Criomhthann Niadh Nár mac Lughaidh, Rí na h'Éireann

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Criomhthann Niadh Nár mac Lughaidh, Rí na h'Éireann

Nicknames: "Criffin Crimthann Niadh Naire", "Criffan Crimthann Niadh Nor", "Criomhthan Niadhnar", "Chiomhthan Hiedh", "Chimhthan Hiadhmar", "Crimthann Nia Náir", "Criffin Niadhnar", "Niadh Nairi", "Naire", "Nair", "Naidh Nar", "Niadhnaire", "Nia Náire Criffan Crimthann Criomthann `Niadh-Nar"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ireland
Death: Died in 9 B.C. from a fall off a horse
Place of Burial: Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg mac Findemna, Rí na h'Éireann and Derbforgaill, Princess of Denmark
Husband of Baine ingen Loich, o Alba and Naira Tacht Chalach ingen Loich ak. as Tuathchuach Nar Baine, Princess of Alba
Father of Feradach Finnfechtnach mac Crimhthann, Ard rí na h'Éireann
Half brother of Mon. Criffan Crimthann (Criomthann; II) `Niadh-Nar' MacLUGAID

Occupation: 100th High King of Ireland, 100th King of Ireland
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Criomhthann Niadh Nár mac Lughaidh, Rí na h'Éireann

Crimhthann Niadhnair
7 B.C.
Son of Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg (98). Crimthann's death was occasioned by a fall from his horse. Was married to Nar-Tath-Chaoch, dau. of Laoch, son of Daire, who lived in the land of the Picts (Scotland). Crimthann Niadh Nar: This Monarch and Conaire Mór (or Conary the Great), the 97th Monarch of Ireland, respectively made expeditions to Britain and Gaul; and assisted the Picts and Britains in their wars with the Romans. Crimthann was married to Bainé, daughter of the King of Alba, and the mother of Feredach Fionn Feachtnach. O'Flaherty in the Ogygia says, "Naira, the daughter of Loich, the son of Dareletus of the northern Picts of Britain, was Crimthann's Queen, after whom, I suppose, he was called Nia-Nair." This Crimthann died at his fortress, called "Dun-Crimthann" (at Bin Edar now the Hill of Howth), after his return from an expedition against the Romans in Britain, from which he brought to Ireland various spoils: amongst other things, a splendid war chariot, gilded and highly ornamented; golden-hilted swords and shields, embossed with silver; a table studded with three hundred brilliant gems; a pair of grey hounds coupled with a splendid silver chain estimated to be worth one hundred cumal ("cumal:" Irish, a maid servant), or three hundred cows; together with a great quantity of other precious articles. In this Crimthann's reign the oppression of the Plebeians by the Milesians came to a climax: during three years the oppressed Attacotti saved their scanty earnings to prepare a sumptuous death-feast, which, after Crimthann's death, was held at a place called "Magh Cro" (or the Field of Blood), supposed to be situated near Lough Conn in the county of Mayo. To this feast they invited the provincial Kings, nobility, and gentry of the Milesian race in Ireland, with a view to their extirpation; and, when the enjoyment was at its height, the Attacots treacherously murdered almost all their unsuspecting victims. They then set up a king of their own tribe, a stranger named Cairbre (the 101st Monarch of Ireland), who was called "Cean-Cait" from the cat-headed shape of his head: the only king of a stranger that ruled Ireland since the Milesians first arrived there.

100Th Monarch Criffan Crimthann Niadh-Nar MacLugaid of IRELAND died from a fall from a horse. Criffan Crimthann (Criomthann; II) Niadh-Nar' MacLUGAID.

the Heroic'; 100th MONARCH of IRELAND; Nia Naire.

Parents: 98th Monarch Lughaid Sriabh-N Dearg of IRELAND and Clothra (Clotherne) ingen ECHACH.

Spouse: Naira (Mar Tath Chabob) of the PICTS. Children were: 102nd Monarch Feredac MacCrimthainan Nia Naire of IRELAND.

-------------------- Crimthann Nia Náir (nephew of Nár), son of Lugaid Riab nDerg, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. Lugaid is said to have fathered him on his own mother, Clothru, daughter of Eochu Feidlech.

