Daniel De Lisle BROCK (1762 - 1842)

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Birthdate:
Death: Died in Guernsey
Occupation: Bailiff, or chief magistrate of Guernsey, Bailiff of Guerns
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About Daniel De Lisle BROCK

NAME: DANIEL DE LISLE BROCK


SURNAME: Brock........ GIVEN NAMES: Daniel de Lisle ........ *SEX: M


BIRTH: 10 DEC 1762


DEATH: 24 SEPT, 1842 Guernsey ....Age:(79)


  • FATHER: Jean BROCK b: 1729
  • MOTHER:Elizabeth de LISLE b: 1733

MARRIAGE: Esther TOURTEL b: circa 1770 in Guernsey, Channel Islands

Married: 7 SEP 1805 in Guernsey, Channel Islands

CHILDREN

1...M... Daniel Brock b: 1799 in Guernsey, Channel Islands (DIED 1800 age 1)


2...M...Eugene de Lisle Brock b: 22 JUN 1807 in Guernsey, Channel Islands


3...F...Harriette Catharine Brock b: 27 JAN 1810 in Guernsey, Channel Islands


4...F...Sophy de Lisle Brock b: 1 AUG 1811 in Guernsey, Channel Islands

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NOTES

See TIMELINE for IGI ancestral Records

See MEDIA for information sources

  • Daniel De Lisle ,the third son of Sir John Brock, Esq., of St Pierre du Bois and his wife Elizabeth de Lisle, the daughter of the then Lieutenant Bailiff of Guernsey* He
  • born in Guernsey on the 10th of December, 1762.one of 14 children, to Sir John Brock
  • educated in Guernsey first, then placed at Alderney, to learn the French language, under M. Vallatt, a Swiss protes- tan clergyman,
  • In 1785, he went by sea to the Mediterranean, and spent Upwards of a year in visiting Spain, Malta, Sicily, Italy, Switzerland, and France
  • From Alderney he was sent to a school at Richmond, in Surrey, where he remained only two years,
  • at the early age of fourteen he went to Dinan with his father, who died there in1777 .
  • Brock was married to Ester Tourtel in..... one of his sons became a captain in the 20th Regiment of Foot .
  • In 1795 he was elected a jurat of the royal court.
  • 1798, he was elected jurat of the Royal Court; and the greater part, if not the whole, of the public documents of that body, were from that period written by him
  • Between the years 1804 and 1810, he was deputed by the States and Royal Court of Guernsey no less than four times, as their representative to government, in matters connected with the trade and privileges of the island;
  • Daniel De Lisle Brock, was revered in Guernsey as a most distinguished Bailiff, serving in office between 1821 and 1842. His painting is also hung in the Royal Court Chamber. Bailiff is the highest administrative position on the island

He died in Guernsey on 24 September 1842 aged 79 years 10 months....and a large public funeral was held in recognition of his long and valued services to the island.

  • his fathers death was an irreparable loss to him and caused him to not return to school. but, he had already shown that he possessed a vigour of intellect much beyond his years.
  • He went to London in connection with trade and other ancient privileges of the island. He headed several deputations to London to defend the rights of islanders and master minded the Guernsey Experiment
  • Afterwards he assumed the very influential position of lieutenant-bailiff or chief magistrate of Guernsey.
  • He was responsible for building Elizabeth College which today is a very popular boys' school.
  • Brock was born in St. Peter Port, Guernsey into a distinguished family. He was elected a jurat of the royal court. He was responsible for building Elizabeth College, which today is a very popular boys' school. Brock served as the bailiff of Guernsey, the highest local rank to which a native can attain. A bailiff is the head of the civil and social life of the Island.
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PASSAGE FROM THE BOOK..........Annals of some of the British Norman isles constituting the ..., Volume 1

DANIEL DE LISLE BROCK.

