David White Rogers

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David White Rogers

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Morristown, Merrimack, New Hampshire, United States
Death: Died in Provo, Utah County, Utah, United States
Place of Burial: Provo, Utah County, Utah, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Samuel Rogers; Samuel Rogers; Hannah Rogers and Hannah Rogers
Husband of Martha Rogers; Elizabeth Anderson Rogers and Ellen Bennett Darnley Rogers
Father of Susannah Mehitable Keate / Pickett; Edward William Rogers; Charles Addison Rogers; Amelia Ann Telle; Glezen Rogers and 10 others
Brother of Susannah Ayer; Samuel Rogers; Hanna Rogers; Rebecca Rogers; Mehetable Rogers and 4 others

Managed by: Scott Rogers
Last Updated:

About David White Rogers

See "Life History" in Timeline.


David White Rogers was an early convert of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was a friend of the Prophet Joseph Smith and was taught the gospel by Parley P. Pratt with whom he retained a close relationship throughout his life. He was a cabinet builder in New York when he was introduced to Parley P. Pratt. He was an amazing ancestor. My records are extensive for this individual. By Kurt Rogers

    "After their sermon, the elders—Parley P. Pratt and Elijah Fordham—informed the congregation that there would be no more meetings, as few showed interest in their message. When David heard this announcement, he stood up and invited the elders to his home. He stated that the men were speaking the truth, and he thought there were others in the city who would like to hear the elders' message. Rogers's offer helped fulfill the elders' earlier impression that people would be raised up to aid them in the work there."

By Naida R. Williamson

"The Church authorities in Quincy wanted to send the Galland documents and information to Joseph Smith, who was in Liberty Jail, for a decision. They tried to find someone familiar with the Jackson Country area to take the material to Joseph, sell the Church lands in Jackson County, and help the needy Saints move to the Quincy area. No one seemed willing to return to Jackson County, fearing the mobs. Finally, David Rogers was approached by Bishop Edward Partridge to fulfill the assignment. Rogers agreed, writing in his report: Although I had heard of the threats that the Jackson folks had made against the Mormons in case they came there to sell or take possession of their lands, (I was a stranger in Mo. and also to the Saints, having as it were, just arrived from the City of New York, on my way to gather with the Saints), notwithstanding, I was not intimidated and therefore, replied: "If it is the will of the Lord and the decision of His servants who have the authority to appoint, endow me and do the business or be found dead trying." Accordingly, the necessary power of attorney, directions written out, on the tenth day of March, 1839, I left Quincy, Illinois, for Jackson County, Mo." ... "The next day while Rogers and Bird were crossing the village green, forty men walked up to them and formed a hollow square with the two Mormons in the center. Soon, about three hundred more gathered. A tall slim fellow named James King, a brother of the sheriff of Jackson County, informed Rogers that he must deliver up to the Jackson boys the money and property received from the sale of land and leave before sunset or he would be a dead man. "We mean what we say!" he added. David Rogers observed to King that inasmuch as he had pronounced sentence upon him he wanted the privilege granted condemned criminals in courts of the law to say a word in defense. Loud voices were heard "Let him speak, let him speak." King drawled, "Say on."

Rogers, drawing himself up to his full height of six feet, three inches, commenced: "A few years ago, the God of Israel sent a few of his servants to settle in Jackson County. They came forth, and in conformity with the laws of the United States and the State of Missouri, bought up some 20,000 acres upon which they settled some 1,500 souls in the space of three years, at which time the people of the county arose enmasse and drove those servants of God from their homes and from the county, in violation of all law. Those servants of God then settled in other counties, and subsequently were driven from the state, under the exterminating order of Governor Boggs. Among those servants of God there are some very old, some crippled, some sick, some widows, and many orphan children, who are destitute of means to convey themselves out of the state. And the Lord will not that they should be exterminated, therefore, the God of Israel has ordered that the lands from which his servants were first driven, shall be sold, and the means used in helping those helpless ones out of the state. And I am here to perform that business, and in the name of Israel's God, and by His powers, I shall accomplish it. Only by your committing willful cold-blooded murder can I be prevented. If anyone is prepared for that, now is the best time you can ever have, in the blaze of this beautiful morning sun and in the presence of this large concourse of witnesses, that the honor and glory of the deed may descend to the latest posterity. That is all I wish to say."

Not a word issued from the lips of any member of the crowd; one by one the people left until David White Rogers stood alone. Even Charles Bird had disappeared."

by Ivan J. Bennett

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David White Rogers's Timeline

1787
October 4, 1787
Morristown, Merrimack, New Hampshire, United States
1813
July 5, 1813
Age 25
Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada
1814
December 5, 1814
Age 27
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
1816
July 28, 1816
Age 28
Queenstown, Ontario, Canada
1818
April 21, 1818
Age 30
Niagara-on-the-Lake, Niagara Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada
1822
December 2, 1822
Age 35
Dunkirk, New York, United States
1823
February 11, 1823
Age 35
Chautauqua County, New York, United States
1825
March 23, 1825
Age 37
Dunkirk, New York, United States