The Lebor Gabála Érenn says he overthrew the High King Conchobar Abradruad, but does not say he became High King himself - Conchobar was succeeded by Cairbre Cinnchait.[1] Geoffrey Keating[2] and the Annals of the Four Masters[3] agree that Crimthann succeeded Conchobar as High King and ruled for sixteen years. He is said to have gone on a voyage with his aunt Nár, a fairy woman, for a month and a fortnight, and returned with treasures including a gilded chariot, a golden fidchell board, a gold-embroidered cloak, a sword inlaid with gold serpents, a silver-bossed shield, a spear and a sling which never missed their mark, and two greyhounds with a silver chain between them. Soon after he returned he fell from his horse and died at Howth. Keating says he was succeeded by his son Feradach Finnfechtnach, the Annals of the Four Masters by Cairbre Cinnchait.

The Lebor Gabála places him in the reign of the Roman emperor Vespasian (AD 69-79). The chronology of Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 12 BC - AD 5, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 8 BC - AD 9.

References

  1. ^ R. A. Stewart Macalister (ed. & trans.), Lebor Gabála Érenn: The Book of the Taking of Ireland Part V, Irish Texts Society, 1956, p. 303-305
  2. ^ Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éirinn 1.37-38
  3. ^ Annals of the Four Masters M5192-9

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crimthann_Nia_N%C3%A1ir -------------------- NOTE: Dates are given BC.(Before Christ) upwards.

Individual Record FamilySearch™ Pedigree Resource File - www.familysearch.org.

 

Search Results | Print

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Crimthann-Niadh-Nar "The Heroic" 100th King of Ireland Compact Disc #131 Pin #1904353 Pedigree

Sex:  M  

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Event(s)

Birth:   abt 0023 BC 

 Ireland  
Death:   0009 

 Dun-Crimhthann,Edair,Ireland  

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Parents

Father:  Lughaidh Sriabh-Ndearg     Disc #131     Pin #1904352   
Mother:  Dearbhorgaill Lochloinn     Disc #131     Pin #1912504  

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Marriage(s)

Spouse:  Nar Baine Tuathchuach     Disc #131     Pin #1895226  
Marriage:  abt 0008  
 Ireland  

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Notes and Sources

Notes:  Available on CD-ROM Disc# 131   
Sources:  None   

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Submitter

Douglas POTTS 

2916 NW Bucklin Hill #477 Silverdale, WA 98383

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100 High King of Ireland

Crimhthann Niadhnair
7 B.C.
Son of Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg (98). Crimthann's death was occasioned by a fall from his horse. Was married to Nar-Tath-Chaoch, dau. of Laoch, son of Daire, who lived in the land of the Picts (Scotland). Crimthann Niadh Nar: This Monarch and Conaire Mór (or Conary the Great), the 97th Monarch of Ireland, respectively made expeditions to Britain and Gaul; and assisted the Picts and Britains in their wars with the Romans. Crimthann was married to Bainé, daughter of the King of Alba, and the mother of Feredach Fionn Feachtnach. O'Flaherty in the Ogygia says, "Naira, the daughter of Loich, the son of Dareletus of the northern Picts of Britain, was Crimthann's Queen, after whom, I suppose, he was called Nia-Nair." This Crimthann died at his fortress, called "Dun-Crimthann" (at Bin Edar now the Hill of Howth), after his return from an expedition against the Romans in Britain, from which he brought to Ireland various spoils: amongst other things, a splendid war chariot, gilded and highly ornamented; golden-hilted swords and shields, embossed with silver; a table studded with three hundred brilliant gems; a pair of grey hounds coupled with a splendid silver chain estimated to be worth one hundred cumal ("cumal:" Irish, a maid servant), or three hundred cows; together with a great quantity of other precious articles. In this Crimthann's reign the oppression of the Plebeians by the Milesians came to a climax: during three years the oppressed Attacotti saved their scanty earnings to prepare a sumptuous death-feast, which, after Crimthann's death, was held at a place called "Magh Cro" (or the Field of Blood), supposed to be situated near Lough Conn in the county of Mayo. To this feast they invited the provincial Kings, nobility, and gentry of the Milesian race in Ireland, with a view to their extirpation; and, when the enjoyment was at its height, the Attacots treacherously murdered almost all their unsuspecting victims. They then set up a king of their own tribe, a stranger named Cairbre (the 101st Monarch of Ireland), who was called "Cean-Cait" from the cat-headed shape of his head: the only king of a stranger that ruled Ireland since the Milesians first arrived there.

