Cunedda Wledig, King of Gwynedd

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Cunedda Wledig "Imperator" ap Edern, Brenin Lothain a Gwenydd

Nicknames: "Imperator", "Wledig", "The Warrior", "the Imperator", "King of North Wales", "Latin: Cunetacius", "English: Kenneth"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Cardigan, Wales
Death: Died in Gwynedd, Wales
Immediate Family:

Son of Edern Aeturnus Ap Padarn, Beisrudd of Britain and NN Princess of Dumonia and Brittany Wife of Edern Aeturnus Ap Padarn
Husband of Gwawl verch Coel, of Rheged
Father of Cynlas; Merio; Teilion; Tybion . ap Cunedda; Edern . ap Cunedda, Brenin Edeyrnion and 11 others

Occupation: Brenin Lothain and Gwenydd (King), Progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd, King of Britian
Managed by: Shawn Stevenson
Last Updated:

About Cunedda Wledig "Imperator" ap Edern, Brenin Lothain a Gwenydd

Cunedda (Wledig, the Imperator) ap Edern

Cunedda, known as Wledig, the Imperator, was born about 0386 in Cardigan, Wales.1 Wledig, the Imperator's father was Edern ap Padarn and his mother was <Unknown>. His paternal grandparents were Padarn (Beisrudd) ap Tegid and <Unknown>. He was an only child. He died about 0460 in Gwynedd, Wales.1

Cunedda ap Edern (c. 386–c. 460 AD; reigned from the 440s or 450s) (Latin: Cunetacius; English: Kenneth), also known as Cunedda Wledig ("holder of lands"), was an important early Welsh leader, and the progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd.

The name Cunedda derives from the Brythonic word counodagos, meaning 'good lord'. His genealogy is traced back to Padarn Beisrudd, which literally translates as Paternus of the Scarlet Robe. One traditional interpretation identifies Padarn as a Roman (or Romano-British) official of reasonably high rank who had been placed in command of Votadini troops stationed in the Clackmannanshire region of Scotland in the 380s or earlier by the Emperor Magnus Maximus. Alternatively, he may have been a frontier chieftain who was granted Roman military rank, a practice attested elsewhere along the empire's borders at the time. In all likelihood, Padarn's command in Scotland was assumed after his death by his son, Edern (Latin: Æturnus), and then passed to Edern's son, Cunedda.

Cunedda and his forebears led the Votadini against Pictish and Irish incursions south of Hadrian's Wall. Sometime after this, the Votadini troops under Cunedda relocated to North Wales in order to defend the region from Irish invasion. Cunedda established himself in Wales, in the territory of the Venedoti, which would become the centre of the kingdom of Gwynedd. Two explanations for these actions have been suggested: either Cunedda was acting under the orders of Maximus (or Maximus's successors) or Vortigern, the high king of the British in the immediate post-Roman era. The range of dates (suggested by P. C. Bartrum) runs from the late 370s, which would favor Maximus, to the late 440s, which would favor Vortigern.

The suggestion that Cunedda was operating under instructions from Rome has been challenged by several historians. David Dumville dismisses the whole concept of transplanting foederati from Scotland to Wales in this manner, given that the political state of sub-Roman Britain would probably have made it impossible to exercise such centralised control by the fifth century. As Maximus himself was dead by the end of 388, and Constantine III departed from Britain with the last of Rome's military forces in 407, less than a generation later, it is doubtful that Rome had much direct influence over the military actions of the Votadini, either through Maximus or any other emissary, for any significant length of time.

Maximus (or his successors) may have handed over control of the British frontiers to local chieftains at an earlier date; with the evacuation of the fort at Chester (which Mike Ashley, incidentally, argues is most likely where Cunedda established his initial base in the region, some years later) in the 370s, he may have had little option. Given that the archaeological record demonstrates Irish settlement on the Llŷn peninsula however and possible raids as far west as Wroxeter by the late 4th century, it is difficult to conceive of either Roman or allied British forces having presented an effective defence in Wales.

