David, Earl of Huntingdon

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David Prince mac Eanric

Also Known As: "David Earl of /Huntington/", "David // E of Huntingdon", "David Huntingdon Earl /Of/", "Earl of Huntingdon", "9th Earl of Huntingdon", "Dunkeld"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Scotland
Death: Died in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire, Scotland
Place of Burial: Abbey Of Saltre, Huntingdonshire, UK
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon; Henry King of Scotland and Ada de Warenne, Countess of Huntingdon
Husband of nn de Huntingdon; Matilda Maud of Huntingdon; Maud de Meschines and Matilda of Chester
Partner of mistress(es) of David, 9th Earl of Huntingdon
Father of Isobel de Brus; dau. of Huntingdon; N.N. of Huntingdon; Henry de Brechin, Lord; Henry of Stirling and 13 others
Brother of Máel Coluim IV mac Eanric, King of Scots; William "The Lion", King of Scots; Ada de Huntingdon, Countess of Holland; Marjorie of Huntingdon; Maud (Matilda, Mabel)) Huntingdon, Princess Of Scotland and 1 other

Occupation: 9th Earl of Huntingdon, Earl of Hungtingdon, Earl of Huntingdon, Scottish Prince, Comte, de Huntingdon, Scottish Nobleman, 8thor9th Earl of Huntingdon, Title: Earl of Huntingdon, 8th Earl of Huntington, adn Prince of Scotland, Crusader, Earl of Huntington
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About David, Earl of Huntingdon

David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon

David of Scotland (Medieval Gaelic: Dabíd) (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince and Earl of Huntingdon. He was a claimant to the Scottish throne.

He was the youngest surviving son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, a daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Elizabeth of Vermandois. His paternal grandfather was David I of Scotland. Huntingdon was granted to him after his elder brother William I of Scotland ascended the throne. David's son John succeeded him to the earldom.


In the litigation for succession to the crown of Scotland in 1290–1292, the great-great-grandson Floris V, Count of Holland of David's sister, Ada, claimed that David had renounced his hereditary rights to the throne of Scotland. He therefore declared that his claim to the throne had priority over David's descendants. However, no explanation or firm evidence for the supposed renunciation could be provided.

On 26 August 1190 David married Matilda of Chester (1171 – 6 January 1233), daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. He was almost thirty years Matilda's senior. The marriage was recorded by Benedict of Peterborough.[1]


David and Matilda had seven children:

  • Margaret of Huntingdon (c. 1194 – c. 1228), married Alan, Lord of Galloway, by whom she had two daughters, including Dervorguilla of Galloway.
  • Robert of Huntingdon (died young)
  • Ada of Huntingdon, married Sir Henry de Hastings, by whom she had one son, Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings.
  • Matilda (Maud) of Huntingdon (-aft.1219, unmarried)
  • Isobel of Huntingdon (1199–1251), married Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale, by whom she had two sons, including Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale.
  • John of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1207 – 6 June 1237), married Elen ferch Llywelyn. He succeeded his uncle Ranulf as Earl of Chester in 1232, but died childless.
  • Henry of Huntingdon (died young)[2][3]

Earl David also had three illegitimate children:[4]

  • Henry of Stirling
  • Henry of Brechin
  • Ada, married Malise, son of Ferchar, Earl of Strathearn

After the extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house in 1290, when the legitimate line of William the Lion of Scotland ended, David's descendants were the prime candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (grandfather of King Robert I of Scotland) and John of Scotland were his descendants through David's daughters Isobel and Margaret, respectively. .... etc.

