David mac Eanric, 9th Earl of Huntingdon (c.1144 - 1219) MP

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Nicknames: "David Earl of /Huntington/", "David // E of Huntingdon", "David Huntingdon Earl /Of/", "Earl of Huntingdon", "9th Earl of Huntingdon"
Birthplace: Scotland
Death: Died in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire, Scotland
Occupation: 9th Earl of Huntingdon, Earl of Hungtingdon, Earl of Huntingdon, Scottish Prince, Comte, de Huntingdon, Scottish Nobleman, 8thor9th Earl of Huntingdon, Title: Earl of Huntingdon, 8th Earl of Huntington, adn Prince of Scotland, Crusader, Earl of Huntington
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
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About David mac Eanric, 9th Earl of Huntingdon

David of Scotland (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince and Earl of Huntingdon. He was the youngest surviving son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, a daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Elizabeth of Vermandois. His paternal grandfather was David I of Scotland. Huntingdon was granted to him after his elder brother William I of Scotland ascended the throne. David's son John succeeded him to the earldom.

In the litigation for succession to the crown of Scotland in 1290-1292, the great-great-grandson Floris V, Count of Holland of David's sister, Ada, claimed that David had renounced his hereditary rights to the throne of Scotland. Floris also then pursued the throne for himself. The veracity of renunciation cannot have otherwise been ascertained, nor its reasons.

David married Maud of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester, by whom he had three sons and four daughters:

Margaret of Huntingdon Isobel of Huntingdon John, his successor as Earl Robert, died young Henry, died young; Matilda (?-1219), died unmarried Ada (?-1241), married Henry de Hastings, father of Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings

After the extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house in 1290, when the legitimate line of William the Lion of Scotland ended, David's descendants were the prime candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (grandfather of King Robert I of Scotland) and John of Scotland were his descendants through David's daughters Isobel and Margaret, respectively.

-------------------- SOURCES: 1) GENEALOGY: The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom; Page 358; G929.72; G35p; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

2) GENEALOGY: The Scots Peerage; Vol II; Page 428; G929.72; P291sc; Denver Public Library; Genealogy -------------------- David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David of Scotland (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219)[1] was a Scottish prince and the Earl of Huntingdon, Carlisle, Doncaster, Northumberland, Garioch, Lennox and Cambridge. He was the youngest surviving son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, a daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Elizabeth de Vermandois. His paternal grandfather was David I of Scotland. Huntingdon was granted to him after his elder brother William I of Scotland ascended the throne. David's son John succeeded him to the earldom. In the litigation for succession to the crown of Scotland in 1290-1292, the great-great-grandson Floris V, Count of Holland of David's sister, Ada, claimed that David had renounced his hereditary rights to the throne of Scotland. Floris also then pursued the throne for himself. The veracity of renunciation cannot have otherwise been ascertained, nor its reasons. David married Maude of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester, by whom he had three sons: John, his successor as Earl Robert, died young[2] Henry, died young[3]; and four daughters: Matilda[4] Ada, married Henry de Hastings, father of Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings[5] Isobel of Huntingdon Margaret of Huntingdon. After the extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house in 1290, when the legitimate line of William the Lion of Scotland ended, David's descendants were the prime candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (grandfather of King Robert I of Scotland) and John of Scotland were his descendants through David's daughters Isobel and Margaret, respectively. [edit]Source

Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 93-26, 94-26, 131-29, 252-26

-------------------- David of Scotland (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince and Earl of Huntingdon. He was the youngest surviving son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, a daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Elizabeth of Vermandois. His paternal grandfather was David I of Scotland. Huntingdon was granted to him after his elder brother William I of Scotland ascended the throne. David's son John succeeded him to the earldom.

In the litigation for succession to the crown of Scotland in 1290-1292, the great-great-grandson Floris V, Count of Holland of David's sister, Ada, claimed that David had renounced his hereditary rights to the throne of Scotland. He therefore declared that his claim to the throne had priority over David's descendants. However, no explanation or firm evidence for the supposed renounciation could be provided.

David married Maud of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester, by whom he had three sons and four daughters:

Margaret of Huntingdon Isobel of Huntingdon John, his successor as Earl Robert, died young[1] Henry, died young[2]; Matilda (?-1219), died unmarried Ada (?-1241), married Henry de Hastings, father of Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings[3] After the extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house in 1290, when the legitimate line of William the Lion of Scotland ended, David's descendants were the prime candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (grandfather of King Robert I of Scotland) and John of Scotland were his descendants through David's daughters Isobel and Margaret, respectively.

