Deacon Samuel Chapin

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Samuel Chapin

Also Known As: "Deacon Samuel Chapin (the puritan)", "Deacon Samuel Chapin"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Paignton, Devon, England, (Present UK)
Death: Died in Springfield, Hampshire County (Present Hampden County), Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
Place of Burial: Chicopee Cemetery, Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Chapin (immigrant) and Phillipa Stone (Easton)
Husband of Cicely Chapin and Cicely Chapin (Penny)
Father of Hannah Hitchcock; Sarah Thomas; David Chapin; Catherine Bliss Gilbert (Chapin); Samuel (twin) Chapin, twin and 6 others
Brother of Jane (Joanne) Narracot; Phillite (Phillipe) Chapin; Thomas Chapin and Margaret Chapin
Half brother of Phineas Chapin

Occupation: Freeman 1641, Founder of Springfield, Massachusetts, Deacon, Magistrate, MA, magistrate, farmer, auditor
Managed by: Lawrence Kay Miller
Last Updated:

About Deacon Samuel Chapin

Served as deacon of the First Congregational Church in Springfield.

From "The Chapin Family History": "In 1877, a bronze statue of 'The Puritan' by the famous sculptor Saint-Gaudens was presented to the city of Springfield and placed beside the public library on State Street. It was presented in memory of Deacon Samuel Chapin, although it is, of course, only an idealized portrait. . . ." -------------------- He was a Freeman in 1641. Moved from France to Roxbury, England in 1638. -------------------- Immigrated to the US in 1638 -------------------- Deacon Samuel Chapin Magistrate; Town Commissioner; Church Deacon

b. 8 Oct 1598 in Paignton, Devonshire, England - d. 11 Nov 1675 in Springfield, MA at age 77 m. Cicely PENNY 9 Feb 1623 in Paignton, Devonshire, England

"The Puritan" - a bronze statue in Merrick Park next to the Public Library in Springfield, Mass. honors one of the town's founders, the Deacon Samuel Chapin. The artist was Augustus St. Gauden and it was commissioned by Chester W. Chapin, Springfield's railroad magnate, in 1885. The statue was originally unveiled on Thanksgiving Day in 1887 in Stearns Square, and remained there for twelve years before being moved to its current location. In moving the statue, the beautiful bronze fountain and pink granite bench that were constructed to compliment the artwork were relocated to other parts of the city. The working model is now owned by the Carnegie Museum of Art.

"The beginning of the Chapin family is altogether creditable. We may well be satisfied that it should start with this genuine old Puritan and what he did, with his fellow pioneers, to open the American Continent and on it found a city and to establish a model Christian Republic. The rolls of heraldry, even if they could show the name linked with royal or princely blood, would add nothing to the true nobility of its origin. It belongs peculiarly to this country, and the sphere of its highest dignity and honor was no doubt ordained to be here. Our chief anxiety should be to maintain and advance its true nobility by lives and deeds worthy of such a father." - Aaron L. Chapin, President of the Chapin Family Association, at the unveiling of the Chapin Statue at Springfield, MA on 24 November 1887. 60

Samuel CHAPIN and his wife, Cicely, came from England with three sons and two daughters in 1635. He most likely came over in the summer, when the passage was the mildest, and probably landed at Boston, which was then, as it is now, the chief port of New England. They probably settled immediately in Roxbury. Roxbury was founded a few years earlier, in 1630, by William Pynchon. It soon became a small village of from two to three score families, most of whom came from Nazing, London, or the west of England. Possibly it was because he had friends among the latter that determined Samuel to settle in Roxbury. Samuel held land as early as 1639, as is shown by the Roxbury land records.

Like most of the early settlers, Samuel Chapin must have been principally a farmer, although undoubtedly he had to turn his hand to many other pursuits as occasion required, which was in fact very often. In 1636 Samuel, then comparatively a young man, was very probably one "of the Roxbury people" who worked on the fortifications at Cornhill in Boston. In the fall of that year the General Court met at Roxbury, thus giving Samuel a chance to see its workings. During his stay in Roxbury the Pequot War took place, which resulted in making it possible to settle with safety in Western New England as at Springfield. The Chapins lived in Roxbury till the close of the year 1642.

In 1636 William Pynchon, then a resident of Roxbury, led a party of about a dozen families to the Connecticut River, where he founded a settlement then called Agawam, but which four years later was renamed Springfield, after his home in England. Most of the settlers took up farming, as there were many fertile meadows along the banks of the Connecticut, while Pynchon for the most part engaged in the fur trade. The settlement grew slowly at first, but by the time the Chapins arrived, it had become a village of respectable size for New England in those days.

As he had in Roxbury, as at Springfield, Samuel was primarily a farmer, but of course here also he had to do all sorts of other things besides. He soon became one of the leading men in the government of the town and held many public offices during his life including Selectman, Auditor and Magistrate and he was Deacon of the church.

Samuel Chapin lived to be an old man and having borne for over twenty years the burdens of government, now in his declining years withdrew from the center of political affairs. He slowly handed over the reins to the younger men in town. Samuel died 11 Nov 1675; according to the diary of his son Japhet, "My father was taken out of this troublesome world the 11th day of November about eleven of the clock, 1675." His widow, Cicely, died 8 Feb 1683.

Samuel had an inventory of his estate performed for his will. The total sum of his goods, not including his land, was over 45 English pounds. His wife's estate was inventoried in 1682 for her will and the goods were then valued at over 100 English pounds.

____________

A chronology of Samuel Chapin's activities:

1638: Samuel Chapin and wife Cicely were recorded at Roxbury. Came to Springfield, MA from Roxbury, MA.

1641, 2 Jun: Samuel Chapin of Springfield, MA, admitted Freeman.

1643: Town officer. He took a prominent part in all the affairs of the town, both religious and civil.

1644: Freeman

1648: A member of the Board of Selectmen on which Benjamin Cooley first served. A member of the first Board of Selectmen and served 9 consecutive years.

1649: Deacon.

1651: Commissioner.

1652: John Pynchon, Elizur Holyoke and Samuel Chapin were appointed Commissioners, or Magistrates, to hear and determine all cases and offenses, both civil and criminal, 'that reach not to life, limbe and banishment.'

1653: The General Court appointed him and John Pynchon to lay out Northampton and its bounds, and they made purchase of the lands from the Indians.

1664: He petitioned the General Court for some land for services done.

1669: The General Court granted him 200 acres as laid out 4 miles from Mendon, bounded as in the platt which is on file, provided it did not exceed 200 acres and that it did not take in any of the meadows now granted to Mendon.

1674, 4 Mar (1st mo.): Samuel Chapin wrote his will. Bequeathed to wife, son Henry, grandson Thomas Gilbert.

1676, 24 Mar: Will probated. Son Japhet Chapin with his wife Abilene deposed. -------------------- SAMUEL2 CHAPIN (JOHN1) was born Abt. 1598 in Roxbury, England, and died November 11, 1675 in Springfield, MA. He married CICELY PENNY February 09, 1622/23 in Paignton, Devon, England, daughter of HENRY PENNY and JANE.