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_of_Scotland,_8th_Earl_of_Huntingdon

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  • David, 9th Earl of Huntingdon1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15
  • M, #3259, b. 1152, d. 17 June 1219
  • Father Henry, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon8,16 b. c 1114, d. 12 Jun 1152
  • Mother Ada de Warren8,16 b. c 1120, d. 1178
  • David, 9th Earl of Huntingdon was born in 1152.8 He married Maud of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Meschines, 6th Earl of Chester, Viscount d'Avranches, Seigneur de St. Sever & Briquessart and Bertrade de Montfort, on 26 August 1190; They had 4 sons (David; Robert; Henry; & Sir John, Earl of Chester & Huntingdon) & 4 daughters (Margaret, wife of Alan Fitz Roland, Lord of Galloway; isabel, wife of Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale; Ada, wife of Sir Henry de Hastings; & Maud, wife of John de Monmouth). He also had 3 illegitimate sons (Sir Henry de Stirling; Sir Henry de Brechin; & Philip) & 2 illegitimate daughters (Ada, wife of Malise of Strathearn; & Margery (Margaret), wife of Sir David de Lindsay).5,7,8,9,12,13,14,15 David, 9th Earl of Huntingdon died on 17 June 1219 at Yardley, Northamptonshire, England; He was buried at Sawtry Abbey, Huntingdonshire.8
  • Family 1
  • Children
    • Sir Henry of Brechin, 1st Lord Brechin+17,18 d. b 30 Aug 1245
    • Marjory of Scotland+19 d. bt 1241 - 14 Jun 1243
    • Ada of Scotland17
  • Family 2 Maud of Chester b. 1171, d. 6 Jan 1233
  • Children
    • Margaret of Huntingdon+3,8,10,13 d. 6 Jan 1233
    • Robert, Prince of Scotland d. b 1219
    • Matilda, Princess of Scotland
    • Ada of Huntingdon+4,5,8,11,12 d. bt 4 Aug 1241 - 30 Jun 1242
    • Maud de Huntingdon8 d. b 6 Jun 1237
    • Isobel of Huntingdon+6,8,20 b. 1206, d. c 20 Mar 1252
    • Sir John 'the Scot', 8th Earl of Chester, 10th Earl of Huntingdon2,7,8,15 b. c 1207, d. 5 Jun 1237
  • Citations
  • 1.[S313] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. IV, p. 670, Vol. VI, p. 646/7; Wallop Family, p. 198; Royal Highness, Ancestry of the Royal Child, by Moncreiffe, p. 20.
  • 2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 745.
  • 3.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 455-456.
  • 4.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 340-341.
  • 5.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 321-323.
  • 6.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 515-517.
  • 7.[S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 427.
  • 8.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 223.
  • 9.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 154.
  • 10.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 189-190.
  • 11.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 204.
  • 12.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 248-249.
  • 13.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 464-465.
  • 14.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 580.
  • 15.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 301.
  • 16.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 578.
  • 17.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 227.
  • 18.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 237.
  • 19.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 379.
  • 20.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 586.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p109.htm#i3259

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  • David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon1
  • M, #102479, b. between 1143 and 1152, d. 17 June 1219
  • Last Edited=19 Jan 2011
  • David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon was born between 1143 and 1152.2 He was the son of Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne. He married Matilda of Chester, daughter of Hugh of Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort, on 26 August 1190.3 He died on 17 June 1219 at Yardley, Northamptonshire, England.3 He was buried at Sawtrey Abbey, Hampshire, England.3
  • He succeeded to the title of Earl of Doncaster on 12 June 1152.2 He succeeded to the title of Earl of Carlisle on 12 June 1152.2 He succeeded to the title of 9th Earl of Huntingdon on 12 June 1152.2 He succeeded to the title of Earl of Northumberland on 12 June 1152.2 He gained the title of Earl of Garioch circa 1180.2 He gained the title of Earl of Lennox in 1205.2 He gained the title of Earl of Cambridge in 1205.2 In 1215/16 he was deprived of all of his English honours, but was restored to them on 13 March 1218.3
  • Children of David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon
    • 1.unknown daughter (?)+4
    • 2.Henry of Stirling3
    • 3.Henry of Brechin3 d. 1238
    • 4.Ada (?)3
  • Children of David of Scotland, 9th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda of Chester
    • 1.Margaret of Huntingdon+5 d. 1228
    • 2.David (?)3
    • 3.Robert of Huntingdon3
    • 4.Ada of Huntingdon+6 d. a 1241
    • 5.Matilda of Huntingdon6 d. a 1219
    • 6.Lady Isabella of Huntingdon+5 b. 1183, d. c 1251
    • 7.John the Scot, 10th Earl of Huntingdon3 b. c 1207, d. 5 Jun 1237
    • 8.Henry of Huntingdon6 b. c 1215, d. a 1215
  • Citations
  • 1.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume VI, page 646. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • 2.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 192. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  • 3.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 193.
  • 4.[S73] William Fowle Crawford, A Crawford Family History (San Diego, California, U.S.A.: self-published, 1997), page 6. Hereinafter cited as Crawford Family History.
  • 5.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 169.
  • 6.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 194.
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10248.htm#i102479

