Philip Smith (1632 - 1684) MP

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Birthplace: Ipswich, Suffolk, England
Death: Died in Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Cause of death: Said to have been killed by a spell cast by a witch in Salem
Managed by: Thomas Edward Shirley
Last Updated:

About Philip Smith

Reg. v.78 p.439: Philip Smith was born about 1633 d. 10 January 1684/85 was lieut., deacon, deputy, and justice of the County Ct. He married Rebecca Foote, dau. of Nathaniel.

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Lt. Samuel SMITH - b. about 1602, England; d. Dec. 1680, Hadley, MA. Embarked from Ipswich, Suffolk, England on board the 'Elizabeth' in Apr. 1634 at age 32 for Watertown, MA. Arriving with his wife and four children, Mary (6), Philip (2), Samuel (9), & Elizabeth (7), he resided in Watertown a short time, and removed to Wethersfield, CT in 1635.

Philip was one of the first men of his time to be a lieutenant, deacon, and representative in Hadley.

From The Magnalia Christi Americana, by Cotton Mather - 1702.

Mr. Philip Smith, aged about 50 years, a son of eminently virtuous parents, a deacon of a church in Hadley, a member of the General Court, a justice in the County Court, a selectman for the affairs of the town, a Lieutenant of the troop, and which crowns all, a man for devotion, sanctity, gravity, and all that was honest, exceeding exemplary. Such a man was in the winter of the year 1684, murdered with an hideous witchcraft, that filled all those parts of New England, with astonishment. He was, by his office concerned about relieving the indigences of a wretched woman in the town; who being dissatisfied at some of his just cares about her, expressed herself unto him in such a manner, that he declared himself thenceforth apprehensive of receiving mischief at her hands. Early in January, he began to be very valetudinarious. He shewed such weanedness from the weariness of the world, etc.... While he remained yet of a sound mind, he solemnly charged his brother to look well after him. Be sure (said he) to have a care for me.... There shall be a wonder in Hadley.... In his distress he exclaimed much upon the young woman aforesaid, and others, as being seen by him in the room. Some of the young men in the town being out of their wits at the strange calamities thus upon one of their most beloved neighbors, went three or four times to give disturbance unto the woman thus complained of; and all the while they were disturbing her, he was at ease, and slept as a weary man; yea, these were the only times they perceived him to take any sleep in all his illness. Gally pots of medicine provided for the sick man were unaccountably emptied: audible scratchings were made about the bed, when his hands and feet lay wholly still, and were held by others. They beheld fire sometimes on the bed; and when the beholders began to discourse of it, it vanished away. Divers people actually felt something often stir in the bed, at a considerable distance from the man; it seemed as big as a cat, but they could never grasp it. Several trying to lean on the bed's head, tho' the sick man lay wholly still, the bed would shake so as to knock their heads uncomfortably. Mr. Smith dies; the jury that viewed his corpse found a swelling on one breast, his back full of bruises, and several holes that seemed made with awls. After the opinion of all had pronounced him dead, his countenance continued as lively as if he had been alive; his eyes closed as in a slumber, and his nether jaw not falling down. Thus he remained from Saturday morning about sunrise, till Sabbathday in the aftenoon. When those who took him out of the bed, found him still warm, tho' the season was as cold as had almost been known in any age; and a New England winter does not want for cold. But on Monday morning they found the face extremely tumified and discolored. It was black and blue, and fresh blood seemed running down his cheek upon the hairs. Divers noises were also heard in the room where the corpse lay; as the clattering of chairs and stools, whereof no account could be given. This was the end of so good a man.

Mary Webster, the woman who disturbed Philip Smith, was sent to Boston, tried for witchcraft, and acquitted. The young men of Hadley tried an experiment upon her. They dragged her out of the house, hung her up until she was near dead, let her down, rolled her some time in the snow, and at last buried her in it, and there left her. But she survived, and died in 1696. No inhabitant of Hampshire Co. was ever executed for witchcraft.

From Families of Early Hartford, Connecticut, by Lucius Barnes Barbour - 1976.

William Webster s. of John & Agnes died 1688 mar Feb 17, 1670 Mary Reeve who died 1696 dau of Thomas Reeve of Springfield. Hadley; his wife was accused of witchcraft and sent to Boston for trial 1684, but was acquitted and died in peace. s.p.

From Genealogies of Hadley Families, by Lucius M. Boltwood.

William Webster was the son of the Hon. John Webster of Connecticut, a magistrate, Deputy Governor, Governor, and one of the Commissioners of the United Colonies. He was an influential member of the church in Hartford, took a deep interest in the controversy which agitated that and other churches, and was one of the leaders of the Hadley company.