He took the freeman's oath in Boston in 1641 and lived for a time in Dorchester, where he was a deacon of the church. Roxbury, Massachusetts records between 1634 and 1643 show him as an owner of 23 acres of land (N.E.G.& H.R. V2 P53). He was one of the founders of Springfield, Massachusetts, coming there in 1642. He signed a petion against the imposts in Springfield, December 2, 1668 (N.E.G. & H.R. V9 P87). He was appointed magistrate of Springfield in 1652. He was one of the leading members of the Springfield Colony and the St. Gaudens statue of "The Puritan" is supposed to be a likeness of him.

FTW has these notes about Samuel CHAPIN - bap. Oct. 8, 1598, Church of St. John the Baptist, Paignton, Devonshire, England.; d. Nov. 11, 1675, Springfield, MA. Son of John CHAPIN and Pillipe EASTON. Member of Rev. John ELIOT's First Church of Roxbury, MA. Removed to Springfield by 1643, where he was a Deacon, constable, selectman, and commisioner. The statue of The Puritan by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in Springfield memorializes Deacon Samuel Chapin. Married in England on Feb. 9, 1623/4.

DEA. SAMUEL CHAPIN came with his family to reside in Springfield in 1642. It would rather appear that he resided in this country considerable time, perhaps eight or ten years before he came to Springfield, and perhaps the greater part of his children were born in this country, but no record has been found of the birth of but one--the youngest, and we do not find any record of but one of his sons taking the freeman's oath. David, his son, was made a freeman in Springfield, 5th day 2d month, 1649. He is supposed to be the progenitor of all who bear the name in this country, and I have not found one of the name who could trace their lineage to any other source. In 1652, 10th of October, Samuel Chapin was appointed one of the magistrates of Springfield, and in 1654 his commission was extended indefinitely. He was also much employed in other public business--a useful and highly esteemed man. In the records of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay in New England," the name John Chapin is mentioned in connection with the building of a movable fort, March 4, 1633-4, and in July, 1634, mention is made of a meadow a part of which "John Chapin hath mown." That is all the information I have found respecting him. Whether he is a brother of Samuel or not is a matter of mere conjecture. Dea. Samuel Chapin died Nov. 11, 1675, age not known. His wife's name was Cicily Penny. Mrs. Cicily Chapin died Feb. 8, 1683, age not known.

Samuel and Cicely sailed to the New World aboard the "Mary and Joe".

He took the freeman's oath in Boston in 1641 and lived for a time in Dorchester, where he was a deacon of the church. Roxbury, Massachusetts records between 1634 and 1643 show him as an owner of 23 acres of land (N.E.G.& H.R. V2 P53). He was one of the founders of Springfield, Massachusetts, coming there in 1642. He signed a petion against the imposts in Springfield, December 2, 1668 (N.E.G. & H.R. V9 P87). He was appointed magistrate of Springfield in 1652. He was one of the leading members of the Springfield Colony and the St. Gaudens statue of "The Puritan" is supposed to be a likeness of him.

Edward Savages book of early settlers records this about Samuel & Cicely: SAMUEL, Roxbury 1638, brot. from Eng. w. Cicely, call. Sisly on rec. and sev. ch. prob. Henry, Josiah, perhaps David, and two ds. Catharine and Sarah, and at R. had Japhet, b. 15 Oct. 1642; rem. that yr. to Springfield, there had Hannah, 2 Dec. 1611; was freem. 2 June 1641, a propr. of Westfield 1660, a deac. and man of distinct. a. 11 Nov. 1675. His wid. d. 8 Feb. 1683. Catharine m. 20 Nov. 1646, Nathaniel Bliss; next, 3 or 31 July 1655, Thomas Gilbert; and third, 28 Dec. 1664, Samuel Marshfield, and to ea. bore four ch. Sarah m. 14 Apr. 1667, Rowland Thomas, and d. 5 Aug. 1684; and Hannah m. 27 Sept. 1666, John Hitchcock. SAMUEL, Mendon, w. prob. of Josiah, was rep. 1692; but no more is kn. to me.

Cicely PENNY - bap. Feb. 21, 1601/2, Paignton, Devon, England; d. Feb. 8, 1682/3, Springfield, MA. Springfield Records record her place in the Meeting House: "Goodwife Chapin is to sitt in the Seate alonge with Mrs Glover (minister's wife) and Mrs Hollyock." Daughter of Henry PENNY (will dated Apr. 6, 1630; inventory dated May 18, 1630) and Jane. Henry, a baker, was also father of Allen, Katherine, Joane BARTER, Ellinor, Alice, and Susan.

Children of Samuel and Cicely Chapin:

David - b. Jan. 4, 1624/5, Paignton, Devon, England. Mentioned in Grandfather PENNY's will. Married 1654, 6th Mo., 29th Lydia CRUMP of Boston, MA. Children: Lydia; Caleb; and others.

Catharine - bap. 1626, Berry Pomeroy, England. Married Samuel MARSHFIELD.

Sarah - bap. Oct. 1628, Berry Pomeroy, England; d. Aug. 5, 1684. Mentioned in Grandfather PENNY's will. Emigrated to New England. Married Apr. 14, 1647 Rowland THOMAS (b. Eng.; d. Feb. 21, 1698, Springfield, MA). Children: Joseph died in infancy; Samuel died in infancy; Mary died in infancy; Joseph married Mary; Benjamin married Anna BELDING; Josiah died in infancy; Josiah died in infancy; Samuel never married; a child died in infancy; Sarah married James WARRINER, Jr.; Mary died in infancy; and Mercy married Joh BAGG.

Samuel - bap. Jan 1630/1, Berry Pomeroy, England; bur. Jul. 10, 1634, Berry Pomeroy, England.

Henry - bap. Jan. 1630/1, Berry Pomery, England; d. Aug. 15, 1718. Emigrated to New England. Married Dec. 15, 1664 Bethia COOLEY (b. 1644; d. Dec. 9, 1711), daughter of Benjamin. Children: Henry died in infancy; Sarah did not marry; Bethiah; Henry married Mary GARNZEY, and Esther BLISS; and Benjamin married Hannah COLTON, daughter of Isaac.

John - bap. Jan. 16, 1632/3, Totnes, Devon, England. Died young.

Honor - bap. May 8, 1636, Berry Pomeroy, England. Probably died in England. A daughter.

Josiah - bap. Oct. 29, 1637, Berry Pomeroy, England; d. Sep. 10, 1726. Married first on Nov. 30, 1658 Mary KING (b. Jun. 15, 1639, Weymouth, MA; d. May 30, 1676, Braintree, MA), daughter of John. Josiah married second on Sep. 26, 1676 Lydia (BROWN?) PRATT (b. Nov. 1658; d. Oct 18, 1711), widow of Thomas PRATT. He married third Mehitabel METCALF. Josiah had fourteen children born at Braintree, MA; the four youngest from his second marriage. Sons: Samuel born at Weymouth, MA; Seth married second Bethiah THURSTON. Daughter of Josias and Lydia: Lydia married Daniel TAFT as his second wife.


Japhet - bap. Oct. 15, 1642, Roxbury, MA; d. Feb. 20, 1712. Married first Jul. 12, 1664 Abelenah COOLEY (b. 1643; d. Nov. 17, 1710), daughter of Samuel, and he married second May 31, 1711 Dorothy ROOT of Enfield. Children of Japhet and Abelenah: Samuel married Hannah SHELDON; Sarah married Nathanial MUNN; Thomas married Sarah WRIGHT; John married Ruth JANES and/or Sarah BRIDGMAN; Hannah died in infancy; Hannah married John SHELDON; David married Sarah STEBBINS; Jonathan died in infancy; and Jonathan married Elizabeth BURT.