Daniel De Lisle Brock succeeded Peter De Havilland (afterwards Knight) as Bailiff of Guernsey in 1810. He was greatly beloved and honoured as Chief Magistrate, and so universal was the admiration of his great talents and services that the Royal Court decreed him on his decease (September the 24th, 1842, at 79 years of age), a public funeral at the public expense. The funeral cortege consisted of the various civil and military authorities, the clergy, the officers of the 48th Depot, and of the five Regiments of Militia, the constables, and douzeniers of each parish, &c, &c., the whole comprising nearly 500 persons, while the procession was witnessed by about 8,000 of the inhabitants.


During his life several valuable testimonials were presented to Mr. Brock for his services, and Qn the last occasion of his being deputed to England the States of Jersey gave Mr. Brock a piece of plate of the cost of Jbioo, while the States of Guernsey voted that portrait which now adorns the interior of the Court House, and which will enable succeeding generations to contemplate ,his fine intellectual countenance, and robust and manly form.


Mr. Brock left an only son, Captain Eugene Brock, who died unmarried at Bermuda in January, 1844.


For a detailed Memoir of Mr. Brock, see the "Gentleman's Magazine" for 1842, p. 546

http://books.google.co.nz/books?pg=RA1-PA208&lpg=RA1-PA208&dq=eugene+de+lisle+brock&sig=F0IVSIksGc_tGoiR3sTxadfmcC8&ei=IUL4UM_mEOOpiALntYDAAQ&sqi=2&id=xFoGAQAAIAAJ&ots=9_EyecLFSQ&output=text

DEEDS

Daniel Delisle Brock, etc.(Sir Isaacs family) Con 5 Lot 36 & Con 9 Lot 20

Murray twp.

Daniel De Lisle was born on December 10th, 1762. In 1795 he was elected a jurat of the royal court. He went to London in connection with trade and other ancient privileges of the island. Afterwards he assumed the very influential position of lieutenant-bailiff or chief magistrate of Guernsey. He was responsible for building Elizabeth College which today is a very popular boys' school.

Bailiff of GSY, 1821-1843. Financial wizard who restored prosperity to GSY after the Napoleonic Wars. Elizabeth College; St. Sampsons Harbour and Market Halls were built during his tenure of office. Married secretly after their second child was born. Marriage information given by the Dean, from St. Martin's Church records. Source: "Channel I." by R. Lempriere. Brock chart from Priaulx library. An Armorial of JSY "GSY People" by L J Marr Also of Daniel De Lisle Brock, Esquire Baliff of Guernsey a magistrate of Singular ability disinterestedness and patriotism he died the 17th of September 1842 in his 80th year

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=hazeys&id=I2443

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Brock, Daniel de Lisle (DNB00)

