Dagobert I, King of the Franks

Is your surname of Austrasia?

Research the of Austrasia family

Dagobert I, King of the Franks's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Dagobert of Austrasia (Meroving), I

Nicknames: "Dagoberto da Néustria I", "Dagobert I King Of /Francec/", "King of All Franks", "King Dagobert I of the /Franks/"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France
Death: Died in St. Denis (within present Paris), (Present Region Ile-de-France), Neustria (within present France), Frankish Empire
Place of Burial: Basilique Saint Denis, St. Denis, Paris, Region Ile-De-France, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Chlothar II the Young, King of the Franks; Prince Sigebert the 1st? of Franconia; Beretrudis of the Burgundians and Princess Brunhilde?
Husband of Regintrude "Ragentrude", "Ragnetrude", "Raintrude", "Regintrud",; Bertilda; Regintrude of the Burgundians; Nantechilde de Bobigny; Gormatrude? and 3 others
Father of Siegbert III the Holy, King of Austrasia; Adèle d'Austrasie, Abbess of Pfalzel; ... d'Austrasie; Regintrud of the Franks; Clovis II "the Lazy", King of the Franks and 1 other
Brother of Wife of Theodo I (Not Fara) and Bertha of the Franks
Half brother of Emma des Francs; Mérovech de Soissons; Wife of Grimoald and Charibert II, King of Aquitaine

Occupation: King of Austrasia (623-634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639)., king of Austrasia (623–634), Roi des Francs (632-639), Roi d'Austrasie (623-639), Roi de Bourgogne et de Neustrie (629-639), Ruled 629-639,
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Dagobert of Austrasia (Meroving), I

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Marriage and issue

He married Nanthild and they had the following:

   * Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.
   * Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:

   * Sigebert III

His other wives were:

   * Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)
   * Bertechildis (Berthilde)
   * Gomentrude

--------------------

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604).

Dagobert was a serial monogamist.

He married Nanthild and they had the following:

   * Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.
   * Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:

   * Sigebert III

His other wives were:

   * Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)
   * Bertechildis (Berthilde)
   * Gomentrude

Dagobert died in the abbey of Saint-Denis and was the first French king to be buried in the Saint Denis Basilica, Paris.

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

--------------------

Dagobert I

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Rule in Austrasia

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace, the Vosges, and the Ardennes, but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate, and the Transjura. Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

United rule

On the death of his father in 629, Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert, son of Sichilde, claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf, the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632, Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.

In 631, Dagobert led three armies against Samo, the rulers of the Slavs, but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg.

Rule in Neustria, from Paris

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Landen. In 634, Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III, on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him eleven years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica, at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert died in the abbey of Saint-Denis and was the first French king to be buried in the Saint Denis Basilica, Paris.

Legacy

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was immortalized in the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The Good King Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, Saint Eligius (Eloi in French). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

In 1984, a 112-minute long French-Italian comedy, Le bon roi Dagobert (Good King Dagobert) was made, based on Dagobert I. The movie is surprisingly realistic in showing the realities of early barbarian France. The soundtrack was composed by Guido and Mauricio De Angelis.

Marriage and issue

Dagobert was a serial monogamist.

He married Nanthild and they had the following:

   * Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.
   * Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:

   * Sigebert III

His other wives were:

   * Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)
   * Bertechildis (Berthilde)
   * Gomentrude

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I

--------------------

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace, the Vosges, and the Ardennes, but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate, and the Transjura. Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

On the death of his father in 629, Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert, son of Sichilde, claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf, the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632, Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.

In 631, Dagobert led three armies against Samo, the rulers of the Slavs, but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg.

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Landen. In 634, Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III, on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him eleven years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica, at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert died in the abbey of Saint-Denis and was the first French king to be buried in the Saint Denis Basilica, Paris.

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was immortalized in the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The Good King Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, Saint Eligius (Eloi in French). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

In 1984, a 112-minute long French-Italian comedy, Le bon roi Dagobert (Good King Dagobert) was made, based on Dagobert I. The movie is surprisingly realistic in showing the realities of early barbarian France. The soundtrack was composed by Guido and Mauricio De Angelis.

Dagobert was a serial monogamist.

He married Nanthild and they had the following:

Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.

Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:

Sigebert III

His other wives were:

Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)

Bertechildis (Berthilde)

Gomentrude

--------------------

Dagobert I, king of the Franks, was the son of Clotaire II. In 623 his father established him as king of the region east of the Ardennes, and in 626 revived for him the ancient kingdom of Austrasia, minus Aquitaine and Provence. As Dagobert was yet but a child, he was placed under the authority of the mayor of the palace, Pippin, and Arnulf, bishop of Metz. At the death of Clotaire II in 629, Dagobert wished to reestablish unity in the Frankish realm, and in 629 and 630 made expeditions into Neustria and Burgundy, where he succeeded in securing the recognition of his authority. In Aquitaine he gave his brother Charibert the administration of the counties of Toulouse, Cahors, Agen, Périgueux, and Saintes; but at Charibert's death in 632 Dagobert became sole ruler of the whole of the Frankish territories south of the Loire. Under him the Merovingian monarchy attained its culminating point. He restored to the royal domain the lands that had been usurped by the great nobles and by the church; he maintained at Paris a luxurious, though, from the example he himself set, a disorderly court; he was a patron of the arts, and delighted in the exquisite craftsmanship of his treasurer, the goldsmith St. Eloi. His authority was recognized through the length and breadth of the realm. The duke of the Basques came to his court to swear fidelity, and at his villa at Clichy the chief of the Bretons of Domnoné promised obedience. He intervened in the affairs of the Visigoths of Spain and the Lombards of Italy, and was heard with deference. Indeed, as a sovereign, Dagobert was reckoned superior to the other barbarian kings. He entered into relations with the eastern empire, and swore a "perpetual peace" with the emperor Heraclius; and it is probable that the two sovereigns took common measures against the Slav and Bulgarian tribes, which ravaged in turn the Byzantine state and the German territories subject to the Franks. Dagobert protected the church and placed illustrious prelates at the head of the bishoprics -- Eloi (Eligius) at Noyon, Ouen (Audoenus) at Rouen, and Didier (Desiderius) at Cahors. His reign is also marked by the creation of numerous monasteries and by renewed missionary activity, in Flanders and among the Basques. He died on the 19th of January 639, and was buried at St. Denis. After his death the Frankish monarchy was again divided. In 634 he had been obliged to give the Austrasians a special king in the person of his eldest son Sigebert, and at the birth of a second son, Clovis, in 635, the Neustrians had immediately claimed him as king. Thus the unification of the realm, which Dagobert had reestablished with so much pains, was annulled.

--------------------

In English:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I

--------------------

Dagobert I

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Rule in Austrasia

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575-604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace, the Vosges, and the Ardennes, but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate, and the Transjura. Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

United rule

On the death of his father in 629, Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert, son of Sichilde, claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf, the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632, Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.

In 631, Dagobert led three armies against Samo, the Slavic king, but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg.

Rule in Neustria, from Paris

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Landen. In 634, Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III, on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him eleven years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Legacy

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was immortalized in the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The Good King Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, Saint Eligius (Eloi in French). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

In 1984 a 112 minutes long french-Italian comedy, Le bon roi Dagobert - The good king Dagobert- was made based on I. Dagobert. The movie is surprisingly realistic in showing the realities of early barbarian France. The soundtrack was composed by Guido and Mauricio De Angelis.

Marriage and issue

Dagobert was a serial monogamist.

He married Nanthild and they had the following:

Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.

Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis and they had the following:

Sigebert III

His other wives were:

Wulfefundis

Bertechildis

References

The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call (chart 2055 & 2058) ISBN 1-933194-22-7

--------------------

Rei da Austrasie (623-634) e Rei de Burgondie (629-639), Neustrie (629-639) e depois dos Francs (629-639)

Dagoberto era o filho mais velho de Clotário II e Berthetrude (ou possivelmente Haldetrude). Clotário reinou sozinho sobre todos os francos desde 613, e Dagoberto se tornou rei da Austrásia quando seus nobres independentes exigiram um rei próprio. Em 623, Clotário instalou seu filho Dagoberto na Austrásia.Com a morte de seu pai em 629, Dagoberto herdou os reinos da Nêustria e da Borgonha. Seu meio irmão Cariberto, filho de Sichilde, reinvidicou a Nêustria mas Dagoberto se opôs a ele. Brodulf, irmão de Sichilde, suplicou a Dagoberto em nome de seu jovem sobrinho, mas Dagoberto o assassinou e cedeu a seu jovem irmão a Aquitânia.Cariberto morreu em 632, e seu filho Chilperico foi assassinado por ordem de Dagoberto. Em 632, Dagoberto tinha a Aquitânia e a Borgonha firmemente sob seu domínio, tornando-se o mais poderoso rei merovíngio em muitos anos e o mais respeitado governante do Ocidente.Também em 632, os nobres da Austrásia se revoltaram sob a liderança do prefeito do palácio, Pepino de Landen. Em 634, Dagoberto aplacou os nobres rebeldes colocando seu filho de apenas três anos de idade, Sigeberto III, no trono, e através disso cedendo o poder real no mais oriental dos seus reinos, justamente como seu pai tinha feito com ele onze anos antes.Como rei, Dagoberto fez de Paris sua capital. Durante seu reino, ele construiu Altes Schloss (Castelo Antigo) em Meersburg (na atual Alemanha), que atualmente é o mais antigo castelo habitado desse país. Religioso devoto, Dagoberto também foi responsável pela construção da Basílica de Saint-Denis no lugar de um monastério beneditino em Paris.Em 631, Dagoberto liderou três exércitos contra Samo, rei eslavo, mas suas forças austrasianas foram derrotadas em Wogatisburg.Dagoberto morreu em 639, e foi o primeiro dos reis franceses a ser sepultado nas tumbas reais de Saint-Denis. Seu segundo filho, Clóvis II, de seu casamento com Nantilde, herdou o resto de seu reino muito jovem.O padrão de divisão e assassinato que caracterizou até mesmo o poderoso reinado de Dagoberto continuou no século seguinte até Pepino o Breve finalmente depor o último rei merovíngio em 751, estabelecendo a dinastia carolíngia. Os reis-meninos merovíngios permaneceram governantes fantoches que herdavam o trono ainda crianças e viviam apenas o bastante para gerar um herdeiro masculino ou dois, enquanto o poder real ficava nas mãos das famílias nobres (a velha nobreza) que exercia controle feudal sobre a maior parte das terras.

