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Davis Stockton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ireland
Death: Died in Albemarle County, Virginia
Place of Burial: Stockton Family Cemetery, Albermarle County, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of father of Davis Stockton and mother of Davis Stockton
Husband of Unknown Stockton
Father of Richard Stockton Sr.; Thomas Stockton, I; Samuel Stockton; Hannah (Stockton) Goudelock; Elizabeth (nee Stockton) Whiteside and 5 others

Managed by: Marsha Gail (Kamish) Veazey
Last Updated:

About Davis Stockton

See http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~davisstockton/Davis%20Stockton%20of%20Albemarle%20County%2c%20Virginia.htm for a wonderful essay on Davis Stockton and family.

Other important points to consider before editing this profile:

  • He was not the son of Richard Stockton and Susanna (Witham) Robinson, who were married 8 November 1691 at Chesterfield Meeting House, Burlington County, New Jersey. It is unlikely he could have been born after 1691, and genetic testing on his descendants has revealed that they are not related to the New Jersey Stocktons. For the DNA study that proves Davis Stockton of Albemarle County, Virginia, and Richard Stockton of New Jersey are not related, please go to The Stockton DNA Project, click on enter, and then click on "dna results" on the left side of the page.
  • There is no evidence as to the first name or maiden name of Davis Stockton's wife. Until such time as hard evidence is found, no assumptions should be made. (Many folks have come up with Sarah http://www.geni.com/people/Sarah-Stockton/6000000007835263972 as his wife; however, no one has any documented proof as of this time.)
  • The claim that Davis Stockton was born at "Dunshauglin Castle, Meath, Leinster, Northern Ireland" is not supported by any documentation. Although one person claims to have had a document that showed that information, he now reports that document has been lost. There is absolutely no documentation whatsoever that Davis Stockton was born at Dunshauglin Castle, County Meath. Please note that County Meath is in Leinster Province, Ireland. Neither County Meath nor Leinster Province are part of Northern Ireland.

- - -

DAVIS STOCKTON OF ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, by Jerry Stockton

The first documented information on Davis Stockton is a Virginia Land Office Patent to Michael Wood (Woods) dated 10 June 1737. "George the Second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and lawful Money . . . do Give Grant and Confirm unto Michael Wood one certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing four hundred Acres lying and being in the County of Goochland on the heads of Ivy Creek on other Branches of the North River on the South Side of the North River and bounded as followeth (to wit) Beginning at a hiccory on Davis Stockton’s Line . . . crossing a Branch of the North River . . . to Pointers in Davis Stockton's Line . . . the Tenth Day June one thousand seven hundred and thirty seven In the Tenth Year of our Reign. William Gooch”

Michael Woods (Sr.) and Davis Stockton were two of the early settlers in Goochland (now Albemarle) County, Virginia. It is not known when they first arrived in Goochland County, but they were there by 1737. Michael Woods' property on Lickinghole Creek "lay at the mouth of Woods's Gap." This was at the eastern entrance of Woods’ Gap a “gentle defile in the Blue Ridge Mountains”. The property of his son, Michael Woods (Jr.), was at the headwaters of Ivy Creek. This was next to Davis Stockton’s property on Ivy Creek.

It appears that Davis Stockton was probably born about 1685. It has long been thought that Davis Stockton was born in Ireland, although no evidence of the Davis Stockton family has been found there. It is not known where his children were born. In the 1730's the Davis Stockton family settled in the Ivy Creek area of then Goochland County, Virginia. They might have also been on the North and South Forks of Mechum's River in the 1730's, however, they are not found there until 15 March 1741. The North Fork of Mechum's River became known as Stockton Creek, and the South Fork became known as Stockton's Mill Creek.

When Henrico Shire was created in 1634 it included the Ivy Creek and Mechum's River area. The name Henrico Shire was soon changed to Henrico County. In 1728 the Ivy Creek and Mechum's River area became part of Goochland County, and in 1744 it became part of the newly formed Albemarle County. In 1761 Amherst County was formed from the southern part of Albemarle County, and the western part of Louisa County was added as the northernmost part of Albemarle County. The northern area of Albemarle County was now in Fredericksville Parish and the southern area of Albemarle County was in St. Anne's Parish. In 1807 the northern part of Amherst County became Nelson County.

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK 18, 1738-1739, pp. 536-537, 12 March 1739 "George the Second by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and lawful Money . . . do Give Grant and Confirm unto Davis Stockdon one certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing Four hundred Acres lying and being in the County of Goochland on both sides of Ivy Creek a branch of the Rivanna and on the South side of the same and bounded as followeth, to wit, Beginning at a white Oak a corner to Capt Charles Hudson . . . Crossing Ivy Creek to a Hiccory . . . the said Davis Stockdon . . . the Twelfth Day of March one thousand seven hundred & thirty nine In the Thirteenth Year of our Reign . . . William Gooch"

The above property was adjacent to the land that Michael Woods obtained with his 10 June 1737 patent. Davis Stockton sold this 400 acre property to his neighbor Michael Woods (Jr.) on 17 Nov 1741 for 30 pounds. This was the only property that Davis Stockton is thought to have owned on Ivy Creek. Davis Stockton also owned land on the North Fork and the South Fork of Mechums River. The North Fork is known as Stockton Creek and the South Fork is known as Stockton's Mill Creek. See GOOCHLAND COUNTY DEED BOOK 3, 1737-1742, p. 497, 17 Nov 1741.

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 20, 1741-1743, pp. 162-164, 15 March 1741 "George the second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and Lawful Money . . . do Give Grant and Confirm unto William Whitesides One Certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing Four hundred Acres lying and being in the County of Goochland on both sides the South fork Mechums River . . . said William Whitesides . . . the Fifteenth Day of March One thousand seven hundred and forty one In the Fifteenth Year of our Reign . . . William Gooch"

Elizabeth Stockton, a daughter of Davis Stockton, married William Whiteside or Whitesides. There is a tradition that William Whiteside was born in Ireland, that he met and married Elizabeth Stockton in Ireland, and that three of William and Elizabeth (nee Stockton) Whiteside's children were born in Ireland. It also states that in about 1735 the William and Elizabeth Whiteside family, and the Davis Stockton family, left Ireland and traveled to America together. However, it does not appear that William and Elizabeth Whiteside had any children born by 1735, or even by 1737 when Davis Stockton is known to have been living in Goochland County, Virginia.

William Whiteside was probably living in Goochland County before his 15 March 1741 patent. The first children of William and Elizabeth (nee Stockton) Whiteside appear to have been born about 1740 or 1741. It is very possible that William Whiteside and Elizabeth Stockton did not meet and marry in Ireland, but instead met and married in Goochland County, Virginia.

THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL MAGAZINE AND TENNESSEE HISTORICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY Volume IX, 1904, pp. 69-70 1. July 7, 1767, William and Elizabeth Whiteside to Adam Dean, three hundred and seventy-three acres or thereabout. Witnessed by William Winston, William Grayson, William Stockton and Maryan Winston. 2. May 11, 1768, William Whiteside, bill of sale of mare, etc., to George Davidson. Witnessed by Michael Woods, Jr., and Samuel Davison. 3. September 19, 1769, William and Elizabeth Whiteside to Adam Dean, one hundred and eight-one acres. Witnesses: Samuel Stockton, John Davis, James Walker and Prudence Stockton. 4. August 6, 1770, writ dispatched from Albermarle to Amherst to examine Elizabeth Whiteside as to whether her consent was freely given to the last mentioned transfer. Commission executed by Timothy riggs and John Robinson, Esquires, of Amherst, and their return ordered to be recorded by Albemarle Court and the session of March, 1771.

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK 20, 1741-1743, pp. 194-196, 15 March 1741 "George the second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and Lawful Money . . . unto Davis Stockton One Certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing Four hundred Acres lying and being in the County of Goochland on both sides of Stockton's Branch of Mechum's River and bounded as followeth (to wit) Beginning at Richard Stockton's Corner . . . to a small Pine in Richard Stockton's line . . . unto said Davis Stockton . . . the Fifteenth Day of March One thousand seven hundred and forty one In the Fifteenth Year of our Reign . . . William Gooch." This 400 acre property was on the North Fork of Mechums River, also known as Stockton Creek.

On 28 April 1741 William Mayo surveyed 400 acres on Mechum's River for Richard Stockton. This property was part of Goochland County until September of 1744 when it became part of the newly formed Albemarle County, Virginia. William Mayo was the Goochland County Surveyor. When William Mayo died in 1744, Peter Jefferson, the father of Thomas Jefferson, became the new Goochland County Surveyor.