Academics such as Sheppard Frere have argued that it may have been Vortigern who, adopting elements of Roman statecraft, moved the Votadini south, just as he invited Saxon settlers to protect other parts of the island. According to this version of events, Vortigern would have instructed Cunedda and his Votadini subjects to move to Wales in response to the aforementioned Irish incursions no later than the year 442, when Vortigern's former Saxon allies rebelled against his rule.

Cunedda's supposed grandson Maelgwn Gwynedd was a contemporary of Gildas, and according to the Annales Cambriae died in 547. The reliability of early Welsh genealogies is not uncontested however, and many of the claims regarding the number and identity of Cunedda's heirs did not surface until as late as the 10th century. Nonetheless, if we accept this information as valid, calculating back from this date suggests the mid-5th century interpretation.

Of Cunedda personally even less is known. Probably celebrated for his strength, courage, and ability to rally the beleaguered Romano-British forces of the region, he eventually secured a politically advantageous marriage to Gwawl, daughter of Coel Hen, the Romano-British ruler of Eboracum (modern York), and is claimed to have had nine sons. The early kingdoms of Ceredigion and Meirionnydd were supposedly named after his two sons Ceredig and Meirion.

--------------------

Cunedda

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cunedda ap Edern (c. 386–c. 460; reigned from the 440s or 450s) (Latin: Cunetacius; English: Kenneth), also known as Cunedda Wledig ("holder of lands"), was an important early Welsh leader, and the progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd.

The name 'Cunedda' derives from the Brythonic word counodagos, meaning 'good lord'. His genealogy is traced back to Padarn Beisrudd, which literally translates as Paternus of the Scarlet Robe. One traditional interpretation identifies Padarn as a Roman (or Romano-British) official of reasonably high rank who had been placed in command of Votadini troops stationed in the Clackmannanshire region of Scotland in the 380s or earlier by the Emperor Magnus Maximus. Alternatively, he may have been a frontier chieftain who was granted Roman military rank, a practice attested elsewhere along the empire's borders at the time. In all likelihood, Padarn's command in Scotland was assumed after his death by his son, Edern (Latin: Æturnus), and then passed to Edern's son, Cunedda.

Cunedda and his forebears led the Votadini against Pictish and Irish incursions south of Hadrian's Wall. Sometime after this, the Votadini troops under Cunedda relocated to North Wales in order to defend the region from Irish invasion. Cunedda established himself in Wales, in the territory of the Venedoti, which would become the centre of the kingdom of Gwynedd. Two explanations for these actions have been suggested: either Cunedda was acting under the orders of Maximus (or Maximus's successors) or Vortigern, the high king of the British in the immediate post-Roman era. The range of dates (suggested by PC Bartrum) runs from the late 370s, which would favor Maximus, to the late 440s, which would favor Vortigern.

The suggestion that Cunedda was operating under instructions from Rome has been challenged by several historians. David Dumville dismisses the whole concept of transplanting foederati from Scotland to Wales in this manner, given that the political state of sub-Roman Britain would probably have made it impossible to exercise such centralised control by the fifth century. As Maximus himself was dead by the end of 388, and Constantine III departed from Britain with the last of Rome's military forces in 407, less than a generation later, it is doubtful that Rome had much direct influence over the military actions of the Votadini, either through Maximus or any other emissary, for any significant length of time.

Maximus (or his successors) may have handed over control of the British frontiers to local chieftains at an earlier date; with the evacuation of the fort at Chester (which Mike Ashley, incidentally, argues is most likely where Cunedda established his initial base in the region, some years later) in the 370s, he may have had little option. Given that the archaeological record demonstrates Irish settlement on the Llŷn peninsula however and possible raids as far west as Wroxeter by the late 4th century, it is difficult to conceive of either Roman or allied British forces having presented an effective defence in Wales.

Academics such as Sheppard Frere have argued that it may have been Vortigern who, adopting elements of Roman statecraft, moved the Votadini south, just as he invited Saxon settlers to protect other parts of the island. According to this version of events, Vortigern would have instructed Cunedda and his Votadini subjects to move to Wales in response to the aforementioned Irish incursions no later than the year 442, when Vortigern's former Saxon allies rebelled against his rule.

