Cyprian Stevens

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Cyprian Stevens

Birthdate:
Birthplace: London, England
Death: Died in Lancaster, Worcester, MA, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of William Stevens
Husband of Mary Stevens
Father of Mary Wright; Cyprian Stevens II; Simon Stevens; Elizabeth Wilder; Deacon Joseph Stevens and 2 others

Occupation: Blacksmith, tavern keeper, constable
Managed by: Carol Ann Selis
Last Updated:

About Cyprian Stevens

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Cyprian Stevens was born Nov. 13, 1647 in London, Greater London, England and died 1720 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts

  • He was born in England, probably London, though his family was originally from Devonshire. He settled first at Rumney March,Massachusetts then moved to Lancaster. He had to leave Lancaster during the Indian Wars and moved to Boston. He was at Sudbury were his brother lived, and while there was given permission to receive and Indian Child of six years of age in his family. Cyprian returned to Lancaster after declarations of peace between England and France. He was a blacksmith by trade. He was a tavern keeper in 1686 and was also appointed to take account of all births and deaths in Lancaster. He was constable in 1690 and clerk of writs in 1682-86.
  • 1682 MIDDLESEX COURT RECORDS Cyprian Stevens being convicted of selling strong drink to ye Indians is fined twenty shillings-money to pay costs to two Indian witnesses 3 - each money April 4th 1682 Cyprina Stevens was constable a few years later and in 1690 was indited for allowing a prisoner to escape. His return to the warrant is as follows. By virtue of this warrant from the Honorable deputy governor, I endeavered to seake the person of Robert Crossler but I having not the constable staff delivered to me he questioned my power and forth with drew upon me and also had a brace of postols one sticking to his girdle and the other in his left hand upon cock. I commanded the Mr. Henry Willard and Joseph Walters to assist in the taking of said Crossler. Upon which he the said Crossler said that he would dye before he would be taken and so with arms he recovered his horse and fleed. The said Crossler all the time keeping himself at a distance protesting any man that layeth hold of him he would kill or be killed. This is attested by Cyprian Stevens -Constable of Lancaster."

From THE HISTORY OF CHARLESTON N.H. BY REV.H.H. SAUNDERSON pg 556

The date of emigration of Cyprian Stevens has not been ascertained but we find that Jan 22, 1671 he married Mary Willard, daughter of Major Simon Willard and later his third wife Mary Dunster. His first residence was in Chelsea, Ma. but at the time of his 2nd marriage he was of Lancaster at which place he became a man of considerable consequence Cyprian and Mary Willard had four children .

From THE HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF LANCASTER, MASS. by Rev. Abijah P. Marvin

The Middlesex Court in April 1682 convicted Cyprian Stevens of " selling strong drink " to the Indians. He was fines twenty shillings and to pay costs to two Indian witnesses, three shillings. In 1686 Stevens had a successor in Nathaniel Wilder who was licenses by the Court of Pleas to" retail wine, beer, aile, cyder and rum" ect. At the same time Stevens was appointed clerk to take account of all births and deaths in Lancaster.

Cyprian Stevens constable in 1690 allowed a prisoner to escape. He was arranged and convicted. He was either careless or else in collusion with the prisoner. But the court was not to be trifled with and he soon fulfilled his warrant. In consequence he was discharged on paying costs.

From THE BIRTH,MARRIAGES AND DEATH REGISTER OF LANCASTER, MA. by H.S.Nourse

In the introduction " the returns of the second clerk, Cyprian Stevens, are found in the Middlesex Registry duly copied from 1680 to 1687."

Cyprian Stevens joined the Church of Christ in Lancaster by John Prentice pastor April 23, 1710

THE EARLY RECORDS OD LANCASTER, MA. by Henry S. Nourse 1884. Cyprian Stevens who married his ( Simon Willard ) daughter Mary 22.11.1671 occupied the homestead thenceforward. The Major's sons lived upon the Still River farm. . In 1727 Simon Stevens,son of Cyprian, sold the Major Willard homestead, together with the night pasture, to Capt. Samuel Willard, son of Henry the fourth son of Major Simon Willard.

From LANCASTER IN PHILIP'S WAR - God strangely preserved rescuing men for the enemy were numerous, about 400, and lay in ambush for them on a common road but their guides conducted them in a private way and they got safe to Cyprian Stevens, his garrison house being very near the other only bridge. This house burnt was the Minister's house. Mr Rowlandson wherein were slain and taken about forty persons, the minister's wife and children.



Family links:

Parents:
 Thomas Stevens (1630 - 1685)
 Mary Fletcher Stevens (1633 - 1683)

Children:
 Joseph Stevens (1683 - 1769)*

Spouse:
 Mary Willard Stevens (1653 - 1685)

  • Point here for explanation

Burial:

Unknown


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Cyprian Stevens

Birth was given as 1646, but was fixed between April 1, and Nov 13 1647. He was a bond of Joseph Wheeler on Nov 13, 1668, along with his brother Thomas. He came to the Americas in 1660.He married Mary Willard, daughter of Simon Willard, Nov. 22, 1671 in Lancaster, Mass. He was in charge of a garrison in Lancaster when attacked by Indians during the King Philip's war.

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From Genealogy and Personal History of Penn. by J.J.Jordan. He emigrated to America with his father ( ? ) and settled first at Rummey Marsh, Chelsia, Mass, removing to Lancaster about the time of the King Philip's war. Being forced to find a safer place of residence for his family he removed to Sudbury and was given authority to receive an Indian child of 6 years, probably from a friendly tribe, whose father was perhaps serving in the English rank. After the close of the King Philip's war he returned to Lancaster and, where he became a prominent citizen He lived in Lancaster but removed to Plainfield in Conneticut. serving several offices and served as clerk of writs from 1682 to 1686. Some of his children may not have been born at Lancaster as he was driven from there for a short time due to the King Philip's war. He lived for a short time nearer Boston, probably at Sudbury.

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From a GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF THE FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW ENGLAND.-Cyprian Stevens came to New England about 1660 from London in his youth ( Under 14 ) where his father lived., his father was the armorer of Buttolph Lane and contracted with our government and company for a supply of arms, he was a member of the company and besides giving 50 pounds of common stock sent three sons and daughter, Mary, as his venture in our cause. He was one of the signers of the instructions to Captain Endicott . Cyprian was from Devonshire in the early days, he was at first at Rummey Marsh ( Chelsea )

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Cyprian Stevens was born in England 1644-45 arrived in Boston, Mass. in 1660. Married in Chelsea, Mass in 1672 and finally settled in Lancaster, Mass.

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From Society of Colonial Wars by Boston General Council in 1906 Stevens, Cyprian 1640 ---- Attacked by Indians in his garrison , 1675-76. Served at Groton, Mass., under Capt. Thomas Wheeler 1673-1676: at Lancaster under Ens. Peter Joselin 1704

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The Stevens Family by E.H. Stevens -He came to this country at about the age of 11 with his sister and older brother. Thomas. He undoubtedly lived in Charlestown but as a minor was not listed. He deeded land to his father-in-law, Simon Willard, in Dunstable in exchange for a blockhouse and land at Lancaster. He was prominent in Lancaster being a clerk of writ and Constable from 1682 to 1686. In 1676 he petitioned the governor for aid after the destruction of the town of Lancaster by King Philip. there were two blockhouses and all the people got into them. The one on the west side was fired and almost all the 50 inhabitants were killed but the Willard-Stevens blockhouse, made of stone, survived and were saved by soldiers from Marlboro. The town was abandoned until Oct 1679. During this time he lived at Rumney Marsh ( Chelsea ) now Revere. In 1693 he had a wife, Ruth, of whom there is no knowledge of who she was but she signed legal papers as his wife. The date and place of his death has not been found.
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In WILLARD MEMOIR Life and times of Major Simon Willard he is mentioned a son-in-law and considerable said which just verifies some of the above statements. ----------------------------------------------------------------- 

From History of Lancaster by Rev. Abijah P. Marvin. He was in the battle where Jonathan Wilder was killed and Ephram Wilder was severely wounded. The Middlesex Court in April 1682 convicted Cyprian Stevens of selling strong drink to the Indians. He was fined 20 shillings, money, and to pay the cost of two Indian witnesses, three shillings. The prohibitory law was intended to shield the Indians from harm in the use of strong drink. Cyprian Stevens was licenses by the Court of Pleas and the General Session of the Peace to retail wine, beer aile, cyder,rum ect. He must have sold too much as there was a limited amount to sell to an Indian. He was relieved of the above appointment and made clerk to make record of all the births and deaths in Lancaster. In 1690, Cyprian Stevens, contsable, allowed a prisoner to escape, He was arraigned and convicted. He was either careless or in collusion with the prisoner. But the court was not to be trifled with and he soon fulfilled his warrant.In Lancaster, his Marriage to Mary Willard daughter of Major Simon Willard in 1671, Major Willard deeded the Lancaster home and lands to his son-in-law.

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From Birth Marriage and Death Register 1643 to 1850 The early records have been mostly lost. Cyprian Stevens was made clerk in 1880 and served to 1890 and good records were kept.then. for six years there was no record as there was an Indian war and utter confusion