  • Goochland County _
  • Surveyed the 28th day of April 1741 For Richard Stockton of
  • the Said County Four hundred acres of Kings Land on the branches
  • of Mechums River in the aforesaid County. Bounded as Followeth -
  • (to witt) Begining at his own corner two pines and a white Oak Sapling
  • between two rocks runing thence on new lines S: 68 degrees: E: 30 poles to pointers
  • one pole from Ambrose Joshua Smiths corner white Oak thence on his line
  • S_ 35 poles crossing Stocktons branch of Mechums River to a pine, S: 18 degrees
  • E: 65 poles to pointers and S: 49 degrees E: 160 poles to his corner Small pine
  • thence on new lines S: 65 degrees: E: 180 poles crossing a brnach to pointers, S: 3 degrees
  • W: 120 poles to pointers, N: 75 degrees: W: 200 poles to pointers and N: 41 degrees : W: 380
  • poles to pointers in the Said Stocktons line, thence on the Same N: 56: E:
  • 138 poles to the first Station 1/3 Plantable 2/3 Barren
  • Wm. Mayo, Surv.

[Note: In the above 1741 survey the symbol for degrees has been replaced with the word degrees.]

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK 19, 1739-1741, pp. 1006-1007, 6 July 1741 "George the second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and Lawful Money . . . do Give Grant and Confirm unto David Stockdon one Certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing four hundred Acres lying and being in the County of Goochland on both sides the South fork of Mechum's River and Bounded as followith (to wit) Beginning at a red Oak and Hiccory Saplin on the North side of the said South fork . . . unto the said David Stockdon . . . the Sixth Day of July One thousand seven hundred and forty one In the Fifteenth Year of our Reign . . . James Blair"

The above 400 acre property on the South Fork of Mechum's River was the site of Davis Stockton's mill. The South Fork is also known as Stockton's Mill Creek. This 400 acre patent seems to be the source of the 100 acres that Samuel Stockton and William Stockton sold to Thomas Stockton on 13 June 1764.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK, pp. 480-482, 13 June 1764 "This Indenture maid the thirteen Day of June one thousand and seven Hundred & Sixty four Between Samuel Stockton & William Stockton & their wives each & every of them of the Parish of St. Anns & County of Albemarle yeoman of the other part & Thomas Stockton wheel Wright . . . one hundred pounds current Money of Virginia . . . unto Thomas Stockton . . . one hundred acres lying & being in the County of Albemarle on Both sides the South fork of Mitchams River which said land was Granted to Samuel Stockton & William Stockton by Patent bearing Date the sixt Day of July one thousand Seven hundred & Forty one . . . Samuel Stockton . . . William Stockton . . . Prudence Stockton . . . Jane Stockton . . . Test . . . John Nicholas Clk" It does not appear that there was a patent to Samuel and William Stockton on 6 July 1741, there was however a patent to Davis Stockton on 6 July 1741 for 400 acres "on both sides the South fork of Mechum's River."

GOOCHLAND COUNTY ROAD ORDERS 1728-1744, by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett, June 1975, revised 2004, p. 41 Order Book 5, Goochland County, 15 Sept. 1741 O.S., p. 3 "Road to be Clear'd . . . On the Petition of . . . Davis Stockdon . . . Sam. Arnett [Samuel Arnold], Richard Stockdon, Thomas Stockdon . . . Leave is given to Clear a road from Thomas Morrisons to the D.S. tree in Michael Woods road. And that the Petitioners be exempt from working on any other road."

THE ROUTE OF THE THREE NOTCH'D ROAD: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett and Howard H. Newlon, Jr., Jan 1976, Revised Sept 2003 "The next year, 1741, found the Goochland Court issuing a Road Order for what apparently was to be the final segment of the Three Notch'd Road. This was a road from the Secretary's Ford on the Rivanna River (near the old woolen mill adjacent to I-64 on the east side of Charlottesville) to the D.S. Tree in Michael Wood's road (the road east from Wood's Gap to Ivy). According to Edgar Woods' History of Albemarle County, Virginia the D. S. Tree had, carved on it, the initials of Davis Stockdon, an early patentee of land near the present Ivy . . . it seems clear that this Mountain Road was marked about 1742 or 1743 (O. S.) along its length from Richmond to the Valley with three notches on trees at periodic intervals. It evidently already had mile markers running from west to east since No. 12 was located near the present Shadwell and Nos. 36 and 40 were near Goochland Court House. These mile markers may have later borne the "three notches" also, though it seems doubtful they were anything more than suitably inscribed trees since the "twelve mile tree" is named in one order. These numbers or markers were placed on the Mountain Road some years before it became the Three Notch'd Road, evidence of them first appearing in a Goochland Road Order of 17 May 1737 O.S. appointing Benjamin Wheeler surveyor of "part of the Mountain Road on the North side of James [Rivanna] River beginning at Number Twelve and ending at Number Thirty." Peter Jefferson, a previous surveyor of this road, probably made the measurements and marked or erected these. The fact that only the Mountain Road (later Three Notch'd) had mile markers seems significant of its status as a main east-west and west-east route. It seems likely that these markers were measured from the D.S. Tree near Ivy, which is approximately twelve miles from the present Shadwell."

THE VIRGINIA LANDMARKS REGISTER, edited by Calder Loth, 1999, p. 11 "D. S. TAVERN, Ivy vicinity, D. S. Tavern is one of Albemarle County's few remaining early ordinaries and the only one in the region to preserve its orignial bar cage. Tradition holds that the tavern marks the site of the D. S. Tree and the zero milepost of the Three-Notched Road, a principal artery from Richmond to the Shenandoah Valley in the 18th and 19th centuries. "D. S." is said to stand for David [sic] Stockton, who blazed the trail from Williamsburg and carved his initials on the tree. It could also stand for D. S. (Dissenters) Presbyterian Church, which stood in this area. The log section may have been constructed as a claims house. This one-room structure evolved with additions into an ordinary, functioning as such from the late 18th century until 1850. Chief Justice John Marshall held title to the property from 1810 to 1813."

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK 22, 1743-1745, pp. 42-44, 1 March 1743 "George the Second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Twenty Shillings of good and Lawful Money . . . do Give Grant and Confirm unto Samuel Arnold one certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing two hundred Acres lying and being in the County of Goochland on the Branches of Ivy Creek and bounded as followeth (to wit) Beginning at Captain Hudsons Corner . . . the First Day of March One thousand seven hundred and forty three In the Seventeenth Year of our Reign . . . William Gooch"

Thomas Stockton, a son of Davis Stockton, married Rachel Allen, a daughter of Samuel and Martha (nee Chapman) Allen. After Samuel Allen died Martha (nee Chapman) Allen married Samuel Arnold. The Samuel Arnold family was probably living next to the Davis Stockton family by 1740. It appears that Thomas Stockton met and married Rachel Allen in Goochland County, and their first children appear to have been born in Goochland County in about 1740.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, ORDER BOOK 1, 1744-1748, p. 45, 22 Aug 1745 Mentions Joseph Kinkead, Andrew Wood and a road from Kinkead's house to Davis Stockton's mill. Rev. Edgar Woods wrote that the Stockton family "erected perhaps the first mill in that section of the county." The mill site was later owned by Davis Stockton's sons Samuel and William Stockton. See 12 Mar 1760 deed from Samuel Stockton to William Stockton.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY IN VIRGINIA, by Rev. Edgar Woods, 1901, pp. 362-363 "Ivy Creek, March 29, 1747. Whereas it is agreed or proposed that ye Inhabitants of Ivy Creek and ye Mountain Plain Congregation joyn together with ye Congregation of Rockfish, to call and invite ye Reverend Samuel Black . . . to be our Minister and Pastor . . . do promise and oblige ourselves to pay yearly and every year ye several sums annexed to our names, for ye outward support and Incouragement of ye said Mr. Samuel Black . . . according to ye Rules and Practice of our Orthodox Reformed Presbyterian Church." Among those who promised support for Reverend Samuel Black were: Richard Stockton, 12 shillings; Davis Stockton, 1 pound, no shillings; Adam Gaudylock, 10 shillings; William Whiteside, 10 shillings; Thomas Lockhart, 10 shillings; Michael Woods, 1 pound, 10 shillings; and Michael Woods Jr., 10 shillings.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 26 Oct 1748 A survey for Davis Stockton for 312 acres on both sides of the South Fork of Mechum's River. This property was transfered to Francis Whelchel who married Martha Ann Stockton, a daughter of Davis Stockton. See Francis Whelchel 25 March 1762 land record below.

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK, NO. 34, 1756-1765, pp. 990-991, 25 March 1762 "George the Third . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Thirty five Shillings of good and lawful Money . . . Do Give Grant and Confirm Unto Francis Welchell one Certain Tract or Parcel of land Containing three hundred and twelve Acres Lying and being in the County of Albemarle on both sides of Mitchum River . . . the Twenty fifth Day of March One thousand seven hundred and Sixty two In the Second Year of our Reign . . . Frans. Fauquier." Francis Whelchel sold this 312 acre property to Patrick Davis on 14 April 1763. See 26 Oct 1748 survey of 312 acres for Davis Stockton.


ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 29 Oct 1748 "This is a plat of 400 Acres of Land in Albemarle County lying on the branches of Metchum River Survd. for Davis Stockton Octobr. 29th 1748 by Thos. Turpin . . . Virgin Spr. Cr."