Cunedda's supposed grandson Maelgwn Hir ap Cadwallon was a contemporary of Gildas, and according to the Annales Cambriae died in 547. The reliability of early Welsh genealogies is not uncontested however, and many of the claims regarding the number and identity of Cunedda's heirs did not surface until as late as the 10th century. Nonetheless, if we accept this information as valid, calculating back from this date suggests the mid-5th century interpretation.

Of Cunedda personally even less is known. Probably celebrated for his strength, courage, and ability to rally the beleaguered Romano-British forces of the region, he eventually secured a politically advantageous marriage to Gwawl, daughter of Coel Hen, the Romano-British ruler of Eboracum (modern York), and is claimed to have had nine sons. Cardigan (Welsh: Ceredigion) and Merioneth (Welsh: Meirionnydd) were supposedly named after his two sons Ceredig and Meirion.

From BBC

Cunedda ap Edern

Cunedda was the first in the line of the Gwynedd royal line and a Romano-Celtic lord

Cunedda ap Edern was born in about 386AD, and was a lord of the Celtic people who lived in Wales, South West England and the North of England, south of the Pictish area of Scotland.

A traditional account has his grandfather, Padarn Beisrudd as a Romano-British offical of high rank who was charged with fighting the Picts in Scotland. He may have been given, like other native frontier lords, a Roman rank. Cunedda is thought to have travelled to North Wales to defend the area against the Irish; an area which became Gwynedd.

The period was one of political chaos in Europe, as Rome was sacked by the Goths, and the previously mighty empire crumbled. Romano-British natives were left in something of a power vaccuum when the Roman state slipped out of Britain in 410AD.

Lords like Cunedda were left to keep something of a working state going, and he himself is thought to have been effective in repelling incursions into the area of which he had control. His family line, the royal family of Gwynedd, continued his military skills and set up a powerful kingdom within Wales.

--------------------

Cunedda ap Edern (c. 386–c. 460 AD; reigned from the 440s or 450s) (Latin: Cunetacius; English: Kenneth), also known as Cunedda Wledig ("holder of lands"), was an important early Welsh leader, and the progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd.

The name Cunedda derives from the Brythonic word counodagos, meaning 'good lord'. His genealogy is traced back to Padarn Beisrudd, which literally translates as Paternus of the Scarlet Robe. One traditional interpretation identifies Padarn as a Roman (or Romano-British) official of reasonably high rank who had been placed in command of Votadini troops stationed in the Clackmannanshire region of Scotland in the 380s or earlier by the Emperor Magnus Maximus. Alternatively, he may have been a frontier chieftain who was granted Roman military rank, a practice attested elsewhere along the empire's borders at the time. In all likelihood, Padarn's command in Scotland was assumed after his death by his son, Edern (Latin: Æturnus), and then passed to Edern's son, Cunedda.

Cunedda and his forebears led the Votadini against Pictish and Irish incursions south of Hadrian's Wall. Sometime after this, the Votadini troops under Cunedda relocated to North Wales in order to defend the region from Irish invasion. Cunedda established himself in Wales, in the territory of the Venedoti, which would become the centre of the kingdom of Gwynedd. Two explanations for these actions have been suggested: either Cunedda was acting under the orders of Maximus (or Maximus's successors) or Vortigern, the high king of the British in the immediate post-Roman era. The range of dates (suggested by P. C. Bartrum) runs from the late 370s, which would favor Maximus, to the late 440s, which would favor Vortigern.

The suggestion that Cunedda was operating under instructions from Rome has been challenged by several historians. David Dumville dismisses the whole concept of transplanting foederati from Scotland to Wales in this manner, given that the political state of sub-Roman Britain would probably have made it impossible to exercise such centralised control by the fifth century. As Maximus himself was dead by the end of 388, and Constantine III departed from Britain with the last of Rome's military forces in 407, less than a generation later, it is doubtful that Rome had much direct influence over the military actions of the Votadini, either through Maximus or any other emissary, for any significant length of time.