Hannah - b. Dec. 2, 1644, Springfield, MA. Married Sep. 27, 1666, Springfield, MA, John HITCHCOCK, son of Luke HITCHCOCK and Elizabeth GIBBONS. Refer to the HITCHCOCK family for additional data and children.

This text was written in 1902, and as such, represents facts applicable at that time]

    The city of Springfield has six well laid out and improved places for the burial of the dead.  In early history of the town settlers established a burial ground in the rear of the meeting house lot, which was entered by the way of Meeting-house lane, or the thoroughfare which is now called Elm Street.  This was the³ silent city² for its inhabitants of that part of town which bordered the river.  In 1645, according to the town records, William Pynchon and Henry Smith bargained with Francis Ball and Thomas Stebbins for two and one-half acres of land on the river, which previously had been called the³ home lots² of those worthy settlers, but which was secured by the town for a burying ground and  training field. It was maintained as a town cemetery until 1696 and then was conveyed to the trustees of the First parish.  This plot lay on the east bank of the river and extended from Elm street nearly to State street. 
    The second burying ground in this locality comprised half an acre of land bought by the trustees of the parish from Aaron Warriner, the tract having been  a part of that settlers¹ home lot. It was situated north of Elm street, west of the present line of of the old Trask foundry lot of later years.  For more than two centuries these tracts were known as the north and south burying grounds, and throughout that long period of history they were established cemeteries of the town; and so continued until the construction of the railroad necessitated the removal of the resting bones from their quiet resting-place on the bank of the Connecticut to some locality more remote from the busy haunts of man.  This work was done under the direction of Elijah Blake; and by him the honored dust of some of our worthy forefathers was transferred to a specially designated spot in the Pine street portion the new cemetery, there to await the final call. Among the remains thus removed were those of Mari (Mary), wife of Elizur Holyoke; Henry Burt, who died in 1662; Deacon Samuel Chapin, the Puritan, whose statue in bronze adorns the terrace west of the city library building; Capt. Elizur Holyoke, who died in 1675; Major John Pynchon, son of the founder of the colony and town; Japhet Chapin, son of the Deacon; Col. Wm. Pynchon; Col. John Pynchon, Josiah Dwight, Col. John Worthington, and hundreds of others who in some manner during their lives had been identified with the early interesting history of the town. 

Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 4 [p.76] ISSUE

DEACON SAMUEL CHAPIN, of Springfield, was bapt. at Paignton, Devonshire, England, 8th October, 1598; d. Springfield, Massachusetts, 11th November, 1675; m. at Paignton, England, 9th February, 1623-24, Cicely PENNEY, dau. of Henry PENNEY of Paignton; sailed to America in 1635 and settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts, where he became a citizen and landholder between 1636 and 1640; he took the Freeman's oath in 1641 and in the next year moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, where he became a Deacon and sometimes preached; he served on a Town Committee in 1642; became Constable in 1645 and Selectman from 1644 to 1651, and in 1660, 1663 and 1664; he was Commissioner in 1652, 1654, 1662 and 1664, and in 1659 had a commission to administer justice.

The Chapin family in America Samuel and Cicely (Penny) Chapin Samuel CHAPIN - bap. Oct. 8, 1598, Church of St. John the Baptist, Paignton, Devonshire, England.; d. Nov. 11, 1675, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA. Son of John CHAPIN and Pillipa EASTON. Member of Rev. John ELIOT's First Church of Roxbury, Suffolk Co., MA. Removed to Springfield, where he was admitted freeman on Jun. 2, 1641 and was a Deacon, constable, selectman, and commissioner. The statue of The Puritan by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in Springfield memorializes Deacon Samuel Chapin. His will was dated Mar. 4, 1674 and proved Mar. 24, 1676, naming wife, son Henry and grandson Thomas GILBERT. Married in England on Feb. 9, 1623/4.

Cicely PENNY - bap. Feb. 21, 1601/2, Paignton, Devon, England; d. Feb. 8, 1682/3, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA. Springfield Records record her place in the Meeting House: "Goodwife Chapin is to sitt in the Seate alonge with Mrs Glover [minister's wife] and Mrs Hollyock." Daughter of Henry PENNY (will dated Apr. 6, 1630; inventory dated May 18, 1630) and Jane. Henry, a baker, was also father of Allen, Katherine, Joane BARTER, Ellinor, Alice, and Susan.

Children of Samuel and Cicely Chapin

David - b. Jan. 4, 1624/5, Paignton, Devon, England; d. Aug. 16, 1672, Boston, Suffolk Co., MA. Mentioned in Grandfather PENNY's will. Married 1654, 6th Mo., 29th Lydia CRUMP of Boston, Suffolk Co., MA. Children of David and Lydia CHAPIN: Children of David and Lydia CHAPIN: Lydia; Caleb married Sarah; Sarah; Hannah; Ebenezer married first Elizabeth ADAMS, and second his first cousin Sarah GILBERT; Johnathan married Elizabeth BURT; Union; and Ruth.

Catharine - bap. 1626, Berry Pomeroy, England. Catharine was first married on Nov. 20, 1646 to Nathaniel BLISS (bur. Nov. 11, 1654, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA), son of Thomas BLISS and Margaret LAWRENCE. The sister (or half-sister) of Nathaniel BLISS was Mary (BLISS) PARSONS, who was tried and acquitted for witchcraft in Springfield in 1651. Catharine was married second on Jun. 30 or Jul. 1, 1655 at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT to Thomas GILBERT (bap. Feb. 16, 1611/2, Yardley, Worcester, England; d. Jun. 5, 1662, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA), son of Thomas GILBERT and Elizabeth BENNETT. Catherine was the third wife of Thomas GILBERT, who was first married Sep. 17, 1639 in All Saints, Bromwich, Staffordshire, England to Mary JAMES (bap. Dec. 12, 1641, Yardley, Worcester, England), and second married Lydia. Lydia GILBERT was executed for witchcraft at Springfield, MA shortly after Nov. 28, 1654. Catherine married third Samuel MARSHFIELD. Children of Catherine and Nathaniel BLISS: Samuel married Sarah STEBBINS; Margaret married Nathaniel FOOTE (son of Nathaniel FOOTE and Elizabeth SMITH); Mary married Nathaniel HOLCOMB (son of Thomas HOLCOMB and Elizabeth); and Nathaniel married Deborah COLTON (daughter of George COLTON and Deborah GARDNER). Children of Catherine and Thomas GILBERT: Sarah married first Samuel FIELD, and second her first cousin Ebenezer CHAPIN; John married first Hannah BLAKEMAN, and second Hannah CANFIELD; Thomas married first Anna BANCROFT, and second Abilene MARSHFIELD (daughter of Samuel MARSHFIELD and Hester WRIGHT); and Henry married Elizabeth BELDING. Refer to the MARSHFIELD family for Catherine's children by her third marriage. Sarah - bap. Oct. 1628, Berry Pomeroy, England; d. Aug. 5, 1684. Mentioned in Grandfather PENNY's will. Emigrated to New England. Married Apr. 14, 1647 Rowland THOMAS (b. Eng.; d. Feb. 21, 1698, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA). Children of Sarah and Rowland THOMAS: Joseph died in infancy; Samuel died in infancy; Mary died in infancy; Joseph married Mary; Benjamin married Anna BELDING; Josiah died in infancy; Josiah died in infancy; Samuel never married; a child died in infancy; Sarah married James WARRINER, Jr.; Mary died in infancy; and Mercy married Joh BAGG.