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THE FOLLOWING IS AN ACCOUNT OF CYPRIAN STEVENS ( A LEADING CITIZEN ) FOUND IN A HAND WRITTEN FILE IN THE LEXINGTON, MASS LIBRARY by T. Cady Oct 1996 CYPRIAN STEVENS Joseph Willard Esq. in his Willard MEMOIR gives but the briefest account of Cyprian Stevens and for the larger part of his life little is found relating to him. If the Lancaster records between 1692 and 1700 were intact doubtless his biography would have been long for in the 10 years after the resettlement he appears the most prominent citizen of the town and in official capacity his elaborately wrought signature appears attached to many a document in the Middlesex Court files. Cyprian Stevens as he always wrote his name was the son of Thomas Stevens of Devanshire, England. He came from London when under 14 about 1660 and probably lived first at Rummey Island now Chelsea. He was probably twenty two or twenty three years of age when in Lancaster January 2, 1671 he married Mary, the daughter of Major Simon Willard. Within a year thereafter, perhaps, Major Simon Willard removed to his Narragansetts farm and conveyed as a marriage portion probably in part the home he had bought of John Tinkett to the young couple in which they lived. It became known as the Cyprian Stevens garrison shortly and the hill nearby for some time bore the name of Stevens Hill. December 1672 this conveyance was made and it is stated therein that it was in exchange for lands of Stevens at Dunstable. The property is described " All ye housings, Barns, Stable and Orchard, lands including meadows lying and being in Lancaster according to their several Bults and bounds as following; The house lot formally called Major Willard's home lott bounded by ye North River and ye night pasture east and ye County highway north and west by the highway that leads to ye North River and another piece of land and meadow lying over Pennycook River from ye house lot bounded xxxxxxxx. This house stood upon the land of Caleb Symones Esq. the road to the center bridge having been cut through the lot. The Children of Cyprian Stevens were Mary 1672 -9 mo -22 d born in Lancaster.Simon born in Boston August 13 1677 or 8 - Dorothy of whom it is known only that she died in infancy. Elizabeth born about 1681. Joseph at later date not known. Of these Mary married Captain Samuel Wright of Sudbury and Runlande. Simon married 1701 Mary daughter of Nathaniel Wilder and a second wife Mary Martyn. He lived in Lancaster but removed to Plainfield, Conneticut. 1723 - 24 or near those dated. Returned to Marlborough and there lived to old age. His children of Lancaster birth WERE SIMON 1708, JONATHAN 1710 NATHANIEL 1712 ELIZABETH 1715 NATHANIEL 1716 DOROTHY 1719 He sold the paternal estate to Captain Samuel Willard. Elizabeth married Captain Ephram Wilder and the two lived together 61 years. He husband dying Dec. 14 1769 at 93 yr 8 m and the wife May 30, 1769 at 88. Joseph married Prudence Rice of Sudbury. He lived in Lancaster only a few years 171?-19 being of Sudbury, Farmingham and Rutland. Capt Pheneas Stevens was his son. When the survivors of the massacre of 1676 had assembled from all parts of the town they were in two garrisons that of Thomas Sawyer in South Lancaster and Cyprian Stevens near the present Sprague Bridge. those in the former had saved themselves by their own unaided powers and bravery. Steven's garrison had been reinforced by the courageous Captain Wadsworth and his little band as Guakin tells us " The enemy had set fire to the bridge but Captain Wadsworth beat off the enemy recovered the garrison house that stood near another bridge belonging to Cyprian Stevens and so thru Gods favor prevented the enemy from cutting off the garrison. God strangely preferred that handful with Captain Wadsworth for the enemy were numerous about 400 and lay in ambushment for him on the common road but his guide conducted him in a private way and so they got safe to Cyprian Stevens his garrison as above mentioned. But the enemy had taken and burn another garrison house very near the other only a bridge and a little ground parting them". The petition of the survivors ( in Massachusets Archives lXViii p 156 ) Cyprian Stevens's handwriting and as characteristic of his style of composition may appropriately for part of this sketch. " to the honored Governor an Council. The humble petition of the distressed people of Lancaster humbley sheweth that since the enemy mad such sad and dismal havocke amongst our dear friends and brethern and we who are left who have our lives for a prey sadly sincable of Gods judgement upon us. This with the distresse we are now in dus embolden us to place our humble request to your Honors, hoping our condition may be considered by you and our request find exceptance with you, our state is very deplorable in our incapacity to subsist, as to remove away we can not the enemy has so encompaced us otherwise for want help our cattle being the most carried away by the barbarous heathen and to stay disemabled for want of food . The towns people are mostly gone who felt the judgement but light and had their catle left with them and theire estate but we many of us heare in this prison have not bread enough to last one month and our other provision spent and gone for the generallity. Our town is drawn into two garrisons wherin are by the good favors of you eighteen soldiers which we gladly mayntain so long as any thing lasts and if your Honor should call them of we are certainly a bag for the enemy if God do not wonderfully prevent. Therefore we hope as God has made you fathers over us. So you will have a father's pity to us and extend your care over us who are your poor distressed subjects. We are sorowful to leave the place but hopeless to keep it unless maintained by the Country. It troubles our spirits to give any encouragement to the enemy ot leave anything to them to promote their wicked designe yet better save our lives that lose life and estate both. We are in danger enement, the enemy laying above us, nay on both sides of us as thus playinly spaire. Our womens cris thus daily encrease be an expression which does not only fill our ears but our hearts full of grief which makes us humbly request your Honor to send a gard of men and that if you please so command we may have carts. About 14 will remove the whoole, eight of which has been pressed long at Sudbury but never came for want of a small gard of men, the whool,,that is all that are in the garrison kept at Major Willard's house which is all from your Honor most humble servants and suplyants. Lancaster March 11th 1676 ( signed by Jacob Ffaerse, John Houghten Senior, John Moore Jonathan Whittcomb, Fohn Houghton Jr. The other on Garrison are in the like distress and so humby desire you like pity and fatherly care having widows and many fatherless children. The number of carts to carry away the garrison in twenty carts Your must humble petitioners. ( signed John Wilder, Sarah ?Widow, Fairbanks, John Rigby, Nathaniel Wilder, John Prescott Sr., Thomas Sawyer Sr., Thomas Sawyer Jr.,Jonathan Prescott, Thomas Wilder, John Rooper, Widow Rooper " " to Cyprian Stevens of Lancaster " In his name you are hereby required to appear before the next court to be holden at Charleston the 20 th of this instant December, then and there, to answer the complaint of Job, an Indian, of Naticke for forcibly taking from him at Naticke within these few days three beaver skins worth three pounds and due damage, hereof you are not to fail at your perill dated the second of December 1681. Also in his name you are required to appear before mee at my house upon the 19 th day of this instant December at one of the clocke afternoon, then and there to answer the compaint of James Wiser, Indian, for taking from him forceably taking from him out of a wigwam his aurm worth forty shillings and carrying away and deteyning it to his great damage this hunting season- hereof fayle not at your perill- Dated the 2 nd of December 1681 Signed Daniel Gerkin Assistant MIDDLESEX COURT RECORDS 1681 December " In case of Job, Indian, VS Cyprian Stevens the jury brought in their verdict finding for the plaintiff forty one shillings in money or the same three beaver skins to be restored to him againe with three shillings damage and costs one pound, nine shill and ten pence" MIDDLESEX COURT FILES 1682 " To the honorable County Court-These are to give you notice that Cyprian Stevens is by ye inhabitance of Lancaster chosen to be Clerk of ye writs for Lancaster June 14 th. 1682. As atests Gamabil Beaman- Constable of Lancaster. 20-4-82 Allowed in Curiam FBR MIDDLESEX COURT FILES Dec. 19, 1681 " Cyprian Stevens accused by the Naticke Indians in open court, particularly the witness are Peter Ephram and Loosomet. They say yt the said Cyprian Stevens about a month since ( with some other English men whose name they know not ) was up in the woods near Watchuset where these Naticke Indians above named and some Albany Indians in company a hunting. Cyprian Stevens and his companion perceiving a booty ( for the Albany Indians had guns and skins ) Cyprian went home and returned within a few days and brought with him some trucking cloth, powder and shot and three bottles about one gallon a piece of strong liquor and he sold some of the strong liquor to said Albony Indians and they were made drunke. He got a gun and some skins of them and when they were sober and came to themselves they fell out with the Naticke Indians and said that they had procured the English to bring strong liquor and to cheat them of their guns and skins and the Albany Indians threatened the Naticke Indians to be revenged of you of this matter. This was ye accusation and information made in open Court by my house by Indian Andrey Pitting, Pianbow, Tom Tray, James Wiser, John Aquilcas and Pakitag- but Peter Ephram and Loosomet were not present at the time by gave ye testiment afterward in open Court at Naticke who is now in Court. Upon this information I bound over to said Cyprian Stevens to answer the complaint at Cambridge Court the first Tuesday in Aprill next and accordingly Cyprian Stevens as principall and Josuah White as surity bound yourselves to the Treasurer of the Court of Middlesex in one hundred pounds to appeare at ye said Court ye first of April next then to answer this complaint and abide ye order of the Court. This was done the day and year above written before me. Signed Daniel Gerkin Sen. Assistant. " At a Court held in Naticke the 28 th December 1681 Lasoomit a Xtran a baptised Indian aged about seventy years testified that he and Peter Ephram of Naticke being a hunting near Watchuset about six week since , they met with 3 Albany Indians at a place called Puannaqueset where they had a hunting house, at which time he say he saw three Englishmen where of Cyprian Stevens was principall and the other two young men. Then he saw the said Cyprian Stevens sell to the Albany Indians about two gallons of strong liquors which they brought in wooden bottles of liquor about one gallon a piece and I understand there was another gallon bottle in a bag. Also he saith ye the said Cyprian Stevens delivered some powder and shott to ye said Albany Indians and the Albany Indians delivered to said Cyprian for the strong liquor powder and shot-bever skins and some other skins but he knows not how many, and he further saith ye three Indians were very drunk and muddled and the chiefe of you quarreled with said Cyprian about another skin and took it back from him but Cyprian had it again.- Daniel Gookin" Peter Ephram's testimony is omitted here because it was very similar to the above. 1682 MIDDLESEX COURT RECORDS Cyprian Stevens being convicted of selling strong drink to ye Indians is fined twenty shillings-money to pay costs to two Indian witnesses 3 - each money April 4 th 1682 Cyprina Stevens was constable a few years later and in 1690 was indited for allowing a prisoner to escape. His return to tha warrent is as follows. By virtue of this warrent from the Honorable deputy governor, I endeavered to seake the person of Robert Crossler but I having not the constable staff delivered to me he questioned my power and forth with drew upon me and also had a brace of postols one sticking to his girdle and the other in his left hand upon cock. I commanded the Mr. Henry Willard and Joseph Walters to assist in the taking of said Crossler. Upon which he the said Crossler said that he would dye before he would be taken and so with arms he recovered his horse and fleed. The said Crossler all the time keeping himself at a distance protesting any man that layeth hold of him he would kill or be killed. This is attested by Cyprian Stevens -Constable of Lancaster." Crossly by evidence of George and Lydia Goss, Jonathan Whitcomb and Jabez Fairbandk and Philip Goss had threatened to kill Goss and had made a disturbance and assaulted Goss in his own house which on the site of the Rowlandson garrison- also that Stevens had, though present, had done nothing toward arresting Crossley then and afterwards " The deposition of Philip Goss aged 39 or thereabouts testifyeth and said that on the fifth day of October instant 1690 he received a warrent from the honorable the deputy Governor to apprehend on Robert Crossler then resident of Lancaster with he after the morning meeting delivered one Samuel Bennett to deliver to Cyprina Stevens, Constable of Lancaster, to execute the same which when delivered as said constable was reading the same, he said Crossler and one Henry Willard passed by ye constable towards his house. Whereupon this defendant went along his feence adjoining to the highway that he might not be discovered by said Crossler and called to ye constable desiring him to preform his office or otherwise he would complain to authority of his neglect herein and afterwards saw y constable come up with ye Crossler about the bridge. Said Crossler making a stop that he might so do and that the said Bennett and one John Beament saw the said constable and Crossler walke downe together towards ye constable's house, where he had opportunity to execute ye warrent and then depart after he saw ye constable and Crossler come together went into his owne house and so did Bennett and Beament and further saith not.

Continued under wife Mary Willard # 70 his wife. Cannot put more on this note pad.

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From THE HISTORY OF CHARLESTON N.H. BY REV.H.H. SAUNDERSON pg 556

The date of emigration of Cyprian Stevens has not been ascertained but we find that Jan 22, 1671 he married Mary Willard, daughter of Major Simon Willard and later his third wife Mary Dunster. His first residence was in Chelsea, Ma. but at the time of his 2 nd.marriage he was of Lancaster at which place he became a man of considerable consequence Cyprian and Mary Willard had four children .

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From THE HISTORY OF THE tOWN OF LANCASTER, MASS. by Rev. Abijah P. Marvin

The Middlesex Court in April 1682 convicted Cyprian Stevens of " selling strong drink " to the Indians. He was fines twenty shillings and to pay costs to two Indian witnesses, three shillings. In 1686 Stevens had a successor in Nathaniel Wilder who was licenses by the Court of Pleas to" retail wine, beer, aile, cyder and rum" ect. At the same time Stevens was appointed clerk to take account of all births and deaths in Lancaster.

Cyprian Stevens constable in 1690 allowed a prisoner to escape. He was arranged and convicted. He was either careless or else in collusion with the prisoner. But the court was not to be trifled with and he soon fulfilled his warrant. In consequence he was discharged on paying costs.

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From THE BIRTH,MARRIAGES AND DEATH REGISTER OF LANCASTER, MA. by H.S.Nourse

In the introduction " the returns of the second clerk, Cyprian Stevens, are found in the Middlesex Registry duly copiednfrom 1680 to 1687."