Maximus (or his successors) may have handed over control of the British frontiers to local chieftains at an earlier date; with the evacuation of the fort at Chester (which Mike Ashley, incidentally, argues is most likely where Cunedda established his initial base in the region, some years later) in the 370s, he may have had little option. Given that the archaeological record demonstrates Irish settlement on the Llŷn peninsula however and possible raids as far west as Wroxeter by the late 4th century, it is difficult to conceive of either Roman or allied British forces having presented an effective defence in Wales.

Academics such as Sheppard Frere have argued that it may have been Vortigern who, adopting elements of Roman statecraft, moved the Votadini south, just as he invited Saxon settlers to protect other parts of the island. According to this version of events, Vortigern would have instructed Cunedda and his Votadini subjects to move to Wales in response to the aforementioned Irish incursions no later than the year 442, when Vortigern's former Saxon allies rebelled against his rule.

Cunedda's supposed grandson Maelgwn Gwynedd was a contemporary of Gildas, and according to the Annales Cambriae died in 547. The reliability of early Welsh genealogies is not uncontested however, and many of the claims regarding the number and identity of Cunedda's heirs did not surface until as late as the 10th century. Nonetheless, if we accept this information as valid, calculating back from this date suggests the mid-5th century interpretation.

Of Cunedda personally even less is known. Probably celebrated for his strength, courage, and ability to rally the beleaguered Romano-British forces of the region, he eventually secured a politically advantageous marriage to Gwawl, daughter of Coel Hen, the Romano-British ruler of Eboracum (modern York), and is claimed to have had nine sons. The early kingdoms of Ceredigion and Meirionnydd were supposedly named after his two sons Ceredig and Meirion. -------------------- Cunedda (Wledig, the Imperator) ap Edern

Cunedda, known as Wledig, the Imperator, was born about 0386 in Cardigan, Wales.1 Wledig, the Imperator's father was Edern ap Padarn and his mother was <Unknown>. His paternal grandparents were Padarn (Beisrudd) ap Tegid and <Unknown>. He was an only child. He died about 0460 in Gwynedd, Wales.1 -------------------- Cunedda (Wledig, the Imperator) ap Edern

Cunedda, known as Wledig, the Imperator, was born about 0386 in Cardigan, Wales.1 Wledig, the Imperator's father was Edern ap Padarn and his mother was <Unknown>. His paternal grandparents were Padarn (Beisrudd) ap Tegid and <Unknown>. He was an only child. He died about 0460 in Gwynedd, Wales.1 -------------------- ID: I7082

Name: Cunedda Wledig ap EDERN KING OF NORTH WALES

Given Name: Cunedda Wledig ap EDERN

Surname: King of NORTH WALES

Sex: M

Change Date: 13 MAY 2009

Note:

aka Kuneda Wledic ap EDEYRN; Led a group of Votadini Picts from Scotland (Firth of Forth) to secure Wales from Irish raiders; Ruler of Manau Goutodin; prob. eponym of Gwynedd

!#4568> Welsh Genealogies Ad 300-1400,-v1-p1*,2,3,5,8,24,27 (FHL #6025561);

  1. 2105> Wales Visitations-v2-p104 (FHL Q942.9 D23d);

!ARCH REC> Wurts Magna Charta; Plantagenent Ancestry; Ancestral Lines, Jones;

Royal Ancestors of Magna Charta Barons; (birth 375, King of Wales. Known as

Cunedda the Great, was a Roman Officer, half Welsh by birth);

!MISC> moved by Vortigern in circa 430 from the north to be employed against

the Irish in north Wales;

@AFN #HPGDCX;

1 2

Birth: ABT 386 in Cardiganshire, Wales, United Kingdom

Death: 445

Christening: , Votadini, North Britain

Ancestral File #: HPGD-CX

Reference Number: > 4 WEL

Father: Edern Ap PADARN b: ABT 364 in Wales, United Kingdom c: in , Votadini, North Britain