Dagoberto foi imortalizado na canção Le bon roi Dagobert (O bom rei Dagoberto), uma música infantil retratando as trocas entre o rei e seu principal conselheiro, Santo Elígio (Saint Eloi em francês). As rimas satíricas colocam Dagoberto em várias posições ridículas das quais os bons conselhos de Elígio conseguem retirá-lo. O texto, que provavelmente se originou no século XVIII, tornou-se extremamente popular como uma expressão do sentimento anti-monarquista da Revolução Francesa. Exceto por colocar Dagoberto e Elísio em suas respectivas funções, a canção não tem nenhuma precisão histórica.

--------------------

I am not fully satisfied that this connection exists through his daughter named Regintrud, although he would be neat to have in a family background. As such, this is a weak connection (at least through his daughter).

From the Wikipedia page on Dagobert I:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the Frankish kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Rule in Austrasia

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace, the Vosges, and the Ardennes, but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert.

The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate, and the Transjura. Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

United rule


On the death of his father in 629, Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert, son of Sichilde, claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf, the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632, Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.

In 631, Dagobert led three armies against Samo, the rulers of the Slavs, but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg.

Rule in Neustria, from Paris

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Landen. In 634, Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III, on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him 11 years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica, at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert died in the abbey of Saint-Denis and was the first Frankish king to be buried in the Saint Denis Basilica, Paris.

Legacy

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was immortalized in the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The Good King Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, Saint Eligius (Eloi in French). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

In 1984, a 112-minute long French-Italian comedy, Le bon roi Dagobert (Good King Dagobert) was made, based on Dagobert I. The movie is surprisingly realistic in showing the realities of early barbarian France. The soundtrack was composed by Guido and Maurizio De Angelis.

Marriage and issue

Dagobert was a serial monogamist. He married Nanthild and they had the following:

1. Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.

2. Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:

1. Sigebert III

His other wives were:

Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)

Bertechildis (Berthilde)

Gomentrude

--------------------

Frankish king, son and successor of King Clotaire II. His father was forced to appoint Dagobert king of the East Frankish kingdom of Austrasia at the request of Pepin of Landen, mayor of the palace, and Arnulf, bishop of Metz, who effectively ruled in Austrasia. After Clotaire's death (629) Dagobert reunited Aquitaine with Austrasia and Neustria and became king of all the Franks. He was, however, forced by popular demand to give (634) Austrasia its own king in the person of his son, Sigebert III. The last of the Merovingians to exercise personal rule, he made himself independent of the great nobles, especially of Pepin of Landen. He extended his rule over the Basques and the Bretons. Dagobert's reign was prosperous; he was a patron of learning and the arts. He founded the first great abbey of Saint-Denis, where he is buried.

Dagobert I (died 639), king of the Franks (629-639). He became king of Austrasia in 623, and by 632 he had also brought Bourgogne and Aquitaine under his rule, becoming the most powerful of the Merovingian kings. He made Paris his capital. Dagobert built numerous monasteries and strengthened the royal power.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I -------------------- Den sista frankiska kungen av den merovingiska dynastin att pröva ett rike förenas i mer än namnet. Son till Chlotar II blev Dagobert kung över Austrasien i 623 och hela frankiska riket i 629. Dagobert säkrade sitt rike genom att göra en vänskap fördrag med den bysantinske kejsaren Herakleios och besegrade Gascons och Bretagne, och kampanjer mot slaverna på sin östra gräns. I 631 han skickade en armé till Spanien för att hjälpa visigotisk usurpatorn Swinthila (Svintila). Han flyttade sin huvudstad från Austrasien till Paris, en central plats från vilken riket skulle styras mer effektivt. Han blidkade sedan Austrasians genom att göra sin tre-årige son Sigibert deras kung i 634. Berömd för sin kärlek för rättvisa, var Dagobert ändå girig och utsvävande. Han efterträddes av Sigibert III och en annan son Klodvig II. Välstånd Dagobert regeringstid, och ett återupplivande av konst under denna period, kan bedömas från de rika innehållet i gravarna av perioden och från Guld-arbete för kyrkorna. Dagobert reviderade frankiska rätt, uppmuntras att lära, nedlåtande konst, och grundade den första stora klostret i Saint-Denis, som han gjort många gåvor.