Cyprian Stevens joined the Church of Christ in Lancaster by John Prentice pastor April 23, 1710

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THE EARLY RECORDS OD LANCASTER, MA. by Henry S. Nourse 1884. Cyprian Stevens who married his ( Simon Willard ) daughter Mary 22.11.1671 occupied the homestead thenceforward. The Major's sons lived upon the Still River farm. . In 1727 Simon Stevens,son of Cyprian, sold the Major Willard homestead, together with the night pasture, to Capt. Samuel Willard, son of Henry the fourth son of Major Simon Willard.

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From LANCASTER IN PHILIP'S WAR - God strangely preserved rescuing men for the enemy were numerous, about 400, and lay in ambush for them on a common road but their guides conducted them in a private way and they got safe to Cyprian Stevens, his garrison house being very near the other only bridge. This house burnt was the Minister's house. Mr Rowlandson wherein were slain and taken about forty persons, the minister's wife and children.

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Story Written by Cyprian of Lancaster Massacre

1675/1676

Lancaster in Philip's War Source: Source: The Early Records of Lancaster, Massachusetts 1643 - 1725 Edited by Henry S. Nourse, A.M. Lancaster, 1884

p. 98

LANCASTER IN PHILIP'S WAR 1675.

ffrom Nashowah Allies [alias] Lankester 16th: Aug'st 1675.

"Honoured Sir

Last nightt aboutt seaven A Clocke we martched Into Nashowah wheare we are Att Presentt butt shall soone as the Constable hath prest us a dozen Horsses; Proseed for groatton & so to Chenceford; according to the orders Major Willard gave me yesterday Att Quoahbauge; our Major having a Seartayne Intelligence of a Considerable Party of Indians yt [that] have gathered toogather a littell above Chensford which I hope wee shalbe up with this Night or to morrough at furthest & if it pleese God I come up with them God assisting me I will Cloosely ingadge with them & God Spearing my life I shall as oppertunity gives leave Acquaintt yo'r honor off my Actjons; I have wth me butt 60: Men at Present. Samuel Mosley"

The above is extracted from a letter of the noted Captain of dragoons to Governor Leverett, in Massachusetts archives LXVII, 239. Six days later, Sunday, August 22d the Indians having warily avoided an encount-er with the dragoons, and got in their rear, made a raid upon Lancaster.

Gen. Daniel Gookin states that this bloody foray was headed by a one-eyed chief of the Nipmucks, named John Monoco "who lived near Lancaster before the war began," and that he had twenty of Philip's men with him.

Mrs. Rowlandson writes:

"Those seven that were killed at Lancaster...upon a sabbath day, and the one who was afterwards killed upon a week day, were slain and mangled in a most barbarous manner by one eyed John and Marlboroughs praying Indians, as the Indians told me."

The charge against the Christian Indians was maliciously untrue, as proven upon their trial. The scene of the murders was at the north end of the settlement, the house of the MacLouds being in the neighborhood of the North Village cemetery. The names of the slain were:

George Bennet

William Flagg

Jacob Farrar, Jun.

Joseph Wheeler

Mordecai MacLoud

Mrs. Lydia MacLoud

Hannah MacLoud aged four years

(also) An infant MacLoud

Flagg was a soldier detailed for duty here, from Watertown. Wheeler was not a Lancaster man, but probably of Concord.

Letter from Ralph Houghton Feb 8th 1675

"ffor the Honoured Countie Court siting at Cambridge.

I was desired by a poore widow whose husband was slaine by the Indians here and hath 5 small children left with her; by a law of the countrie shee should have brought in an Inventorie of her husbands estate, but such are the deficulties of the time and alsoe the trouble of her litle children that shee could not posibly with any saftie com downe; her name is Lidia Benet, and alsoe a Scotsman Mordicai Mukload [MacLoud] who alsoe was slaine and his wife and children, and his house and goods all burned; he hath a brother surviving, both of them had a desire to have com downe with their Inventories but both of them have Catle in the woods, but know not whether the Indians have killed them or not, and therefore they humbly desire the honoured Court not to looke upon them as contemners of authoritie but give them liberty untill another Court and in soe doing, the honoured will ingage the widow and fatherless children as in dutie they are bound to pray for the honoured Court.

Lans 2: 8m: 1675 Subscribed by Ralph Houghton Clarke of the writs"

[Middlesex Court Files]

The bold incursion of one-eyed John was but the prelude to the fearful tragedy of February 10th. Of the plan for the destruction of Lancaster in all its details, even to the very day assigned for its accomplish-ment, the colonial authorities were fully advised; yet so far as any records show, with a neglect that seems criminally strange, they did almost nothing to ward off or meet the blow. Of the aboriginal poss-essors of Nashaway, none, unless Sholan, better deserves to be honored among us than that Indian scout, whose courage, skill and fidelity should have saved the town from the massacre of 1676, James Quanapaug, alias James Wiser, also Quenepenett or Quannapohit.

This Christian Indian was so well known for his bravery, capacity and friendship for the English, that Philip had marked him for martyrdom and given orders accordingly to some of his lieutenants. The Governor of the Colony about the same date, commissioned him and a fellow Christian [Indian] named Job Kattenanit, from Natick, for the dangerous venture of visiting the Indian camps to bring back information of the numbers and plans of Philip's forces. These two men, the historian William Hubbard tells us, "through the woods, in the depths of winter, when the ways were impassable for any other sort of people," sought the Nipnet outposts, and "ordered their business so prudently as that they were admitted into those Indian habitations as friends and had free liberty of discourse with them." They were closely watched, how-ever, threatened, and but for a powerful friend would have been slain.

In Quanapaug's own words:

"Next morning I went to One-eyed John's wigwam. He said he was glad to see me: I had been his friend for many years & had helped him kill Mohaugs: and said nobody should meddle with me. I told him what was said of me. He said if any body hurt me they should die. I lay in the sagamores wigwam; and he charged his gun, and threatened any man that should offer me hurt. And this Indian told me they would fall upon Lancaster, Groton, Marlborough, Sudbury and Medfield, and that the first thing they would do should be to cut down Lancaster bridge so to hinder their flight and assistance coming to them, and they intended to fall upon them in about twenty days time from Wednesday next."

[James Quanapaug's Information]

p.100

Quanapaug finding that he must soon meet Philip, and having effected the the main purpose of his errand, evaded his suspicious foes by a cunning stratagem, and on the 24th, 11th mo., 1675, bought to his em-ployers, the Governor and Council, full knowledge of the hostile forces and their fell intent. The emergency demanded speedy energy; it met inaction.

Rumors of coming woe meantime stirred the air in the Nashaway valley. The chief military officer, the minister, and other leading citizens went to the Bay to awaken the Council from their lethargy and beg for help. It was too late. February 9th 1675/6, about ten o'clock at night, Job Kattenanit, the second spy, completely exhausted, dragged himself to Major Gookin's door in Cambridge. He had deserted wife and children, and alone travelled upon snow shoes through the pathless wilderness from New Braintree, a terribly fatiguing march of eighty miles, to save his English friends. James Quanapaug had foretold that on the morrow the blow would be struck at Lancaster. Let Daniel Gookin tell Job's story and the fulfillment of the prophecy.

Daniel Gookin:

"He brought tidings that before he came from the enemy at Menemesse, a party of Indians, about four hundred, were marched forth to attack and burn Lancaster, and on the morrow, which was February 10th they would attempt it. This time exactly suited with James his information before hinted, which was not then credited as it should have been; and consequently no so good means used to prevent it or at least to have lain in ambushments for the enemy. As soon as Major Gookin understood this tidings by Job, he rose out of his bed and, advising with Mr. Danforth one of the Council that lived near him, they despatched away post in the night to Marlborough Concord and Lancaster, ordering forces to surround Lancaster with all speed. The posts were at Marlborough by break of day and Capt. Wadsworth with about forty soldiers marched away as speedily as he could possibly to Lancaster (which was ten miles distant). But before he got there the enemy had set fire on the bridge. But Capt. Wadsworth got over and beat off the enemy, recovering a garrison house, that stood near another bridge, belonging to Capt. Stevens, and so through God's favor prevented the enemy from cutting off the garrison, God strangely preserving that handful with Capt. Wadsworth, for the enemy were numerous, about four hundred, and lay in ambushment for him on the common road, but his guides conducted him in a private way and so they got safe to Cyprian Stevens, his garrison house very near the other only bridge and a little ground parting them. This house burnt was the minister's house Mr. Rowlandson wherein were slain and taken captive about forty persons, the minister's wife and children amongst them. [Daniel Gookin's History of the Praying Indians]

p.104

London 1676.

News from New England being a True and Last Account of the present Bloody Wars, etc.

"In a town called Nashaway which they set Fire to, and burnt to the Ground, taking no less than 55 Persons into their Merciless Captivity, of these 55 Captives, the Minister of the Towns Relations made no less than 17 of them: viz. Mrs. Rowlandson, the Ministers Wife, and three of his children, her Sister [Elizabeth Kerley] and seven Children and her Sister Drew [Hannah Divoll] and four Children.

Another pamphlet published in London late in the same year, entitled "A new and further Narrative of the State of New England," copies its facts from the preceding.

A List of the Casualties - Feb'y 10 1675/6 Compiled from all Known Sources of Information

KILLED IN ROWLANDSON GARRISON Ensign John Divoll

Josiah Divoll, son of John, aged 7

Daniel Gains

Abraham Joslin aged 26.

John MacLoud

Thomas Rowlandson, nephew of the minister, aged 19.

John Kettle, aged 36

John Kettle, Jr.

Joseph Kettle, son of John, aged 10.

Mrs. Elizabeth Kerley, wife of Lieut Henry Kerley

William Kerley, son of Lieut Henry Kerley, aged 17

Joseph Kerely, son of Lieut Henry Kerley, aged 7

Mrs. Priscilla Roper, wife of Ephraim.

Pricilla Roper child of Ephraim, aged 3. CARRIED CAPTIVE FROM ROWLANDSON GARRISON

Mrs. Mary Rowlandson wife of the minister - ransomed.

Mary Rowlandson, dau of the minister - aged 10, ransomed.

Sarah Rowlandson, dau of the minister - aged 6, wounded & died Feb 18.

Joseph Rowlandson, son of the minister, aged 13, ransomed.

Mrs. Hannah Divoll, wife of Ensign John Divoll, ransomed.

John Divoll, son of Ensign John Divoll, aged 12, died - captive?

William Divoll, son of Ensign John Divoll, aged 4, ransomed.

Mrs. Ann Joslin, wife of Abraham Joslin, killed in captivity.

Beatrice Joslin, dau of Abraham Joslin, killed in captivity.

Joseph Joslin, brother of Abraham Joslin, aged 16

Henry Kerley, son of Lieut Henry Kerley, aged 18

Hannah Kerley, dau of Lieut Henry Kerley, aged 13

Mary Kerley, dau of Lieut Henry Kerley, aged 10

Martha Kerely, dau of Lieut Henry Kerley, aged 4

A child Kerley, name & age unknown

Mrs. Elizabeth Kettle, wife of John Kettle, ransomed

Sarah Kettle, dau of John Kettle, aged 14, escaped.

Jonathan Kettle, son of John Kettle, aged 5.

A child Kettle, daughter of John Kettle.

Ephraim Roper alone escaped furing the assault.

Mrs. Rowlandson writes: "Of thirty-seven persons who wer in this one house, none escaped either present death or a bitter captivity save only one." (Most authorities are united, however, in stating the number of the garrison as 42. Seven persons are therefore unaccounted for in above list.