_________________________

  • David of Scotland (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince and Earl of Huntingdon. He was the youngest surviving son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, a daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Elizabeth of Vermandois. His paternal grandfather was David I of Scotland. Huntingdon was granted to him after his elder brother William I of Scotland ascended the throne. David's son John succeeded him to the earldom.
  • In the litigation for succession to the crown of Scotland in 1290-1292, the great-great-grandson Floris V, Count of Holland of David's sister, Ada, claimed that David had renounced his hereditary rights to the throne of Scotland. Floris also then pursued the throne for himself. The veracity of renunciation cannot have otherwise been ascertained, nor its reasons.
  • David married Maud of Chester, daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester, by whom he had three sons and four daughters:
    • Margaret of Huntingdon
    • Isobel of Huntingdon
    • John, his successor as Earl
    • Robert, died young
    • Henry, died young;
    • Matilda (?-1219), died unmarried
    • Ada (?-1241), married Henry de Hastings, father of Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings
  • After the extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house in 1290, when the legitimate line of William the Lion of Scotland ended, David's descendants were the prime candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (grandfather of King Robert I of Scotland) and John of Scotland were his descendants through David's daughters Isobel and Margaret, respectively.

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SOURCES:

1) GENEALOGY: The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom; Page 358; G929.72; G35p; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

2) GENEALOGY: The Scots Peerage; Vol II; Page 428; G929.72; P291sc; Denver Public Library; Genealogy

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http://fabpedigree.com/s086/f375566.htm

David (9th Earl) de HUNTINGDON

    poss. Lord of BRERETON; aka David (Canmore) DUNKELD (Prince & one-time Heir Presumptive) of SCOTLAND; Crusader
    Born:  Huntingdon 1144    Died:  1219 Northamptons.

HM George I's 14-Great Grandfather. HRE Ferdinand I's 11-Great Uncle. HRE Charles VI's 16-Great Grandfather. U.S. President George Washington's 15-Great Grandfather. PM Churchill's 20-Great Grandfather. Lady Diana's 21-Great Grandfather. Osawatomie' Brown's 19-Great Grandfather. Poss. Jamie's 22-Great Grandfather.

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Wives/Partners:       (NN), a mistress   ;   Maud (Matilda) KEVELIOC (KEVILIOC; KEVLIOC) 
Children:       (Miss) le SCOT   ;   Ada de HUNTINGDON   ;   Margaret de HUNTINGDON   ;   (Miss) de HUNTINGDON   ;   Isabella de HUNTINGDON   ;   Henry (Lord) de BRECHIN   ;   Margery of SCOTLAND 