Sources: www.familysearch.org

             The High Kings of Ireland

----------------------------

Crimhthann Niadhnair, King of Ireland, d. 009 in Dun Crimhthainn, Edair, Ireland, cause of death was a massacre by the Aitheach Tuatha.

Father: Lughaidh Sriabh nDearg, King of Ireland, d. ca. 009 BC, cause of death was grief.

Crimhthann slew Conchobhar Abhradhruadh to become king ca. 7 BC and reigned for sixteen years. In Anno Mundi 5200, in the eighth year of Crimhthann's reign, Jesus the Christ was born.

Crimhthann went on a famous expedition from which he brought back many valuable items, though he died on the return journey. Among these items were jewels, a golden chariot, a jewelled chess board, and the Cedach Crimhthainn, which was a cloak embroidered with gold. He also brought a sword inlaid with gold serpents, a shield with silver bosses, a spear the wound from which would never heal, a sling from which the stone never missed its target, and two greyhounds joined by a heavy silver chain.

Spouse: Baine, Princess of Alba

Baine was probably the daughter of either Daire Dorn Mor or Coirpre Firmaora.

Married ca. 008.

Children:

•Fearadhach Finnfeachtnach, b. ca. 010, m. ? verch Prasutagus, d. ca. 036 in Tara, Ireland, He became king of Ireland, ca. 015 in Tara, Ireland


Source: ancient Kings of Ireland - Google (31.5.2010)S.B, -------------------- Crimthann Niadh Nar King of Ireland

Birth 017 BC

Death 009, Hill of Howth, Ireland (fell from his horse)

Father Lugaidh Sriabh Dearg King of Ireland (<54bc-008bc)

Mother Clotherne

Misc. Notes

was the 100th 'Monarch of Ireland, and styled "The Heroic." It was in this Monarch's reign that our Lord and Saviour JESUS CHRIST was born. Crimthann's death was occasioned by a fall from his horse, B.C. 9. Was married to Nar-Tath-Chaoch, dau. of Laoch, son of Daire, who lived in the land of the Picts (Scotland).

Crimthann Niadh Nar: This Monarch and Conaire Mór (or Conary the Great), 97th Monarch of Ireland, respectively made expeditions to Britain and Gaul; and assisted the Picts and Britains in their wars with the Romans. Crimthann was married to Bainé, daughter of the King of Alba, and the mother of Feredach Fionn Feachtnach, (the next name on this Stem). O'Flaherty in the Ogygia, p. 181, says, "Naira, the daughter of Loich, the son of Dareletus of the northern Picts of Britain, was Crimthann's Queen, after whom, I suppose, he was called Nia-Nair."

This Crimthann died at his fortress, called "Dun-Crimthann" (at Bin Edar now the Hill of Howth), after his return from an expedition against the Romans in Britain, from which be brought to Ireland various spoils : amongst other things, a splendid war chariot, gilded and highly ornamented; golden-hilted swords and shields, embossed with silver; a table studded with three hundred brillant gems; a pair of grey hounds coupled with a splendid silverchain estimated to be worth one hundred cumal ("cumal:" Irish, a maid servant), or three hundred cows ; together with a great quantity of other. precious articles. In this Crimthann's reign the oppression of the Plebeians by the Milesians came to a climax : during three ycars the oppressed Atticotti saved t1heir scanty earnings to prepare a sumptuous death-feast, which, after Crimthann's death, was held at a place called "Magh Cro" (or the Field of Blood), supposed to be situated near Lough Conn in the county of Mayo. To this feast they invited the provincial Kings, nobility, and gentry of the Milesian race in Ireland, with a view to their extirpation ; and, when the enjoyment was at its height, the Attacots treacherously murdered almost all their unsuspecting victims.

They then set up a king of their own tribe, a stranger named Cairbre (the 101st Monarch of Ireland), who was called "Cean-Cait" from the cat-headed sbape of his head: the only king of a stranger that ruled Ireland since the Milesians first arrived there. —CONNELLAN.