←Brochmael, Ysgythrawg Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900

Brock, Daniel de Lisle Brock, Isaac→

Author:Henry Manners Chichester

BROCK, DANIEL DE LISLE (1762-1842), bailiff of Guernsey from 1821 to 1842, belonged to an English family established in Guernsey as early as the sixteenth century. His father, John Brock of St. Peter's, who had been a midshipman in the royal navy, married Elizabeth de Lisle, daughter of the then lieutenant-bailiff of the island, and by her had fourteen children, ten of whom attained maturity. John Brock died in 1777, at the age of 48. Daniel de Lisle, his third son, was born in Guernsey on 10 Dec. 1762. After such schooling as the island afforded in those days, he was placed at Alderney under the tuition of M. Vallat, a Swiss pastor, afterwards rector of St. Peter-in-the-Wood, Guernsey, and subsequently at a school at Richmond, Surrey. He was, however, taken away at the age of fourteen to accompany his father, who was in failing health, to France, where the latter died at Dinan. He spent about twelve months in visiting the Mediterranean, Switzerland, and France, in 1785-6, and twelve years later, in 1798, was elected a jurat of the royal court of Guernsey, from which time his name is intimately associated with the history of his native place. On four separate occasions, between 1804 and 1810, he was deputed by the states and royal court of Guernsey to represent them in London, in respect of certain measures affecting the trade and ancient privileges of the island. In 1821 he was appointed bailiff, or chief magistrate, of the island, and soon after was again despatched to London, to protest, which he did with success, against the extension to Guernsey of the new law prohibiting the import of corn until the price should reach 80s. a quarter. In 1832, when the right of the inhabitants to be tried in their own courts was menaced by a proposed extension of the power of writs of habeas corpus to the island, Brock and Mr. Charles de Jersey, king's procureur, were sent to London to oppose the measure, and did so with success. Three years later Brock was once more despatched to London at the head of a deputation to protest against the proposed deprivation of the Channel Islands of their right of exporting corn into England free of duty. Owing to the remonstrance of the deputation, a select committee of the House of Commons was appointed to inquire into the subject, and the bill was subsequently withdrawn. On this occasion the states of Jersey presented Brock with a service of plate valued at 100l., and his portrait was placed in the royal court-house of Guernsey. Brock was married and had two children: a son, who became a captain in the 20th foot, and a daughter. He died in Guernsey on 24 Sept. 1842. A public funeral was accorded to his remains, in recognition of his long and valued services to his native island.

[Tupper's Life of Sir Isaac Brock (2nd ed. London, 1847), appendix B; Jacob's Annals of the Bailiwick of Guernsey (Paris, 1830), part i.]

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Brock,_Daniel_de_Lisle_(DNB00)

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Daniel De Lisle was born on December 10th, 1762.

In 1795 he was elected a jurat  of the royal court.
He went to London in connection with trade and other ancient privileges of the island. Afterwards he assumed the very influential position of lieutenant-bailiff or chief magistrate of Guernsey.
He was responsible for building Elizabeth College which today is a very popular boys' school.

BROCK, DANIEL DE LISLE (1762-1842), bailiff of Guernsey from 1821 to 1842, belonged to an English family established in Guernsey as early as the sixteenth century. His father, John Brock of St. Peter's, who had been a midshipman in the royal navy, married Elizabeth de Lisle, daughter of the then lieutenant-bailiff of the island, and by her had fourteen children, ten of whom attained maturity. John Brock died in 1777, at the age of 48. Daniel de Lisle, his third son, was born in Guernsey on 10 Dec. 1762. After such schooling as the island afforded in those days, he was placed at Alderney under the tuition of M. Vallat, a Swiss pastor, afterwards rector of St. Peter-in-the-Wood, Guernsey, and subsequently at a school at Richmond, Surrey. He was, however, taken away at the age of fourteen to accompany his father, who was in failing health, to France, where the latter died at Dinan. He spent about twelve months in visiting the Mediterranean, Switzerland, and France, in 1785-6, and twelve years later, in 1798, was elected a jurat of the royal court of Guernsey, from which time his name is intimately associated with the history of his native place. On four separate occasions, between 1804 and 1810, he was deputed by the states and royal court of Guernsey to represent them in London, in respect of certain measures affecting the trade and ancient privileges of the island. In 1821 he was appointed bailiff, or chief magistrate, of the island, and soon after was again despatched to London, to protest, which he did with success, against the extension to Guernsey of the new law prohibiting the import of corn until the price should reach 80s. a quarter. In 1832, when the right of the inhabitants to be tried in their own courts was menaced by a proposed extension of the power of writs of habeas corpus to the island, Brock and Mr. Charles de Jersey, king's procureur, were sent to London to oppose the measure, and did so with success. Three years later Brock was once more despatched to London at the head of a deputation to protest against the proposed deprivation of the Channel Islands of their right of exporting corn into England free of duty. Owing to the remonstrance of the deputation, a select committee of the House of Commons was appointed to inquire into the subject, and the bill was subsequently withdrawn. On this occasion the states of Jersey presented Brock with a service of plate valued at 100l., and his portrait was placed in the royal court-house of Guernsey. Brock was married and had two children: a son, who became a captain in the 20th foot, and a daughter. He died in Guernsey on 24 Sept. 1842. A public funeral was accorded to his remains, in recognition of his long and valued services to his native island.