För att nämna denna sida: "Dagobert I" Encyclopædia Britannica <http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=28983&tocid=0&query=dagobert> -------------------- Dagobert I was the King of Austrasia (623–634), King of all the Franks (629–634), and King of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica, at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert was a serial monogamist. He first married our ancestor Nanthild and they had the following two children, of whom one was our ancestor Clovis II. He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and he begat a son with her. His other wives were Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde), Bertechildis (Berthilde), and Gomentrude.

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was immortalized in the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The Good King Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, Saint Eligius (Eloi in French). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

In 1984, a 112-minute long French-Italian comedy, Le bon roi Dagobert (Good King Dagobert) was made, based on Dagobert I. The movie is surprisingly realistic in showing the realities of early barbarian France.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I for more information.

King Dagobert was our ancestor through two distinct lines of descent: through his son Clovis and his daughter Regintrude, each of whom was independently our ancestor. -------------------- Roi des Francs

Roi d'Austrasie -------------------- Dagobert I (c. 603 - January 19, 639) was the king of the Franks from 629 to 639.

The son of King Clotaire II, Dagobert became king of Austrasia and on the death of his father, the sole king of the Franks. By 632 he had Bourgogne and Aquitaine under his rule, becoming the most powerful of the Merovingian kings and the most respected ruler in the West. He married five times.

As king, Dagobert I made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss Castle in Meersburg, Germany which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica at the site of a Benedictine Monastery in Paris.

Dagobert was the last of the Merovingian kings to wield any real royal power. In 632 the nobles of Austrasia revolted under Mayor of the Palace Pepin I, and Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son Sigebert III on the Austrasian throne, thereby ceding royal power in all but name. When Dagobert died in 639, another son, Clovis II, inherited the rest of his kingdom at age five.

This pattern continued for the next century until Pippin III finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 731, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families (the Old Noblesse) who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the Royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

King Dagobert was immortalized by the song The good king Dagobert.

---

Dagobert I

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dagobert I (c. 603 - January 19, 639) was the king of the Franks from 629 to 639.

The son of King Clotaire II, Dagobert became king of Austrasia and on the death of his father, the sole king of the Franks. By 632 he had Bourgogne and Aquitaine under his rule, becoming the most powerful of the Merovingian kings and the most respected ruler in the West. He married five times.

As king, Dagobert I made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss Castle in Meersburg, Germany which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica at the site of a Benedictine Monastery in Paris.

Dagobert was the last of the Merovingian kings to wield any real royal power. In 632 the nobles of Austrasia revolted under Mayor of the Palace Pepin I, and Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son Sigebert III on the Austrasian throne, thereby ceding royal power in all but name. When Dagobert died in 639, another son, Clovis II, inherited the rest of his kingdom at age five.

This pattern continued for the next century until Pippin III finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families (the Old Noblesse) who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the Royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

King Dagobert was immortalized by the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The good king Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, St. Eligius (Eloi in the French text). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions, from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

His ancestry is shown elsewhere on this tree.

Dagobert I's father was King of all Franks Clothaire Meroving II and his mother was Haldetrude de Bourgogne. His paternal grandparents were Chilperic I Soissons Franks and Fredegunde Franks; his maternal grandparents were Richemeres von Franconia and Garritrude de Hamage. He had a brother and two sisters, named Charibert II, Bertha and Emma. He was the second oldest of the four children. He had a half-sister named Oda. -------------------- http://a.decarne.free.fr/gencar/dat0.htm#20

His parents continue back on this site, I've just run out of inputting steam. Sharon Doubell

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the Frankish kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Rule in Austrasia

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace, the Vosges, and the Ardennes, but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate, and the Transjura. Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

United rule

On the death of his father in 629, Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert, son of Sichilde, claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf, the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632, Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.

In 631, Dagobert led three armies against Samo, the rulers of the Slavs, but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg.

Rule in Neustria, from Paris

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Landen. In 634, Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III, on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him eleven years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica, at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert died in the abbey of Sain

Legacy

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Marriage and issue

Dagobert was a serial monogamist.

He married Nanthild and they had the following:

Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.

Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:

Sigebert III

His other wives were:

Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)

Bertechildis (Berthilde)

Gomentrude -------------------- Dagoberto I

Origem: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre.