______________________

  1. Event: Yardley, Northamptonshire, England Lived
  2. Note:
   !Younger brother of Kings Malcolm IV and William I of Scotland. [Ped. of Charlemagne, Vol. III, p. 310]
   BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES - 22nd ggrandfather
   !Son of Earl Henry; father of Isabella and Margaret. [Chronicle of the Royal Family, chart]
   !Son of Henry, Earl Huntingdon, and Ada de Warenne; m. Maud de Meschines; father of Ada of Scotland. [The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, p. 373]
   Earl of Huntingdon; dau. of Henry of Scotland and Ada de Warenne; m. Maud de Meschines; father of Isabel of Scotland. [Royal Descents, p. 369]
   Son of Henry, earl of Huntingdon; father of Margaret, Isabel, Ada, and John. [Robert the Bruce, chart]
   Crusader. [Williams-Wolcott & Related Families, p. 159]
   Youngest son of Prince Henry; Earl of Huntingdon; d. 1219 and bur. at Sawtrey Abbey. [Misc. Gen. et Heraldica, p. 337]
   !TITLE: Earl of Huntingdon and Prince of Scotland [The Oxford Illustrated History of the British Monarchy by Cannon and Griffith.]
   Earl of Huntingdon, Lord of Fotheringhay and Scottysbury in Northamptonshire (English fiefs of the kings of Scotland), Lord of Strathbolgie and the Garrioch in Scotland; bro. to William the Lion, king of Scots 1165; son of Henry, Crown Prince of Scots, and Adeline of Warrenne & Surrey; m. Maud of Chester. [Charlemagne & Others, Chart 2916]
   Earl of Huntingdon, b.c. 1144, d. at Jerdelay, 17 June 1219; m. 1190, Maud de Kevelioc; father of Margaret and Isabella among others. [Ancestral Roots, p. 224]
   Earl of Huntingdon; son of David I; father of Margaret and Isabel. [Scotland: A Concise History, Genealogy of the Scottish Kings]
   Son of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon, and Ada Warren; m. Maud Keveliok de Meschines; father of Margaret who m. Alan MacDonal. [WFT]
   Son of Henry Huntingdon and Ada Warenne; m. Maude; father of:
   1. Ada who m. Henry Hastings
   2. Margaret who m. Alan
   3. Isabella who m. Robert Bruce
   [WFT Vol 10 Ped 2388]
   During an apparent hiatus in the succession of the Celtic earls of Mar in the 1170s, William granted his younger brother, David, the lordship of Garioch,centred upon an earth-and-timber castle at Inverurie. [Kildrummy Castle, p. 4]

______________________

David is a possible inspiration figure for the Robin Hood legend because the legend plays at the same time as David lived in the 1190s. Another similarity is the Earl of Huntingdon question, because a historian names Robin Hood as a possible Earl of that area. Also both had taken part in the Third Crusade and by 1194 David had taken part at the siege of Nottingham Castle where the High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derby County was taken captive. His son Robert who died young was also a possible inspiration for Robin Hood.

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https://histfam.familysearch.org//getperson.php?personID=I61971&tree=Welsh

David was born on a date unknown in 1084 in Scotland.[3] He was probably the eighth son of King Máel Coluim mac Donnchada, and certainly the sixth and youngest produced by Máel Coluim's second marriage to Queen Margaret. He was the grandson of the ill-fated King Duncan I.[4]

William Rufus, King of England, opposed Domnall's accession to the northern kingdom. He sent the eldest son of Máel Coluim, David's half-brother Donnchad, into Scotland with an army. Donnchad was killed within the year,[11] so in 1097 William sent Donnchad's half-brother Edgar into Scotland. The latter was more successful, and was crowned King by the end of 1097.[12]

During the power struggle of 1093–97, David was in England. In 1093, he may have been about nine years old.[13] From 1093 until 1103 David's presence cannot be accounted for in detail, but he appears to have been in Scotland for the remainder of the 1090s. When William Rufus was killed, his brother Henry Beauclerc seized power and married David's sister, Matilda. The marriage made David the brother-in-law of the ruler of England. From that point onwards, David was probably an important figure at the English court.[14] Despite his Gaelic background, by the end of his stay in England, David had become fully Normanised. William of Malmesbury wrote that it was in this period that David "rubbed off all tarnish of Scottish barbarity through being polished by intercourse and friendship with us".[15]