Brother of Sir Isaac Brock...

--------------------------

SIBLINGS OF SIR ISAAC BROCK

History gives us antecedents and a place in time.

John Brock, was born on the 24th of January, 1729. He married Elizabeth de Lisle, daughter of the bailiff of Guernsey and the couple had fourteen children, four girls and ten boys. John, a mid-shipman died at Dinan, France at the age of forty-eight. In chronological order their children were:

1. Elizabeth born in 1756 died in youth.

2. Rebecca born in 1758 died in youth.

3. John was born in 1759. He joined the 8th Regiment of Foot (King's) as an ensign. Later he became a brevet lieutenant-colonel in the 81st Regiment. He was killed in a duel at Capetown, South Africa in 1801.

4. Ferdinand was born in 1760. He served in the 60th Regiment of Foot, the famous Royal American Regiment, which was raised in the colonies at the time of the conflict with France and served with distinction during the American Revolution. Ferdinand was killed by a Spaniard at age nineteen at the defence of Baton Rouge on the Mississippi River.

5. Peter Henry was born in 1761 and died an infant.

6. ------------------- Daniel De Lisle--------------------------------------------

was born on December 10th, 1762. In 1795 he was elected a jurat [* See Below] of the royal court. He went to London in connection with trade and other ancient privileges of the island. Afterwards he assumed the very influential position of lieutenant-bailiff or chief magistrate of Guernsey. He was responsible for building Elizabeth College which today is a very popular boys' school.

7. William was born in 1764. He was a merchant banker in London and with his brother, Irving, was engaged in trade with Russia, Sweden and Prussia on the Baltic Sea. William took a keen interest in Isaac's career and gave him money to purchase his various commissions. William intended the money as gifts, but unknown to William the cost of each purchase was entered on the company's financial records as loans. Some eight hundred ships insured for 40% of their value suffered various misadventures in the Baltic Sea including being lost at sea, taken by privateers and seized when they arrived in port. Napoleon said "England is a nation of shopkeepers," and he set up a blockade of Europe to prevent Britain from trading with European countries. Some of the above-mentioned shipping disasters resulted from Napoleon's blockade. In 1811 because of its various shipping misfortunes, William's company suffered a financial collapse and went into receivership which resulted in all outstanding loans being called in including the amounts William used to purchase Isaac's commissions. This demand for repayment of money they did not have plunged the Brock family into serious financial straits.

8. Peter was born in 1765 and died young with no issue.

9. Elizabeth was born in 1767. She married John Elisha Tupper of Guernsey, and they had three sons and one daughter: (a) one of the sons, Ferdinand Brock Tupper, wrote The Life and Career of Major-General Isaac Brock in 1847. Ferdinand had no children.

(b) Henry Bingham Tupper inherited the portrait of Isaac Brock from his Uncle Irving. Henry married and had a son who also married and had a son who died while young.

(c) Henry Tupper was born in 1809. He married and had one daughter Henrietta Tupper.

10. Frederick born in 1768 married a Miss Levat. They had no children.

11. Isaac born October 6th, 1769; died October 13th, 1812.

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Name: Daniel DeLisle Brock

Sex: M

Birth: 10 DEC 1762 in Guernsey, Channel Islands

Death: 17 SEP 1842 in Guernsey, Channel Islands, England ..

Note:

From:Brock Book - Daniel de Lisle, b. 1762, m. Esther Todd, High Bailiff of Guernsey, d. 1842 1817 December 3: Grant of 600 acres to Daniel Delisle Brock, William Brock, John Savery Brock, Irving Brock (4 brothers of Sir Isaac Brock), Monaghan Township

Records of Northumberland County Brocks, Ontario, Canada

Deeds

Daniel Delisle Brock, etc.(Sir Isaacs family) Con 5 Lot 36 & Con 9 Lot 20

Murray twp.