Ir para: navegação, pesquisa

Dinastia Merovíngia Rei de todos os francos

Reis da Nêustria

Reis da Austrásia

Faramundo 410-426

Clódio 426-447

Meroveu 447-458

Childerico I 458-481

Clóvis I 481 - 511

 Childeberto I 511-558 
 Clotário I 511-561 
 Clodomiro 511-524 
 Teodorico I 511-534 
   Teodeberto I 534-548 
   Teodebaldo 548-555 

Clotário I 558-561

 Cariberto I 561-567 
 Chilperico I 561-584 
   Clotário II 584-629 
 Guntram 561-592 
   Childeberto II 592-595 
   Teodorico II 595-613 
   Sigeberto II 613 
 Sigeberto I 561-575 
   Childeberto II 575-595 
   Teodeberto II 595-612 
   Teodorico II 612-613 
   Sigeberto II 613 

Clotário II 613-629

 Dagoberto I 623-629 

Dagoberto I 629-639

 Cariberto II 629-632 
   Chilperico 632 
 Clóvis II 639-658 
   Clotário III 658-673 
   Teodorico III 673 
   Childerico II 673-675 
   Teodorico III 675-691 
 Sigeberto III 634-656 
    Childeberto o Adotado      656-661 
   Clotário III 661-662 
    Childerico II 662-675 
    Clóvis III 675-676 
    Dagoberto II 676-679 

Teodorico III 679-691

Clóvis IV 691-695

Childeberto III 695-711

Dagoberto III 711-715

 Chilperico II 715-721 
 Clotário IV 717-718 

Chilperico II 718-721

Teodorico IV 721-737

Childerico III 743-751


Dagoberto I

Rei de todos os francos (629-639)

Rei da Austrásia (623-634)

Rei da Nêustria (629-639)

Rei da Borgonha (629-639)

Nascimento 604

Morte 19 de Janeiro de 639, Saint-Denis

Sepultura Igreja da Abadia de Saint-Denis

Dagoberto I (◊ 604 † 19 de Janeiro de 639) foi rei da Austrásia (623-634) e rei da Nêustria e da Borgonha (629-639). Foi o último monarca merovíngio a exercer algum poder real.

Índice [esconder]

1 Ascensão ao poder

2 Reinado

3 Morte e legado

4 Le bon roi Dagobert

5 Pais

6 Casamentos e filhos

7 Ver também

8 Ligações externas


[editar] Ascensão ao poder


Medalhão retrato de Dagoberto I, por Jean Dassier (1676–1763)Dagoberto era o filho mais velho de Clotário II e Berthetrude (ou possivelmente Haldetrude). Clotário reinou sozinho sobre todos os francos desde 613, e Dagoberto se tornou rei da Austrásia quando seus nobres independentes exigiram um rei próprio. Em 623, Clotário instalou seu filho Dagoberto na Austrásia.

Com a morte de seu pai em 629, Dagoberto herdou os reinos da Nêustria e da Borgonha. Seu meio irmão Cariberto, filho de Sichilde, reivindicou a Nêustria mas Dagoberto opôs-se a ele. Brodulf, irmão de Sichilde, suplicou a Dagoberto em nome de seu jovem sobrinho, mas Dagoberto o assassinou e cedeu a seu jovem irmão a Aquitânia.

Cariberto morreu em 632, e seu filho Chilperico foi assassinado por ordem de Dagoberto. Em 632, Dagoberto tinha a Aquitânia e a Borgonha firmemente sob seu domínio, tornando-se o mais poderoso rei merovíngio em muitos anos e o mais respeitado governante do Ocidente.

[editar] Reinado

Também em 632, os nobres da Austrásia se revoltaram sob a liderança do prefeito do palácio, Pepino de Landen. Em 634, Dagoberto aplacou os nobres rebeldes colocando seu filho de apenas três anos de idade, Sigeberto III, no trono, e através disso cedendo o poder real no mais oriental dos seus reinos, justamente como seu pai tinha feito com ele onze anos antes.

Como rei, Dagoberto fez de Paris sua capital. Durante seu reino, ele construiu Altes Schloss (Castelo Antigo) em Meersburg (na atual Alemanha), que atualmente é o mais antigo castelo habitado desse país. Religioso devoto, Dagoberto também foi responsável pela construção da Basílica de Saint-Denis no lugar de um monastério beneditino em Paris.

Em 631, Dagoberto liderou três exércitos contra Samo, rei eslavo, mas suas forças austrasianas foram derrotadas em Wogatisburg.

[editar] Morte e legado

Dagoberto morreu em 639, e foi o primeiro dos reis franceses a ser sepultado nas tumbas reais de Saint-Denis. Seu segundo filho, Clóvis II, de seu casamento com Nantilde, herdou o resto de seu reino muito jovem.

O padrão de divisão e assassinato que caracterizou até mesmo o poderoso reinado de Dagoberto continuou no século seguinte até Pepino o Breve finalmente depor o último rei merovíngio em 751, estabelecendo a dinastia carolíngia. Os reis-meninos merovíngios permaneceram governantes fantoches que herdavam o trono ainda crianças e viviam apenas o bastante para gerar um herdeiro masculino ou dois, enquanto o poder real ficava nas mãos das famílias nobres (a velha nobreza) que exercia controle feudal sobre a maior parte das terras.