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 12 March 1749 Adam Goudelock, 182 acres on a Spring Branch, neighbors Martha Stockton and Sarah Stockton. This was on what was then known as Virgin Spring Creek, but is now known as Dollins Creek. See Adam Gaudilock's 20 Aug 1760 patent for this 182 acre property. It mentions Martha Stockton's line and Sarah Stockton's line. Samuel Stockton became owner of the Sarah Stockton 397 acre patent on 1 March 1773. He sold 322 acres of the 397 acres on Virgin Spring Creek to R. Dollins on 8 Nov 1773. Hannah Stockton, a daughter of Davis Stockton, appears to have met and married Adam Goudelock in Albemarle County, Virginia. The Adam and Hannah (nee Stockton) Goudelock family moved to Union County, South Carolina.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY IN VIRGINIA, by Rev. Edgar Woods, 1901, p. 363 "Albemarle Company of Militia, lately in actual service for the defence and protection of the frontier against the Indians, September, 1758. Hening's Statutes, VII, 203." Captain James Nevill, Samuel Stockton, William Stockton, Adam Gaudylock, William Whiteside, Henry Brenton and Michael Woods, Jr., were among the 56 men mentioned as members of the Albemarle Company of Militia in William Waller Hening's 1820 book. Samuel and William Stockton were sons of Davis Stockton. Adam Goudelock and William Whiteside were sons-in-law of Davis Stockton. Adam Goudelock married Hannah Stockton, a daughter of Davis Stockton. William Whiteside married Elizabeth Stockton, also a daughter of Davis Stockton. Either Henry or Robert Brenton might have been a son-in-law of Davis Stockton. A 1773 record shows "Sarah Branton (late Sarah Stockton)." Michael Woods, Jr., was a neighbor of Davis Stockton.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK 2, p. 88, 8 Nov 1758 November the 8th day 1758 . . . Then received of Mr. Davis Stockton fourty pounds current money of Virginia in full of all Bills Bonds Boock Debts and Accts and in full of all contracts and agreements that ever was between the said Stockton and me . . . Thomas Lankford . . . Test Adam Goudilock . . . Samuel Stockton . . . At a Court held for Albemarle County the eight day of March 1759 . . . This Receipt was proved by the oath of Samuel Stockton one of the witnesses thereto and on the motion of Davis Stocton ordered to be recorded.

ABEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK 3, p. 17, 12 March 1760/1761 Samuel Stockton to William Stockton, 204 acres on the South Fork of Mechum's River where the mill stands on Stockton's Mill Creek. William Stockton sold this 204 acre property to James Garland in 1767.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY IN VIRGINIA, by Rev. Edgar Woods, 1901, pp. 319-320 “Among the earliest settlers in the western part of the county, who came as is said under the leadership of Michael Woods, was a family named Stockton. Though their name has entirely disappeared, they have in a number of ways left their mark behind. They consisted of several branches. They erected perhaps the first mill in that section of the county. The north fork of Mechum's River still bears the name of Stockton's Creek, the south fork in early times was called Stockton's Mill creek, and the first name by which Israel's Gap was known was Stockton's Thoroughfare. The famous abbreviation of D. S. is also ascribed to the head of the family. One story recites that Michael Woods and Davis Stockton landed at Williamsburg, and came to the wilds of Goochland together, that arriving at D. S., they advanced in different directions, Woods continuing straight forward to Woods's Gap, and Stockton bearing to the left along the foot of the mountain towards Batesville, and that as a memorial of the place where they separated, Stockton carved his initials on a tree . . Woods's home lay at the mouth of Woods's Gap, and the Stocktons were settled along Mecham's River, the south fork as well as the north.”

In his 1901 book Rev. Edgar Woods shows a date of death for Davis Stockton as 1760, however, he does not give a source for the 1760 date. Davis Stockton's exact year of death is not known. The appraisal of "the Estate of Davis Stockton Decd." is dated "January 8th 1762." Albemarle County records have been thoroughly searched and no will for Davis Stockton has been found.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, WILL BOOK 2, p. 114 Stockton Appraisal Pursuant to an Order of the Worshipful Court of Albemarle and in obedience to the sd Order We the Subscribers have appraised the Estate of Davis Stockton Decd. as follows Viz

  • To 9 Hogs £2..15.. To 1 Horse £3 To 4 Cattle £6..5 . . . . . . . £12 ..............
  • To 1 Bed and furniture £1..10. To 1 Chest 2/6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ... 12 .... 6
  • To 1 Riding Coat 20/ To 1 Waist Coat 12/6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ... 12 .... 6
  • To Pewter 10/. To 2 Iron Pots 9/1. To Knives and forks 5/ . . . . . 1 .... 4 ......
  • To a Parcel of Wooden Ware 7/. To 2 Books 5/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 ......
  • To 1 Cow sold £2..5.. To 1 Churn 1/3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 .... 6 .... 3
  • To 1 C. weight of Poark 16/8. 1 Bell 3/6 1 Barrl 2/6 . . . . . . . . . . 1 .... 2 .... 8
  • To Iron Ware £2..0..10 To 1 mare and Colt £13..10. . . . . . . . . 15 ... 10 ... 10
  • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Totall . . . 36 ... 00 .... 9

Given under our hands January 8th 1762. William Grayson James Coffey Chas Lambert

This appraisment was returned to Albemarle County Court the fourteenth Day of January 1762 and Ordered to be recorded Test John Nicholas Clk

DAVID LEWIS JR. OF VIRGINIA AND CAROLINA, by Chester R. Johnson, c1995, Albemarle County, Virginia, Court Records, 23 July 1762, David Lewis of St. Anns Parish, Albemarle Co., appointed Alexander Baine of Henrico Co., his attorney to recover from several persons the sums of money or tobacco listed by their names which are now due and owed to him. In Albemarle County, Virginia, about 125 men including:

  • Samuel Arnall, 11 pounds, 15 shillings, 10 pence, 3 farthings
  • Francis Whelchel, 3 pounds, 10 shillings, 6 pence
  • Wm. & Saml. Stockton, 9 pounds, 2 shillings, 10 pence
  • Thos. Stockton, 1 pound, 4 shillings, 10 pence
  • Richd. Stockton, 10 shillings
  • Adam Goudelock, 1 pound, 4 shillings, 6 pence, 3 farthings

Recorded in court, 13 Aug 1762, David Lewis Junr. seal

THE STOCKTON FAMILY OF NEW JERSEY AND OTHER STOCKTONS, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M. D., 1911, p. 234 "Davis 1 Stockton is said to have come from the north of Ireland and settled, first, in Lancaster County, Pa., and then in Goochland County (later Albemarle County), Va. He was given a patent for 400 acres of land there, adjoining the land of his son-in-law, Adam Godylouch, March 12, 1739 . . . His wife's name was Sarah.” There is no evidence that Davis Stockton was from the north of Ireland or that he was ever in Pennsylvania.

SKETCHES OF VIRGINIA, HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL, by Rev. William Henry Foote, D. D., 1850, pp. 101-102 "Michael Woods, from Ireland came in the year 1734 and settled at Henderson's quarter near Wood's Gap in Albemarle. Three sons and three sons in law came with him and settled near. One of the sons in law, William Wallace, took his residence on Mechums river, in Albemarle . . . These were the founders of Mountain Plain Congregation."

It appears that Davis Stockton might have married about 1710. If he married at age 25, he would have been born about 1685. There is no hard evidence as to when or where Davis Stockton was born, or when or where he married.

DNA proves that Davis and Robert Stockton are descended from the same male Stockton ancestor. It could be they had the same father, or the same grandfather, or an earlier male Stockton ancestor. Davis and Robert Stockton do not share a Stockton ancestor with the Richard Stockton family of New Jersey. Davis Stockton has not been found in any Pennsylvania records, and Davis Stockton has not been found in New York or New Jersey records. It appears that the first record for Davis Stockton is the 10 June 1737 Goochland County, Virginia, land patent.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 26 Oct 1748 and 29 Oct 1748 "This is a Plat of 397 Acres of Land in Albemarle County lying on the branches of Metchum River Survd. for Sarah Stockton Octobr. 26 1748 . . . by Thos. Turpin, Asst. Sur." Sarah Stockton's survey of 397 acres is on the same page of the surveyor's book as Davis Stockton's survey for 312 acres. They are both dated "Octobr. 26 1748." On 29 Oct 1748 a survey of 400 acres for Davis Stockton on Branches of Mechams River.

ALBEMARLE COUNTY WILLS & DEEDS BOOK NO. 1, 1748-1752, pp. 348-350, 14 August 1751 This indenture made this March the Second day in the twenty third year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the second & c. Anno Dom 1750 Between Paul Abney of County of Albemarle, Planter, of one part & John Graves of said County, Planter, of other part . . . a certain parcel of land being in County of Albemarle containing One hundred acres . . . unto John Graves his heirs & assigns forever In Witness whereof Paul Abney to these present hath set his hand & seal in presence of us Davis Stockton, Adam Goudylock, Robert Brenton, Wm. Whiteside . . . Paul Abney . . . At a Court held for Albemarle County the 14th day of August 1751.