Samuel - bap. Jan 1630/1, Berry Pomeroy, England; bur. Jul. 10, 1634, Berry Pomeroy, England.

Henry - bap. Jan. 25, 1630/1, Berry Pomery, England; d. Aug. 15, 1718. Emigrated to New England and settled in Chicopee Parish, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA. Married on Dec. 15, 1664 in Springfield, Hampden Co., MA to Bethia COOLEY (b. 1644; d. Dec. 9, 1711), daughter of Benjamin COOLEY and Sarah. Children of Henry and Bethia CHAPIN: Henry died in infancy; Mary married Benjamin WRIGHT; Sarah did not marry; Bethiah; Henry married Mary GARNZEY, and Esther BLISS; and Benjamin married Hannah COLTON (daughter of Isaac COLTON and Mary COOPER).

John - bap. Jan. 16, 1632/3, Totnes, Devon, England. Died young.

Honor - bap. May 8, 1636, Berry Pomeroy, England. Probably died in England. A daughter.

Josiah - bap. Oct. 29, 1637, Berry Pomeroy, England; d. Sep. 10, 1726. Married first on Nov. 30, 1658 Mary KING (b. Jun. 15, 1639, Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA; d. May 30, 1676, Braintree, Norfolk Co., MA), daughter of John. Josiah married second on Sep. 26, 1676 Lydia (BROWN?) PRATT (b. Nov. 1658; d. Oct 18, 1711), widow of Thomas PRATT. He married third Mehitabel METCALF. Children of Josiah and Mary CHAPIN: Samuel married Mary HOBART; John; Mary married Joseph ADAMS, Jr.; Deborah died young; Joseph; Shem died as infant; Seth married second Bethiah THURSTON; Joseph; Henry died as infant; Ephraim married Margaret TORREY; and Deborah married Samuel READ. Children of Josiah and Lydia CHAPIN: Lydia married Daniel TAFT as his second wife; Sarah married Ebenezer READ; David; and Hannah married John HOLBROOK.

Japhet - bap. Oct. 15, 1642, Roxbury, Suffolk Co., MA; d. Feb. 20, 1711/2. He was selectman for Springfield eight times, and was in the 1676 Turner Falls battle in King Philip's War. Married first on Jul. 22, 1664 in Milford, New Haven Co., CT to Abelenah COOLEY (b. 1643; d. Nov. 17, 1710), daughter of Samuel, and he was married second on May 31, 1711 to Dorothy ROOT of Enfield. Children of Japhet and Abelenah CHAPIN: Samuel married Hannah SHELDON; Sarah married Nathanial MUNN; Thomas married Sarah WRIGHT; John married Sarah BRIDGMAN; Ebenezer married Ruth JANES; Hannah died in infancy; Hannah married John SHELDON; David married first Sarah STEBBINS, and second Mindwell ALLEN; Jonathan died in infancy; Jonathan married Elizabeth BURT; and possibly Daniel.

Hannah - b. Dec. 2, 1644, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA. Married Sep. 27, 1666, Springfield, Hampden Co., MA, John HITCHCOCK, son of Luke HITCHCOCK and Elizabeth GIBBONS. Refer to the HITCHCOCK family for additional data and children.

-------------------- Samuel Chapin (October 8, 1598 – November 1, 1675) was one of the founders of Springfield, Massachusetts.

He was born in Paignton (now part of Torquay), Devonshire, England, to John Chapin and Phillippe Easton on October 8, 1598.

On February 9, 1623, Samuel married Cicily Penny. They had seven children: Sarah, Henry, Hannah, David, Catherine, Josiah, and Japhet. Through them, they had many famous desc ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Deacon Samuel CHAPIN7,97,2024,2027,2028 was born on 8 Oct 1598 in Paignton, Devonshire, England.2029,2030 He was christened on 8 Oct 1598 in Paignton, Devonshire, England. He died on 11 Nov 1675 in Springfield, Hampden Co., Massachusetts.2028,2031 He was buried on 15 Nov 1675 in Springfield, Hampden Co., Massachusetts. Name Suffix:<NSFX> Deacon Deacon Samuel Chapin was a forceful and dynamic man. A man with Puritan faith, he brought his family to New England about 1638. L iving first in Roxbury, Mass. then moving to Springfield in 1642 as one of the founders of that city then called Agawam. He served his town in many capaciti es including Selectman, Auditor and Magistrate and he was Deacon of the church for some 25 years.

Next to the Public Library in Springfield there is a br onze statue, 'The Puritan', placed there 24 Nov 1887 which honors him. It is the sculptor's idea of how such a man as Deacon Chapin, a man of his moral sta nding and spiritual qualities ought to have looked. A chronology of Samuel Cha pin's activities:

1638: Samuel Chapin and wife Cicely were at Roxbury. Came to Springfield, MA from Roxbury, MA. 1641, 2 Jun: Samuel Chapin of Springfie ld, MA, admitted Freeman.

1643: Town officer. He took a prominent part in al l the affairs of the town, both religious and civil. 1644: Freeman

1648: A member of the Board of Selectmen on which Benjamin Cooley first served. A memb er of the first Board of Selectmen and served 9 consecutive years.

1649: De acon.

1651: Commissioner.

1652: John Pynchon, Elizur Holyoke and Samuel C hapin were appointed Commissioners, or Magistrates, to hear and determine all cases and offences, both civil and criminal, 'that reach not to life, limbe a nd banishment.'

1653: The General Court appointed him and John Pynchon to la y out Northampton and its bounds, and they made purchase of the lands from th e Indians.

1664: He petitioned the General Court for some land for services done.

1669: The General Court granted him 200 acres as laid out 4 miles fr om Mendon, bounded as in the platt which is on file, provided it did not excee d 200 acres and that it did not take in any of the meadows now granted to Mend on.

1674, 4 Mar (1st mo.): Samuel Chapin wrote his will. Bequeathed to wife , son Henry, grandson Thomas Gilbert.

1676, 24 Mar: Will probated. Son Japhe t Chapin with his wife Abilene deposed. Parents: John CHAPIN and Phillipe EASTON. Spouse: Cicely PENNY. Deacon Samuel CHAPIN and Cicely PENNY were married on 9 Feb 1624 in Paignton, Devonshire, England.2029,2030 Children were: David CHAPIN, Catherine CHAPIN, Sarah CHAPIN, Henry CHAPIN, Samuel CHAPIN, John CHAPIN, Honor CHAPIN, Josiah CHAPIN, Japhet CHAPIN, Hannah CHAPIN.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~lzrslong/b957.htm -------------------- There is a statue of Deacon Samuel Chapin in the city park in Springfield -------------------- In 1635 we find Samuel with his wife and four children located in Roxbury, Mass., and records show that his father John accompanied them to New England. He was now 37 years of age, a man much esteemed and often employed in public business. It is with Springfield, Mass., however, that the name of this American progenitor is most intimately associated.