Marriage 1 Gwawl ferch COEL b: ABT 388 in Wales, United Kingdom

Married: in , North Wales

Children

Einion Yrth (the Impetuous) KING OF GWYNEDD b: ABT 417 in North Wales c: in , Votadini, North Britain
Ysfael Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 416 in Wales, United Kingdom
Edern Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 410 in Edeirnion, Merionethshire, Wales, United Kingdom
Rhufon Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 411 in Rhufoniog, Denbighshire, Wales, United Kingdom
Ceredig Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 413 in Ceredigion, Wales, United Kingdom
Afloeg Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 414 in Cafflogion, Llyn, Caernarvonshire, Wales, United Kingdom
Gwen ferch CUNEDDA b: ABT 424 in Wales, United Kingdom c: in , Votadini, North Britain
Tegid (Tegeingl) ferch CUNEDDA b: ABT 420 in Wales, United Kingdom c: in , Votadini, North Britain
Dogfael Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 422 in Dogfeiling, Dyffryn Clwyd, Denbighshire, Wales, United Kingdom
Dunod ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 419 in Dunoding, Wales, United Kingdom
Gwron Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 426 in Votadini, North Britain
Tybion Ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 408 in Meirionydd, Merionethshire, Wales, United Kingdom
Tybion ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 403 in , Votadini, North Britain
Edern ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 406 in Edeirnion, Merionethshire, Wales, United Kingdom
Rhufon ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 410 in , Rhufoniog, Wales, United Kingdom
Afloeg ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 420 in Cafflogion, Caernarvonshire, Wales, United Kingdom
Ysfael ap CUNEDDA b: ABT 421 in , Votadini, North Britain

Sources:

Abbrev: Ancestral File

Title: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R) Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 JAN 1998;FamilySearch® Ancestral File? v4.19" 3 Feb 2001

/i> Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 JAN 1998;FamilySearch® Ancestral File? v4.19" 3 Feb 2001

/i> Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 JAN 1998;FamilySearch® Ancestral File? v4.19" 3 Feb 2001

Repository:

Name: Family History Library

35 N West Temple Street

Repository:

Abbrev: Pedigree Resource File CD 6

Title: Pedigree Resource File CD 6 (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 1999)serve, Inc., 1999)serve, Inc., 1999).

Repository:

  • Cunneda "the Great" Wledig ap Edern (Aeternus) King of Votadini & North Wales

born about 0370 Votadini, North Britain

died about 0450

father:

  • Edern (Aeternus) ap Padern

born about 0420?

mother:

unknown

siblings:

unknown

spouse:

  • Gwawl verch Coel Hen

born about 0387 Pennines, Britain

children:

  • Einion Yrth "the Impetuous" ap Cunneda King of Gwynedd born about 0425
  • Gwron ap Cunedda born about 0431 Votadini, North Britain

Ceredig ap Cunneda

Edern ap Cunneda

biographical and/or anecdotal:

Cunedda Weledig (Cunedda the Great), was the first in the dynasty of Cunnedda, the line of Gwynedd. According to Davies tradition states Cunneda and eight sons and one grandson came down from the north and drove the Irish from Gwynedd.

notes or source:

ancestry.com & HBJ

"A History of Wales" by John Davies

Cunedda

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cunedda ap Edern

Father Eternus (Edeyrn)

Cunedda ap Edern (fl 5th century) (Latin: Cunetacius; English: Kenneth), also known as Cunedda Wledig ("holder of lands"), was an important early Welsh leader, and the progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd.

The name Cunedda derives from the Brythonic word kunodagos, meaning 'good hound'. His genealogy is traced back to Padarn Beisrudd, which literally translates as Paternus of the Scarlet Robe. One traditional interpretation identifies Padarn as a Roman (or Romano-British) official of reasonably high rank who had been placed in command of Votadini troops stationed in the Clackmannanshire region of Scotland in the 380s or earlier by the Emperor Magnus Maximus. Alternatively, he may have been a frontier chieftain who was granted Roman military rank, a practice attested elsewhere along the empire's borders at the time. In all likelihood, Padarn's command in Scotland was assumed after his death by his son, Edern (Latin: Æturnus), and then passed to Edern's son, Cunedda.