[edit] Notes David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon House of Dunkeld Born: ? c. 1144 Died: 17 June 1219 Scottish royalty Preceded by William the Lion Heir of Scotland as heir presumptive 9 December 1165–1193 Succeeded by Margaret of Scotland, Countess of Kent Peerage of England Preceded by Simon of St Liz Earl of Huntingdon Succeeded by John de Scotia [hide]v • d • eMormaers or Earls of Lennox


[Known] Mormaers/Earls from Lennox line (to 1458) David of Huntingdon ¶ · Ailín I · Ailín II · Maol Domhnaich · Maol Choluim I · Maol Choluim II · Domhnall · Margaret with Baltar mac Amlaimh · Donnchadh · Isabella with Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany

Stewart Earls (1488–1581) John Stewart · Matthew Stewart · John Stewart · Matthew Stewart · Charles Stewart · Robert Stewart · Esmé Stewart

Stewart Dukes (1581–1672) Esmé Stewart · Ludovic Stewart · Esmé Stewart · James Stewart · Esmé Stewart · Charles Stewart

¶ - Not from Lennox line


[edit] References 1.^ "thePeerage.com - Person Page 10776". Thepeerage.com. http://www.thepeerage.com/p10776.htm#i107752. Retrieved 2008-11-08. 2.^ "thePeerage.com - Person Page 10777". Thepeerage.com. http://www.thepeerage.com/p10777.htm#i107765. Retrieved 2008-11-08. 3.^ "thePeerage.com - Person Page 10777". Thepeerage.com. http://www.thepeerage.com/p10777.htm#i107766. Retrieved 2008-11-08.

This biography of a member of Scottish royalty is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. 

v • d • e Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_of_Scotland,_Earl_of_Huntingdon" Categories: 1140s births | 1219 deaths | Heirs to the Scottish throne | Earls in the Peerage of England | House of Dunkeld | Scottish royalty stubs -------------------- http://fabpedigree.com/s086/f375566.htm

David (9th Earl) de HUNTINGDON

    poss. Lord of BRERETON; aka David (Canmore) DUNKELD (Prince & one-time Heir Presumptive) of SCOTLAND; Crusader
    Born:  Huntingdon 1144    Died:  1219 Northamptons.

HM George I's 14-Great Grandfather. HRE Ferdinand I's 11-Great Uncle. HRE Charles VI's 16-Great Grandfather. U.S. President George Washington's 15-Great Grandfather. PM Churchill's 20-Great Grandfather. Lady Diana's 21-Great Grandfather. Osawatomie' Brown's 19-Great Grandfather. Poss. Jamie's 22-Great Grandfather.

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Wives/Partners:       (NN), a mistress   ;   Maud (Matilda) KEVELIOC (KEVILIOC; KEVLIOC) 
Children:       (Miss) le SCOT   ;   Ada de HUNTINGDON   ;   Margaret de HUNTINGDON   ;   (Miss) de HUNTINGDON   ;   Isabella de HUNTINGDON   ;   Henry (Lord) de BRECHIN   ;   Margery of SCOTLAND 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jamesdow/s086/f375566.htm -------------------- 8th Earl of Huntingdon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_of_Scotland,_8th_Earl_of_Huntingdon -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_of_Scotland,_8th_Earl_of_Huntingdon -------------------- Brother of Malcolm and William, both Kings of Scotland -------------------- Brother of King William the Lion --------------------

  1. Event: Yardley, Northamptonshire, England Lived
  2. Note:
   !Younger brother of Kings Malcolm IV and William I of Scotland. [Ped. of Charlemagne, Vol. III, p. 310]
   BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES - 22nd ggrandfather
   !Son of Earl Henry; father of Isabella and Margaret. [Chronicle of the Royal Family, chart]
   !Son of Henry, Earl Huntingdon, and Ada de Warenne; m. Maud de Meschines; father of Ada of Scotland. [The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, p. 373]
   Earl of Huntingdon; dau. of Henry of Scotland and Ada de Warenne; m. Maud de Meschines; father of Isabel of Scotland. [Royal Descents, p. 369]
   Son of Henry, earl of Huntingdon; father of Margaret, Isabel, Ada, and John. [Robert the Bruce, chart]
   Crusader. [Williams-Wolcott & Related Families, p. 159]
   Youngest son of Prince Henry; Earl of Huntingdon; d. 1219 and bur. at Sawtrey Abbey. [Misc. Gen. et Heraldica, p. 337]
   !TITLE: Earl of Huntingdon and Prince of Scotland [The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Monarchy by Cannon and Griffith.]
   Earl of Huntingdon, Lord of Fotheringhay and Scottysbury in Northamptonshire (English fiefs of the kings of Scotland), Lord of Strathbolgie and the Garrioch in Scotland; bro. to William the Lion, king of Scots 1165; son of Henry, Crown Prince of Scots, and Adeline of Warrenne & Surrey; m. Maud of Chester. [Charlemagne & Others, Chart 2916]
   Earl of Huntingdon, b.c. 1144, d. at Jerdelay, 17 June 1219; m. 1190, Maud de Kevelioc; father of Margaret and Isabella among others. [Ancestral Roots, p. 224]
   Earl of Huntingdon; son of David I; father of Margaret and Isabel. [Scotland: A Concise History, Genealogy of the Scottish Kings]
   Son of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon, and Ada Warren; m. Maud Keveliok de Meschines; father of Margaret who m. Alan MacDonal. [WFT]
   Son of Henry Huntingdon and Ada Warenne; m. Maude; father of:
   1. Ada who m. Henry Hastings
   2. Margaret who m. Alan
   3. Isabella who m. Robert Bruce
   [WFT Vol 10 Ped 2388]
   During an apparent hiatus in the succession of the Celtic earls of Mar in the 1170s, William granted his younger brother, David, the lordship of Garioch,centred upon an earth-and-timber castle at Inverurie. [Kildrummy Castle, p. 4]

-------------------- David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon was born between 1143 and 1152. He was the son of Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne.

