Constantine I, King of the Picts and Scots

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Causantín mac Cináeda

Also Known As: "Causantín", "Constantín", "mac Cináeda", "King of Alba", "King Constantine II of /Scotland/", "The Wine-Bountiful", "King of Scotland //", "Constantine II // King of Scotland", "Constantine", "son of Cináed", "nicknamed An Finn-Shoichleach", ""The Wine-Bountiful"", "Const...", "..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Iona, Argyleshire, Scotland
Death: Died in Scotland
Cause of death: Died in battle against the Norse.
Place of Burial: Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Kenneth I mac Alpine, King of the Picts; Kenneth I and Unknown Wife
Husband of NESTA and Sabhdh . ingen Gregor
Father of Donald II "The Madman", King of Scots and Donald Madman King of Scots Alpin, II
Brother of NN ingen Cináed; Ædh mac Cináeda, Rí na h'Alba and Máel Muire ni Cináeda

Occupation: King of Scotland, King of Picts 862-877, KING OF SCOTLAND, CONSTANTINE, konge, Slain by the Norwegians in a battle., Kung av Alba, Roi d'Ecosse de 863 à 877, King of Scots, Roi, d'Ecosse, 862, des Pictes, 1ʻ, d'Alba, King of Alba, King of the Picts
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Constantine I, King of the Picts and Scots

Constantine spent most of his reign fighting to consolidate and expand upon the Kingdom of Scotland created when Kenneth I had brought together the crowns of the Scots and the Picts to form the beginnings of what became known as Alba. To the south he battled against the King of Strathclyde. This culminated when he arranged the death of the King of Strathclyde in 872. He replaced him with his own brother in law, Rhun: effectively making Strathclyde a subordinate kingdom to Alba.

-------------------- King of Picts Scots. King of Alba between 862 and 877. Beheaded in battle by Vikings. -------------------- Constantine I, King of Alba

    Constantine I, King of Alba was born in 836.1 He was the son of Kenneth I 'the Hardy', King of Alba. He died in 877 at Inverdorat, the Black Cove, Angus, Scotland, killed in action against the Danes.2 He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.2
    He was also known as Causantín mac Cináeda.3 He gained the title of  King Constantine of the Picts and Scots. He succeeded to the title of  King Constantine I of Alba in 863.4 
    Most of his reign was spent in beating off Viking assults or attempting to extend his authority southwards. Although he ordered the murder of King Artgal (his brother in law and the refugee ruler of Strathclyde) in 871, sometimes he bought peace with his enemies by paying tribute. King of the Scots and Picts for 14 years and was killed in a battle with the Danes at Inverdovat. He has an extensive biographical entry in the  Dictionary of National Biography.5
     

Child of Constantine I, King of Alba 1.Donald II, King of Alba+ d. 900

Citations 1.[S2299] John Warburg, "re: Kings of Scotland," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 28 May 2007. Hereinafter cited as "re: Kings of Scotland." 2.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 168. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families. 3.[S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia. 4.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 167. 5.[S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "Constantine I, -879". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography

http://thepeerage.com/p10290.htm#i102891 -------------------- Reigned 862-877


Notes ◦Donald was his only son.

 

Causantín or Constantín mac Cináeda (in Modern Gaelic, Còiseam mac Choinnich; died 877) was a king of the Picts. He is often known as Constantine I, in reference to his place in modern lists of kings of Scots, though contemporary sources described Causantín only as a Pictish king. A son of Cináed mac Ailpín ("Kenneth MacAlpin"), he succeeded his uncle Domnall mac Ailpín as Pictish king following the latter's death on 13 April 862. It is likely that Causantín's (Constantine I) reign witnessed increased activity by Vikings, based in Ireland, in Northumbria and in northern Britain. He died fighting one such invasion.

This is an excerpt from the article Constantine I, King of Scots from the Wikipedia free encyclopedia. A list of authors is available at Wikipedia


Sources 1.[S327] Lakey - Genealogy, Gilbert Marlow Lakey, (http://members.cox.net/benchrest/Genealogy.html)

2.[S370] Kings & Queens, Neil Grant, (pub 2003 by HarperCollinsPublishers Hammersmith London W6 8JB), p8 (Reliability: 3)

3.[S410] Pedigrees of the Scottish Clans, John D McLaughlin, (http://members.aol.com/lochlan4/pedigree.htm), Genelaig Albanensium - (Pedigree of the Kings of Scotland) (Reliability: 3)



-------------------- Causantín or Constantín mac Cináeda was a king of the Picts. He is often known as Constantine I, in reference to his place in modern lists of kings of Scots, though contemporary sources described Causantín only as a Pictish king. A son of Cináed mac Ailpín ("Kenneth MacAlpin"), he succeeded his uncle Domnall mac Ailpín as Pictish king following the latter's death on 13 April 862. It is likely that Causantín's (Constantine I) reign witnessed increased activity by Vikings, based in Ireland, in Northumbria and in northern Britain. He died fighting one such invasion.

In 875, the Chronicle and the Annals of Ulster again report a Viking army in Pictland. A battle, fought near Dollar, was a heavy defeat for the Picts; the Annals of Ulster say that "a great slaughter of the Picts resulted". In 877, shortly after building a new church for the Culdees at St Andrews, Causantín was captured and executed (or perhaps killed in battle) after defending against Viking raiders. Although there is agreement on the time and general manner of his death, it is not clear where this happened. Some believe he was beheaded on a Fife beach, following a battle at Fife Ness, near Crail. William Forbes Skene reads the Chronicle as placing Causantín's death at Inverdovat (by Newport-on-Tay), which appears to match the Prophecy of Berchán. The account in the Chronicle of Melrose names the place as the "Black Cave," and John of Fordun calls it the "Black Den". Causantín was buried on Iona.

Causantín's son Domnall and his descendants represented the main line of the kings of Alba and later Scotland.

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Constantine I, King of the Picts and Scots's Timeline

836
836
Argyleshire, Scotland
862
862
Age 26
Forres, Morayshire, Scotland
862
Age 26
Dunkeld, England
862
- present
Age 26
King of the Scots
862
- 877
Age 26
863
863
- 877
Age 27
877
877
Age 41
Scotland
877
Age 41
Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland
1893
November 7, 1893
Age 41
1914
October 21, 1914
Age 41