Rebecca FOOTE - b. about 1634; d. Apr. 6, 1701, Hadley, MA. Married second Oct. 2, 1688, Major Aaron COOK (b. about 1601; d. Sep. 5, 1690) of Windsor, CT and Northampton, MA as his fourth wife (no children). Daughter of Nathaniel FOOTE and Elizabeth.

Added by Walter G. Ashworth, Sixth Great Grandson

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Reg. v.78 p.439: Philip Smith was born about 1633 d. 10 January 1684/85 was lieut., deacon, deputy, and justice of the County Ct. He married Rebecca Foote, dau. of Nathaniel.

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Lt. Samuel SMITH - b. about 1602, England; d. Dec. 1680, Hadley, MA. Embarked from Ipswich, Suffolk, England on board the 'Elizabeth' in Apr. 1634 at age 32 for Watertown, MA. Arriving with his wife and four children, Mary (6), Philip (2), Samuel (9), & Elizabeth (7), he resided in Watertown a short time, and removed to Wethersfield, CT in 1635.

Added by Walter G. Ashworth, Sixth Great Grandson

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Philip, first of Wethersfield, removed to Hadley after 1659.

-------------------- He was one of the first men of his time, in the town of his adoption, Hadley, he was a lieutenant, deacon, and representative, and died Jan. 10, 1695, "murdered with an hideious witchcraft," according to Cotton Mather.

-------------------- http://pcs2051.tripod.com/smith.htm

Generation No. 2

2. PHILIP2 SMITH (SAMUEL1) was born 25 Nov 1632 in Suffolk, England, and died 10 Jan 1684/1685 in Hampshire, Massachusetts. He married REBECCA FOOTE Mar 1658 in Hampshire, Massachusetts. She was born 1634 in Hartford, Connecticut, and died 06 Apr 1701 in Hampshire, Massachusetts.

Notes for PHILIP SMITH:

Extract taken from the book entitled "Colonial Families of the United States - The Foote Family" as follows:

"Philip Smith was the son of Samuel Smith, senior, one of the first settlers of Wethersfield, merchant, and after 1659, of Hadley, (Mass.,) where he died about the beginning of the year 1680." At Page 505 of the book, it is stated that Lt. Phillip Smith died on 10 January 1684/1685.

Lieutenant Smith purportedly died from the effects of witchcraft! The following is an extract from the Magnalia Christi Americana by Cotton Mather (first published in 1702):

"Mr. Philip Smith, aged about 50 years, a son of eminently virtuous parents, a deacon of a church in Hadley, a member of the General Court, a justice in the County Court, a selectman for the affairs of the town, a Lieutenant of the troop, and which crowns all, a man for devotion, sanctity, gravity, and all that was honest, exceeding exemplary. Such a man was in the winter of the year 1684, murdered with an hideous witchcraft, that filled all those parts of New England, with astonishment.

"He was, by his office concerned about relieving the indigences of a wretched woman in the town; who being dissatisfied at some of his just cares about her, expressed herself unto him in such a manner, that he declared himself thenceforth apprehensive of receiving mischief at her hands.

"About the Beginning of January he began to be very Valetudinarious, labouring under Pains that seem'd Ischiatick. The Standers by could now see in him one ripening apace for another World, and fill'd with Grace and Joy to an high Degrce. He shew'd such Weanedness from and Weariness of the Worid, that he knew not (he said) whether he might pray for his Continuance here: And such assurance he had of the Divine Love unto him, that in Raptures he would cry out, Lord, stay thy hand; it is enough, it is more than thy frail Servant can bear. But in the midst of these things he still utter'd an hard Suspicion that the ill Woman who had threatened him, had made Impressions with Inchantments upon him.

"While he remain'd yet of a sound Mind, he very sedately, but very solemnly charg'd his Brother, to look well after him. Tho', he said, he now understood himself, yet he knew not how he might be. But be sure, (said he) to have a care of me, for you shall see strange things. There shall be a Wonder in Hadley! I shall not be dead, when tis thought I am! He press'd this Charge over and over; and afterwards became Delirious; upon which he had a Speech incessant and voluable, and (as was judg'd) in various Languages. He cry'd out, not only of Pains, but also of Pins, tormenting him in several parts of his Body; and the Attendants found one of them.

