Cornelis Aertsen Van Schaick (1610 - 1669)

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Nicknames: "Schaik", "Schayk"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Westbroek, Utrecht, Netherlands
Death: Died in New Amsterdam, New Netherlands
Managed by: Zack Zuzalek
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About Cornelis Aertsen Van Schaick

Cornelis Aertsen VAN SCHAICK (Adriaen (Aert Jansz) was born 1610 in Westbroek, Utrecht, Netherlands; he married Belitje Arabella Hendrickse, daughter of Henrick Hendrickse, 1 Jul 1640 in Sloterdyck, Utricht, Netherlands; he married Wyntje Eberts 10 Jul 1666 in New Amsterdam, New Netherlands; he died 1669 in New Amsterdam, New Netherland.

He Cornelis was born about 1610 in Westbroek, Province of Utrecht, The Netherlands, Holland. Cornelis was among the settlers chosen by the Dutch West India Company to establish a colony in the New World. Cornelis Aertsen Van Schaick was a man of 26 who arrived in New Netherlands after a long and arduous voyage in 1636. He joined a group of brave, resolute and hard-working people who were devoted to the colonization of the West India Company. The father of Cornelis was Adriaen (Aert) Van Schaick, who was born about 1580. The Dutch settlers of New Amsterdam were a diligent, thrifty and sturdy people unlike the personalities and characters portrayed by Washington Irving in his 'Knickerbockers History of New York.' From all that is known about Cornelis, it appears that he was energetic and active in building and defending the new settlement. Cornelis was willing to accept whatever risks were present in the hostile environment in which he lived and reared a family. In 1636, Cornelis received a grant of land from the West India Company. A tragedy befell Cornelis when he was living at Pavonia (PaulusHook). His buildings and property were destroyed in the February, 1643 Indian uprising. A number of Dutch settlers were killed in the conflict, which occurred during the administration of Gov. William Kieft. After Indians torched his house and farm buildings, Cornelis moved to Manhattan. However, the move did not offer a great deal of protection, considering Manhattan was also a frontier wilderness at the time. In 1645, Cornelis became the grantee of 22 acres of land at Crown Point, Corlears Hook, adjoining the Corlear plantation. The property had a long frontage on the East River. In 1656, Cornelis leased Gov. Stuyvessant's bouwrie, one of the largest as well as the most remote from the city. During the period of the lease, it was necessary to post extra watches throughout every night to protect the bouwries in this area from possible Indian depredation. The Indians had never become really friendly with the Dutch settlers since the 1643 episode. Although a peace treaty with the Indians was signed in 1645; there was continuous friction and misunderstandings between the Dutch and the Indians. Cornelis also became the lessee of the Jan Damen farm which extended from the East River to the Hudson, and was bounded generally on the south by what became known as Wall Street. On the north, it was bounded by Maiden Lane. He was one of the leading farmers of the colony, and is reported to have supplied the families of New Amsterdam with much of their produce. Cornelis for many years occupied the 'Great House' on the Damen farm located just outside the land gate on what is now the eastside of Broadway diagonally across from what is now Cedar Street. Upon the death of Jan Damen, Cornelis became one of the administrators of this estate. It is of passing interest that the Damen Farm abutted land formerly owned by Goosen Gerritsen Van Schaick (believed to be a cousin of Cornelis), who, when elected Magistrate of Albany in 1648, came to New Amsterdam to dispose of his property before accepting the office in Albany. Goosen Gerritsen came to New Netherlands in the year 1637. On September 12, 1648, Cornelis acknowledged by his mark that he was indebted to Bryant Dircksen Goethart in the sum of 322 guilders in sewan (local currency for trading with the Indians) payable on June 1, 1649. As one of the Overseers for the Outward (Bowery section of New York) where he received his first grant of land, Cornelis brought several suits against other landowners for improper maintenance of their fences. Cornelis was a friend and supporter of Gov. Peter Stuyvesant and early in 1664 made a contribution at the request of the governor for improving the defenses of the city. He did not sign any of the Remonstrances or Petitions requesting relief or redress. His fair-mindedness and excellent standing in the community is demonstrated by his repeated selection by the Burgomasters Court of New Amsterdam as one of the arbitrators in contested litigation which the Court found should be submitted to arbitration. The evidence is ample that Cornelis was well thought of in the Colony, and that he played a credible part in its early history, particularly throughout the Stuyvesant administration. Cornelis died in 1669 and his estate passed to his surviving heirs, his son, Arie Cornelissen, his brother, Hendrik Cornelissen and their sister, Lisbeth Cornelissen. They conveyed to Capt. John m Barry of Bergen, New Jersey two parcels of land on the island of Manhattan, the two parcels being confirmed by a patent from Gov. Francis Lovelace bearing the date 16 September 1669

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Cornelis Van Schaick's Timeline

1610
1610
Westbroek, Utrecht, Netherlands
1640
July 1, 1640
Age 30
Sloterdyck, Utrecht, Netherlands
1641
July 7, 1641
Age 31
New Amsterdam,New,,Netherlands
1642
July 9, 1642
Age 32
New Amsterdam, New York, United States
1646
September 1, 1646
Age 36
New Netherlands
1651
October 10, 1651
Age 41
New Netherlands
1662
July 10, 1662
Age 52
New Amsterdam, New Netherlands
1669
1669
Age 59
New Amsterdam, New Netherlands
1947
November 10, 1947
Age 59
November 10, 1947
Age 59