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 34, 1756-1765, p. 19, 10 March 1756 "George the Second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and lawful Money . . . Do Give Grant & Confirm unto Sarah Stockton one certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing Three hundred and ninety seven Acres lying and being in the County of Albemarle both Sides the Virgin - Spring - Branch of Mechum River and bounded as followeth to wit Beginning at a Pine in Davis Stockton's Line . . . the tenth day of March one thousand seven hundred and fifty six In the twenty ninth Year of our Reign . . . Robt. Dinwiddie"

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 34, 1756-1765, pp. 144-145, 16 Aug 1756 "George the second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Forty Shillings of good and Lawful Money . . . Do Give Grant and Confirm unto Adam Gaudilock one certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing four Hundred Acres lying and being in the County of Albemarle on the branches of the South fork of Meecham's River and bounded as followeth, to wit, Beginning at a Pointer in Henry Tyrells Line . . . to Pointers in Martha Stockton's line . . . to Pointers in Davis Stockton's line . . . the sixteenth day of August one thousand seven hundred fifty six In the Thirtieth Year of our Reign . . . Robt. Dinwiddie"

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 34, 1756-1765, pp. 687-688, 20 August 1760 "George the Second . . . in Consideration of the Sum of Twenty Shillings of good and Lawful Money . . . Do Give Grant and Confirm unto Adam Gaudilock One Certain Tract or Parcel of Land Containing One hundred and Eighty two Acres lying and being in the County of Albemarle on the Virgin Spring Branch and Bounded as followeth (to wit) Beginning at pointers in Martha Stockton's line and running thence . . . to pointers in Sarah Stockton's line . . . to pointers in Thomas Shields's line . . . the twentieth Day of August one thousand seven hundred and Sixty In the thirty fourth Year of our Reign . . . Fran: Fauquier."

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 41, 1772-1773, pp. 130-131, 1 March 1773 "Whereas by one Patent under the Seal of this our Colony & Dominion of Virginia bearing date the tenth Day of March one thousand seven hundred & fifty six there was granted unto Sarah Stockton one certain Tract or Parcel of Land containing three hundred & ninety seven Acres in the County of Albemarle on both sides the Virgin Spring Branch of Mechum River . . . Whereas Sarah Branton (late Sarah Stockton) hath failed to pay such Quitrents, & Samuel Stockton hath made humble Suit to our, late Lieutenant & Governor General of our said Colony & Dominion & hath obtained a Grant for the same . . . Do Give Grant & Confirm unto the said Samuel Stockton the said Tract . . . Begining at a Pine in Davis Stocktons Line . . . the first day of March one thousand and seven hundred & seventy three, in the thirteenth Year of our Reign . . . Dunmore"

ENCARTA WORLD ENGLISH DICTIONARY, 1999 Feme sole " . . . in law, a single woman, including women not married, widows, divorcees, and married women living independently and separately from their husbands." Feme sole is sometimes shown with the French spelling of femme seule. It appears the in the 1700's a male needed to be 21 to buy property, however, a female could buy property at age 18 if she was a feme sole, that is, an unmarried woman. In the 1700's a woman had to be a feme sole to buy property in her own name, and it is rare to find a feme sole.

Although it is not impossible, it appears unlikely that the Sarah mentioned the the 1748, 1756, 1760 and 1773 records is the wife of Davis Stockton. The Sarah mentioned in the land records might have been either a widow of an unknown Davis Stockton son, or more likely an unmarried daughter of Davis Stockton. As an unmarried female it appears she could by land in her own name at age 18. This is also what appears to be the case with Martha Ann Stockton who married Francis Whelchel. Martha Stockton and Sarah Stockton are mentioned on a 12 March 1749 survey for Adam Goudelock. On 14 August 1751 Davis Stockton, Adam Goudylock, William Whiteside and Robert Brenton were witnesses to a deed. 1 March 1773 patent "Whereas Sarah Branton (late Sarah Stockton) hath failed to pay such Quitrents." It could be that Davis Stockton helped his daughters purchase land next to his property. There is no proof as to whether the Sarah Stockton mentioned in the land records was Davis Stockton's wife, daughter, widowed daughter-in-law or some other relationship.


SPOUSE:

The maiden name of Davis Stockton's wife is shown by some researchers as Goudelock, however, there is no evidence that name is correct. Several other possible maiden names have also been put forward including Anthony, Arnold, Morgan, Whiteside, Woods and Wooten, all without any evidence that they are correct. Davis Stockton's wife is sometimes shown as Sarah Anthony Goudelock. That is just a combination of two of her possible maiden names.

Many researchers show the first name of Davis Stockton's wife as Sarah, but that name is presented without proof. The Sarah Stockton shown in property records appears to be a daughter of Davis Stockton, and not the wife of Davis Stockton. Other researchers show the wife of Davis Stockton as Martha, but that name appears to come from a mistake by Rev. Edgar Woods in his 1901 book. Rev. Woods thought that Martha (nee Chapman) Arnold was the widow of Davis Stockton, she was not, she was the widow of Samuel Allen.

Rev. Edgar Woods wrote "Davis died in 1760. His widow Martha seems afterwards to have been married to Samuel Arnold, who lived on Ivy Creek." Rev. Woods was not correct about Davis Stockton's widow being married to Samuel Arnold after the death of Davis Stockton. Rev. Woods probably read Martha (nee Chapman) Arnold's affidavit of 1765 that included "my Trusty and Loving Son Thomas Stockton." Thomas Stockton had married Rachel Allen, a daughter of Martha (nee Chapman) and her first husband, Samuel Allen. After the death of Samuel Allen, the Widow Martha Allen married Samuel Arnold. Martha (nee Chapman) Arnold was referring to her son-in-law, Thomas Stockton.

CHILDREN:

  • Richard Stockton, born about 1710, maybe in Ireland
  • Thomas Stockton, Sr., born about 1714, maybe in Ireland
  • Samuel Stockton, born about 1720, maybe in Ireland
  • Elizabeth (nee Stockton) Whiteside, born about 1720-1725, maybe in Ireland
  • William Stockton, born about 1715-1730, maybe in Ireland
  • Hannah (nee Stockton) Goudelock, born about 1720-1730, maybe in Ireland
  • Martha Ann (nee Stockton) Whelchel, born about 1720-1730, maybe in Ireland
  • and possibly Sarah (nee Stockton) Branton, born about 1720-1730, maybe in Ireland

DOCUMENTS:

SOURCES:

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 17, 1735-1738, pp. 350-351, 10 June 1737 (Michael Woods, 400 a. Ivy Creek)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 18, 1738-1739, pp. 536-537, 12 March 1739 (Davis Stockton, 400 a. Ivy Creek)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 19, 1739-1741, pp. 1006-1007, 6 July 1741 (Davis Stockton, 400 acres)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 20, 1741-1743, pp. 162-164, 15 March 1741 (William Whitesides, 400 acres)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 20, 1741-1743, pp. 194-196, 15 March 1741 (Davis Stockton, 400 acres)

GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 15 Sep 1741 (Road to be Clear'd . . . Davis, Richard, and Thomas Stockdon)

GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK 3, 1737-1742, 17 Nov 1741, (Davis Stockton to Michael Woods, 400 acres)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 22, 1743-1745, pp. 42-44, 1 March 1743 (Samuel Arnold, 200 acres Ivy Creek)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, ORDER BOOK 1, 1744-1748, p. 45, 22 Aug 1745 (Kinkead's house to Davis Stockton's mill)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 26 Oct 1748 (Davis Stockton, 312 acres, later to F. Whelchel)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 26 Oct 1748 (Sarah Stockton, 397 acres branch of Mechum's)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 29 Oct 1748 (Davis Stockton, 400 acres)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 12 March 1749 (Adam Goudelock, 182 acres)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, SURVEYOR'S PLAT BOOK, 19 May 1749 (Adam Goudelock, 400 acres)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY WILLS & DEEDS BOOK NO. 1, 1748-1752, 14 August 1751 (Stockton, Goudelock, Brenton, Whiteside)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 32, 1752-1756, p. 55, 4 April 1753 (William Whiteside, 300 acres)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 34, 1756-1765, p. 19, 10 March 1756 (Sarah Stockton, 397 acres)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 34, 1756-1765, pp. 144-145, 16 Aug 1756 (Adam Gaudilock, 400 acres)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK 2, p. 88, 8 Nov 1758 (Davis Stockton, 40 pounds current money)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK 3, p. 17, 12 March 1760 (Samuel to William, 204 acres Stockton's Mill Creek)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 34, 1756-1765, pp. 687-688, 20 Aug 1760 (Adam Gaudilock, 182 acres)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, WILL BOOK 2, p. 114, 8 Jan 1762 (Appraisal of Davis Stockton's estate)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK, NO. 34, 1756-1765, pp. 990-991, 25 March 1762 (312 acres to Francis Whelchel)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK 4, p. 291, 14 Apr 1763 (Francis Whelchel to Patrick Davis, 312 acres)

ALBEMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DEED BOOK, pp. 480-482, 13 June 1764 (Samuel, William to Thomas Stockton, 100 acres)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 37, 1767-1768, p. 272, 20 July 1768 (William Whitesides, 181 acres)