KILLED OUTSIDE OF ROWLANDSON GARRISON, BEING ALL OF SOUTH LANCASTER John Ball

Mrs. Elizabeth Ball, wife of John

An infant child of John Ball

Jonas Fairbank

Joshua Fairbank, son of Jonas, aged 15.

Ephraim Sawyer, aged 26

Henry Farrar

Richard Wheeler

CAPTIVE Two of John Ball's family, names unknown

The whole number of casualties being 55, nine remain not ascertained. A soldier from Watertown aged 20, named George Harrington, was killed near Prescott's Mills a few days after the massacre and John Roper was killed the day the town was finally abandoned by all its inhabitants, March 26, 1676.

p.106

So gret was the terror inspired throughout the Bay towns by the quick succeeding Indian raids of this period that it was seriously proposed to abandon and fence out Lancaster, Groton and other outlying towns by a stockade eight feet high and twelve miles in length, from Watertown to Wamesit [Massachusetts Archives, LXVIII 174.]

"Three pounds per head bounty was voted by General Court for the killing or capturing of "sculking Indians."

p.107 Lancaster March 11, 1675/6 - Letter to the Governor and Counsell -"A humble Petition of the poor distressed people of Lancaster (excerpt) "...many of us heare in this prison, have not bread to last us one month & our other provisions spent & gon, for the genrallyty, our Town is drawn into two garisons - sixteen soulders....we areseartaynly a bayt (bait) for the enemy. We are sorrowful to leave the place but hoplesse to keep it unlesse mayntayed by the Cuntrey....our women cris dus daily...which dus not only fill our ears but our hearts full of Greefe and makes us humbly Request yo'r Hon'rs to send a Gard of men & that if you please so comand we may have Carts about fourteen will re-move the whool eight of which has presed long at Sudbury but never came for want of a small gard of men, the whooll that is, all that are in the Garison, Kept in Major Willards house which is all from y're Hon'rs most humble servants & suplyants -

Lancast'r March 11, 1675/6 Jacob FFarrar

John Houghton Sen'r

John Moore

John Whittcomb

Job Whittcomb

Jonathan Whittcomb

John Houghton Jun'r

Cyprian Steevens

The other garrison are in like distresse & soe humbly desire yo'r like pitty & ffatherly care, having widows & many fatherless children - the number of carts to Carey away this garison is twenty carts. Yo'r Hon'rs Humble pettisioners John Prescott Sen'r

Tho. Sawyer Sen'r

Tho. Sawyer Jun'r

Jonathan Prescott

Tho Willder

John willder

Sarah Wheeler, Wid.

Widow Ffarbanks

John Rigby

Nathaniell Wilder

John Rooper

Widow Rooper

The whole is in the handwriting of Cyprian Steevens.

[Massachusetts Archives, LXVII, 156.]

--------------------

http://worcester.bettysgenealogy.org/charlton/charltonstevens.html

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ID: I1231

Name: Mary Willard

Sex: F

Birth: 27 SEP 1653 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Death: 1685 in Worcester County, Massachusetts

Father: Simon Willard b: 7 APR 1605 in Horsmonden, Kent, England

Mother: Mary Dunster b: 15 DEC 1630 in Bury, Lancs, England

Marriage 1 Cyprian Stevens b: in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Married: 2 JAN 1671/72 in Chelsea, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Children

Simon Stevens b: 13 AUG 1677 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts

-------------------

ID: I15329

Name: Cyprian Stevens 1 2 3

Sex: M

Death: AFT 1692 in of Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts 4 1

Reference Number: 15331

Marriage 1 Mary Willard b: 7 SEP 1653 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Married: 22 JAN 1672 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts 1 5 3

Children

Phineas Stevens

Sources:

Title: Descendants of Josiah Willard of Wethersfield, Connecticut

Author: The Willard Family Association

Publication: The Willard Family Association of America, Inc. 1972

Note: Excellent

Repository:

Note: James A. Kimble personal library

Media: Book

Page: Page 3

Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700

Author: Clarence Almon Torrey

Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore 1987

Note: With an Introduction by Gary Boyd Roberts. Prepared for Publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley.

Toledo Public Library, Toledo, Ohio #929.74 Tor & Allen County Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana #G974 T63n

Note: Excellent

Repository:

Note: James A. Kimble personal library

Media: Book

Page: Page 706

Text: "STEEVENS, Cyprian"

Title: History of Wethersfield

Note: Connecticut, 1600s-1800s Local Familes and Histories.

The Buck family is featured in "Genealogies and Biographies of Ancient Wethersfield" Vol. II and the Kirby & Willard families in "History of Wethersfield" Vol. II. I failed to indicate the volume # in some cases. SORRY.

Repository:

Note: Genealogy.Com

Media: Book

Page: Volume II - Page 793

Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700

Author: Clarence Almon Torrey

Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore 1987

Note: With an Introduction by Gary Boyd Roberts. Prepared for Publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley.

Toledo Public Library, Toledo, Ohio #929.74 Tor & Allen County Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana #G974 T63n

Note: Excellent

Repository:

Note: James A. Kimble personal library

Media: Book

Page: Page 706

Text: "1692+/-"

Title: New England Marriages Prior to 1700

Author: Clarence Almon Torrey

Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore 1987

Note: With an Introduction by Gary Boyd Roberts. Prepared for Publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley.

Toledo Public Library, Toledo, Ohio #929.74 Tor & Allen County Library, Fort Wayne, Indiana #G974 T63n

Note: Excellent

Repository:

Note: James A. Kimble personal library

Media: Book

Page: Page 706

----------------

SIMON, Cambridge, s. of vol. 4, p. 555 Richard of Horsemonden, Co. Kent, where he was bapt. 7 Apr. 1605, came 1634, arr. in May, with w. Mary, d. of Henry Sharpe of Horsemonden, bapt. 16 Oct. 1614; and d. Mary; rem. next yr. to the new settlem. of Concord, where prob. this d. soon d. aft. m. with Joshua Edmunds, and b. of her first ch. 16 Feb. 1650. At Cambridge or Concord, he had Elizabeth whose date of b. is not found, wh. m. 8 Apr. 1653, Robert Blood; Josiah, whose date is also unkn.; Samuel, in recorder's rec. at Boston, call. Simon, b. 31 Jan. 1640; Sarah, 27 June or 24 July 1642, wh. m. 2 July 1666, Nathaniel Howard of Charlestown, and d. 22 Jan. 1678; Abovehope, 30 Oct. 1646, d. at 17 yrs. unm.; Simon, 23 Nov. 1649; Mary, again, 7 or 27 Sept. 1653, wh. m. 22 Jan. 1672, Cyprian Stevens; Henry, 4 June 1655; John, 12 Jan. or Feb. 1657; Daniel, 29 Dec. 1658; but of these the last four were b. of a sec. w. Elizabeth Dunster, sis. of the presid. of the coll. or third w. Mary Dunster, a niece of the presid. for the dates of m. are not giv. But bef. the b. of his next ch. he rem. to Lancaster, there had Joseph, 4 Jan. 1661; Benjamin, 1665; Hannah, 6 Oct. 1666, wh. m. 23 May 1693, capt. Thomas Brintnall of Sudbury, and was the last surv. ch. of her f.; and Jonathan, 14 Dec. 1669; beside two others, Elizabeth and Dorothy, wh. both d. young. I suppose he must have had some acquaint. in Eng. with milit. duty, for he was made lieut. here so early as 1637, capt. 1646, and maj. the highest rank at that time, in 1655; and was rep. 1636-49, chos.

Assist. 1657 to his d. 24 Apr. 1676. Bef. the Ind. destr. Groton in 1676, to wh. he had rem. a few yrs. earlier, he had estab. his retreat at Salem, but d. at Charlestown, during the sess. of the Ct. of Assist. For his serv. the governm. had many yrs. bef. made him a gr. of 1,000 acres, wh. he had never taken up, but had giv. to his d. Elizabeth on her m. but his wid. Mary was compel. to petition for it in the yr. of his d. SIMON, Salem, third s. of the preced. m. a. 1679, Martha, d. of Richard Jacob of Ipswich, where he liv. some time, had at I. Jacob, b. perhaps 17 Sept. 1680; but at S. Josiah, 24 May 1682; Martha, 27 Jan. 1684; Simon, 4 Nov. 1685, d. under 2 yrs.; and Richard 26 or 29 Jan. 1687; was freem. 1680, capt. in the E. war with the Ind. 1689, and deac. (had sec. w. 30 Apr. 1702, Elizabeth wid. of John Walley, perhaps, but the Geneal, 371, ignores this sec. w.) and late in July 1722 took ano. w. Priscilla Buttolph, and d. 21 June 1731. THOMAS, Northampton 1668, br. of Nathaniel of the same, and subject to the same maledict. See Weller. Farmer notes in 1834, that gr. of this name at Harv. were 23; at Yale, 2; at other N. E. coll. 11. In ea. of the seven generat. from maj. Simon are one or more s. of the coll. to our times.

---------------------------

  1. ID: I00187
  2. Name: Cyprien Stevens 1
  3. Sex: M
  4. Name: Cyprian Stevens
  5. Birth: ABT. 1649 in prob. London, England
  6. Death: 1725 in Lancaster, Worcester, MA
  7. Change Date: 27 AUG 2000
  8. Immigration: 1661 New England
  9. Reference Number: 1173
  10. Note:
   Note: Born abt. 1640, per Stevens-Stephens Genealogy, pg. 42.
   Sources:
   NEHGS "Register," Vol 93, pg. 286 & "Ages from Depositions in Middlesex Co ., MA," NEHGS "Register," Vol 85, pg. 455 & "Willard Genealogy ," Charles Henry Pope, 1915.
   NEHGS "Register," Vol 93, pg. 286.
   NEHGS "Register," Vol 93, pg. 286 & "Lancaster Records," N EH GS " Register ," Vol 16, pg. 259 & "Gen. Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England ," James Savage, 1860-1862 & "Willard Genealogy ," Charles Henry  Pope, 1915.
   Title: Early Massachusetts Marriages Prior to 1800, Third Book
   Author: Rev. Frederic W. Bailey
   Publication: New Haven, CT: 1897 & Worcester, MA: 1914; repr. by Genealogical Publ. Co., Baltimore, 1968
   Repository:
   Note: Morristown Free Public Library, Morristown, NJ
   Call Number:
   Media: Book
   Page: pg. 60
   Title: The Birth, Marriage & Death Register of Lancaster, Massachusetts, 16 43-1850
   Author: Henry S. Nourse
   Publication: Clinton, MA: 1890; reproduced on CD by Search & Re Search Publishing Corporation, Wheat Ridge, CO
   Repository:
   Call Number:
   Media: Book
   Page: pg. 14
   -------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------
   Ancestry of Bob and Mary Beth Wheeler on Ancestry.com
   Entries: 61472 Updated: Sun Aug 19 13:20: 35 20 01 Contact: Mary Beth Wheeler <mb@thewheelers.com> Home Page: Ancestry of Bob and Mary Beth Wheeler
   Source:
   WILLARD GENEALOGY, SEQUEL TO WILLARD MEMORIAL
   MATERIALS GATHERED CHIEFLY BY JOSEPH WILLARD
   AND CHARLES WILKES WALKER
   EDITED AND COMPLETED BY CHARLES HENRY POPE
   PRINTED FOR THE WILLARD FAMILY ASSOCIATION, BOSTON, MASS., 1915*
   Digital Edition © 2001 by Richard Bingham
   Oceanport, New Jersey
   ISBN 1-930968-20-5
   Copyright, 1915
   By THE WILLARD FAMILY ASSOCIATION
   Murray and Emery Company
   Kendall Square
   Cambridge

Marriage 1 Mary Willard b: 7 SEP 1653 in Concord, Middlesex, MA

   * Married: 22 JAN 1671/72 in Lancaster, Worcester, MA

Children

  1. Has No Children Dorothy Stevens
  2. Has Children Joseph Stevens
  3. Has Children Mary Stevens b: 22 NOV 1672
  4. Has No Children Cyprien Stevens , Jr. b: 22 NOV 1672
  5. Has No Children Simon Stevens b: 13 AUG 1677
  6. Has No Children Elizabeth Stevens b: ABT. 1681

Sources:

  1. Title: WILLARD GENEALOGY, SEQUEL TO WILLARD MEMOIR
     Author: Materials gathered by Joseph Willard and Charles Wilkes Walker, Edited and completed by Charles Henry Pope
     Publication: Printed for the Willard Family Assn., Boston, MA, 1915, Murray and Emery, Kendall Sq., Cambridge, MA, Digital Edition 2001 by Richard Bingham, Oceanport, NJ
     Repository:
     Media: Electronic 

----------------------------------

Cyprian Stevens

Added by Carolhow on 10 Aug 2007

Birth was given as 1646, but was fixed between April 1, and Nov 13 1647. He was a bond of Joseph Wheeler on Nov 13, 1668, along with his brother Thomas. He came to the Americas in 1660.He married MARY WILLARD, daughter of Simon Willard, Nov. 22, 1671 in Lancaster, Mass. He was in charge of a garrison in Lancaster when attacked by Indians during the King Philip's war.