Daniel De Lisle was born on December 10th, 1762. In 1795 he was elected a jurat of the royal court. He went to London in connection with trade and other ancient privileges of the island. Afterwards he assumed the very influential position of lieutenant-bailiff or chief magistrate of Guernsey. He was responsible for building Elizabeth College which today is a very popular boys' school.

Bailiff of GSY, 1821-1843. Financial wizard who restored prosperity to GSY after the Napoleonic Wars. Elizabeth College; St. Sampsons Harbour and Market Halls were built during his tenure of office. Married secretly after their second child was born. Marriage information given by the Dean, from St. Martin's Church records. Source: "Channel I." by R. Lempriere. Brock chart from Priaulx library. An Armorial of JSY "GSY People" by L J Marr Also of Daniel De Lisle Brock, Esquire Baliff of Guernsey a magistrate of Singular ability disinterestedness and patriotism he died the 17th of September 1842 in his 80th year

EXTRACT FROM A BOOK.................................THE HISTORY OF GUERNSEY

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=NphJAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA484&lpg=PA484&dq=THE+BROCKS+OF+GUERNSEY&source=bl&ots=UrmAJsWRWH&sig=w5V8-eTcj_Ak4E_SUIygGXXnync&hl=en&ei=Pq-5SZylO5GUsAOh4cUy&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result

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Extract from a book...........THE HISTORY OF GUERNSEY

In the afternoon, the British troops having assembled from various points, and now equal in number, quickly compelled the enemy to surrender, upwards of 900 men being made prisoners. So beloved was Brock by the 49th, that his death is said to have cost the invaders many a life on that day, which otherwise had been spared. After lying in state at the government house, the deceased was interred with every military honor, in a cavalier bastion, at Fort George ; and as soon as the funeral solemnities were ended on the British side, the Americans, by a previous intimation from their general, fired a compliment of minute guns on theirs !!! In person, Sir Isaac Brock was tall, erect, and well proportioned, his countenance was fine and benevolent, and his manners were frank and engaging.—One of his brothers, Ferdinand, a lieutenant of the 60th regiment, was slain in the defence of Baton Rouge, on the Mississippi, in the first American war ; and another, John, a lieutenant-colonel, was killed in 1802, in a duel at the Cape of Good Hope, in consequence of his having, as steward of a public ball, very properly resisted the introduction, by his antagonist, who was a captain in the army, of a female of disreputable character. Another brother was the bailiff, or chief magistrate of Guernsey; and the tenth and youngest brother, Irving, who died at Bath in 1838, was "the accomplished translator of Bernier's Travels in India."

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=NphJAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA484&ots=UrmAJsWRWH&dq=THE%20BROCKS%20OF%20GUERNSEY&pg=PA484&output=text

bailiff of GUERNSEY

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bailiff_(Channel_Islands)

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Bailiff_(Channel_Islands)

http://www.worldstatesmen.org/Guernsey.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Bailiffs_of_Guernsey

BRONZE BUST STATUE OF DANIEL DE LISLE BROCK

http://www.travel-images.com/guernsey.html

an exert from a book written by Ferninand Tupper....................

Brock's own description.' The second clue is found in Appendix B of Tupper's full-scale

biography where he dwells on the qualities of Daniel de Lisle Brock (1 762-1 842), Isaac's

oldest brother and probably Guernsey's most famous bailiff: "In countenance and

robustness of frame, although not so tall, as well as in vigour of intellect and decision of

character, the bailiff strongly resembled his brother Sir Isaac Bro~k."~

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DANIEL DE LISLE BROCK, Esq.

BAILIFF OF GUERNSEY.