Cunedda and his forebears led the Votadini against Pictish and Irish incursions south of Hadrian's Wall. Sometime after this, the Votadini troops under Cunedda relocated to North Wales in order to defend the region from Irish invasion, specifically the Uí Liatháin, as mentioned in the Historia Brittonum. Cunedda established himself in Wales, in the territory of the Venedoti, which would become the centre of the kingdom of Gwynedd. Two explanations for these actions have been suggested: either Cunedda was acting under the orders of Maximus (or Maximus's successors) or Vortigern, the high king of the British in the immediate post-Roman era. The range of dates (suggested by P. C. Bartrum) runs from the late 370s, which would favor Maximus, to the late 440s, which would favor Vortigern.

The suggestion that Cunedda was operating under instructions from Rome has been challenged by several historians. David Dumville dismisses the whole concept of transplanting foederati from Scotland to Wales in this manner, given that the political state of sub-Roman Britain would probably have made it impossible to exercise such centralised control by the fifth century. As Maximus himself was dead by the end of 388, and Constantine III departed from Britain with the last of Rome's military forces in 407, less than a generation later, it is doubtful that Rome had much direct influence over the military actions of the Votadini, either through Maximus or any other emissary, for any significant length of time.

Maximus (or his successors) may have handed over control of the British frontiers to local chieftains at an earlier date; with the evacuation of the fort at Chester (which Mike Ashley, incidentally, argues is most likely where Cunedda established his initial base in the region, some years later) in the 370s, he may have had little option. Given that the archaeological record demonstrates Irish settlement on the Llŷn peninsula however and possible raids as far west as Wroxeter by the late 4th century, it is difficult to conceive of either Roman or allied British forces having presented an effective defence in Wales.

Academics such as Sheppard Frere have argued that it may have been Vortigern who, adopting elements of Roman statecraft, moved the Votadini south, just as he invited Saxon settlers to protect other parts of the island. According to this version of events, Vortigern would have instructed Cunedda and his Votadini subjects to move to Wales in response to the aforementioned Irish incursions no later than the year 442, when Vortigern's former Saxon allies rebelled against his rule.

Cunedda's supposed grandson Maelgwn Gwynedd was a contemporary of Gildas. The reliability of early Welsh genealogies is not uncontested however, and many of the claims regarding the number and identity of Cunedda's heirs did not surface until as late as the 10th century.

Of Cunedda personally even less is known. Probably celebrated for his strength, courage, and ability to rally the beleaguered Romano-British forces of the region, he eventually secured a politically advantageous marriage to Gwawl, daughter of Coel Hen, the Romano-British ruler of Eboracum (modern York), and is claimed to have had nine sons. The early kingdoms of Ceredigion and Meirionnydd were supposedly named after his two sons Ceredig and Meirion.

Allt Cunedda

The hill of Allt Cunedda close to Cydweli in Carmarthenshire is probably associated with this Cunedda and suggests his campaigns against the Irish extended from Gwynedd into to south west Wales. Amateur excavations of this site in the nineteenth century revealed an Iron Age hill fort and several collapsed stone cists containing the buried but well preserved skeletons of several men with formidable physical proportions. At least one of these was found in the seated position and another buried beneath a massive stone "shield" who had apparently been killed by a head wound. The bones appear to have been sent to various museums and have all since been woefully lost. One of the tumuli was known locally as Banc Benisel and was reputedly the grave of a Sawyl Penuchel, a legendary King of the Britons presumably from late Iron Age Britain. His epithet Penuchel or Ben Uchel means "high head" perhaps on account of his height. [1] According to the Welsh Life of Saint Cadoc, a king named Sawyl Penuchel held court at Allt Cunedda. Confusingly, Geoffrey of Monmouth, in his History of the Kings of Britain (1136), uses the name Samuil Penessil for a legendary pre-Roman king of Britain, preceded by Redechius and succeeded by Pir.[1] Whether this is the same king and Cadoc's tale is just revisiting an old folk memory, this a different man of the same name, or simply an error by the composer of the Life, is unclear.