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From Genealogy and Personal History of Penn. by J.J.Jordan. He emigrated to America with his father ( ? ) and settled first at Rummey Marsh, Chelsia, Mass, removing to Lancaster about the time of the King Philip's war. Being forced to find a safer place of residence for his family he removed to Sudbury and was given authority to receive an Indian child of 6 years, probably from a friendly tribe, whose father was perhaps serving in the English rank. After the close of the King Philip's war he returned to Lancaster and, where he became a prominent citizen He lived in Lancaster but removed to Plainfield in Conneticut. serving several offices and served as clerk of writs from 1682 to 1686. Some of his children may not have been born at Lancaster as he was driven from there for a short time due to the King Philip's war. He lived for a short time nearer Boston, probably at Sudbury.

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From a GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF THE FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW ENGLAND.-Cyprian Stevens came to New England about 1660 from London in his youth ( Under 14 ) where his father lived., his father was the armorer of Buttolph Lane and contracted with our government and company for a supply of arms, he was a member of the company and besides giving 50 pounds of common stock sent three sons and daughter, Mary, as his venture in our cause. He was one of the signers of the instructions to Captain Endicott . Cyprian was from Devonshire in the early days, he was at first at Rummey Marsh ( Chelsea )

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Cyprian Stevens was born in England 1644-45 arrived in Boston, Mass. in 1660. Married in Chelsea, Mass in 1672 and finally settled in Lancaster, Mass. 

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From Society of Colonial Wars by Boston General Council in 1906 Stevens, Cyprian 1640 ---- Attacked by Indians in his garrison , 1675-76. Served at Groton, Mass., under Capt. Thomas Wheeler 1673-1676: at Lancaster under Ens. Peter Joselin 1704.

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The Stevens Family by E.H. Stevens -He came to this country at about the age of 11 with his sister and older brother. Thomas. He undoubtedly lived in Charlestown but as a minor was not listed. He deeded land to his father-in-law, Simon Willard, in Dunstable in exchange for a blockhouse and land at Lancaster. He was prominent in Lancaster being a clerk of writ and Constable from 1682 to 1686. In 1676 he petitioned the governor for aid after the destruction of the town of Lancaster by King Philip. there were two blockhouses and all the people got into them. The one on the west side was fired and almost all the 50 inhabitants were killed but the Willard-Stevens blockhouse, made of stone, survived and were saved by soldiers from Marlboro. The town was abandoned until Oct 1679. During this time he lived at Rumney Marsh ( Chelsea ) now Revere. In 1693 he had a wife, Ruth, of whom there is no knowledge of who she was but she signed legal papers as his wife. The date and place of his death has not been found

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In WILLARD MEMOIR Life and times of Major Simon Willard he is mentioned a son-in-law and considerable said which just verifies some of the above statements.
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From History of Lancaster by Rev. Abijah P. Marvin. He was in the battle where Jonathan Wilder was killed and Ephram Wilder was severely wounded. The Middlesex Court in April 1682 convicted Cyprian Stevens of selling strong drink to the Indians. He was fined 20 shillings, money, and to pay the cost of two Indian witnesses, three shillings. The prohibitory law was intended to shield the Indians from harm in the use of strong drink. Cyprian Stevens was licenses by the Court of Pleas and the General Session of the Peace to retail wine, beer aile, cyder,rum ect. He must have sold too much as there was a limited amount to sell to an Indian. He was relieved of the above appointment and made clerk to make record of all the births and deaths in Lancaster. In 1690, Cyprian Stevens, contsable, allowed a prisoner to escape, He was arraigned and convicted. He was either careless or in collusion with the prisoner. But the court was not to be trifled with and he soon fulfilled his warrant.In Lancaster, his Marriage to Mary Willard daughter of Major Simon Willard in 1671, Major Willard deeded the Lancaster home and lands to his son-in-law.
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From Birth Marriage and Death Register 1643 to 1850 The early records have been mostly lost. Cyprian Stevens was made clerk in 1880 and served to 1890 and good records were kept.then. for six years there was no record as there was an Indian war and utter confusion. 