He was evidently an acquaintance of William Pynchon in England and a neighbor for a short time in Roxbury, and Pynchon having founded the town of Agawam (later called Springfield) in 1636, the Chapins immigrated thither in 1642.

When Pynchon appointed a committee of five men of standing, called selectmen, to watch over the morals, health and public welfare of the community, Deacon Chapin was named as a member. He was constantly engaged in the business of the town.

In 1651 Mr. Pynchon was convicted of heresy and returned to England, and his son-in-law, Henry Smith, became chief magistrate. In 1652, however, he resigned and followed his chief to England - whereupon, the General Court commissioned Pynchon's son, Capt. John, his son-in-law, Lieut. Elizur Holyoke, and Samuel Chapin, "Magistrates for the administration of Justice, allowing them the power of a County Court."

Deacon Chapin conscientiously discharged important trusts for the maintenance of religion and good order, and left an abiding impress of his life and character on the city. "To judge from the private and official acts of the man, and from the firm hand he wrote, he was a man of some education, strong will, inflexible integrity and real piety."

His holdings in Springfield and vicinity were large, but he gave all to his sons in his life time, reserving a life interest for himself and wife - his will disposing of only his personal estate. In 1674 he was living with his son Japhet at Chicopee, adjoining Springfield. In October 1675, Springfield was attacked and burned by the Indians, and although he was then 77 years of age, Deacon Chapin was a participant in repelling the attack from fortified houses. He did not live to see it rebuilt, however, for in about a month his son Japhet wrote: "My father was taken out of this troublesome world the 11th day of November, about eleven o'clock in the eve, 1675." Cicely Chapin, the wife, died 8 Feb. 1682/3, at Springfield.

In 1887 a monument was erected to his memory in the Library Square in Springfield. Executed by St. Gaudens and called "The Puritan", it was intended as an ideal of Deacon Chapin, of whose face and figure there is no oral or written record in existence. A striking physiognomy, typifying as it does that grand race who "feared God and kept their powder dry".

In 1923 the city adopted a municipal flag, upon which is reproduced that statute ~ "a noteworthy tribute to the character and influence of Deacon Samuel Chapin, that he has thus been chosen to symbolize the spirit of this historic city, whose early development was so largely under his direction."

The above record has been adapted principally from the Chapin Book, published in 1924 by Gilbert Warren Chapin at Hartford.

Deacon Samuel and Cicely Chapin had seven children. (NEB Genealogy) -------------------- Baptized Oct. 8, 1598 at Church of St. John the Baptist, Paignton, Devonshire, England: Die d Nov 11, 1675, Springfield, Ma. Member of Rev. John Eliot's First Church of Roxbury, MA. R emoved to Springfield by 1643, where he was a Deacon, constable, Selectman, and commisioner . The statue of The Puritian by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in Springfield memorializes Deacon Sa muel Chapin. Additional information found in The Book Springfield Families by Thomas B. Warr en, Conn State Library, page 686. LDS PAF. Book: The Chapin Family in England. Springfield Library. Decon Samuel Chapin and Ciseley brought with them Sarah, Henry b. 1630 m Bethiah Cooley, Josi ah lived in Braintree,David m. Linda Crump and lived in Boston. Catherine m. Nathaniel Bliss , Thomas Guilbert and Samuel Marshfield. Sarah Married Roland Thomas and Japhet was baptize d at Roxbury, 15 Oct 1742. He married Abelenah Cooley and Dorothy Root.The children born a t Springfield: Hannah born 1644 and married John Hitchcock. This family sailed to America i n 1635 and settled in Roxbury, Mass before moving to Springfield in 1642. They had seven chi ldren Book: Springfield Families by Thomas B. Warren Conn. State Library, page 686 Book: The Chapin Family in England Springfield, Mass Library One major book is: "The Chapin book of Genealogical Data with Brief Biographical sketches o f the Decendants of Deacon Samuel Chapin" compiled by Gilbert Warren Chapin Published: Hartf ord, Conn: The Chapin Family Association. Includes first to twelth generations. (Over 2000 p ages) Available at FHL on microfilm. Volume 1: 907412, Volume 2: 907413. The FHL di d another filming in 1980 and it contained Volume 1-2. The number is: FHL US/CAN Film 10335 17.. Memorial to Samuel Chapin by Longfellow: Lives of great men, all remind us, We can make our lives sublime, And departing leave behin d us, Foot prints on the sands of time.

Deacon Samuel Chapin was a forceful and dynamic man. A man with Puritan faith, he brought hi s family to New England about 1638. Living first in Roxbury, Mass. then moving to Springfiel d in 1642 as one of the founders of that city then called Agawam. He served his town in man y capacities including Selectman, Auditor and Magistrate and he was Deacon of the church fo r some 25 years. Next to the Public Library in Springfield there is a bronze statue, "The Pur itan", placed there 24 Nov 1887 which honors him. It is the sculptor's idea of how such a ma n as Deacon Chapin, a man of his moral standing and spiritual qualities ought to have looked.

A chronology of Samuel Chapin's activities:

1638: Samuel Chapin and wife Cicely were at Roxbury. Came to Springfield, MA from Roxbury, MA . 1641, 2 Jun: Samuel Chapin of Springfield, MA, admitted Freeman. 1643: Town officer. He took a prominent part in all the affairs of the town, both religious a nd civil. 1644: Freeman 1648: A member of the Board of Selectmen on which Benjamin Cooley first served. A member of t he first Board of Selectmen and served 9 consecutive years. 1649: Deacon. 1651: Commissioner. 1652: John Pynchon, Elizur Holyoke and Samuel Chapin were appointed Commissioners, or Magistr ates, to hear and determine all cases and offences, both civil and criminal, "that reach no t to life, limbe and banishment." 1653: The General Court appointed him and John Pynchon to lay out Northampton and its bounds , and they made purchase of the lands from the Indians. 1664: He petitioned the General Court for some land for services done. 1669: The General Court granted him 200 acres as laid out 4 miles from Mendon, bounded as i n the platt which is on file, provided it did not exceed 200 acres and that it did not take i n any of the meadows now granted to Mendon. 1674, 4 Mar (1st mo.): Samuel Chapin wrote his will. Bequeathed to wife, son Henry, grandso n Thomas Gilbert. 1676, 24 Mar: Will probated. Son Japhet Chapin with his wife Abilene deposed.

Notes for Cicely Penny: In her will, Cecily CHAPIN bequeathed to sons Henry CHAPIN of Springfield, MA and Josia h CHA PIN of Braintree, MA; to Sarah THOMAS and Hannah HITCHCOCK; to Henry GILBERT, apprentice to J ohn HITCHCOCK. Named son Japhet executor.