He married Matilda of Chester, daughter of Hugh of Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester and Bertrada de Montfort, on 26 August 1190.

He died on 17 June 1219 at Yardley, Northamptonshire, England.

He was buried at Sawtrey Abbey, Hampshire, England.

David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon succeeded to the title of Earl of Carlisle on 12 June 1152. He succeeded to the title of Earl of Doncaster on 12 June 1152. He succeeded to the title of 9th Earl of Huntingdon on 12 June 1152. He succeeded to the title of Earl of Northumberland on 12 June 1152. He gained the title of Earl of Garioch circa 1180. He gained the title of Earl of Lennox in 1205. He gained the title of Earl of Cambridge in 1205. In 1215/16 he was deprived of all of his English honours, but was restored to them on 13 March 1218.

Children of David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon:

   * Henry of Stirling
   * Henry of Brechin d. 1238
   * unknown daughter (?)

Children of David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda of Chester

   * David (?)
   * Robert of Huntingdon
   * Margaret of Huntingdon b. b 1193, d. 1228
   * Lady Isabella of Huntingdon b. c 1206, d. c 1251
   * Sir John the Scot, 10th Earl of Huntingdon b. c 1207, d. c 6 Jun 1237
   * Henry of Huntingdon b. c 1215, d. a 1215
   * Ada of Scotland b. b 1219
   * Ada of Huntingdon b. b 1219, d. a 1241
   * Matilda of Huntingdon b. b 1219, d. a 1219

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10248.htm#i102479 -------------------- His father was also Máel Coluim III of scotland. -------------------- David is a possible inspiration figure for the Robin Hood legend because the legend plays at the same time as David lived in the 1190s. Another similarity is the Earl of Huntingdon question, because a historian names Robin Hood as a possible Earl of that area. Also both had taken part in the Third Crusade and by 1194 David had taken part at the siege of Nottingham Castle where the High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derby County was taken captive. His son Robert who died young was also a possible inspiration for Robin Hood.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud,_Countess_of_Huntingdon -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_of_Scotland,_8th_Earl_of_Huntingdon -------------------- Born in 1143, William the Lion was the younger brother of Malcolm IV. A year after his accession, he went to Normandy with Henry II and later spent Easter 1170 at Windsor. In 1174, however, he joined Henry II's son in his rebellion against his father, and invaded England. He was captured at Alnwick, Northumberland and brought to Henry II with 'his feet shackled beneath the belly of his horse.' He was then held prisoner first in Yorkshire, later at Northampton and finally in France. He was released by the terms of the Treaty of Falaise of 8 December 1174, having been forced to agree to do homage to Henry II 'for Scotland and for all his other lands', and surrender key Scottish castles such as Edinburgh and Stirling. As William's feudal lord, Henry now had the right to arrange his marriage, and he gave him Ermengarde de Beaumont, whose father was the son of an illegitimate daughter of Henry I. William eventually recovered Scotland from the English king's feudal overlordship, however, when Henry II was succeeded by Richard I. Richard, determined to raise money for his third Crusade, surrendered his feudal superiority over Scotland for 10,000 marks by the Quitclaim of Canterbury on 5 December 1189 and Scotland was an independent country once more. In 1196-7, William established his sovereignty in Caithness. Under William, the development of feudal institutions continued; in part, the Scottish monarchy's government closely resembled England's. William established royal burghs in eastern Scotland up to the Moray Firth, and extended the use of sheriffs in the same area. Perth and Stirling became major centres of royal administration. William I was a vigorous royal patron of the Scottish Church he founded Arbroath Abbey, Angus in or before 1178. In 1182 Pope Lucius III sent him the Golden Rose and in 1188 Pope Clement III took the Scottish Church under his special protection. In 1192, the Pope granted a Bull to William that recognised the separate identity of the Scottish Church (previously the Church in Scotland had been brought under the authority of the Archbishop of York), and its independence of all ecclesiastical authorities apart from Rome. Gervase of Canterbury described William as 'a man of outstanding sanctity much preferring to have peace than the sword and to provide for his people by wisdom rather than iron'. William died at Stirling on 4 December 1214, aged 71, and was buried at Arbroath.

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David, Earl of Huntingdon's Timeline

1144
1144
Scotland
1145
April 1145
Age 1
<Of, Clydesdale, Lanarkshire, Scotland>
1150
1150
Age 6
1162
1162
Age 18
UK
1185
April 1185
Age 41
Clydesdale, Lanarkshire, , Scotland
1190
August 26, 1190
Age 46
August 28, 1190
Age 46
England
1191
1191
Age 47
Huntington, Huntingdonshire, England
1193
1193
Age 49
Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England
1194
1194
Age 50
Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, Eng.