This able magistrate, the third son of John Brock, Esq., was born in Guernsey on the 10th of December, 1762, and closed a long and useful career on Saturday evening, the 24th September, 1842, at the age of 79 years and nearly 10 months. After receiving such rudiments of education as the island could furnish in those days, he was placed at Alderney, to learn the French language, under M. Vallatt, a Swiss protes- tan clergyman, and a man of talent, who was afterwards rector of St. Peter-in-the-Wood, in Guernsey. From Alderney he was sent to a school at Richmond, in Surrey, where he remained only two years, as at the early age of fourteen he went to Dinan with his father, who died there. The premature death of his parents was an irreparable loss to the son, as it was the cause of his not returning to school, where he had already shown that he possessed a vigour of intellect much beyond his years. His two elder brothers were in the army, and the pardonable fondness of his mother induced her to retain at home the only one of her sons, who could in some measure replace the counsels of her husband.

In 1785, he went by sea to the Mediterranean, and spent Upwards of a year in visiting Spain, Malta, Sicily, Italy, Switzerland, and France. In 1798, he was elected jurat of the Royal Court; and the greater part, if not the whole, of the public documents of that body, were from that period written by him. In 1821, he obtained the high and responsible appointment of bailiff, or chief magistrate, of Guernsey. ."It has been truly said that the history of Guernsey, for the last fifty years, was, in fact, the history of Daniel De Lisle Brock. So exclusively has the better part of Mr. Brock's life been devoted to the service of his country—so completely have his affections been wrapped up in her welfare —so ardently, so zealously, and so unceasingly has he laboured to promote her prosperity and to protect her privileges—and so intimately has he been connected with all the important occurrences of the period alluded to—that in reading the history of the island, we read the history of this, the most able and devoted of its friends."

Between the years 1804 and 1810, Mr. Brock was deputed by the States and Royal Court of Guernsey no less than four times, as their representative to government, in matters connected with the trade and privileges of the island; and he also went once to Jersey, to confer with the Royal Court there on the same subject. In these missions, Mr. Brock distinguished himself by his luminous and argumentative papers,* and the authority of the Royal Court was happily preserved intact by his representations and unremitting exertions. In one of his official visits to London, he became known to the Duke of Northumberland, at whose table he was an occasional guest. The Duke mentioned to him that his grandfather, who had been Governor of Guernsey (a sinecure) from the year 1742 to his death in 1750, had expressed his surprise that, during that period, he had never been asked for a single favor by any inhabitant of the island. In those days the natives, with their simple habits and moderate wants, were happily more independent of the smiles or frowns of power than they are at present, as, possessing no parliamentary influence, they have little chance in the distribution of government patronage.

  • "There are some of the public papers written by Mr. Brock which may be profitably studied as models of this kind of composition." — Guernsey Star, September 26, 1842.

" In 1821, an act of parliament having been passed prohibiting the importation of foreign corn into the Channel Islands, whenever its entry for consumption was prohibited in England, to wit, until it reached the price of 80s. per quarter, Mr. Brock was again deputed to London to contend against a measure fraught with such fatal consequences to the islands, and at the same time to obtain some modifications in the navigation laws. Mr. Brock, who was essentially assisted in this business by Mr. James Carey, jurat, succeeded in both these objects. The obnoxious corn law was repealed so far as the Channel Islands were concerned, and some important privileges conceded to their trade and navigation, especially in granting them free intercourse with the British colonies, and the American continent and islands. So highly were these last services appreciated, that when Mr. Brock returned to Guernsey, on the 24th July, 1822, he was received with unexampled enthusiasm. On landing in the morning, he was saluted with deafening cries of "Brock for ever!" " Long may he live!" ice. The public joy was manifested on this occasion in many different ways. The shipping in the harbour hoisted their flags; crowns and garlands of flowers, flags, loaves of bread, with ears of corn, were tastefully arranged, and suspended in almost every street; mottos and devices, expressive of unbounded gratitude, were exhibited in every direction, and in the greatest variety; and the church bells throughout the island rang merry peals during the day. Bands of music paraded the town, followed by crowds, on whose happy countenances " Mirth, admit me of thy crew," was expressed. The musicians wore various coloured bands round their hats, with the motto of " Long live Bailiff Brock!" They surrounded a banner crowned with flowers, hearing the following inscription :

" The grateful inhabitants of Guernsey, to the worthy Bailiff,

DANIEL DE LISLE BROCK.