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THE FOLLOWING IS AN ACCOUNT OF CYPRIAN STEVENS ( A LEADING CITIZEN ) FOUND IN A HAND WRITTEN FILE IN THE LEXINGTON, MASS LIBRARY by T. Cady Oct 1996 CYPRIAN STEVENS Joseph Willard Esq. in his Willard MEMOIR gives but the briefest account of Cyprian Stevens and for the larger part of his life little is found relating to him. If the Lancaster records between 1692 and 1700 were intact doubtless his biography would have been long for in the 10 years after the resettlement he appears the most prominent citizen of the town and in official capacity his elaborately wrought signature appears attached to many a document in the Middlesex Court files. Cyprian Stevens as he always wrote his name was the son of Thomas Stevens of Devanshire, England. He came from London when under 14 about 1660 and probably lived first at Rummey Island now Chelsea. He was probably twenty two or twenty three years of age when in Lancaster January 2, 1671 he married Mary, the daughter of Major Simon Willard. Within a year thereafter, perhaps, Major Simon Willard removed to his Narragansetts farm and conveyed as a marriage portion probably in part the home he had bought of John Tinkett to the young couple in which they lived. It became known as the Cyprian Stevens garrison shortly and the hill nearby for some time bore the name of Stevens Hill. December 1672 this conveyance was made and it is stated therein that it was in exchange for lands of Stevens at Dunstable. The property is described " All ye housings, Barns, Stable and Orchard, lands including meadows lying and being in Lancaster according to their several Bults and bounds as following; The house lot formally called Major Willard's home lott bounded by ye North River and ye night pasture east and ye County highway north and west by the highway that leads to ye North River and another piece of land and meadow lying over Pennycook River from ye house lot bounded xxxxxxxx. This house stood upon the land of Caleb Symones Esq. the road to the center bridge having been cut through the lot. The Children of Cyprian Stevens were Mary 1672 -9 mo -22 d born in Lancaster.Simon born in Boston August 13 1677 or 8 - Dorothy of whom it is known only that she died in infancy. Elizabeth born about 1681. Joseph at later date not known. Of these Mary married Captain Samuel Wright of Sudbury and Runlande. Simon married 1701 Mary daughter of Nathaniel Wilder and a second wife Mary Martyn. He lived in Lancaster but removed to Plainfield, Conneticut. 1723 - 24 or near those dated. Returned to Marlborough and there lived to old age. His children of Lancaster birth WERE SIMON 1708, JONATHAN 1710 NATHANIEL 1712 ELIZABETH 1715 NATHANIEL 1716 DOROTHY 1719 He sold the paternal estate to Captain Samuel Willard. Elizabeth married Captain Ephram Wilder and the two lived together 61 years. He husband dying Dec. 14 1769 at 93 yr 8 m and the wife May 30, 1769 at 88. Joseph married Prudence Rice of Sudbury. He lived in Lancaster only a few years 171?-19 being of Sudbury, Farmingham and Rutland. Capt Pheneas Stevens was his son. When the survivors of the massacre of 1676 had assembled from all parts of the town they were in two garrisons that of Thomas Sawyer in South Lancaster and Cyprian Stevens near the present Sprague Bridge. those in the former had saved themselves by their own unaided powers and bravery. Steven's garrison had been reinforced by the courageous Captain Wadsworth and his little band as Guakin tells us " The enemy had set fire to the bridge but Captain Wadsworth beat off the enemy recovered the garrison house that stood near another bridge belonging to Cyprian Stevens and so thru Gods favor prevented the enemy from cutting off the garrison. God strangely preferred that handful with Captain Wadsworth for the enemy were numerous about 400 and lay in ambushment for him on the common road but his guide conducted him in a private way and so they got safe to Cyprian Stevens his garrison as above mentioned. But the enemy had taken and burn another garrison house very near the other only a bridge and a little ground parting them". The petition of the survivors ( in Massachusets Archives lXViii p 156 ) Cyprian Stevens's handwriting and as characteristic of his style of composition may appropriately for part of this sketch. " to the honored Governor an Council. The humble petition of the distressed people of Lancaster humbley sheweth that since the enemy mad such sad and dismal havocke amongst our dear friends and brethern and we who are left who have our lives for a prey sadly sincable of Gods judgement upon us. This with the distresse we are now in dus embolden us to place our humble request to your Honors, hoping our condition may be considered by you and our request find exceptance with you, our state is very deplorable in our incapacity to subsist, as to remove away we can not the enemy has so encompaced us otherwise for want help our cattle being the most carried away by the barbarous heathen and to stay disemabled for want of food . The towns people are mostly gone who felt the judgement but light and had their catle left with them and theire estate but we many of us heare in this prison have not bread enough to last one month and our other provision spent and gone for the generallity. Our town is drawn into two garrisons wherin are by the good favors of you eighteen soldiers which we gladly mayntain so long as any thing lasts and if your Honor should call them of we are certainly a bag for the enemy if God do not wonderfully prevent. Therefore we hope as God has made you fathers over us. So you will have a father's pity to us and extend your care over us who are your poor distressed subjects. We are sorowful to leave the place but hopeless to keep it unless maintained by the Country. It troubles our spirits to give any encouragement to the enemy ot leave anything to them to promote their wicked designe yet better save our lives that lose life and estate both. We are in danger enement, the enemy laying above us, nay on both sides of us as thus playinly spaire. Our womens cris thus daily encrease be an expression which does not only fill our ears but our hearts full of grief which makes us humbly request your Honor to send a gard of men and that if you please so command we may have carts. About 14 will remove the whoole, eight of which has been pressed long at Sudbury but never came for want of a small gard of men, the whool,,that is all that are in the garrison kept at Major Willard's house which is all from your Honor most humble servants and suplyants. Lancaster March 11th 1676 ( signed by Jacob Ffaerse, John Houghten Senior, John Moore Jonathan Whittcomb, Fohn Houghton Jr. The other on Garrison are in the like distress and so humby desire you like pity and fatherly care having widows and many fatherless children. The number of carts to carry away the garrison in twenty carts Your must humble petitioners. ( signed John Wilder, Sarah ?Widow, Fairbanks, John Rigby, Nathaniel Wilder, John Prescott Sr., Thomas Sawyer Sr., Thomas Sawyer Jr.,Jonathan Prescott, Thomas Wilder, John Rooper, Widow Rooper " " to Cyprian Stevens of Lancaster " In his name you are hereby required to appear before the next court to be holden at Charleston the 20 th of this instant December, then and there, to answer the complaint of Job, an Indian, of Naticke for forcibly taking from him at Naticke within these few days three beaver skins worth three pounds and due damage, hereof you are not to fail at your perill dated the second of December 1681. Also in his name you are required to appear before mee at my house upon the 19 th day of this instant December at one of the clocke afternoon, then and there to answer the compaint of James Wiser, Indian, for taking from him forceably taking from him out of a wigwam his aurm worth forty shillings and carrying away and deteyning it to his great damage this hunting season- hereof fayle not at your perill- Dated the 2 nd of December 1681 Signed Daniel Gerkin Assistant MIDDLESEX COURT RECORDS 1681 December " In case of Job, Indian, VS Cyprian Stevens the jury brought in their verdict finding for the plaintiff forty one shillings in money or the same three beaver skins to be restored to him againe with three shillings damage and costs one pound, nine shill and ten pence" MIDDLESEX COURT FILES 1682 " To the honorable County Court-These are to give you notice that Cyprian Stevens is by ye inhabitance of Lancaster chosen to be Clerk of ye writs for Lancaster June 14 th. 1682. As atests Gamabil Beaman- Constable of Lancaster. 20-4-82 Allowed in Curiam FBR MIDDLESEX COURT FILES Dec. 19, 1681 " Cyprian Stevens accused by the Naticke Indians in open court, particularly the witness are Peter Ephram and Loosomet. They say yt the said Cyprian Stevens about a month since ( with some other English men whose name they know not ) was up in the woods near Watchuset where these Naticke Indians above named and some Albany Indians in company a hunting. Cyprian Stevens and his companion perceiving a booty ( for the Albany Indians had guns and skins ) Cyprian went home and returned within a few days and brought with him some trucking cloth, powder and shot and three bottles about one gallon a piece of strong liquor and he sold some of the strong liquor to said Albony Indians and they were made drunke. He got a gun and some skins of them and when they were sober and came to themselves they fell out with the Naticke Indians and said that they had procured the English to bring strong liquor and to cheat them of their guns and skins and the Albany Indians threatened the Naticke Indians to be revenged of you of this matter. This was ye accusation and information made in open Court by my house by Indian Andrey Pitting, Pianbow, Tom Tray, James Wiser, John Aquilcas and Pakitag- but Peter Ephram and Loosomet were not present at the time by gave ye testiment afterward in open Court at Naticke who is now in Court. Upon this information I bound over to said Cyprian Stevens to answer the complaint at Cambridge Court the first Tuesday in Aprill next and accordingly Cyprian Stevens as principall and Josuah White as surity bound yourselves to the Treasurer of the Court of Middlesex in one hundred pounds to appeare at ye said Court ye first of April next then to answer this complaint and abide ye order of the Court. This was done the day and year above written before me. Signed Daniel Gerkin Sen. Assistant. " At a Court held in Naticke the 28 th December 1681 Lasoomit a Xtran a baptised Indian aged about seventy years testified that he and Peter Ephram of Naticke being a hunting near Watchuset about six week since , they met with 3 Albany Indians at a place called Puannaqueset where they had a hunting house, at which time he say he saw three Englishmen where of Cyprian Stevens was principall and the other two young men. Then he saw the said Cyprian Stevens sell to the Albany Indians about two gallons of strong liquors which they brought in wooden bottles of liquor about one gallon a piece and I understand there was another gallon bottle in a bag. Also he saith ye the said Cyprian Stevens delivered some powder and shott to ye said Albany Indians and the Albany Indians delivered to said Cyprian for the strong liquor powder and shot-bever skins and some other skins but he knows not how many, and he further saith ye three Indians were very drunk and muddled and the chiefe of you quarreled with said Cyprian about another skin and took it back from him but Cyprian had it again.- Daniel Gookin" Peter Ephram's testimony is omitted here because it was very similar to the above. 1682 MIDDLESEX COURT RECORDS Cyprian Stevens being convicted of selling strong drink to ye Indians is fined twenty shillings-money to pay costs to two Indian witnesses 3 - each money April 4 th 1682 Cyprina Stevens was constable a few years later and in 1690 was indited for allowing a prisoner to escape. His return to tha warrent is as follows. By virtue of this warrent from the Honorable deputy governor, I endeavered to seake the person of Robert Crossler but I having not the constable staff delivered to me he questioned my power and forth with drew upon me and also had a brace of postols one sticking to his girdle and the other in his left hand upon cock. I commanded the Mr. Henry Willard and Joseph Walters to assist in the taking of said Crossler. Upon which he the said Crossler said that he would dye before he would be taken and so with arms he recovered his horse and fleed. The said Crossler all the time keeping himself at a distance protesting any man that layeth hold of him he would kill or be killed. This is attested by Cyprian Stevens -Constable of Lancaster." Crossly by evidence of George and Lydia Goss, Jonathan Whitcomb and Jabez Fairbandk and Philip Goss had threatened to kill Goss and had made a disturbance and assaulted Goss in his own house which on the site of the Rowlandson garrison- also that Stevens had, though present, had done nothing toward arresting Crossley then and afterwards " The deposition of Philip Goss aged 39 or thereabouts testifyeth and said that on the fifth day of October instant 1690 he received a warrent from the honorable the deputy Governor to apprehend on Robert Crossler then resident of Lancaster with he after the morning meeting delivered one Samuel Bennett to deliver to Cyprina Stevens, Constable of Lancaster, to execute the same which when delivered as said constable was reading the same, he said Crossler and one Henry Willard passed by ye constable towards his house. Whereupon this defendant went along his feence adjoining to the highway that he might not be discovered by said Crossler and called to ye constable desiring him to preform his office or otherwise he would complain to authority of his neglect herein and afterwards saw y constable come up with ye Crossler about the bridge. Said Crossler making a stop that he might so do and that the said Bennett and one John Beament saw the said constable and Crossler walke downe together towards ye constable's house, where he had opportunity to execute ye warrent and then depart after he saw ye constable and Crossler come together went into his owne house and so did Bennett and Beament and further saith not.

Continued under wife Mary Willard # 70 his wife. Cannot put more on this note pad.

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From THE HISTORY OF CHARLESTON N.H. BY REV.H.H. SAUNDERSON pg 556

The date of emigration of Cyprian Stevens has not been ascertained but we find that Jan 22, 1671 he married Mary Willard, daughter of Major Simon Willard and later his third wife Mary Dunster. His first residence was in Chelsea, Ma. but at the time of his 2 nd.marriage he was of Lancaster at which place he became a man of considerable consequence Cyprian and Mary Willard had four children .

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From THE HISTORY OF THE tOWN OF LANCASTER, MASS. by Rev. Abijah P. Marvin

The Middlesex Court in April 1682 convicted Cyprian Stevens of " selling strong drink " to the Indians. He was fines twenty shillings and to pay costs to two Indian witnesses, three shillings. In 1686 Stevens had a successor in Nathaniel Wilder who was licenses by the Court of Pleas to" retail wine, beer, aile, cyder and rum" ect. At the same time Stevens was appointed clerk to take account of all births and deaths in Lancaster.

Cyprian Stevens constable in 1690 allowed a prisoner to escape. He was arranged and convicted. He was either careless or else in collusion with the prisoner. But the court was not to be trifled with and he soon fulfilled his warrant. In consequence he was discharged on paying costs.

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From THE BIRTH,MARRIAGES AND DEATH REGISTER OF LANCASTER, MA. by H.S.Nourse

In the introduction " the returns of the second clerk, Cyprian Stevens, are found in the Middlesex Registry duly copiednfrom 1680 to 1687."

Cyprian Stevens joined the Church of Christ in Lancaster by John Prentice pastor April 23, 1710

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THE EARLY RECORDS OD LANCASTER, MA. by Henry S. Nourse 1884. Cyprian Stevens who married his ( Simon Willard ) daughter Mary 22.11.1671 occupied the homestead thenceforward. The Major's sons lived upon the Still River farm. . In 1727 Simon Stevens,son of Cyprian, sold the Major Willard homestead, together with the night pasture, to Capt. Samuel Willard, son of Henry the fourth son of Major Simon Willard.

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From LANCASTER IN PHILIP'S WAR - God strangely preserved rescuing men for the enemy were numerous, about 400, and lay in ambush for them on a common road but their guides conducted them in a private way and they got safe to Cyprian Stevens, his garrison house being very near the other only bridge. This house burnt was the Minister's house. Mr Rowlandson wherein were slain and taken about forty persons, the minister's wife and children.

Additional information about this story

Description

Date

Location

Attached to Mary Willard (1653 - 1685)

Cyprian Stevens (1647 - 1720)