VIRGINIA LAND OFFICE PATENT BOOK NO. 41, 1772-1773, pp. 130-131, 1 March 1773 (Sarah's 397 a. to Samuel Stockton) [ HENING'S] STATUTES AT LARGE, Volume VII, 1820, by William Waller Hening, p. 203

SKETCHES OF VIRGINIA, HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL, by Rev. William Henry Foote, D. D., 1850, pp. 101-102

ALBEMARLE COUNTY IN VIRGINIA, by Rev. Edgar Woods, 1901, pp. 319-320, 362-363 THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL MAGAZINE AND TENNESSEE HISTORICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY, Volume IX, 1904

THE STOCKTON FAMILY OF NEW JERSEY AND OTHER STOCKTONS, by Thomas Coates Stockton, M. D., 1911

CHRONICLES OF THE SCOTCH-IRISH SETTLEMENT IN VIRGINIA, by Lyman Chalkley, 1912

DAVIS STOCKTON OF VIRGINIA, by Leona Irene Smith Johnson and Winfred Broadus Smith, 1st Edition 1972, 2nd Edition 1975

THE VIRGINIA LANDMARKS REGISTER, edited by Calder Loth, 1999, p. 11

THE ROUTE OF THE THREE NOTCH'D ROAD: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, by Nathaniel Pawlett, Jan 1976, Revised Sept 2003

GOOCHLAND COUNTY ROAD ORDERS 1728-1744, by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett, June 1975, revised 2004, p. 41


DAVID LEWIS JR. OF VIRGINIA AND CAROLINA, by Chester R. Johnson, c1995, Albemarle County, Virginia, Court Records, 23 July 1762

- - -

ALBEMARLE COUNTY IN VIRGINIA, by Rev. Edgar Woods, 1901

Among the earliest settlers in the western part of the county, who came as is said under the leadership of Michael Woods, was a family named Stockton. Though their name has entirely disappeared, they have in a number of ways left their mark behind. They consisted of several branches. They erected perhaps the first mill in that section of the county. The north fork of Mechum's River still bears the name of Stockton's Creek, the south fork in early times was called Stockton's Mill Creek, and the first name by which Israel's Gap was known was Stockton's Thoroughfare. The famous abbreviation of D. S. is also ascribed to the head of the family. One story recites that Michael Woods and Davis Stockton landed at Williamsburg, and came to the wilds of Goochland together, that arriving at D. S., they advanced in different directions, Woods continuing straight forward to Woods's Gap, and Stockton bearing to the left along the foot of the mountain towards Batesville, and that as a memorial of the place where they separated, Stockton carved his initials on a tree. While their landing on the eastern shores of Virginia is contrary to all the best established traditions, there may be truth in the rest of the narration. Both were patentees of land, and they may have gone from the foot of the Ridge to Williamsburg on business; on their return, the separation would naturally have taken place at the point mentioned, as Woods's home lay at the mouth of Woods's Gap, and the Stocktons were settled along Mechum's River, the south fork as well as the north.

As already intimated, the head of the family was Davis Stockton. His first entry of four hundred acres on Ivy Creek was made in 1739, and in 1741 he patented eight hundred more on both forks of Mechum's. Altogether the family connection obtained grants of nearly four thousand acres in that section. Davis died in 1760. His widow Martha seems afterwards to have been married to Samuel Arnold, who lived on Ivy Creek. Davis's children were Richard, Samuel, William and Thomas. Samuel and William had a mill on the south fork of Mechum's, not far from Batesville, the same no doubt their father built, which in 1767 they sold to James Garland. Prior to 1780 Samuel emigrated to Rutherford County, North Carolina, and was probably accompanied by William. Richard lived in the fork of Mechum's, near the old Black place; in fact, that place was a part of his land, he and his wife Agnes having sold four hundred acres to Rev. Samuel Black in 1751. He died in 1775, leaving five sons, Richard, Thomas, John, Robert and Davis. The name of John appears among the subscribers to the Albemarle Declaration of Independence, made in 1779. Previous to 1791 Richard and Robert removed to Henry County. Richard became Clerk of the Strawberry Baptist Association, and Robert entered the Baptist ministry, and subsequently went to Kentucky, where he died about 1837. Thomas, probably the son of Davis, died in 1783. He and his wife Rachel had had six sons and two daughters, some of whom were still in the county as late as 1805.

In later years John N. C. Stockton came to the county from Pennsylvania. He was a proprietor of the Stage lines running in Virginia, and made Charlottesville his headquarters. He became a large landholder in the neighborhood. In 1830 he purchased from Andrew Leitch the old Stage lot on the corner of Market and Seventh Streets, in 1832 Carrsbrook from Alexander Garrett, as executor of Dabney Minor, and in 1835 Retreat from Jonathan B. Carr. He was also the owner of Camp Holly, on the Barboursville Road. He married Emily Bernard, a niece of William D. Fitch. In 1837 he came to an untimely end, by drowning in Mobile Bay. William P. Farish became the administrator of his estate, and ultimately one of his successors in the ownership of the Stage lines. William Stockton, brother of John N. C., married Sarah, daughter of Gideon Strange and Mildred Magruder, and emigrated to Florida.

[Note: Rev. Edgar Woods is incorrect about Davis Stockton's widow being married to Samuel Arnold after the death of Davis Stockton. This is probably from Martha (nee Chapman) Arnold's affidavit in 1765 that stated "my Trusty and Loving Son Thomas Stockton." Thomas Stockton had married Rachel Allen, a daughter of Martha (nee Chapman) and her first husband, Samuel Allen. After the death of Samuel Allen, the Widow Martha Allen married Samuel Arnold. Martha (nee Chapman) Arnold was referring to her son-in-law, Thomas Stockton. This note was added by Jerry Stockton.] ---

-------------------- http://familypedia.wikia.com/wiki/Richard_Stockton,_Sr._(c1710-1775) -------------------- • Reference Number: D • _UID: 1E8F7898C38CE04BBAE5FA446A20BD86E15F • Note:

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=fredexbailey&id=I3371&style=TEXT

Note: The first documented information on the Stockons is a land deed of 1739 in Goochland County, VA which later became Albemarle County. Davis Stockton's will was probated in 1762. Date of death from "Albemarle County in Virginia", by Rev. Edgar Woods. It is known that, on 12 March 1739, Davis was in Goochland (Albemarle) County, Virginia, where he obtained a grant of 400 acres adjoining land of Adam Godylouch. (This surname is spelled in numerous ways, including Goudylock.)

Since we now know through DNA testing that Davis and Robert Stockton cannot be related to Richard's line, it also means the Judges Thomas and John in Ireland c1660 can't be the parent either. Both of them are from London. Irish records were burned in the 1921 uprising, so we don't have much to go on.

Between the Robert Stockton descendants combing PA records, and Richard Stockton descendants doing the same in New England, the only "proof" we've found is that there is NO record for Davis Stockton before the 1739 Goochland Co., VA land patent. His brother Robert is on the 1732 Lancaster PA Tax list, but no Davis. That's the brick wall.

Per "Echos of Their Voices" by Carl R. Baldwin - British rule had become too burdensome for them (Davis & Sarah) as they reached maturity. By 1710 they were living in Chester County, PA. Stockton began to prosper as a farmer, although sites in eastern Pennsylvania for an expanding family were becoming difficult to find. He sold out in Chester County and by 1732 was a resident of Pennsylvania's lancaster County. There he met Michael Woods, like himself an immigrant from North Ireland. They became fast friends. During their stay in William Penn's colony, Davis and Sarah had seven children - Richard, Ann, Thomas, Hannah, William, Elizabeth and Samuel. Woods heard of virgin land being opened for settlement in Virginia's newly created county of Goochland. he went there to investigate in 1737m, entering Goochland County from the west, through a gentle defile in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Both the pass and the creek that traversed it became known as Woods's Gap. Before returning to Pennsylvania to fetch his family, Woods obtained title to acreage at the confluence of Woods's Gap and the Mechum Riber, and at the headwaters of Ivy Creek. The Stocktons, and probably other families, joined Woods when he journed back to Goochland County to work his property in 1739. After crossing through Woods's Gap, the Woods family and the Stockton's separated, Woods continuing straight ahead to the land he had staked out. Stockton bore to the left and found his virgin soil along the lower stretches of Ivy Creek, new the modern town of Batesville. For many years residents of the area wondered about the large initials - "D.S." - carved in a tree near Woods's Gap. They apparently were made by the sentimental Stockton to mark the point of parting. In 1739, Stockton obtained title to 400 acres on Ivy Creek and two years later, obviously with his older children in mind, he acquired 800 more at the north and south forks of Mechum Riber. Goochland County was broken up in 1744. The Woods and Stockton families found themselves living in the newly formed Albemarle County. No Stocktons remain in Albemarle, but they left their name on the land. The north fork of Mechum's River is still called Stockton's Creek. In early times the south fork, on which the Stockton's operated the first mill in that part of Virginia, was called Stockton's Mill Creek. Once a defile in the mountains now know as Israel's Gap was called Stockton's Thoroughfare.