Happy is he who labours to promote the happiness of his fellow-citizens.

He will secure their eternal gratitude. They will unceasingly exclaim :

' May God preserve our friend, our benefactor, and our parent.'"

"This inscription, having been borne in triumph in every part of the town, was presented to the object of well-merited praise, and accepted. Preparations had been made by the W*

militia bands to receive this distinguished patriot at the landing place ; but their good intentions were thwarted, in consequence of the early hour at which the arrival took place. At a public meeting of the inhabitants, it was determined to present a piece of plate to Mr. Brock, as a testimony of the value attached to his public services, and in the hope that this faint evidence of their attachment might serve to stimulate others to follow his steps, and might descend as a memorial to his posterity. Upwards of £300 were quickly raised for this purpose, and other less valuable, but not less gratifying, testimonials were presented to him. Nor was Jersey less grateful, as a public meeting was held in the town of St. Helier, when the thanks of the island and a handsome piece of plate were unanimously voted to him."

In 1826, General Sir John Doyle, Bart, and G. C.B., for many years lieutenant-governor of Guernsey, visited the island; and at a public dinner, given to him on the 29th August, at the Assembly Rooms, he rose and spoke as follows: ,

"Gentlemen, — Having received permission from the chair, I rise to propose a toast which would be well received in any society where the enlightened individual is known. But here I anticipate it will be met by acclamation and enthusiasm. I do not propose his health, merely because he is my friend, although I feel truly honored by his friendship i and the more so, as I know that it originated and was cemented by his conviction of my honest zeal for the public good, and the deep interest I took in the welfare of his native land. But I give him as a public man, who, to a sound, vigorous, and cultivated understanding, joins a liberal and enlightened mind—an innate love of justice, and hatred of oppression —an inflexible adherence to that which appears to him to be right—a man too wise to be cunning. Armed with the ' mens conscia recti,' he marches straightforward to his object, nor turns into the devious path of crooked policy, and left-handed wisdom. To these qualities are added indefatigable industry, and a patience not to be exhausted. This is the man, who, as a public magistrate in high station, I offer for your acceptance. Of his private worth, I dare not say all that I feel. He is present. You know him, and can duly appreciate his value. You will have anticipated that I mean the bailiff of Guernsey. I now propose to you 'The health of the bailiff, and unalloyed happiness to the island of Guernsey.'"

In 1832, one of the most ancient and vital privileges of Guernsey—the right of the inhabitants to be tried in their own local court — was placed in peril, it being assailed by no less a character than Lord Chief Justice Tenterden, who sought to extend the power of the writ of habeas corpus to this island. The history of this event would occupy much more space than we can now devote to it. Suffice it here to say, that after much correspondence on the subject, Mr. Brock and Mr. Charles De Jersey, the king's procureur, were deputed to London, to act in conjunction with the bailiff and procureur of Jersey in opposing the measure. 

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=nA1y3iF0EjkC&lpg=PA472&ots=lOfAZSO-tv&dq=LIEUT.%20E.%20WILLIAM%20TUPPER%2C%20R.N.&pg=PA463&output=text

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Daniel de Lisle Brock

The former Bailiff who headed several deputations to London to defend the rights of islanders and master minded the Guernsey Experiment.

Daniel de Lisle Brock was born on 10 December 1762, one of 14 children, to Sir John Brock of St Pierre du Bois and his wife Elizabeth de Lisle, the daughter of the then Lieutenant Bailiff of Guernsey.

He was taught by a pastor in Alderney before schooling in Surrey which laid the groundwork for his eventual election as a Jurat of Guernsey's Royal Court in 1798.

