah Allerton. He inherited the southern third of the Dividing Creek plantation and became the progenitor of the Ditchley branch of the family.

Charles Lee, the youngest son, married Elizabeth Medstand and inherited the middle third of Dividing Creek plantation, including his parents’ home there. His descendants make up the Cobbs Hall branch of the family.

Richard Lee II married Letitia Corbin. Four of their sons – Richard, Philip, Thomas, and Henry – became, respectively, are the progenitors of the Mount Pleasant, Maryland, Stratford, and Lee Hall branches of the family. Their only daughter, Ann, married William Fitzhugh. She also has many descendants. Richard and Letitia are buried at the Burnt House Cemetery near Hague in Westmoreland County, Virginia.

Thomas Lee married Hannah Ludwell and in addition to building Stratford Hall, raised a remarkable family of eleven children. On June 7, 1776, the most famous of this family, Richard Henry Lee rose in the Continental Congress and moved:

"That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved." Henry Lee, the youngest son of Richard and Letitia Lee, married Mary Bland and their youngest son, Henry II, as legend has it, won the hand of the "Lowland Beauty", Lucy Grymes away from his friend, George Washington. In any event, they remained close friends throughout their lives. Henry and Lucy Lee made their home at Leesylvania, near Dumfries, Virginia and their descendants are known as the Leesylvania Line of the family.

The eldest son of Henry II and Lucy Lee, Henry III earned the nickname of Light Horse Harry, for his exploits during the Revolutionary War. After his first wife Matilda died, Henry III married Anne Hill Carter. Together they had six children: Algernon Sidney who died at 15 months old, Charles Carter, Anne Kinloch, Sidney Smith, Robert Edward and Catherine Mildred. -------------------- Birth: 22 Mar 1616/17: Occup: COLONELl/War: Shropshire, England to Jamestown, Virginia: Death: 1 Mar 1664/65 Jamestown, Virginia, Cobbs Hall, Dividing Creek, VA Burial: Northumberland, VA "Lee Family Home/Cemetery"

-------------------- Colonel Richard Henry Lee

  • Born: 1597, Shropshire, England * Wifr: Anne Constable in 1641 in North Cumberland, Virginia * Died: 1 Mar 1665, Jamestown, Virginia, Cobbs Hall, Dividing Creek, VA at age 68 * Buried: Northumberland, VA

Col. Richard Lee I, “the Immigrant” (1617–1664) arrived in Jamestown in 1639 at the age of 22 with very little to his name other than the patronage of an influential man, Sir Francis Wyatt, the 1st Governor of Virginia. Once there he became Attorney General of the Colony of Virginia, Colonial Secretary of State, and member of the King's Council. He became Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office. He was a loyal supporter of King Charles I of England, and his public offices ceased when Oliver Cromwell seized power in England in 1649. In addition he served as High Sheriff and was a Colonel in the Militia. He was also a tobacco planter, trader, owner and trader of slaves, and employer and importer of indentured English servants (who paid for their passage to America with 7 years of labour). At the time of his death he was the largest landholder in the colony (13,000 acres) and perhaps the richest man in Virginia.

Richard Lee was baptised on 22 March 1617 at Worchester the second of 3 sons of John Lee (-1630), a cloth manufacturer, and his wife Jane Hancock (-1639), the daughter of another cloth manufacturer Edward Hancock.[2]

Richard was an orphan by the time he was 21 years of age. His maternal uncle Thomas Hancock, to whom he was ward until his 24th birthday, arranged for him to immigrate to Virginia. Richard emigrated from London in 1639 employed as personal secretary of Sir Francis Wyatt. In 1643 the new Governor, Sir William Berkeley (1606–1677), on the recommendation of Sir Francis Wyatt, appointed Richard as Attorney General of the Colony.[1]

Richard was in the fur trading business with the Indians. Because of this, Richard took his bride away from the capital city, and went to live among the Indians beyond the frontier of settlement. His first patent was for land on the north side of the York River at the head of Poropotank Creek, in what was then York, later Gloucester County. He had received the title to this 1,000 acre (4 km²) tract on August 10, 1642 through the headrights of thirty-eight immigrants unable to pay their own passage, who were brought over by Col. Lee in his own ship on his return from Breda in 1650. However, Lee did not take title to this land until 1646, when there is record of his purchasing 100 acres (0.4 km2) at this location. Richard’s first home was on leased land on the same side of the river, at the head of Tindall’s Creek near the Indian community of Capahosic Wicomico. However, on April 18, 1644, hordes of Powhatan Indians massacred the newcome

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Colonel Richard "the Immigrant" Lee I's Timeline

1618
March 22, 1618
Coton, Shropshire, England
March 22, 1618
Martin, Worcestershire, England
March 22, 1618
On Way to Va. From England
1639
1639
Age 20

He emigrated from England and became Clerk of the Quarter Court at Jamestown, within the Secretary of State’s office.

1640
1640
Age 21
England
1640
Age 21
to, Va, from, Straford-Langston, Co Essex, England
1640
Age 21
to, Va, from, Straford-Langston, Co Essex, England
1640
Age 21
to, Va, from, Straford-Langston, Co Essex, England
1643
1643
Age 24
1645
1645
Age 26
possibly Jamestown, Virginia