Davis Stockton's estate was inventoried on January 2, 1762 Albermarle Co., Virgina as follows: To 9 hogs, a horse and 4 cattle, to a bed and furniture and a tea chest, to a riding coat and a waist coat, to pewter, 2 iron potts, to knives and forks, to a parcell of wooden ware, to two books, to a cow sold, to a churn, to one pound weight of pearls, to a bell and a barrel, to iron ware, to a mare and a colt. Total 36 pounds 0 shillings 9 pence William Grayson, James Coffey, Charles Lambert

  • DAVIS STOCKTON OF VIRGINIA, 1972, Johnson & Smith; many errors,misquotes and assmuptions; tried to prove a case for Robert and Davis being sons of Richard and Abigail; THIS IS THE ONLY SOURCE FOR A CONNECTION BETWEEN DAVIS OF VA, ROBERT OF PA AND RICHARD OF NJ.
  • WILL BOOK 2, PG. 114, ALBEMARLE CO., VA: Appraisal of Davis Stockton estate: 8 JAN 1762; 9 hogs, 1 horses, 4 cattle, 1 bed andfuriture, 1chest, 1 riding coat, 1 waistcoat, peuter, 2 iron pots, knives and forks, 2 books, 1 cow, 1 churn, weight of pork, 1 bell, 1 barrel, iron ware , 1 mare and colt; total of 36 pounds, 9 pence. By Wm. Grayson, James Coffey, Chas Lambert.
  • THE STOCKTON FAMILY OF NEW JERSEY AND OTHER STOCKTONS, DR. Thomas Coates STOCKTON, 1911, APPE NDIX "Other Stockton", PG 234; "said to have come from the north of Ireland and settled first in Lancaster Co., PA,and then in Goochland Co. (later Albemarle) VA. He was given a patent for400 acres of land there, adjoining the land of his son-in-law,Adam Godylouch, 12 MAR 1739. In a census of Books in the Colony of VA,taken in 1762, he was credited with the possession of two books, valued at 5 shillings."; begins Appendix with, "The record of the PA and VA Stocktons begins with Davis Stockton and Robert Stockton, who were b.about the same time, both settled in Lancaster County, Pa., and among whose descendants a tradition of relationship survives... The VA Magazine of History and Biography states that Davis Stockton came from the north ofIreland; and, from the fact that the family of Robert Stockton were Presbyterians and inter-married with a number of Scotch-Irish families,it SEEMS PROBABLE that he also was Scotch-Irish, and that he and Davis Stockton were brothers." [ lists only Richard, Samuel, William ,Thomas and Hannah]
  • STOCKTON FAMILY REUNION 1957 from D.P. Lattimore, San Juan Capistrano,CA
  • THE WELCHELS IN AMERICA, BY FRANCIS HUGGINS BUG
  • There is absolutely NO PROOF, NO SOURCE, NO DOCUMENTS connecting Davis Stockton to either Robert Stockton of PA (d. 1747) or Richard Stockton of NJ (d. 1707). Both Robert and Richard have been extensively documented in PA and NJ. NO RECORD OF DAVIS STOCKTON HAS BEEN FOUND IN EITHERSTATE!

!ROB LANGDON; langdon4@earthlink.net; 2 SEP 2000, message 970; IDENTIFIES DAVIS as Lord Davis Stockton, born Dunshauglin Castle,Northern Ireland,1686; married Sarah Martha Wooten; had 6 children and emigrated to VA where he died 1769. (Inventory 1762 ?) NOTE; gives no source for this information.

  • NOTE: I have used Rob's information because it is fun to do so,not because I have any documents to prove it is true.
  • We have no definite information on births or marriages of Davis' children. We know his son Richard's children were born 1730-1754 ( he left no minor heirs in 1775 so all were born before 1754); Davis' daughter Ann (Welchel) had a child in 1752; Son, Samuel was on the VA Colony Census Book in 1762 so had to be 21 years old. Therefore Davis must have married about 1710; if he married at 20, he was born c1680.We do not know how many children he had, or where he was married, or if Sarah was his first wife. His son-in-laws, Welchel, Whiteside and Goudylock were in the Rev. War.
  • The Whiteside's family History states positively that William Whitesides was born in Ireland ; that he married Elizabeth, daughter of Davis and that their three children were born in Ireland. He came to America c1735, about the same time Davis Stockton appears. It would appear Davis and his sons-in-law came together; therefore we are wasting our time looking for earlier records in PA or VA.
  • "Sketches of Virginia", W.H. Foote. 1849; "Michael Wood, from Ireland came in the year 1734 a nd settled at Henderson's quarter near Wood's Gap in Albemarle. Three sons and three sons-in-law came with him and settled near. .." Davis is known to have been with Michael Wood;

Please leave the notes when you down load! That is the most important part. Davis Stockton is said to have come from the north of Ireland and settled, first, in Lancaster county, Pa. and then, in Goochland County (later Albermarle County, Va. ) He was given a patent for 400 acres of land there, adjoining the land of his son-in-law, Adam Godylouch, March 12 ,1739. In a Census of Books in the Colony of Virginia, taken in 1762, he was credited with possession of two books, valued at five shillings. His wife's name was Sarah. He dies in 1769. Source from "Some Descendents of Davis Stockton 1686-1761: A Descendency Revision to Davis Stockton of Virginia" by Chester R. Johnson states that Davis died in 1761, not 1769. His estate was inventoried on January 2, 1762 Albermarle Co., Virgina.

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=fredexbailey&id=I3371&style=TEXT