[editar] Le bon roi Dagobert

Dagoberto foi imortalizado na canção Le bon roi Dagobert (O bom rei Dagoberto), uma música infantil retratando as trocas entre o rei e seu principal conselheiro, Santo Elígio (Saint Eloi em francês). As rimas satíricas colocam Dagoberto em várias posições ridículas das quais os bons conselhos de Elígio conseguem retirá-lo. O texto, que provavelmente se originou no século XVIII, tornou-se extremamente popular como uma expressão do sentimento anti-monarquista da Revolução Francesa. Exceto por colocar Dagoberto e Elísio em suas respectivas funções, a canção não tem nenhuma precisão histórica.

[editar] Pais

♂ Clotário II (◊ 584 † 629)

♀ Bertrude (◊ c. 590 † c. 618)

[editar] Casamentos e filhos

em 626, Clichy, com Gomatrude (◊ c. 598 † depois de 630), filha de Brunulfo II, conde das Ardenas. Casamento sem o consentimento de Clotário II. Repudiada em 631.

em Dezembro de 629, La Chapelle Saint-Denis, com Nantilde (◊ c. 610 † 642)

♂ Clóvis II (◊ c. 635 † 657)

em c. 630 com Ragnetrude (◊ ? † ?), irmã de Gomatrude.

♂ Sigeberto III (◊ 631 † 656)

com Vulfegunda (◊ ? † ?)

com Bertilda (◊ ? † ?) -------------------- Dagobert Of Austrasia 1 2 •Sex: M •Title: King of France and Austra •Birth: 602 3 2 •Death: 9 JAN 638/39 in Epinay-sur-Seine, France 3 2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I

Father: Clothaire II Of Franks b: 584 Mother: Altrude b: ABT 584

Marriage 1 Nantechild b: 607 Children 1. Chlodovech II b: ABT 634

Marriage 2 Regintrude Children 1. Regintrude 2. Siegbert III Of Austrasia

B


Y the murder and robbery of his young kinsmen, Clotaire II. Became master of all three kingdoms, and therefore, like his namesake, sole king of France. He is noted in history not only for his cruelty t Brunhilda, but also because he was forced to make a new law, whereby the nobles were henceforthallowed to leave their lands and titles to their children. Before that, when a nobleman had died, his lands had always been given back to the king. At this time, also, there was chosen in each of te three kingdoms a chief officer, called Mayor of the Palace, to govern under the king.

While Clotaire was noted for his hardness of heart, his son Dag'obert is so famous for his good nature and jollity that no one in France ever mentions him except as "the good king Dagobert." At his father's death (628), he too found himself sole king of France, and during his reign he received, besides, tribute from many tribes in Germany. He made many wise laws, listened tot he complaints of the poor as patiently as to those of the rich, and dealt out justice to all alike.

[61] Many of Dagobert's wise deeds are said to have been due to the good advice given by his treasurer (Eloi), a man of such fine principles that he was called "saint" even during his lifetime. This treasurer was also a very clever goldsmith, and made for the king a golden throne, and a crown and scepter, long carefully preserved in the treasury of the Church of St. Denis, near Paris.

This church—a wonder of architecture—stands in the very spot where St. Denis is said to have been buried. The story runs that a poor little chapel, built over the saint's grave, had fallen into ruins and was quite forsaken. One day while pursuing a deer, Dagobert saw it plunge into a thicket, and soon found that it had taken refuge in this tumble-down place. The tender-hearted king not only spared the poor deer's life, but vowed to build a church and abbey there. For this reason he is considered the founder of the abbey of St. Denis, although very little of the building he erected there still exists.

[62] The church finished, we are told that Dagobert laid upon the altar a quaint banner of crimson and gold, cut in the shape of a flame, which is known as the "Or'iflamme." This was the sacred royal banner of France. For centuries no French king ever went to war without first visiting the church of St. Denis, where the abbot gave him this standard, which was kept on the altar in times of peace. The Oriflamme was always carried before the king in battle, and it waved from his tent camp, while the royal war cry of "Montjoie et St. Denis" (moN-zhwä' ā săN dē-nee')was heard in every fray where it was carried.

Dagobert felt such an interest in the church he had founded, that he begged to be buried in it. His tomb in the Church of St. Denis—which was several times reconstructed in later centuries—can still be seen, with quaint sculptures all around it, showing how saints and demons are said to have fought for the king's soul, which we are happy to say, was finally carried off in triumph to heaven. From the time of Dagobert's burial in this church (638) until the end of the eighteenth century, French monarchs were always laid to rest in this edifice, which contains so many beautiful and interesting tombs that thousands of strangers—as well as countless patriotic Frenchmen—go to visit it every year.