Page X11 of Chapin Book: Deacon Samuel Chapin's Place in the Community: Samuel Chapin came to New Englan probably with his father and family in 1635 or earlier. A r ecord at Roxbury, of early but unknown dates shows that he possessed 24 acres of land there , and had eight persons in his family, himself, wife, father, and five children. (The presen ce of his father John Chapin, at this time is in conformity with records already quoted). I n 1641 he bought a house and lot of James Howe and became a Freeman, which implied he was a c hurch member and gave him the right to vote and hold office under the Colonial Government. He was evidently an acquaintance of William Pynchon in England and a neighbor, for a short ti me, in Roxbury. Pynchon, in 1636, led about a dozen families westward to the Connecticut Riv er, where he founded the settlement first known as Agawam, later named Springfield. The Chap ins apparently migrated to the new settlement during the winter of 1642-3. This change was d oubtless largely due to Pynchon's influence. William Pynchon apponted five men of standing in Springfield, called Selectman, to warch ove r morals, health, and public measures. Deacon Samuel was one of these. One of their most de licate duties was that of assigning the seats in the meeting house. The place of Mrs. Cissil y C. is there recorded: "Goodwife Chapin is to sitt in the Seate alonge with Mrs. Glover an d Mrs. Hollyock." Mrs. Grover was the minister's wife and was therefore the leading lady, an d Mrs. Hollyock was the daughter of William Pynchon. Samuel was engaged in town business and held continuously office of selectman 1644 to 1652 an d again in 1661 and 1664, and later as auditor. He was first called deacon in the records o n Feb. 21 1650. Besides the regular duties assigned to this office, he conducted the Sabbat h service, including preaching, for several years when the church lacked a pastor. In 1651, William Pynchon was convicted of heresy, by the General Court, and returned to Engla nd. His son-in-law, Henry Smith then became chief magistrate. The next year he too returne d to England and Capt. John Pynchon, Lieut. Elizer Holyoke and Samuel Chapin were by the Gene ral Court commissioned magistrates for the administration of justice, "allowing them the powe r of a County Court." He held the office until 1664, and in addition performed important dut ies, laying out land grants and the plantations that became Northampton and Hadley. His first home lot was at the corner of the present Main and Pynchon Streets, but by 1664 h e appears to have been living in Chicopee, with his son Japhet. His holding in Springfield w ere large, but he gave all to his sons in his life time, reserving a life interest for himsel f and his wife, his will disposing of personal estate only. In October, 1675, Springfield was attacked by Indians and burned. Deacon Chapin did not se e the town rebuilt, for in about a month, as he wrote his son Japhet, "My father was taken ou t of this troublesome world the 11 day of November about eleven of the clock in the eve, 1675 ." Deacon Samuel Chapin "conscientiously and wisely discharged important trusts for the maintena nce of religion and good order and left an abiding impress of his character and life on the c ity." To judge from the private acts of the amn, and from the firm hand he wrote, he was a m an of some education, strong will, inflexible integrity, abundant charity and real piety. See: LIFE OF DEACON SAMUEL CHAPIN OF SPRINGFIELD by Howard Millar Chapin, Providence, R I 19 08, the fullist account, based upon original documents and records. -------------------- 1638: Samuel Chapin and wife Cicely were recorded at Roxbury. Came to Springfield, MA from Roxbury, MA.

1641, 2 Jun: Samuel Chapin of Springfield, MA, admitted Freeman.

1643: Town officer. He took a prominent part in all the affairs of the town, both religious and civil.

1644: Freeman

1648: A member of the Board of Selectmen on which Benjamin Cooley first served. A member of the first Board of Selectmen and served 9 consecutive years.

1649: Deacon.

1651: Commissioner.

1652: John Pynchon, Elizur Holyoke and Samuel Chapin were appointed Commissioners, or Magistrates, to hear and determine all cases and offenses, both civil and criminal, 'that reach not to life, limbe and banishment.'

1653: The General Court appointed him and John Pynchon to lay out Northampton and its bounds, and they made purchase of the lands from the Indians.

1664: He petitioned the General Court for some land for services done.

1669: The General Court granted him 200 acres as laid out 4 miles from Mendon, bounded as in the platt which is on file, provided it did not exceed 200 acres and that it did not take in any of the meadows now granted to Mendon.

1674, 4 Mar (1st mo.): Samuel Chapin wrote his will. Bequeathed to wife, son Henry, grandson Thomas Gilbert.

1676, 24 Mar: Will probated. Son Japhet Chapin with his wife Abilene deposed. -------------------- (Deacon Samuel Thomas Chapin) -------------------- He was a Deacon.


-------------------- See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deacon_Samuel_Chapin

-------------------- Note: Of Springfield, MA "THE PURITAN", sailed about 1635, freeman 3 June 1641 1

Note: The famous statue, "The Puritan" by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in Springfield is of Samuel Chapin.

Christened October 8, 1590, Church of St. John the Baptist, Paignton, Devonshire, England. Samuel Chapin came to America in 1635. He is on the records of Roxbury, MA by 1639.

He had moved to Springfield, MA by 1643. Soon after his arrival, he began to hold public office. On September 26, 1644, he was chosen as one of 5 for the first Board of Selectmen in Springfield. They were elected by a vote of all the freemen of the town and had a general supervision of the affairs of the town including settling disputes, regulating highways, bridges, finances, etc. He served in that capacity for 8 years. On May 1, 1645 he is on record as a constable. It is not certain how long he served.

Excerpts from The Life of Deacon Samuel Chapin by Howard Millar Chapin: 1647 was a hard year. There were floods in the spring, caterpillars in the summer and sickness in the fall. Wolves were a nuisance so a bounty of 10s was offered for every dead one. Swine also caused a great deal of trouble and damage by running loose through the village.

In 1648, a still more troublesome disturbance broke out. Hugh Parsons and his wife were accused of witchcraft. The excitement was intense and they were brought to trial. They were tried in Boston where they were finally convicted in 1650. Mary died in prison and Hugh escaped and left the country. But before this trouble was settled, a worse one began. William Pynchon, the mainstay of Springfield, was convicted of heresy by the General Court. He was immediately deprived of his office and in 1652, with his son-in-law Henry Smith, and the minister Mr. Moxon, returned to England...thus leaving the magistracy vacant. Three men came to the front and took control of the affairs of the town, governing it until their deaths. Two of these men were closely related to William Pynchon - his son John and his son-in-law Holyoke-the third was the Deacon, Samuel Chapin.

On October 19, 1652 [they] were appointed Commissioners... That is they had full power and authority to govern the inhabitants of Springfield. The new commissioners soon established a strong government in Springfield. A vigorous enforcement of the law and the prompt prosecution of criminals showed that firm and earnest men were directing the affairs of state.

Samuel Chapin was actively interested in the church and appears to have been a deacon as early as 1650. [During 1656, the town was without a minister for a long time and church services were conducted by the deacons, including Samuel Chapin.]

He served in the government more than 20 years.

For forty years, the inhabitants of Springfield had lived side by side with in Indians in Perfect peace and tranquility. Therefore on the outbreak of King Phillip's War, Springfield was not in the least alarmed. As the conflict spread westward, Springfield still felt confident that the Indians who surrounded it would not join Phillip in the war. On October 5th, 1675 [the Indians attacked.] Mrs. Matthews was captured and killed, and the greater part of the town was set on fire. About 30 houses were burnt, which was almost half the town. The inhabitants set to work to rebuild the town. Samuel Chapin, however, did not live to see the town rebuilt for according to the diary of his son, Japhet, "My father was taken out of this troublesome world the 22nd day November about eleven of the clock, 1675."

COLONIAL JUSTICE IN WESTERN MA (J H Smith, 1961) p 62-65 m in Eng Feb 1624; b POigntonprobably to New England in 1635 with his father and family. At Roxbury 1641.At Springfield 1642. Farmer, also served a magistrate 1652-1664. Apparently educated, possibly as a lawyer.