"In his distress he exclaimed much upon the young woman aforesaid, and others, as being seen by him in the room. Some of the young men in the town being out of their wits at the strange calamities thus upon one of their most beloved neighbors, went three or four times to give disturbance unto the woman thus complained of; and all the while they were disturbing her, he was at ease, and slept as a weary man; yea, these were the only times they perceived him to take any sleep in all his illness. Gally pots of medicine provided for the sick man were unaccountably emptied: audible scratchings were made about the bed, when his hands and feet lay wholly still, and were held by others. They beheld fire sometimes on the bed; and when the beholders began to discourse of it, it vanished away. Divers people actually felt something often stir in the bed, at a considerable distance from the man; it seemed as big as a cat, but they could never grasp it. Several trying to lean on the bed's head, tho' the sick man lay wholly still, the bed would shake so as to knock their heads uncomfortably.

"Mr. Smith dies; the jury that viewed his corpse found a swelling on one breast, his back full of bruises, and several holes that seemed made with awls. After the opinion of all had pronounced him dead, his countenance continued as lively as if he had been alive; his eyes closed as in a slumber, and his nether jaw not falling down. Thus he remained from Saturday morning about sunrise, till Sabbathday in the aftenoon. When those who took him out of the bed, found him still warm, tho' the season was as cold as had almost been known in any age; and a New England winter does not want for cold. But on Monday morning they found the face extremely tumified and discolored. It was black and blue, and fresh blood seemed running down his cheek upon the hairs. Divers noises were also heard in the room where the corpse lay; as the clattering of chairs and stools, whereof no account could be given. This was the end of so good a man."

Cover page from a first edition of Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi Americana. It is considered to be his greatest work. The book was published in 1702, when he was 39. It is basically a history of the New England settlements during the 17th century. Despite being Mather's most well-known work, many modern historians consider it to be difficult to read and understand because of its poor organization. Random quotes in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew appear throughout. However, most critics also praise the work, believing it to be one of the best source documents for describing the establishment of the New England colonies and the growth of a uniquely American society.

From the book entitled History of Hadley by Sylvester Judd (1863):.

"Mary Webster, the woman who disturbed Philip Smith, was sent to Boston, tried for witchcraft, and acquitted. The young men of Hadley tried an experiment upon her. They dragged her out of the house, hung her up until she was near dead, let her down, rolled her some time in the snow, and at last buried her in it, and there left her. But she survived, and died in 1696. No inhabitant of Hampshire Co. was ever executed for witchcraft."

From Families of Early Hartford, Connecticut by Lucius Barnes Barbour (1976):

"William Webster s. of John & Agnes died 1688 mar Feb 17, 1670 Mary Reeve who died 1696 dau of Thomas Reeve of Springfield. Hadley; his wife was accused of witchcraft and sent to Boston for trial 1684, but was acquitted and died in peace."

From Genealogies of Hadley Families by Lucius M. Boltwood:

"William Webster was the son of the Hon. John Webster of Connecticut, a magistrate, Deputy Governor, Governor, and one of the Commissioners of the United Colonies. He was an influential member of the church in Hartford, took a deep interest in the controversy which agitated that and other churches, and was one of the leaders of the Hadley company."

Children of PHILIP SMITH and REBECCA FOOTE are:

3. i. SAMUEL3 SMITH, b. Jan 1658/1659, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. 28 Aug 1707, East Hartford, Connecticut.

ii. JOHN SMITH, b. 18 Dec 1661, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. 16 Apr 1727, Hadley, Massachusetts.

iii. JONATHAN SMITH, b. 1663, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. Nov 1737.

iv. PHILIP SMITH, b. 1665, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. 25 Jan 1725, East Hartford, Connecticut.

v. REBECCA SMITH, b. 1668, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. 07 Oct 1750.

vi. NATHANIEL SMITH, b. 02 Jan 1670/1671, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. Abt. 1740, Hatfield, Massachusetts.

vii. JOSEPH SMITH, b. 1674, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. 08 Sep 1736, Upper Middleton, Connecticut.

viii. ICHABOD SMITH, b. 11 Apr 1675, Hadley, Massachusetts; d. 06 Sep 1746, Hadley, Massachusetts.

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Lt. Philip Smith, Deacon of Hadley's Timeline

1632
April 30, 1632
Ipswich, Suffolk, England
November, 1632
Hadleigh, Suffolk, England
November, 1632
Hadleigh, , Suffolk, England
November, 1632
Hadleigh, Suffolk, England
November, 1632
Hadleigh, Suffolk, England
1633
April 30, 1633
Age 1
Hadleigh, Suffolk, England
April 30, 1633
Age 1
Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom
April 30, 1633
Age 1
Hadleigh, Suffolk, England
April 30, 1633
Age 1
Hadleigh, Suffolk, England
April 30, 1633
Age 1
Hadleigh, Suffolk, England