Hugh II de Kevelioc 5th Earl The 5th earl was Ranulf’s son Hugh II de Kevelioc who was born in Wales. His father's northern lands were given to King David of Scotland, known as the Earldom of Huntingdon. Scotland had been divided into two and ruled by David and his brother William. William died in 1124 without issue so David succeeded to the whole of Scotland. He had received a Norman education and Anglo-Saxon culture influenced him. He granted lands to Anglo-Saxon friends and later to Anglo-Normans. David became Earl of Nottingham and Huntingdon through marriage to Maud the daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc. Their son John was to become the 7th and last Earl of Chester.i

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Sylvia Bain Árbol Familiar

Pedigree Resource File

name: David // Earl of Huntingdon (AFN: 9FTG-6Q) sexo: male nacimiento: 1144 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England defunción: 17 June 1219 , Jedburgh, Roxburghshire, Scotland entierro: Abbey of Saltre, , Huntingtonshire, England matrimonio: 26 August 1190 of, , , Scotland

Padres Padre: Henry // Prince of Scotland (AFN: 8XJC-RB) madre: Ada /de Warenne/ (AFN: 18GS-P9S)

Matrimonios (1)

cónyuge: Maud /de Meschines/ (AFN: 9G42-0X) matrimonio: 26 August 1190 of, , , Scotland

	Ocultar hijos (7)

hijo 1: Robert de /Huntingdon/ (AFN: 9G42-14) sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1191 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England defunción: aproximadamente 1221 Dy

hijo 2: Henry de /Huntingdon/ (AFN: 9G42-29) sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1193 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England defunción: Dy

hijo 3: Margaret /Huntingdon/ (AFN: 9FG0-MW) sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1194 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England defunción: después de 6 January 1233

hijo 4: Isabelle /Huntingdon/ (AFN: 9G42-3G) sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1199 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England defunción: 1251 / 1252 entierro: Saltre Abbey, , Huntingdonshire, England

hijo 5: Matilda /Huntingdon/ (AFN: 9G42-4M) sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1203 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England defunción: Unmd

hijo 6: John /Le Scot/ of Huntingdon, Earl of Chester (AFN: 9FTV-SH) sexo: male nacimiento: aproximadamente 1207 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, Scotland defunción: 5 June 1237 Sp, Darnal, Yorkshire, England entierro: St Werburg, Chester, Cheshire, England

hijo 7: Ada /Huntingdon/ (AFN: 9G42-60) sexo: female nacimiento: aproximadamente 1216 of, Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England defunción: aproximadamente 1265

Fuentes (5) Ancestral File (R) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Ancestral File (R) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Ancestral File (R) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Ancestral File (R) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Ancestral File (R) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Cita de este registro "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/S5XM-LQ1 : accessed 2014-07-30), entry for David // Earl of Huntingdon.

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________________________ FROM WIKIPEDIA

David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon

David of Scotland pictured in Sir Walter Scott's 1832 crusader novel The Talisman. Although emphasising his own story is fiction, Scott's Introduction states that David did go on crusade with Richard the Lionheart "and was the hero of some very romantic adventures on his way home". Spouse Matilda of Chester House House of Dunkeld Father Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon Mother Ada de Warenne Born c. 1144 Died 17 June 1219 (aged 74–75)

David of Scotland (Medieval Gaelic: Dabíd) (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince and Earl of Huntingdon. He was a claimant to the Scottish throne.

He was the youngest surviving son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, a daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Elizabeth of Vermandois. His paternal grandfather was David I of Scotland. Huntingdon was granted to him after his elder brother William I of Scotland ascended the throne. David's son John succeeded him to the earldom.

In the litigation for succession to the crown of Scotland in 1290–1292, the great-great-grandson Floris V, Count of Holland of David's sister, Ada, claimed that David had renounced his hereditary rights to the throne of Scotland. He therefore declared that his claim to the throne had priority over David's descendants. However, no explanation or firm evidence for the supposed renunciation could be provided.