THE CHAPIN BOOK (C G Chapin, 1924) same basic info. "The CHAPIN statue at Springfield" b 'PAignton' see also LIFE OF DEACON SAMUEL CHAPIN of SPRINGFIELD (H M Chapin, 190

 [not located as of 4/97]

A GEN OF HENRY JUDSON CHAPIN (G E Engel, 1970) same basic in for Samual; refs to English recognition John ? as son of Roger.Family claims the "Pilgrim" statue at St Gaudins, Springfield MA is of Samuel. ▼References

   ↑ Chapin, Howard Millar. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register: The English Ancestry of Dea. Samuel Chapin of Springfield, Mass., Volume: vol. 83. (New England Historic Genealogical Society, July, 1929), page 354.
     Samuel Chapin, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
       the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia 
   Deacon Samuel Chapin (October 8, 1598 – November 1, 1675) was one of the founders of Springfield, Massachusetts.
   He was born in Paignton, (near Torquay) Devon, England, to John Chapin and Phillippe Easton on October 8, 1598.
   On February 9, 1623, Samuel married Cicily Penny. They had seven children: Sarah, Henry, Hannah, David, Catherine, Josiah, and Japhet. After Cicily died he was remarried on the 29th of August 1654 to Lydia Crump.
   He had many famous direct descendants, including Presidents John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Grover Cleveland and William Taft, actor Spencer Tracy, abolitionist John Brown, financier J.P. Morgan, and singers Harry Chapin and Jen Chapin.
   He immigrated to America with William Pynchon in 1630, became a full member of John Eliot's congregation at Roxbury, and was later established as deacon in Springfield.
   In 1881, Chester W. Chapin, a railroad tycoon, congressman and Chapin descendant, commissioned master sculptor Augustus St. Gaudens to produce a work memorializing his ancestor. The sculpture, most commonly known as The Puritan, is currently sited in Springfield's Merrick Park. Created to emphasize the piety, and perhaps moral rigidity, of the country's religious founders—evident in the sculpted Chapin's proud pose, certain stride, flowing cape and hefty Bible, as well as his assertive use of a walking cane. Smaller variants of the same work can be found in several museums.
   ↑ 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Chapin Family History.
     "In 1877, a bronze statue of 'The Puritan' by the famous sculptor Saint-Gaudens was presented to the city of Springfield and placed beside the public library on State Street. It was presented in memory of Deacon Samuel Chapin, although it is, of course, only an idealized portrait. . . ."

-------------------- Samuel Chapin and Cicely Penny.

.
           Sources: New England Historical and Genealogical Reg­ister, Vol. 83, pp. 352‑355; First Century of Springfield, by Henry Burt, Vol. 2, pp. 543, 544; Chapin Genealogy, by Orange Chapin, pp. 2, 238, 239; Randall and Allied Fami­lies, by F. A. Randall, pp. 337, 338..
.
           Samuel Chapin was born in 1598 in the village of Paignton on Tor Bay, about seven miles north from Dartmouth, in Devonshire, England. He was raised there, and in 1624 knelt with his chosen bride, Cicely Penny, for the ceremony of marriage at the Paignton church. To them were born eight children in England..
           With six or seven of these children (one or two of them having died) Samuel and Cicely sailed for New England, probably in the year 1638. Samuel was recorded in Roxbury, Massachusetts, in 1639, but in a few years (in 1642 or 1643) moved again to the new settlement of Springfield. Two more children were born in America..
           He took a prominent part in all the affairs of the town, both re­ligious and civil. He was a member of the first Board of Selectmen and served nine consecutive years. In 1652 he was appointed one of the magistrates of Springfield, and in 1654 his com­mis­sion was extended indefinitely, Ato hear and determine all cases and offences, both civ­il and criminal that reach not to life, limbe and banishment.@ He was also much employed in other public businessCa useful and highly es­teemed man. He was appointed a Deacon of the church in 1650, and at various times, in the absence of a minister, conducted religious ser­vices, alternating with others..
           He served on important committees, and the General Court in 1653 appointed him and John Pynchon to lay out Northampton and its bounds. These two also made the purchase of the lands from the Indians. In 1659 they were appointed to lay out Had­ley on both sides of the Connecticut Riv­er, that on the west side subsequently becom­ing the town of Hatfield..
           Specimans of his handwriting indicate an education in penmanship superior to the majority of the early settlers. It is clear that he had been trained to a certain extent in legal matters before coming to New England, and had been employed where his live­li­hood came from the use of the pen. That Samuel Chapin could draw in accurate lan­guage a legal document is evidence that he had received instruction in England under those who were skilled in the law..
           Deacon Chapin=s accounts at Pynchon=s store well illustrate the general habit of the settlers and the articles used by them. These ex­tracts are taken from the accounts of 1652 and a year or more later. He was charged with 14s for half a pound of powder, 2s 6d for 3 pounds of sugar, 8d for 500 pins, ,4 7s 6d for 10 yds. of Ker­sey, 5s 3d for smithery work, 5s 2d for 2 yds. Scots cloth, 4s 10d for 32 pounds of soap, ,12 for a parcel of wampum sent to Henry Chapin, 2s 11d for 2 yd. of Green Say, 2s 6d for 1 pair of stockings, 1s 3d for 2 yd. of flannel, 17s 6d for 7 yds of linen cloth, 6s 6d for one Bible, 6s for one pint bottle, 1s 10d for a quart and 3 of  brandy, 2s for one pound of pepper, and 42d for 1 pint of vinegar..
           In payment of his accounts he was credited with 8s for 4 days work of David, 9s for David=s work at the mill, 4s 6d for work of oxen, 2s 6d for 3 lbs. of candles, ,3 4s for 192 lbs. of beef, ,11 1s for 60 bushels of wheat, 7s for a skin of Beaver, 16s for wheat delivered by Thomas Stebbins, 17s 6d from Katherine Bliss, ,15 18s for 87 bushels of wheat at ye mill in June >55, 2s 6d for a qu. of veal, ,1 4s 4d for string­ing 194 fathoms of wampum..
           The settlers of Springfield lived on terms of the utmost cordial­ity and friend­ship with the surrounding Indian tribes. All the lands that came into their possession were purchased fairly and honorably, and to the entire satisfaction of the natives, who harbored no feelings of hostility to the English. The settlers came among them on terms of equality, to teach them habits of industry, to traffic with them, and do them good..
           Thus the white man and the red man lived as neighbors and friends for forty years. In 1675 the whole scene was changed; the hour had arrived in which the momen­tous question was to be settled, whether the whites were to be extirpated from the land of their adoption, or the red men subdued and scattered and driven from the place of their fath­ers= sepulchers..
           By the agency of Philip of Pokanoket, the youngest son of Massa­soit, a union was formed for a Ageneral rising of the natives to sweep the hated intruders from the ancient hunting grounds of the Indian race.@.
           Among others, the colony at Springfield was marked for the slaugh­ter, and so artfully was the treacherous plot laid that destruction must have been the result, but for a timely warning from their friends at Windsor. Aroused by the alarm of impending danger, they fled in great haste to the forts, and were saved with the exception of two men and one woman. The savages pillaged the town, and committed twenty-­nine houses and nearly as many barns to the flames, and destroyed all the mills. It was in the month of October; crops had been gathered in, and the winter stores of the colo­nists were swept away as in a moment..
           Thus amid the ashes of their dwellings, and the destruction of their gathered harvests, the colonists looked with fearful apprehension upon the approaching winter. But a merciful God so ordered that the winter was uncommonly mild, and the stores that escaped the flames sup­plied the needs of the colonists..
           In the midst of these dark and tragic scenes was the family of Deacon Samuel Chapin, who died November 11, 1675, a single month af­ter the burning of Spring­field. His death may have been connected with the burning or just incidental to it. He had large holdings in Springfield, but gave them all to his children in his life­time, his will disposing of personal estate only. His wife lived as a widow until her decease in 1683. He was seventy‑seven at death, and she was eighty‑one..
.
                                                             * * * * * * *.
.
           Samuel Chapin was conspicuous in all the affairs that concerned the moral, religious, and secular interests of the town. The de­cisions rendered by him indicate that he was a man of strong will, in­flexible integrity, pious and charitable. St. Gau­den=s statue of AThe Puritan,@ unveiled at Springfield in 1887, with a replica in Cen­tral Park, New York City, is intended as an ideal of Deacon Samuel Chapin, though Athere is of his face or features no oral or written record.@ It is a remarkable work of art, embodying the aggressive force of the people who settled New England, and some of the characteristics of those days, and incidents in the history of Deacon Chapin. With the Bible in hand it is easy to conceive that he is on the way to the meeting‑ house, to participate in the religious services about which he felt so strongly..