On four separate occasions, between 1804 and 1810, he was asked to represent the concerns of the States of Guernsey to the Parliament in London about measures it was looking to enact which would threaten or affect the islands' trade and ancient privileges.

In 1816 he began the Guernsey Experiment which was a reaction to the problem of debt and rising prices following the end of the Napoleonic Wars and introduction of the gold standard.

With the cost of paying off previous loans using 80% of annual revenues and urgent needs for repairs to the sea defences and a new market building the States needed funds but could not afford to pay the interest on another loan.

Market building on the one pound note

Brock's idea was for the States to pay for its own projects by issuing its own bank notes rather than borrowing from a private bank, meaning there would be no interest to pay, leading to substantial savings.

It was a massive success leading in later years to Brock and the first funded project, the building of the Town Market building, appearing on the modern Guernsey £1 notes.

Brock was the Bailiff of Guernsey from 1821 to 1842 and lived in Bon Air House in St Martins during his whole tenure.

Bon Air House >

His position again brought him into discussion with Parliament as he protested, with success, against the extension to Guernsey of the corn law.

He was also instrumental in keeping the right of Channel Islanders to be tried in their own courts when this privilege was threatened by a proposed extension of the power of writs of habeas corpus to the island in 1832.

Three years later he headed yet another delegation which argued for the islands retaining their right to export corn into England free of duty.

Brock was married with two children; a son who became a captain in the 20th Regiment of Foot and a daughter. He died in Guernsey on 24 September 1842 and a large public funeral was held in recognition of his long and valued services to the island.

One of his brothers was Sir Isaac Brock who was credited with saving Upper Canada in 1812.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.bbc.co.uk/guernsey/content/images/2009/08/13/daniel_de_lisle_brock_203_203x152.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.bbc.co.uk/guernsey/content/articles/2009/08/06/daniel_de_lisle_brock_feature.shtml&usg=__KmtPA5PSVqebnIWdQ5-pnk3iFoc=&h=152&w=203&sz=10&hl=en&start=9&sig2=ye7KXuxvNhSbY5T2jlhGqg&um=1&tbnid=eJZTK6147adqYM:&tbnh=79&tbnw=105&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dbrock%2B%252Bguernsey%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1I7ASUS_en___NZ309%26sa%3DG%26um%3D1&ei=GVaWSrqBNIrUswO29tWNDA

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BON AIR House....home of Daniel de Lisle Brock

http://www.bbc.co.uk/guernsey/content/image_galleries/bon_air_house_gallery.shtml

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Хронология Daniel de Lisle Brock

1762
December 10, 1762

IGI Individual Record FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0 British Isles
DANIEL DELISLE BROCK Pedigree Male
Event(s):
Birth: 1762 , Guernsey, Channel Islands
Death: 1842
Parents:
Father: JOHN BROCK Family
Mother: ELIZABETH DELISLE
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Form submitted by a member of the LDS Church. The form lists the submitter's name and address and may include source information

1799
1799
Age 36
Guernsey
1807
1807
Age 44
Guernsey
1810
1810
Age 47
Guernsey
1811
August 1, 1811
Age 48
Guernsey,
1841
1841
Age 78

1841 Channel Islands Census
Name: Daniel Lisle Brock
Age: 78
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1763
Gender: Male
Where born: Guernsey, Channel Islands
Civil Parish: St Martin
County/Island: Guernsey
Country: Channel Islands
Street address: Bongir
Occupation:Bailiff of Guernsey
Registration district: Guernsey
Sub-registration district: Guernsey
Neighbors: View others on page
Household Members: Name Age
Daniel Lisle Brock78
Esther Brock 71
Sophy Brock 30
Judith Mollet 20
Caroline Torode 20

1842
September 24, 1842
Age 79
Guernsey
????
????
St Peter Port, Saint Peter Port, Guernsey