Stockton Genealogy Use of DNA Results in Conjunction with Existing Genealogical Research Copyright, Stephen F. Stockton, Bloomington, Illinois USA; July 1, 2004 <http://www.familytreedna.com/surname_join.asp?code=G23612&special=True> photo gallery <photogallery.htm> Stockton. The Stockton surname derives from England, but is now also found in several former British colonies. There are telephone listings for over 7000 Stockton households in the United States, and the surname is well represented in Canada and Australia. The meaning of the name is probably connected with some settlement in a wooded area; that is, the first "Stocktons" probably resided in some type of log structure, or stockade. In old English, "stoc" means the cut trunks of a tree, and "tun" means a structure or settlement. In a play on this meaning, one of the family coats of arms is decorated with three tree stumps. The name was recorded in the 11th -century Domesday Book as the manor of "Stochetone" in Shropshire, and an Adam de Stocton (roughly translated as "Adam of the cut tree settlement") was mentioned in an 1196 document. There are several small settlements called Stockton in England, but the name was historically concentrated in three areas of England: (1) southern Cheshire and northern Shropshire, (2) Yorkshire and the former Cleveland area, and (3) Essex, Middlesex, and London. There are records showing that many of the London-area Stocktons came to that place in the late middle ages, when many rural residents came to the City to learn a trade. DNA studies may allow us to map some of the early branches of the family. For example, we now know that a branch from the Cheshire-Shropshire area has genes normally associated with a Norman origin. The ancestors of this line may have accompanied William the Conqueror when he defeated King Harold at Hastings in 1066, and could have been rewarded with one of the most valuable spoils of war - land. Of course, at that time, they probably did not have the surname "de Stocton", and may have had no surname at all. Three main branches of the Stockton family have been identified in the United States: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. There are others as well, as evidenced by the results of the Stockton DNA Project. There have been some efforts to link the New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia branches. One hypothesis was that the Pennsylvania and Virginia branches were descendents of unrecorded children of Richard Stockton, the immigrant who established the New Jersey branch in the middle 1600's. This theory seemed unlikely and is not supported by the recent DNA evidence. However, DNA is supportive of another anecdotal story: that the founder of the Pennsylvania branch, Robert Stockton, and the founder of the Virginia branch, Davis Stockton, were brothers. Our DNA results cannot prove that they were brothers, but does show that they had a common male ancestor, which is consistent with the possibility of that sibling relationship. New Jersey Branch of the Stockton Family. Richard Stockton, the founder of the New Jersey Stocktons, was first recorded in America at Visslingen, near the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam, in November, 1656. He is recorded in a number of records there after that date, and he was one of about two dozen signatories to the Flushing Remonstrance, which was an early demand for freedom of religion in America. Just as New Amsterdam became New York, Visslingen was renamed Flushing when the British assumed control of the area in 1664. Richard Stockton's village is today part of the New York City borough of Queens, and home to the New York Mets baseball team. It has been variously claimed that Flushing's Richard ("the Emigrant") Stockton was from all three of the main English Stockton areas: London, Yorkshire-Durham, and Cheshire-Shropshire. Colonial Families of the United States of America, George N. MacKenzie, editor (New York, 1907), states that Richard was descended from Randall Stockton of London, who was himself from Cheshire. New Jersey Biographical and Genealogical Notes from the Volumes of the New Jersey Archives (New Jersey Historical Society, Trenton, 1916) says that Richard descended from an English family at Stockton on the River Tees in Durham. These sources are without citation. Another source, A History of the Stockton Family, by J.W. Stockton (Patterson & White, Philadelphia, 1881), said that Richard "was the son of John Stockton, of the parish of Malpas, in Cheshire, England, and was born in the year 1606". The book goes on to claim that the father, John, was of the Stockton family that resided at Kiddington, in Malpas parish. This belief was then followed in T.C. Stockton's book, The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other Stocktons (Carnahan Press, Washington DC, 1911). The Parish Church of the village of Malpas, Cheshire is St. Oswald's. It is located in Church Street, about 150 yards west of the town center, or "cross". In the attractive church building, which dates to the 14th century, there are several reminders of the Stockton family of the late 16th and early 17th century. One plaque records Owen Stockton of Kiddington in Malpas, and his eldest son, John, who died in 1610 and 1643 respectively. There are carvings in two very old wooden church pews: "John Stockton 1626". There is also a plaque to the memory of another John Stockton of Kiddington, who passed in 1700. The Stocktons of Kiddington (today called Cuddington, an area just west of Malpas), were landowners, wealthy for their time. They owned considerable land in southern Cheshire and some in northern Shropshire, although they were not titled. Records from the Church and at the College of Arms in London document several generations of that family. Owen (?-1610) was the father of John (1576-1643), whose eldest son was Thomas (1609-1674), whose eldest son was John (about 1644-1700). That latter John died childless, but he did have two brothers who carried on the line away from Malpas. Unfortunately, the ancestry given Richard "the Emigrant" Stockton by J.W. Stockton's The History of the Stockton Family is not accurate. The parish records do record the birth of a Richard Stockton on 26 June 1606, but the father is shown as John Stockton of the Higher Wych in Wigland in Malpas, which is an area just south of village of Malpas, but very distinct from Kiddington in Malpas. In fact, none of the official records of the Kiddington Stocktons mentions the birth of a Richard to any of the males of that family. Adding doubt to the book's claim, we know that Richard "the Emigrant" Stockton died in New Jersey in 1707. He was also fathering children as late as 1680. It is therefore unlikely that he was born as early as 1606. It is more probable that he was born sometime in the period 1628-1632. Ironically, the John Stockton misidentified in the book as Richard's father was probably related to Richard. Richard "the Emigrant" Stockton was from the Stockton family of the Higher Wych in Wigland in Malpas parish, and the misidentified father was probably his uncle or cousin. There is documentary evidence showing that Flushing's Richard "the Emigrant" Stockton was a descendent of the Stocktons of the Higher Wych in Wigland in Malpas, Cheshire. The evidence of this is credible, but indirect and complex, and will be the subject of a future article. However, no exact birth date or place for Richard has yet been found. The lineage of the New Jersey Stocktons is well documented and identified with the growth of the United States. Richard "the Emigrant" Stockton's son, Richard "the Builder" Stockton, purchased thousands of acres of land around Princeton, New Jersey from William Penn and built the first Stockton home there. His son, John Stockton, was a co-founder of Princeton University, and constructed the second Stockton home, Morven (which later served as the governor's mansion, and is today a state museum). John's son, Richard "the Signer" Stockton, was a lawyer, a member of the Continental Congress and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Richard's son, Richard "the Duke" Stockton was a lawyer and United States Senator. Richard's son, Robert "the Commodore", was a naval officer who led the forces that captured California and annexed it into the United States - he was also the first governor of California and a United States Senator. Robert's son, John Potter Stockton, was attorney-general of New Jersey and also a United States Senator. Further generations produced ambassadors, lawyers, military officers, and corporate executives, as well as the author of this article - a more ordinary person. Four Branches of Stocktons in Cheshire-Shropshire. We have already identified at least two branches of the Stockton family from around Malpas, although the Higher Wych in Wigland and the Kiddington in Wigland branches may share a common ancestry prior to about 1500. There are records of "de Stoctons" at Malpas as early as 1303, but the main wealth of that line was passed into the Eaton family (and eventually the Grosvenor family) with the marriage of Isabella de Stocton to Robert de Eaton in 1334. Ormerod's History of the City and County Palatine of Chester says that a junior line to that early family survived at Tushingham, which is adjacent to the Higher Wych in Wigland, and could account for the Stocktons at the latter place in the 1500's. Like much of Cheshire, the Kiddington Stocktons supported Charles I during the English Civil War, and much of the family's property was lost to the "sequestration" process after the King's beheading in 1649. After the death of John Stockton in 1700, no survivors of that branch remained in Malpas, although two of John's brothers had removed to Ireland. There was also a branch of Stocktons around Whitchurch, in northern Shropshire. Whitchurch is only about six miles from the village of Malpas, and only four miles from the Higher Wych in Wigland. This branch is discussed in an excellent article by Douglas Richardson in the New England Historical & Genealogical Society Register (April, 1993). There were a number of Stocktons farming in northern Shropshire during the 16th-17th centuries, and both the Kiddington and Higher Wych in Wigland branches had connections to Whitchurch. Finally, there is a branch of the Stockton family centered around Bunbury, which is more north and east of Malpas in Cheshire. In addition to Richard "the Emigrant" Stockton's move to America sometime prior to 1656, there is evidence of members of the Kiddington and Whitchurch branches moving to Warwickshire, Norfolk, London, and Surrey, as well as Ireland as mentioned above. Some members of the Bunbury branch are in Canada. London Stocktons. This category includes Stocktons from the home counties in southeast England. Following a common pattern, many of the London Stocktons were born in other areas and removed to London to engage in the trades. There were hundreds of Stocktons in the City during the 17th century, and there are records of some who again removed away from London in later years. There were Stocktons in Essex in the 15th century. One, Sir John Stockton, was a mercer who became Lord Mayor of London in 1470. According to the College of Arms, he was survived by a son, but allegedly that branch then died out. However, the coat of arms registered to Sir John Stockton was later used both by Stocktons in Malpas and the New Jersey Stocktons. It is not known if there is a connection between the Essex Stocktons and these other branches, or if the arms were being used without authority. Yorkshire Stocktons. Research documents a separate, major branch of Stocktons in Yorkshire, Durham and the former Cleveland area during the period 1560-1700, and presumably beyond. Some concentrations of Stocktons were at Great Edstone, Ingleby Arncliffe, Kirby Misperton, New Malton, Pickering Thorntondale, and Stokesley. These Stocktons are more likely to have had Viking or Anglo-Saxon connections than the Stocktons in Cheshire-Shropshire, although this can only be proven by conducting a DNA test on known descendents of Yorkshire Stocktons. Of course, the largest place named Stockton in England, Stockton-on-Tees, is in this same area, and was an early manor that could have lent its name to the family. Just outside of the city of York, there is a small settlement called Stockton-on-the-Forest. Pennsylvania and Virginia Stocktons. With recent DNA findings consistent with the anecdotal family tradition that Robert Stockton of Pennsylvania and Davis Stockton of Virginia were brothers, more credibility could be given to the further tradition that they were "from the north of Ireland". Obviously, Stockton is not a common Irish name, and there are very few recorded instances of Stocktons in Ireland. Unfortunately, because a 1922 fire destroyed many Irish records, it is very difficult to trace the family there. As stated above, among the few documented Stocktons in Ireland were Thomas Stockton, his two sons, and his brother, John. All were descendents of the Kiddington Stocktons of Malpas, Cheshire, and Thomas and his sons were in Dublin in the period from about 1650-1674. They also had connections with County Wicklow and County Louth. Census records indicate that there was a second John Stockton in County Clare about the same time, but little is known of him at this time. Dublin and the three counties mentioned above are all in the central and southern regions of Ireland, and not in Northern Ireland, so there is no obvious connection to the "north of Ireland" tradition. Although there is no record of their arrival, Robert and Davis Stockton both appeared in America in the 1730's. Robert settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and Davis was an early settler near Charlottesville, Virginia. One of Robert's descendents was a governor of Maryland. The descendents of Davis moved westward from Virginia, especially into Kentucky, Tennessee, Missouri, and Texas. The Virginia Stocktons are probably the largest group of Stocktons in the USA. Stockton DNA. Stockton DNA research to date has proven its value. Long after memories fade, ancestors pass, and paper records are lost or destroyed, we all carry markers of our genealogical origins in every cell of our bodies. The evidence carried is limited and must be carefully interpreted, usually in conjunction with more ordinary genealogical research. The Stockton DNA Project focuses on male DNA because the family surname follows the male line. Already, the DNA evidence has illustrated that a link between the New Jersey Stocktons and the Pennsylvania/Virginia Stocktons is unlikely - it is fairly certain that Robert Stockton and Davis Stockton are not lost sons of Richard "the Emigrant" Stockton. This also would seem to rule out an earlier link between the branches. The DNA results have also confirmed previous genealogical research that establishes a link from the New Jersey Stocktons back to the Malpas, Cheshire area. DNA from several New Jersey Stocktons is a close match with the DNA of at least one English resident descended from a Stockton who resided in Wales, just west of Malpas. Further testing could establish more DNA groupings of Stocktons, in England and other places. Once more groupings are established, further linkages are likely to emerge. For example, it is possible that a match to the Pennsylvania/Virginia Stocktons might be found. We know that the DNA of the Pennsylvania/Virginia branch is not similar to the New Jersey branch, and therefore is probably not similar to the Higher Wych in Wigland branch, from which New Jersey branch descended. However, as stated above, the Higher Wych in Wigland branch is not necessarily related to the Kiddington branch, and it is still possible that the Pennsylvania/Virginia branch is related to the Kiddington branch. The Yorkshire branch is another possible match. DNA is not the sole answer for genealogical research, but it provides yet another tool to be used in conjunction with standard research methods. We hope to further investigate the Stockton family genealogy by encouraging participation in both the DNA testing program and by obtaining known lineages from family members. <membership.htm> <genealogy.htm> contact us <mailto:info@stocktondnaproject.com>