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Stevens, Benjamin, Salisbury, s. of John of the same, m. 28 Oct. 1673. Hannah, d. of Thomas Barnard of the same, had Elinor, and Catharine, tw. b. 2 Jan. 1675; Benjamin, 7 Oct. 1677; Mary, 7 Nov. 1679; Hannah, 30 Apr. 1682; Ebenezer, 29 June 1684 and John, 29 Jan. 1689; and d. 13 Mar. 1691. BENJAMIN, Andover, youngest s. of the first John of the same, was a capt. and magistr. d. 1730, without male issue. CYPRIAN, Lancaster, had come, a. 1660 from London, in his youth under 14 yrs. where his f. Thoas liv. wh. was, perhaps, that armorer of Buttolph lane, wh. contract. with our Gov. and Comp. there in Mar. 1629 for supply of arms, was a mem. of the comp. and beside giv. £50 to the com. stock, sent us three s. and d. Mary, as his adventure in our cause; and one of the signers of the instruct. to Capt. Endicott bef. his com. for wh. see Hutch. I. 9 in note, tho. the fam. was of Devonsh. in earlier days. He perhaps was first at Rumney marsh, now Chelsea, m. 22 Jan. 1672, Mary, d. of Simon Willard, the majr, had Cyprian, b. 22 Nov. foll.; Mary; Dorothy, wh. d. young; Simon; Eliz.; and Joseph. Some of these ch. were, perhaps, not b. at L. for in the gr. [p.185] war of 1675-6 he had been driv. by the Ind. to make his resid. nearer Boston, prob. in some of the interval, at Sudbury, and had authty. to receive an Ind. ch. of six yrs. prob. of a friendly tribe whose f. might be serv. in our ranks; but he went back, aft. the peace, to L. Mary m. Samuel Wright of Rutland. EDWARD, Boston, by w. Mary had Thomas, b. 15 Apr. 1669. EDWARD, Marshfield, is by Miss Thomas seen there, prob. some time betw. 1665 and 1691, but no date is supplied exc. by infer. and tho. she gives him ch. Edward, William, Eliz. and Patience, she could not tell his f. EDWARD, Boston, wh. m. 8 Oct. 1700, Rebecca, wid. of Thomas Harris, first, however, wid. of John Croakham, d. of Abraham Josselyn, had mov. in from ano. town, for he was not householder in 1695. EPHRAIM, Andover, s. of John of the same, m. 11 Oct. 1680, Sarah, d. of the first George bbot, had Sarah, b. 8 Nov. 1681; Eliz. 18 Aug. 1683; Hannah, 29 Nov. 1685; Mehitable, 10 Oct. 1691, d. young; Mary, 21 Feb. 1694; Ephraim, 24 July 1698; and Mehitable, again, 10 Sept. 1700. His w. d. 28 June, 1711; and he d. 26 June 1718, a. 69 yrs. old. ERASMUS, Boston, by w. Eliz. had John, b. 16 Aug. 1671; and Mary, 1673, but the mo. and day are lost by the leaf of rec. being torn. He prob. kept an inn, for, 1686, a poor Carolina overseer of a planta. hav. been made prison. by pirates, and escap. from them at Casco, was by Ed. Randolph, collector of our port, referr. to him for food and clothing. See 3 Mass. Hist. Coll. VII. 157. FRANCIS, Rehoboth 1658, had div. of lds. there in that yr. and ten yrs. later. His inv. of 1 Jan. 1670 shows that he was then d. and being call. sen. makes it prob. that he had s. FRANCIS, Rehoboth, wh. had Gilbert, b. 26 Feb. 1675; and his w. Eliz. was bur. six days aft. GEORGE, Boston, cooper, d. Oct. 1655, by will giv. all his little prop. to Isaac Collimore, so that he may well be thot. unm. and prob. only trans. HENRY, Boston, stone mason, as the ch. rec. calls him, came in the Defence 1635, from London, aged 24, liv. in the pt. call. Muddy riv. now Brookline, by w. Alice, on London custom ho. emb. 2 July in the Abigail on the same day with her h. (no doubt by error of the clk.) aged 22, had John, b. 10 Sept. 1637; James, 10 Apr. 1640; Joseph, 1 Sept. 1642; all bapt. 18 June 1643, on the same day, that she join. our ch. and Deborah, 25, bapt. 27 Apr. 1645; and by sec. w. Mary had Joanna, 28 May 1652; Henry, 20 July 1656, d. young; Joshua, 15 May 1659; Henry, again, 25 May 1663; and Samuel, 24 Sept. 1665; was there in 1674. Ano. HENRY was of Lynn 1634, serv. to John Humfrey, Esqr. and for burn. his master's ho. was 1640, sentenc. to 21 yrs. serv. as in Col. Rec. I. 311, wh. may be compar. with the detail in Winth. II. 13. By a letter from ano. HENRY, 29 June 1675, wh. I suppose was of Stonington, 1670, but the preced. day, an inhab. of Swanzey, perhaps s. of [p.186] Francis of Rehboth is giv. the first acco. of the outbreak of Philip's war. See 3 Mass. Hist. Coll. X. 117. He may have rem. to Stonington aft. this destruct. and there m. Eliz. d. of that brave Capt. John Gallop, wh. fell in the gr. swamp fight. Still ano. HENRY, was a propr. of New Haven 1685, hav. m. 6 Feb. 1678, Joanna, d. of Philip Leeke, had Eliz. b. 10 Dec. 1678; Philip, 16 Jan. 1684; and prob others, and d. 1689. *JAMES, Gloucester, s. of William of the same, prob. b. in Eng. m. 31 Dec. 1656, Susanna, d. of Sylvester Eveleth, had William, b. 10 Mar. 1658; John, 23 Jan. 1661, d. at one wk.; James, 4 Jan. 1662, d. bef. his f.; Isaac, 15 Aug. 1664, d. at 4 mos.; Samuel, 5 Dec. 1665; Isaac, again, 11 Nov. 1668, d. in few days; Ebenezer, 20 Sept. 1670; Mary, 13 June 1672; Hannah, 9 Apr. 1675; David, 5 Nov. 1677; and Jonathan, 7 Mar. 1680. He was freem. 1671, oft. one of the selectmen, deac. and rep. 1689 and 90 beside other yrs. bef. and aft. and d. 25 Mar. 1697. His d. Mary m. 24 Jan. 1693, the sec. Francis Norwood. JAMES, Boston, s. of Henry of the same, had w. Sarah at Muddy riv. for wh. dur. his absence in 1674, the f. of her h. engag. to furnish a ho. JEREMIAH, Boston, a young man, d. early in Oct. 1663, perhaps sent by his f. to deal out books, for of his inv. amt. to £72 4s. 11½d. they made up £68 17s. 5d. JOHN, Hingham, had div. of ld. 1638, may have rem. JOHN, Newbury, perhaps came in the Confidence from Southampton 1638, aged 31, hav. liv. at Caversham in Co. Oxford, but Drake in Geneal. Reg. XIV. 335 reads the name of the parish Gonsham. This is the more strange, from his explanat. in note, and especial. since the error in G. R. II. 109 had been point. out in G. R. IV. list of Errata aft. p. 385. In old chirogr. as first vol. of Boston Rec. the capital C. much resembles G. Caversham is the most S. part of Oxfordsh. close to Reading in Berks. He had John, b. 20 June 1639; Timothy, 23 Sept. 1641; was freem. 18 May 1642; rem. to Andover and had Nathan, the first b. of A. says tradit.; Ephraim; Joseph, 15 May 1654; and Benjamin, 24 June 1656; and d. 11 Apr. 1662, aged 56, leav. wid. Eliz. wh. prob. he brot. from Eng. and she d. 1 May 1694, aged 80. JOHN, Salisbury, perhaps the freem. of 2 June 1641, by w. Catharine had John, b. 2 Nov. 1639; Eliz. 7 Mar. 1641, d. soon; Eliz. again, 4 Feb. 1642; Nathaniel, 11 Nov. 1645; Mary, 1647; and Benjamin, 2 Feb. 1650. His w. d. July 1682, and he d. Feb. foll. Eliz. m. 14 Oct. 1661, Morris Tucker, and d. Oct. foll. JOHN, Guilford 1650, is on the list of freem. there 1669, d. 2 Oct. of next yr. In his will nam. the four ch. s. John in old Eng. Thomas, and William here, and d. Mary, w. of John Collins, wh. had first h. Henry Kingsnoth, that d. in 1668, and had m. the other, 2 June 1669. JOHN, New London 1664, Caulkins thinks came from Guilford, s. of the preced. shipwright, [p.187] m. Mary, d. of John Coit, was propound. for freem. 1669, had John, and Mary, both bapt. 12 Mar. 1671; James, 17 Sept. foll.; Samuel, 20 Sept. 1674; beside Joseph and Thomas; and he rem. 1676 to New Haven. JOHN, Dover, of wh. no more is kn. but that he was on the list, 1662. He may have liv. 1668, at Marblehead to petitn. against imposts. JOHN, Andover, s. of John of the same, m. 13 June 1662, Hannah, d. of Robert Barnard of the same, had, it may be, several ch. beside Jonathan, wh. d. 15 June 1674; and Nathan; but we have from that town only rec. of m. and d. His w. d. 13 Mar. 1675; and he m. 10 Aug. 1676, Esther, d. of Richard Barker, and may have had more ch. JOHN, Salisbury, eldest s. of John of the same, b. on our side of the ocean, m. 17 Feb. 1670, Joanna Thorn, had John, b. 26 Dec. foll.; Eliz. 8 Apr. 1673, d. next yr.; Jeremiah, 6 Oct. 1675; Eliz. again, 4 Feb. 1678; and Judith, 18 Jan. 1687, perhaps by sec. w. Hannah; and d. 26 Nov. 1691. JOHN, Newbury, prob. s. of William of the same, m. 9 Mar. 1670, Mary, d. of the first Aquila Chase, had Mary, b. 6 Feb. 1671; Thomas, 3 July 1676, and perhaps rem. aft. being adm. freem. 1669, to Chelmsford, for one of the name there d. June 691. JONATHAN, a soldier in Philip's war, of the Conn. forces, severely wound. was prob. of Guilford, or Killingworth, then call. Kenilworth. JOSEPH, Salisbury, perhaps eldest s. of the first John of Newbury, m. Mary, d. of Ralph Blaisdale in 1667. JOSEPH, Mendon, freem. 1673. JOSEPH, Braintree, by w. Sarah had a d. Trial, b. 16 Dec. 1677. JOSEPH, Andover, s. prob. of John of the same, m. 28 May 1679, Mary Ingalls, prob. d. of Henry of the same, wh. d. 21 Sept. 1699, had perhaps sev. other ch. beside Joseph, b. 20 June 1682, H. C. 1703, min. of Charlestown (ord. 13 Oct. 1713, and d. of smallpox, 16 Nov. 1721, with w. sole d. Sarah, w.'s sis. his s. Joseph, and a serv. all in few days, wh. was f. of Benjamin, H. C. 1740, the disting. min. of Kittery); was a deac. and d. 1743, aged 88. JOSEPH, Sudbury, s. of Cyprian, wh. d. 1769, by w. Prudence had Phineas, b. 20 Feb. 1707; Abzubah, 21 Oct. 1708; and Samuel, Sept. 1711; rem. to Framingham, and had Mindwell, 24 Feb. 1714; Isaac; and Mary; rem. to Rutland, there had Dorothy, 1721; Joseph, 1723; Lucy, 1725; Joseph, again; was town treasr. selectman, and deac. On 14 Aug. 1723 he lost all his s. viz. Samuel, and the new b. Joseph, k. by the Ind. with Rev. Joseph Willard, Yale 1714, min. of the town; when the others, Phineas, and Isaac, were by them carr. capt. to Canada. Phineas was much disting. for milit. serv. JOSIAH, Braintree, perhaps br. of the preced. d. 19 June 1677. NATHAN, the first b. of Andover, d. there, Feb. 1719, says the rec. wh. calls him cornet; but I find not evid. of any w. or ch. NATHANIEL, Dover, perhaps s. of John of the same, tho. Mr. Quint marks him as first [p.188] of the stock, by w. Mary had Mary, b. 4 Oct. 1672; and he m. 20 Dec. 1677, Mehitable, d. of Edward Colcord, had Samuel, Edward, and perhaps others. NATHANIEL, Guilford 1685-95, was s. of William. NICHOLAS, Charlestown, d. 17 May 1646, as Farmer says; but I doubt he was not long a resid. OBADIAH, Stamford, eldest s. of Thomas of the same, had Thomas, b. 1679; Ephraim, 1681; and some others, of wh. or the mo. I hear not the names. RICHARD, Concord, perhaps that s. of Thomas, the London armorer, d. 1683. If my conject. be right, his wid. and only d. says Willard, in note to Barry, went home. RICHARD, Taunton, had Richard, b. 23 Feb. 1670; Mary, 8 July 1672; Thomas, 3 Feb. 1675; Thomasin, 3 July 1677; Nathaniel, 30 July 1680; nam. 1689 as one of the inhab. to wh. William Bradford made confirmat. gr. ROBERT, Braintree, had Sarah, b. 31 Oct. 1641; and his wid. Mary d. 22 Jan. 1692, near 90 yrs. old. SAMUEL, Newbury, s. of William, was prob. that soldier serj. k. by the Ind. at Bloody brook, 18 Sept. 1675, with his townsmen, serg. Thomas Smith and others, tho. Felt, II. 505, claims him for Salem, and he was s.-in-law of Joshua Rea of S. His wid. Rebecca had admin. and d. Sarah is ment. SAMUEL, Marlborough, s. of Richard, perhaps brot. by his f. was a deac. early in eighteenth centu. THOMAS, Sudbury, may be the youth in the Abigail, from London, 1635, aged 12, perhaps s. of Thomas of London, the armorer, may have gone home and come again, with Cyprian, and was freem. 1665, by w. Mary had Ann, b. 20 Mar. 1664; Thomas, 14 Apr. 1665; John, 23 Apr. 1667; Cyprian, 19 Apr. 1670; and Jacob, 1 Mar. 1674; was freem. 1665; and town clk. 15 yrs. Barry thinks he was first at Charlestown, a blacksmith, and late in life liv. at Stow, but at Sudbury had been offer. ld. to keep a sch. THOMAS, Stamford 1641, had Thomas, Benjamin, Joseph, Ephraim, and Obadiah the eldest; but d. 19 Aug. 1658, when all were so young, that without nam. one, he gave est. to w. to bring them up. THOMAS, Boston 1670, a baker, was an early inhab. by w. Sarah had John, b. 15 May 1648; Thomas, 28 Dec. 1651, d. young; Jonas, 27 Oct. 1653; Aaron, 28 Feb. 1655; Sarah, 31 Aug. 1657, d. soon; Thomas, again, 20 May 1658; Moses, 22 Apr. 1659; Joseph, 17 Apr. 1661; and Sarah, 8 Dec. 1663. *THOMAS, Guilford 1650, s. of John of the same, prob. b. in Eng. rem. to Killingworth, or as by its first sett. call. from their native place in O. E. in 1665, Kenilworth, but why the name was degrad. to its mod. form, is beyond the knowl. of any in the last three or four generat. yet easily conject. He was among the freem. 1669, rep. 1671 of K. but bef. that planta. was sett. he had, by w. Mary, sev. ch. b. at G. tho. larger pt. may be claim. possib. by K. They were Mary; James, b. 21 Feb. 1651; Rebecca, wh. m. Edward Rutty; Sarah, 25 Jan. 1657, wh. m. 18 Apr. or May 1678, Stephen [p.189] Dod; John, 10 Mar. 1660; Thomas, 21 Feb. 1662; Timothy, 1664; Joseph, and Abigail, tw. 23 Apr. 1666 (she m. Edward Lee); Eliz. 14 July 1668, m. Nathaniel Chittenden; Ebenezer, 26 Jan. 1671; Phebe, 21 Feb. 1673; and Jonathan, 2 Feb. 1676; and d. 18 Nov. 1685. THOMAS, Boston, mariner, d. at Roanoke, and admin. was giv. to his br.-in-law, George Kelly, 15 Oct. 1672. THOMAS, Newbury, m. 15 Apr. 1672, Martha, d. prob. of the first Christopher Bartlet, and perhaps the same man took sec. w. 13 Oct. 1681, Mary, d. of Thomas Mighill of Rowley. THOMAS, Casco, sw. alleg. to Charles II. 8 Sept. 1665, bot. of Ind. Westgustago riv. a. 1673, but sold his right next yr. THOMAS, Amesbury, sw. alleg. 20 Dec. 1677. One THOMAS was of Westerly 1680; and one d. at Middletown, call. sen. 9 Sept. 1714. THOMAS, Plainfield 1689, s. of Thomas of Sudbury. TIMOTHY, Roxbury, s. of the first John of Newbury, m. 12 Mar. 1665, Sarah, prob. eldest d. of Tobias Davis, had Timothy, b. 28 Jan. 1666, H. C. 1687, the first of this name at the Coll.; Sarah, 6 Mar. 1668; John, 24 July 1670; Joseph, 7 Apr. 1673; Eliz. 21 Aug. 1675; Maria, 6 Apr. 1678; Hannah, 27 Aug. 1680; Samuel, 30 Mar. 1682; Abigail, 25 Nov. 1685; and Nathaniel, 6 June 1688; was deac. and d. 31 Jan. 1708. TIMOTHY, Glastonbury, s. of the preced. ord. 1693, m. 17 May 1694, Eunice, d. of John Chester of Wethersfield, had Timothy, b. 23 Mar. 1695, d. next mo.; Sarah, 19 Mar. 1696, d. at 21 yrs.; and John, 4 June 1698, d. soon; and his w. d. 16 of the same mo. He m. sec. w. 19 May 1701, Alice, wid. of Rev. John Whiting, d. of Joseph Cook, had John, again, 13 Sept. 1702, d. young; Eunice, 14 Sept. 1704, d. soon; Martha, 6 Sept. 1705, d. young; tw. s. 8 Sept. 1707, d. very soon; Timothy, again, 9 July 1709; Joseph, 15 Aug. 1711; and Benjamin, Mar. 1714, and d. 14 Apr. 1726. *WILLIAM, Gloucester, a man of eminent skill as shipbuild. prob. first at Salem, and join. the ch. 29 Dec. 1639, freem. 13 May 1640, with prefix of resp. had desir. early in 1634, to build a float. battery for protect. of Boston as in Col. Rec. I. 113 and 120, selectman 1642, and aft.; rep. 1644. He had built many large sh. at London, bef. he came hither, I suppose in 1632, for in Jan. aft. Emanuel Downing, writ. in London to the Rt. Hon. Sir John Coke, princ. Secr. of State, that from high author. he hears, that he is “so able a man, as they believe there is hardly such an other to be found in this kingdom.” See the letter in 3 Mass. Hist. Coll. VIII. 324. He had bapt. at Salem, Isaac, and Mary, not perhaps tw. 26 Jan. 1640; Ruth, 7 Mar. 1641, wh. m. 7 Oct. 1663, Stephen Glover; beside James, bef. ment. prob. the oldest, and William, certain the youngest, but whether all were by w. Philippa, or when he or she d. is unkn. WILLIAM, Newbury, may be that passeng. in the Confidence from Southampton [p.190] 1638, aged 21, prob. br. of John, a fellow-passeng. both from Caversham in Oxfordsh. and was not, I think, as Farmer said, first sett. at Salem, freem. with John, 18 May 1642, by w. Eliz. d. of Samuel Bidfield, m. 19 May 1645, had, says Coffin, Bidfield, b. 16 Mar. 1649, d. young; John, 19 Nov. 1650; and Samuel, 18 Nov. 1652; and d. 19 May 1653, prob. sudden. as his will has that date. It was pro. 30 June foll. names only ch. John and Samuel, made w. Eliz. extrix. WILLIAM, Killingworth 1665, whither he rem. from Guilford, br. of Thomas of the same, b. in Eng. freem: 1669, m. 3 Mar. 1653, Mary, d. of John Meigs, had John, b. 3 Mar. 1654; Samuel, 1 Mar. 1656; Nathaniel, 10 May 1659, d. soon; Nathaniel, again, 29 Oct. 1661; Judith, 1 Oct. 1668; Josiah, 8 Dec. 1670; and Mary, 2 Nov. 1677. When he d. is nt mark. but it was prob. bef. 1685, when among proprs. of G. no other of the name, beside Nathaniel is found. Yet he may have been of K. at that time, and giv. his G. est. to Nathaniel. Others of his ch. however did settle at G. His w. or wid. d. 30 Apr. 1703. WILLIAM, Charlestown, m. 1 July 1673, Abigail Green, so comm. a name that it is perilous to conject. wh. was her f. WILLIAM, Gloucester, eldest s. of James of the same, m. 15 June 1682, Abigail, prob. d. of William Sargent; and Mr. Babson says he d. 24 Sept. 1701. A wid. Ann S. perhaps the mo. of John and William of the same, d. at Newbury, July 1650; and a wid. S. at Newtown, L. I. 1656. Farmer omit. to ment. as he was wont, the numb. of gr. found by Harv. Catal. fourteen, and at Yale ten, up to 1852.