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.

Spouses

1Nar Tacht Chalach Princess of the Picts

Birth

bef 024 BC, Scotland

Father

Loich (Loagh)

Children

Feredach Fionn (<009-36)

-------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_017.htm

was the 100th 'Monarch of Ireland, and styled "The Heroic." It was in this Monarch's reign that our Lord and Saviour JESUS CHRIST was born. Crimthann's death was occasioned by a fall from his horse, B.C. 9. Was married to Nar-Tath-Chaoch, dau. of Laoch, son of Daire, who lived in the land of the Picts (Scotland).

Crimthann Niadh Nar: This Monarch and Conaire Mór (or Conary the Great), 97th Monarch of Ireland, respectively made expeditions to Britain and Gaul; and assisted the Picts and Britains in their wars with the Romans. Crimthann was married to Bainé, daughter of the King of Alba, and the mother of Feredach Fionn Feachtnach, (the next name on this Stem). O'Flaherty in the Ogygia, p. 181, says, "Naira, the daughter of Loich, the son of Dareletus of the northern Picts of Britain, was Crimthann's Queen, after whom, I suppose, he was called Nia-Nair."

This Crimthann died at his fortress, called "Dun-Crimthann" (at Bin Edar now the Hill of Howth), after his return from an expedition against the Romans in Britain, from which be brought to Ireland various spoils : amongst other things, a splendid war chariot, gilded and highly ornamented; golden-hilted swords and shields, embossed with silver; a table studded with three hundred brillant gems; a pair of grey hounds coupled with a splendid silverchain estimated to be worth one hundred cumal ("cumal:" Irish, a maid servant), or three hundred cows ; together with a great quantity of other. precious articles. In this Crimthann's reign the oppression of the Plebeians by the Milesians came to a climax : during three ycars the oppressed Atticotti saved t1heir scanty earnings to prepare a sumptuous death-feast, which, after Crimthann's death, was held at a place called "Magh Cro" (or the Field of Blood), supposed to be situated near Lough Conn in the county of Mayo. To this feast they invited the provincial Kings, nobility, and gentry of the Milesian race in Ireland, with a view to their extirpation ; and, when the enjoyment was at its height, the Attacots treacherously murdered almost all their unsuspecting victims. They then set up a king of their own tribe, a stranger named Cairbre (the 101st Monarch of Ireland), who was called "Cean-Cait" from the cat-headed sbape of his head: the only king of a stranger that ruled Ireland since the Milesians first arrived there. —CONNELLAN.

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9. -------------------- Title: King of Ireland

-------------------- Lived in the time of Christ -------------------- Crimthann Nia Náir (nephew of Nár), son of Lugaid Riab nDerg, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. Lugaid is said to have fathered him on his own mother, Clothru, daughter of Eochu Feidlech.[1]

The Lebor Gabála Érenn says he overthrew the High King Conchobar Abradruad, but does not say he became High King himself - Conchobar was succeeded by Cairbre Cinnchait.[2] Geoffrey Keating[3] and the Annals of the Four Masters[4] agree that Crimthann succeeded Conchobar as High King and ruled for sixteen years. He is said to have gone on a voyage with his aunt Nár, a fairy woman, for a month and a fortnight, and returned with treasures including a gilded chariot, a golden fidchell board, a gold-embroidered cloak, a sword inlaid with gold serpents, a silver-bossed shield, a spear and a sling which never missed their mark, and two greyhounds with a silver chain between them. Soon after he returned he fell from his horse and died at Howth. Keating says he was succeeded by his son Feradach Finnfechtnach, the Annals of the Four Masters by Cairbre Cinnchait.

The Lebor Gabála places him in the reign of the Roman emperor Vespasian (AD 69-79). The chronology of Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 12 BC - AD 5, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 8 BC - AD 9.

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Criomhthann Niadh Nár mac Lughaidh, Rí na h'Éireann's Timeline

-39
-39
Ireland
9
9
Age 47
Ireland
15
15
Age 53
Tara, Ireland
112
112
Age 150
9 B.C. from a fall off a horse
????
Europe
????
Ireland
????
100th, King of Scotland
????
100th, King of Scotland
????
????
100th, King of Scotland