Dagobert is considered the best and wisest of all the Merovingian kings, and his memory is still kept green in France by an old nursery rhyme, which is familiar to children there as the Mother Goose ditties are to you. As most of his successors were weak, idle, and stupid, they are known as the Sluggard, or Do-nothing, Kings. They ate, drank, and were merry; rode about in royal style, [63] lolling lazily in great wagons drawn by slow-pacing oxen; and troubled themselves about nothing in the world save their own pleasure. As a rule they died very young, the result of too much eating and drinking, and not enough exercise; but none of them were ever missed.

These slothful kings were mere figureheads. The real power in the kingdom had fallen into the hands of their principal officers, the mayors of the palace, who ruled Neustria, Austrasia, and Burgundy about as they pleased. But as these mayors of the palace were often jealous of one another, and anxious to govern all France alone, their rivalry led to many bitter quarrels and even to open warfare.

Finally a famous Austrasian mayor of the palace, named Pepin (of Héristal), defeated the Neustrians in a great battle (Testry 687), and thus became sole master of all northern France. It suited him, however, to keep puppet-kings on the throne, whom he crowned or deposed just as his fancy prompted.

For many years after this, mayors of the palace made and unmade kings, getting rid of those who were inconvenient by means of poison or of the dagger, or by cutting off their long hair and shutting them up in monasteries.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagobert_I

and we are descended from the Trojans

http://willofjehovah.com/Family%20History/_Rowe/from%20Adam/__harald%20hildetand/___1st%20Edition/__harald%20hildetand.htm -------------------- b. 605

d. Jan. 19, 639, Saint-Denis, France

the last Frankish king of the Merovingian dynasty to rule a realm unitedin more than name only.

The son of Chlotar II, Dagobert became king of Austrasia in 623 and ofthe entire Frankish realm in 629. Dagobert secured his realm by making afriendship treaty with the Byzantine emperor Heraclius, defeating theGascons and Bretons, and campaigning against the Slavs on his easternfrontier. In 631 he sent an army to Spain to help the Visigothic usurperSwinthila (Svintila). He moved his capital from Austrasia to Paris, acentral location from which the kingdom could be governed moreeffectively. He then appeased the Austrasians by making histhree-year-old son Sigebert their king in 634. Famed for his love ofjustice, Dagobert was nevertheless greedy and dissolute. He was succeededby Sigebert III and another son, Clovis II.

The prosperity of Dagobert's reign, and the revival of the arts duringthis period, can be judged from the rich contents of the tombs of theperiod and from the goldsmiths' work for the churches. Dagobert revisedFrankish law, encouraged learning, patronized the arts, and founded thefirst great abbey of Saint-Denis, to which he made many gifts.

Copyright c 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

BIOGRAPHY: In 623, Dagobert's father, Chlotar II, King of the Franks, made him king of Austrasia to please the leading Austrasian nobles: Mayor of the Palace Pepin I and Saint Arnulf, Bishop of Metz. When Chlotar died in 629, Dagobert became sole King of the Franks, and he moved his capital from Austrasia to Paris. Later, Dagobert left the council of Pepin for a more flexible Neustrian Mayor of the Palace. In 632, he was forced to put his three-year old son Sigebert on the throne of Austrasia as the nobles were in revolt, however Pepin was not made his Mayor of the Palace. The Neustrian nobles then wished to unite with Burgundy, and so they urged Dagobert to put his son Clovis II as king of both those kingdoms, although he was only 5 years old and could be easily manipulated by the nobles. When Dagobert died in 639, the nobles of the kingdoms controlled both his sons, now puppet kings.

History: Dagobert I (died 639), king of the Franks (629-39), son of Clotaire II. He became king of Austrasia in 623 and at the death of his father the sole king of the Franks. By 632 he had also brought Burgundy and Aquitaine under his rule, becoming the most powerful of the Merovingian kings and the most respected sovereign in the West. He made Paris his capital. St. Éloi (588?-659) was Dagobert's principal adviser, and his rule was marked by the building of numerous monasteries and the strengthening of the royal power. At his death the Frankish kingdom was divided between his sons.

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Wikipedia:

Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Rule in Austrasia

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace, the Vosges, and the Ardennes, but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate, and the Transjura. Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

United rule

"Throne of Dagobert", bronze. The base, formed by a curule chair, is traditionally attributed to Dagobert, while the arms and the back of the chair were added under Charles the Bald. This throne was last used by Napoleon I in 1804 when he created the Legion d'Honneur. Cabinet des Medailles.

On the death of his father in 629, Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert, son of Sichilde, claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf, the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632, Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.

In 631, Dagobert led three armies against Samo, the rulers of the Slavs, but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg.

Rule in Neustria, from Paris

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Landen. In 634, Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III, on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him eleven years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica, at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert died in the abbey of Saint-Denis and was the first French king to be buried in the Saint Denis Basilica, Paris.