Much of the archaeological evidence was inadvertently destroyed by J. Fenton's expedition in 1851 and it is not known if all the great men buried at this site were contemporaries or if there were successive burials on a site with long term cultural significance. The name connection with Cunedda makes it tempting to speculate that the great Cunedda himself may have been buried at this site; a site whose Iron Age notoriety may well have have maintained a cultural importance well after the end of the Roman period and into the Dark Ages. The folk memories of people living near Allt Cunedda that were recorded by the Victorian antiquarians suggests an enduring respect for this site of deep historic importance.

[edit]Immediate Family

[2]

[edit]Immediate Ancestors

Eternus (Edeyrn) father

Paternus-(Padarn Beisrudd-of the red robe) grandfather

Tacitus - (Tegid) great grandfather

[edit]Issue

Osmail

Rumanus

Dunautus

Eternus

Ceretic

Abloyc

Enniaun Girt (Einion Yrth)

Docmail

Typiaun

[edit]References

Lloyd, John Edward (1911). A History of Wales: From the Norman Invasion to the Edwardian Conquest, Volume I. p. 117, 118.

J. Fenton, 'The Grave of Sawyl Benisel, King of the Britons', Archaeol. Camb., vol 2, (1851) new ser, pp. 159162.

[edit]Footnotes

^ History of the Kings of Britain 3.19 at Wikisource. Lewis Thorpe's translation for Penguin Classics (p. 105) gives two kings, Samuil followed by Penessil.

^ A History of Wales from the Earliest Times to the Edwardian Conquest, Volume I, 1912

The genealogies of Welsh princes in Harleian MS. 3859, which were put together not later than the middle of the tenth century, supply the links which connect Maelgwn and Cunedda and furnish the latter with a long pedigree.86 Maelgwn was the son of Cadwallon Lawhir (the Long-handed), the son of Einion Yrth (the Impetuous ?),87 the son of Cunedda ; as to the ancestors ascribed to Cunedda, most of them may be disregarded, but the names of his father, grandfather and great-grandfather, namely, Edeyrn, Padarn Beisrudd (of the Red Robe), and Tegid, wear a historical aspect. In the same MS. is to be found an interesting account of the sons of Cunedda. Their names are given, in tenthcentury orthography, as Osmail, Rumaun, Dunaut, Ceretic, Abloyc, Enniaun Girt, Docmail, and Etern; a ninth is added, called Typiaun, who is said to have died in Manaw Gododin before the great expedition and to have been represented in the division of the Brythonic spoils by his son Meriaun. The boundary of the nine, it is stated, was on the one hand the Dyfrdwy (Dee) and on the other the Teifi, and they held very many regions in Western Britain.88 Which these regions were, though the MS. does not expressly mention them, may be inferred from the bounds given and from certain pedigrees which it contains, pedigrees of princes who traced their descent to sons of Cunedda and were clearly rulers of cantrefs or larger districts in North-west Wales. They were the districts which still preserved the names of Cunedda's sons and grandson, " Osmeliaun," which has not so far been identified, Rhufoniog, Dunoding,89 Ceredigion, Aflogion (a cymwd of Lleyn),90 Dogfeiling (the cantref of Dyffryn Clwyd),91 Edeyrnion and Meirionydd.

Whether the men who gave their names to the districts lying between the Teifi and the Dee were really the sons of Cunedda and not rather his followers and lieutenants may be open to doubt, but that they were the actual founders of Brythonic chieftainships in this region can hardly be questioned. Names like Ceredigion (Caraticiana), Rhufoniog (Romaniaca), Meirionydd (Marianio), require a Ceredig, a Rhufon, a Meirion to make them intelligible and the Cunedda legend supplies the simplest and most reasonable explanation of their origin. -------------------- Cunedda and his forebears led the Votadini against Pictish and Irish incursions south of Hadrian's Wall. Sometime after this, the Votadini troops under Cunedda relocated to North Wales in order to defend the region from Irish invasion. Cunedda established himself in Wales, in the territory of the Venedoti, which would become the centre of the kingdom of Gwynedd. Two explanations for these actions have been suggested: either Cunedda was acting under the orders of Maximus (or Maximus's successors) or Vortigern, the high king of the British in the immediate post-Roman era. The range of dates (suggested by P. C. Bartrum) runs from the late 370s, which would favor Maximus, to the late 440s, which would favor Vortigern.