On 26 August 1190 David married Matilda of Chester (1171 – 6 January 1233), daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. He was almost thirty years Matilda's senior. The marriage was recorded by Benedict of Peterborough.[1]

David and Matilda had seven children:

   Margaret of Huntingdon (c. 1194 – c. 1228), married Alan, Lord of Galloway, by whom she had two daughters, including Dervorguilla of Galloway.
   Robert of Huntingdon (died young)
   Ada of Huntingdon, married Sir Henry de Hastings, by whom she had one son, Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings.

Matilda (Maud) of Huntingdon (-aft.1219, unmarried) Isobel of Huntingdon (1199–1251), married Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale, by whom she had two sons, including Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale. John of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1207 – 6 June 1237), married Elen ferch Llywelyn. He succeeded his uncle Ranulf as Earl of Chester in 1232, but died childless. Henry of Huntingdon (died young)[2][3]

Earl David also had three illegitimate children:[4]

   Henry of Stirling
   Henry of Brechin
   Ada, married Malise, son of Ferchar, Earl of Strathearn

After the extinction of the senior line of the Scottish royal house in 1290, when the legitimate line of William the Lion of Scotland ended, David's descendants were the prime candidates for the throne. The two most notable claimants to the throne, Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale (grandfather of King Robert I of Scotland) and John of Scotland were his descendants through David's daughters Isobel and Margaret, respectively.

Possible Robin Hood connection

David is a possible inspiration figure for the Robin Hood legend because the legend plays at the same time as David lived in the 1190s. Another similarity is the Earl of Huntingdon question, because a historian names Robin Hood as a possible Earl of that area. Also both had taken part in the Third Crusade and by 1194 David had taken part at the siege of Nottingham Castle where the High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derby County was taken captive. His son Robert who died young was also a possible inspiration for Robin Hood.

In popular culture

Sir Walter Scott's 1825 novel The Talisman features Earl David in his capacity as a prince of Scotland as a crusader on the Third Crusade. For the majority of the novel, Earl David operates under an alias: Sir Kenneth of the Couchant Leopard. Earl David's adventures are highly fictionalized for this novel.

The television series Robin of Sherwood features Earl David of Huntingdon. The first reference to Earl David (by name only) is in the episode "The Prisoner", in which Prince John states that Earl David is a "dissident" who opposes Prince John's possible succession as King Richard's heir should Richard die without a legitimate heir of his body. The earl himself appears in the first part of "Herne's Son" in which he is not referred to directly as David; his character is the father of Robert of Huntingdon, the second son of Herne to feature in the series adopting the alias of Robin Hood. In the episode "Rutterkin", the earl appears again with a fictitious brother named Edgar, and though he is again not referred to directly as David, it is definitively stated that the earl is the brother of the king of Scotland (as Earl David was the brother of King William The Lion of Scotland). ("The Prisoner", "Herne's Son" and "Rutterkin" were all written by Richard Carpenter.) Earl David was played by Michael Craig.

Earl David features briefly in the 2013 Robin Hood novel The Arrow of Sherwood by Lauren Johnson. He is depicted at the siege of Nottingham Castle in support of King Richard in 1194.

-------------------- David of Scotland (Medieval Gaelic: Dabíd) (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince and Earl of Huntingdon. He was a claimant to the Scottish throne.

-------------------- David of Scotland (Medieval Gaelic: Dabíd) (c. 1144 – 17 June 1219) was a Scottish prince and Earl of Huntingdon. He was a claimant to the Scottish throne.

view all 39

David, Earl of Huntingdon's Timeline

1144
1144
Scotland
1145
April 1145
Age 1
<Of, Clydesdale, Lanarkshire, Scotland>
1162
1162
Age 18
UK
1175
1175
Age 31
1181
1181
Age 37
Huntington, UK
1190
August 28, 1190
Age 46
England
1191
1191
Age 47
Huntington, Huntingdonshire, England
1193
1193
Age 49
Huntingdon, Huntingdonshire, England
1193
Age 49
Northumberland, UK
1193
Age 49
Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, UK