Legacy

Detail of Dagobert's tomb, thirteenth century

Dagobert's tomb at Saint-Denis, remade in the thirteenth century

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was immortalized in the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The Good King Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, Saint Eligius (Eloi in French). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

In 1984, a 112-minute long French-Italian comedy, Le bon roi Dagobert (Good King Dagobert) was made, based on Dagobert I. The movie is surprisingly realistic in showing the realities of early barbarian France. The soundtrack was composed by Guido and Maurizio De Angelis.

Marriage and issue

Dagobert was a serial monogamist.

He married Nanthild and they had the following:

   * Clovis II, who inherited the rest of his kingdom at a young age when his father died.
   * Regintrud who married into the Bavarian Agilolfings, either Theodo, Duke of Bavaria or his son Duke in Salzburg.

He also had a mistress named Ragintrudis (Ragnetrude) and they had the following:

   * Sigebert III

His other wives were:

   * Wulfefundis (Wulfegunde)
   * Bertechildis (Berthilde)
   * Gomentrude

-------------------- Dagobert I (c. 603 – 19 January 639) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last Merovingian dynast to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the French kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.

Rule in Austrasia

Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar II had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own.

When Chlothar II granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace, the Vosges, and the Ardennes, but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court. Dagobert created a new duchy (the later Duchy of Alsace) in southwest Austrasia to guard the region from Burgundian or Alemannic encroachments and ambitions. The duchy comprised the Vosges, the Burgundian Gate, and the Transjura. Dagobert made his courtier Gundoin the first duke of this new polity that was to last until the end of the Merovingian dynasty.

United rule

On the death of his father in 629, Dagobert inherited the Neustrian and Burgundian kingdoms. His half-brother Charibert, son of Sichilde, claimed Neustria but Dagobert opposed him. Brodulf, the brother of Sichilde, petitioned Dagobert on behalf of his young nephew, but Dagobert assassinated him and gave his younger sibling Aquitaine.

Charibert died in 632 and his son Chilperic was assassinated on Dagobert's orders. By 632, Dagobert had Burgundy and Aquitaine firmly under his rule, becoming the most powerful Merovingian king in many years and the most respected ruler in the West.

In 631, Dagobert led three armies against Samo, the rulers of the Slavs, but his Austrasian forces were defeated at Wogastisburg.

Rule in Neustria, from Paris

Also in 632, the nobles of Austrasia revolted under the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Landen. In 634, Dagobert appeased the rebellious nobles by putting his three-year-old son, Sigebert III, on the throne, thereby ceding royal power in the easternmost of his realms, just as his father had done for him eleven years earlier.

As king, Dagobert made Paris his capital. During his reign, he built the Altes Schloss in Meersburg (in modern Germany), which today is the oldest inhabited castle in that country. Devoutly religious, Dagobert was also responsible for the construction of the Saint Denis Basilica, at the site of a Benedictine monastery in Paris.

Dagobert died in the abbey of Saint-Denis and was the first French king to be buried in the Saint Denis Basilica, Paris.

Legacy

The pattern of division and assassination which characterise even the strong king Dagobert's reign continued for the next century until Pepin the Short finally deposed the last Merovingian king in 751, establishing the Carolingian dynasty. The Merovingian boy-kings remained ineffective rulers who inherited the throne as young children and lived only long enough to produce a male heir or two, while real power lay in the hands of the noble families who exercised feudal control over most of the land.

Dagobert was immortalized in the song Le bon roi Dagobert (The Good King Dagobert), a nursery rhyme featuring exchanges between the king and his chief adviser, Saint Eligius (Eloi in French). The satirical rhymes place Dagobert in various ridiculous positions from which Eligius' good advice manages to extract him. The text, which probably originated in the 18th century, became extremely popular as an expression of the anti-monarchist sentiment of the French Revolution. Other than placing Dagobert and Eligius in their respective roles, it has no historical accuracy.

In 1984, a 112-minute long French-Italian comedy, Le bon roi Dagobert (Good King Dagobert) was made, based on Dagobert I. The movie is surprisingly realistic in showing the realities of early barbarian France. The soundtrack was composed by Guido and Mauricio De Angelis. -------------------- The chronicler Fredergar states that he had very loose morals, but does name his 3 queens, of which Ragnetrude is not listed. Since Fredergar also states it would be impossible to list his concubines and mistresses for the list "being too long", the only one listed by name had to be important enough.

It appears that Ragnetrude was the biological mother of Dagobert's oldest child, Sigebert the 3rd.

view all 24

Dagobert I, King of the Franks's Timeline

602
602
Metz Austria
605
605
Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France
610
610
Age 5
Reuilly, 27489, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France,
630
October 9, 630
Age 25
Metz,Moselle,Lorraine,France
630
Age 25
632
632
Age 27
France
632
Age 27
Metz, Moselle, France
633
633
Age 28
Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France
635
635
Age 30
Paris, Ile-de-France, France
635
Age 30
Metz, Moselle, France