--------------------

ID: I00187

Name: Cyprien Stevens 1

Sex: M

Name: Cyprian Stevens

Birth: ABT. 1649 in prob. London, England

Death: 1725 in Lancaster, Worcester, MA

Change Date: 27 AUG 2000

Immigration: 1661 New England

Reference Number: 1173

Note:

Note: Born abt. 1640, per Stevens-Stephens Genealogy, pg. 42.

Sources:

NEHGS "Register," Vol 93, pg. 286 & "Ages from Deposit io ns in M id dl es ex Co ., MA," NEHGS "Register," Vol 85, pg. 455 & "Wil la rd Genea lo gy ," Cha rles H enry Pope, 1915.

NEHGS "Register," Vol 93, pg. 286.

NEHGS "Register," Vol 93, pg. 286 & "Lancaster Records," N EH GS " Re gi st er ," Vol 16, pg. 259 & "Gen. Dictionary of the First Se tt le rs of N ew E ngl and ," James Savage, 1860-1862 & "Willard Genealo gy ," Ch ar les He nry P op e, 191 5.

Title: Early Massachusetts Marriages Prior to 1800, Third Book

Author: Rev. Frederic W. Bailey

Publication: New Haven, CT: 1897 & Worcester, MA: 1914; r ep r. by G en ea lo gi cal Publ. Co., Baltimore, 1968

Repository:

Note: Morristown Free Public Library, Morristown, NJ

Call Number:

Media: Book

Page: pg. 60

Title: The Birth, Marriage & Death Register of Lancaster, M as ac hu se tt s, 16 43-1850

Author: Henry S. Nourse

Publication: Clinton, MA: 1890; reproduced on CD by Se ar ch & Re Se ar ch Pu bl ishing Corporation, Wheat Ridge, CO

Repository:

Call Number:

Media: Book

Page: pg. 14

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Ancestry of Bob and Mary Beth Wheeler on Ancestry.com

Entries: 61472 Updated: Sun Aug 19 13:20: 35 20 01 Co nt ac t: Ma ry Be th Wheeler <mb@thewheelers.com> Home P age: A nce st ry of B ob and Ma ry Be th Wheeler

Source:

WILLARD GENEALOGY, SEQUEL TO WILLARD MEMORIAL

MATERIALS GATHERED CHIEFLY BY JOSEPH WILLARD

AND CHARLES WILKES WALKER

EDITED AND COMPLETED BY CHARLES HENRY POPE

PRINTED FOR THE WILLARD FAMILY ASSOCIATION, BOSTON, MASS., 1915*

Digital Edition © 2001 by Richard Bingham

Oceanport, New Jersey

ISBN 1-930968-20-5

Copyright, 1915

By THE WILLARD FAMILY ASSOCIATION

Murray and Emery Company

Kendall Square

Cambridge

Marriage 1 Mary Willard b: 7 SEP 1653 in Concord, Middlesex, MA

Married: 22 JAN 1671/72 in Lancaster, Worcester, MA

Children

Dorothy Stevens
Joseph Stevens
Mary Stevens b: 22 NOV 1672
Cyprien Stevens , Jr. b: 22 NOV 1672
Simon Stevens b: 13 AUG 1677
Elizabeth Stevens b: ABT. 1681

Sources:

Title: WILLARD GENEALOGY, SEQUEL TO WILLARD MEMOIR

Author: Materials gathered by Joseph Willard and Charles Wilkes Walker, Edited and completed by Charles Henry Pope

Publication: Printed for the Willard Family Assn., Boston, MA, 1915, Murray and Emery, Kendall Sq., Cambridge, MA, Digital Edition 2001 by Richard Bingham, Oceanport, NJ

Repository:

Media: Electronic

view all 23

Cyprian Stevens's Timeline

1647
November 13, 1647
London, England
1672
November 22, 1672
Age 25
Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States
November 22, 1672
Age 25
Lancaster,Worcester,Massachusetts,USA
November 22, 1672
Age 25
Lancaster, Mass.
1675
1675
Age 27
Lancaster,MA,died young
1677
August 13, 1677
Age 29
Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA
1680
1680
Age 32
Lancaster,Sudbury,Mass
1685
July 26, 1685
Age 37
Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
1702
May 10, 1702
Age 54
Plainfield, Windham, Connecticut
May 10, 1702
Age 54
Plainfield, Windham, Connecticut