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Cunedda Wledig Lothian King of Wales (North)

Born : Abt. 380

Died : Abt. 460

Age : 80

Ruled 450s-c460s

Father Aeternus ap Padeyrn Prince of Britain

Mother

Marriage - Gwawl Princess of Britain (North)

Children Abt. 419 - Einion Yrth Venedos King of Wales (Gwynedd)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.american-pictures.com/genealogy/persons/per08788.htm#0

-------------------- Cunedda was also called Cunedag.

According to the Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur (400): "In this year Cunedda, Kaletach wrth elyn nac asgwrn, and his sons came from Manaw Gododdin to expel the Irish."

Cunedda Wledig ab Edeyrn of Britain married Gwawl verch Coel of Britain, daughter of Dux Britanniarium Coel Hen Guotepauk of Britain and Ystradwal verch Cadfan o Dumnonia, before 417.

He was the Pictish chief of the Manaw Gododdin, a subsidiary of the main Gododdin people who lay just beyond the Antonine Wall, around the Forth's headwaters and a natural citadel at Stirling, before 424 at Lothian, Scotland. He was invited by Magnus Maximus to settle in northwest Wales circa 424.

Cunedda was our ancestor through two distinct lines of descent--through his son Brenin and his daughter Gwen, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p91.htm#i11473 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- The wikipedia entry is here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunedda

ca 5th Century -------------------- Came from Manaw Gododin on the Firth of forth. -------------------- Cunedda ap Edern (c. 386–c. 460 AD; reigned from the 440s or 450s) (Latin: Cunetacius; English: Kenneth), also known as Cunedda Wledig ("holder of lands"), was an important early Welsh leader, and the progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd.

-------------------- Cunedda Wledig or Cynedda Weledit or Kenneth The Warrior or Guledig ap Edern. -------------------- A northern British chieftain who ruled part of Gododdin. He and his warband rode across Britain to help expel Irish invaders from Wales. He settled down in Gwynedd and founded a number of royal dynasties. -------------------- Wledig means "holder of lands." Cunedda derives from the Brythonic word kunodagos, meaning "good hound."

An important early Welsh leader, and the progenitor of the royal dynasty of Gwynedd.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunedda -------------------- By the time Rome left Britain in the early 5th century, two branches were seated in the far north (Cunedda and Coel Hen) and two in what is now Powys (Gwrtheyrn aka Vortigern and Cadell).  Cunedda relocated to Gwynedd where his family had intermarried with men descended from Llyr Llediath and he was the founder of the First Royal Dynasty of Gwynedd.  Men descended from Coel Hen were called "The Men of The North" and they did not migrate to Wales until the Saxons forced them from their lands in the 7th century.  A man of that line founded the Second Royal Dynasty of Gwynedd in the 9th century.  We think a double marriage united the two Powys families in the 5th century; the First Powys Dynasty was descended from Cadell Ddyrnllwg, while the Second Powys Dynasty descended from Cassanauth Wledig, a man we believe was a grandson of Gwrtheyrn (Vortigern). -------------------- aka the progenitor of the Gwynedd dynasty

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Cunedda Wledig, King of Gwynedd's Timeline

386
386
Cardigan, Wales
408
408
Age 22
Of, Meirionydd, Merionethshire, Wales
410
410
Age 24
Of, Edeirnion, Merionethshire, Wales
410
Age 24
Powys, Montgomeryshire, Wales, UK
411
411
Age 25
Rhufoniog, Denbighshire, Wales
413
413
Age 27
Of, , Ceredigion, Wales
414
414
Age 28
Cafflogion, Llyn, Caernarvonshire, Wales
416
416
Age 30
Of, , , Wales
416
Age 30
North Wales
417
417
Age 31
North Wales