From: jerrystockton8@msn.com To: drskipb3@msn.com Subject: Stockton genealogy Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2008 18:07:52 +0000

.ExternalClass .EC_hmmessage P {padding:0px;} .ExternalClass body.EC_hmmessage {font-size:10pt;font-family:Tahoma;} Skip,

I have a great deal of information about the Stockton family if you are interested. Below is a chart I put together of Davis 1 Stockton's children and grandchildren. I can also send this to you as a word attachment if you want. Sometimes as an e-mail the format for the below chart goes bad. Jerry Stockton

.ExternalClass .EC_hmmessage P {padding:0px;} .ExternalClass body.EC_hmmessage {font-size:10pt;font-family:Tahoma;} DAVIS 1 and SARAH STOCKTON ----------------------------------------------------------children------------------------------------------------------------- RICHARD 2 SAMUEL 2 THOMAS 2 WILLIAM 2 HANNAH 2 MARTHA ANN 2 ELIZABETH 2 Agnes Prudence Rachel Jane Adam Dr Francis William (Anthony ?) (Torbet ?) Allen (Marshall ?) Goudelock Whelchel Whiteside

Jerry Stockton (jerrystockton8@msn.com)

.ExternalClass .EC_hmmessage P {padding:0px;} .ExternalClass body.EC_hmmessage {font-size:10pt;font-family:Tahoma;} DAVIS 1 and SARAH STOCKTON ----------------------------------------------------------children------------------------------------------------------------- RICHARD 2 SAMUEL 2 THOMAS 2 WILLIAM 2 HANNAH 2 MARTHA ANN 2 ELIZABETH 2 Agnes Prudence Rachel Jane Adam Dr Francis William (Anthony ?) (Torbet ?) Allen (Marshall ?) Goudelock Whelchel Whiteside -------------------------------------------------------grandchildren-------------------------------------------------------- THOMAS Sr DAVIS NEWBERRY MARSHALL DAVIS FRANCIS Jr DAVIS 1st Mary Elizabeth Margaret Mary ? Mildred Judith Elizabeth ____________? Whiteside Lattimore Kindrick ? ?Millie? Davis Johnson 2nd Mary Wilkins Golden ANN JEMIMA ANN DAVIS ROBERT Daniel Capt. John Micajah WILLIAM Nancy Elizabeth JOHN Lattimore Lattimore II Carter Agatha Barnes Coffey Mary ?Polly? Agnes Morton or Devin THOMAS THOMAS Jr WILLIAM Jr Nuckolls WILLIAM JAMES Prudence Frances __________? __________? Sarah Eliz. Rev ROBERT Goudelock ?Fanny? __________? SARAH Davis McLafferty Catherine __________? Thomas Blakey Murry ELIZABETH JOHN JOHN ?The Signer? William 1st Judith TollyDAVID Margaret ANN Ownby 2nd Catherine Margaret __________? William Moore Haden Saffold Jr PATSY DANIEL __________? WILLIAM Jr. RICHARD Jr Catherine HANNAH Collins Mary Elizabeth Ferrell Mr. Booth Copeland Blakey DR JOHN RACHEL Abigail THOMAS S. NANCY Francis PRUDENCE Davis Isabella Eliz. Robert Lattimore Thomas Chitwood hields Stockton HANNAH DAVIS Dennis MARGARETMARGARET Susannah SUSANNAH Barnes William John __________? __________? Monroe Pulliam __________? ANN JESSE __________? SAMUEL SARAH Mary ELIZABETH Ashworth Elizabeth Hugh ? Hayes Mr. Brackett Ross Johnson ADAM W. WINNEFORD 1st _________ ? John 2nd Elizabeth Randalls SpruellMOURNING ANNA Alexander Richard Wilkey Singleton

JEMIMA FRANCIS William Mary Ann Sharp ClarkELIZABETH SARAH Thomas Lewis Lockhart Nolan

DEBORAH ELIZABETH John Davis McMahan Stockton

BIOGRAPHY: *Stockton Surname yDNA Project; "Although no written documented evidence has been found proving a connection between the Robert Stockton of Pennsylvania and Davis Stockton of Virginia families, ... We now know, and have scientifically verified through DNA testing, that these two families are indeed related through an earlier common male ancestor. ... Now researchers can take up the task of determing how they are related and who the common ancestor may be. NOTE; the "earlier" ancestor could be any number a generations back.

  • yDNA testing of descendants shows him to be Haplo

Group I with an exact match to Robert Stockton of PA descendants, but NO matches with the Richard Stocktonof NJ descendant whoare Haplo Group G.

  • Will Book 2, pg. 114, Albemarle Co., VA: Appraisal of

Davis Stockton estate: 8 Jan 1762; 9 hogs, 1 horses, 4 cattle, 1 bed and furiture, 1 chest, 1 riding coat, 1 waistcoat, peuter, 2 iron pots, knives and forks, 2 books, 1 cow, 1 churn, weight of pork, 1 bell, 1 barrel, iron ware, 1 mare and colt; total of 36 pounds, 9 pence. By Wm. Grayson, James Coffey, Chas Lambert. [NOTE; there was no Will, only the investory of his estate.]

  • The Stockton Family of New Jersey and Other

Stocktons, Dr. Thomas Coates Stockton, 1911, Appendix "Other Stockton", pg 234; "said to have come from the north of Ireland and settled first in Lancaster Co., PA, and then in Goochland Co. (later Albemarle) VA. He was given a patent for 400 acres of land there, adjoining the land of his son-in-law, Adam Godylouch, 12 Mar 1739. In a census of Books in the Colony of VA, taken in 1762, he was credited with the possession of two books, valued at 5 shillings."; begins Appendix with, "The record of the PA and VA Stocktons begins with Davis Stockton and Robert Stockton, who were b. about the same time, both settled in Lancaster County, Pa., and among whose descendants a tradition of relationship survives... The VA Magazine of History and Biography states that Davis Stockton came from the north of Ireland; and, from the fact that the family of Robert Stockton were Presbyterians and inter-married with a number of Scotch-Irish families, it SEEMS PROBABLE that he also was Scotch-Irish, and that he and Davis Stockton were brothers." [lists only Richard, Samuel, William, Thomas and Hannah and states that the Appendix is made up of information "that came to hand".]

message 970; Identifies Davis as Lord Davis Stockton, born Dunshauglin Castle, Northern Ireland, 1686; married Sarah Martha Wooten; had 6 children and emigrated to VA where he died 1769. (Inventory 1762 ?) NOTE; He gives no source for this information. A paid professional researcher in Ireland was unable to locate any Stockton records and no "Castle Dunshauglin" can be found, although there is a city by that name in County Meath.

  • The Whiteside's family History states positively that

William Whitesides was born in Ireland; that he married Elizabeth, daughter of Davis and that their three children were born in Ireland. He came to America c1735, about the same time Davis Stockton appears. It would seem Davis and his sons-in-law came together; therefore we are wasting our time looking for earlier records in PA or VA.

  • "Sketches of Virginia", W.H. Foote. 1849; "Michael

Wood, from Ireland came in the year 1734 and settled at Henderson's quarter near Wood's Gap in Albemarle. Three sons and three sons in law came with him and settled near. .." Davis Stockton is said to have been with Michael Wood.

NOTES: Davis probably died in Dec 1761 or early Jan 1762;

  • Will Book 2, pg. 114, Albemarle Co., VA: Appraisal of Davis Stocktonestate: 8

Jan 1762; 9 hogs, 1 horses, 4 cattle, 1 bed and furiture, 1 chest, 1riding coat, 1 waistcoat, peuter, 2 iron pots, knives and forks, 2 books, 1 cow, 1churn, weight of pork, 1 bell, 1 barrel, iron ware, 1 mare and colt; total of 36pounds, 9 pence. By Wm. Grayson, James Coffey, Chas Lambert. [NOTE; there was no Will,only the investory of his estate.]

view all 14

Davis Stockton's Timeline

1685
1685
Ireland
1706
1706
Age 21
Ireland
1708
1708
Age 23
maybe Ireland
1710
1710
Age 25
probably Ireland or England
1712
1712
Age 27
unknown - probably Ireland or England
1712
Age 27
Ireland
1720
1720
Age 35
probably England or Ireland
1722
1722
Age 37
unknown - maybe Ireland or England
1725
1725
Age 40
unknown - maybe Ireland
1730
1730
Age 45
maybe Ireland