-------------------- Samuel Chapin and Cicely Penny.

.
           Sources: New England Historical and Genealogical Reg­ister, Vol. 83, pp. 352‑355; First Century of Springfield, by Henry Burt, Vol. 2, pp. 543, 544; Chapin Genealogy, by Orange Chapin, pp. 2, 238, 239; Randall and Allied Fami­lies, by F. A. Randall, pp. 337, 338..
.
           Samuel Chapin was born in 1598 in the village of Paignton on Tor Bay, about seven miles north from Dartmouth, in Devonshire, England. He was raised there, and in 1624 knelt with his chosen bride, Cicely Penny, for the ceremony of marriage at the Paignton church. To them were born eight children in England..
           With six or seven of these children (one or two of them having died) Samuel and Cicely sailed for New England, probably in the year 1638. Samuel was recorded in Roxbury, Massachusetts, in 1639, but in a few years (in 1642 or 1643) moved again to the new settlement of Springfield. Two more children were born in America..
           He took a prominent part in all the affairs of the town, both re­ligious and civil. He was a member of the first Board of Selectmen and served nine consecutive years. In 1652 he was appointed one of the magistrates of Springfield, and in 1654 his com­mis­sion was extended indefinitely, Ato hear and determine all cases and offences, both civ­il and criminal that reach not to life, limbe and banishment.@ He was also much employed in other public businessCa useful and highly es­teemed man. He was appointed a Deacon of the church in 1650, and at various times, in the absence of a minister, conducted religious ser­vices, alternating with others..
           He served on important committees, and the General Court in 1653 appointed him and John Pynchon to lay out Northampton and its bounds. These two also made the purchase of the lands from the Indians. In 1659 they were appointed to lay out Had­ley on both sides of the Connecticut Riv­er, that on the west side subsequently becom­ing the town of Hatfield..
           Specimans of his handwriting indicate an education in penmanship superior to the majority of the early settlers. It is clear that he had been trained to a certain extent in legal matters before coming to New England, and had been employed where his live­li­hood came from the use of the pen. That Samuel Chapin could draw in accurate lan­guage a legal document is evidence that he had received instruction in England under those who were skilled in the law..
           Deacon Chapin=s accounts at Pynchon=s store well illustrate the general habit of the settlers and the articles used by them. These ex­tracts are taken from the accounts of 1652 and a year or more later. He was charged with 14s for half a pound of powder, 2s 6d for 3 pounds of sugar, 8d for 500 pins, ,4 7s 6d for 10 yds. of Ker­sey, 5s 3d for smithery work, 5s 2d for 2 yds. Scots cloth, 4s 10d for 32 pounds of soap, ,12 for a parcel of wampum sent to Henry Chapin, 2s 11d for 2 yd. of Green Say, 2s 6d for 1 pair of stockings, 1s 3d for 2 yd. of flannel, 17s 6d for 7 yds of linen cloth, 6s 6d for one Bible, 6s for one pint bottle, 1s 10d for a quart and 3 of  brandy, 2s for one pound of pepper, and 42d for 1 pint of vinegar..
           In payment of his accounts he was credited with 8s for 4 days work of David, 9s for David=s work at the mill, 4s 6d for work of oxen, 2s 6d for 3 lbs. of candles, ,3 4s for 192 lbs. of beef, ,11 1s for 60 bushels of wheat, 7s for a skin of Beaver, 16s for wheat delivered by Thomas Stebbins, 17s 6d from Katherine Bliss, ,15 18s for 87 bushels of wheat at ye mill in June >55, 2s 6d for a qu. of veal, ,1 4s 4d for string­ing 194 fathoms of wampum..
           The settlers of Springfield lived on terms of the utmost cordial­ity and friend­ship with the surrounding Indian tribes. All the lands that came into their possession were purchased fairly and honorably, and to the entire satisfaction of the natives, who harbored no feelings of hostility to the English. The settlers came among them on terms of equality, to teach them habits of industry, to traffic with them, and do them good..
           Thus the white man and the red man lived as neighbors and friends for forty years. In 1675 the whole scene was changed; the hour had arrived in which the momen­tous question was to be settled, whether the whites were to be extirpated from the land of their adoption, or the red men subdued and scattered and driven from the place of their fath­ers= sepulchers..
           By the agency of Philip of Pokanoket, the youngest son of Massa­soit, a union was formed for a Ageneral rising of the natives to sweep the hated intruders from the ancient hunting grounds of the Indian race.@.
           Among others, the colony at Springfield was marked for the slaugh­ter, and so artfully was the treacherous plot laid that destruction must have been the result, but for a timely warning from their friends at Windsor. Aroused by the alarm of impending danger, they fled in great haste to the forts, and were saved with the exception of two men and one woman. The savages pillaged the town, and committed twenty-­nine houses and nearly as many barns to the flames, and destroyed all the mills. It was in the month of October; crops had been gathered in, and the winter stores of the colo­nists were swept away as in a moment..
           Thus amid the ashes of their dwellings, and the destruction of their gathered harvests, the colonists looked with fearful apprehension upon the approaching winter. But a merciful God so ordered that the winter was uncommonly mild, and the stores that escaped the flames sup­plied the needs of the colonists..
           In the midst of these dark and tragic scenes was the family of Deacon Samuel Chapin, who died November 11, 1675, a single month af­ter the burning of Spring­field. His death may have been connected with the burning or just incidental to it. He had large holdings in Springfield, but gave them all to his children in his life­time, his will disposing of personal estate only. His wife lived as a widow until her decease in 1683. He was seventy‑seven at death, and she was eighty‑one..
.
                                                             * * * * * * *.
.
           Samuel Chapin was conspicuous in all the affairs that concerned the moral, religious, and secular interests of the town. The de­cisions rendered by him indicate that he was a man of strong will, in­flexible integrity, pious and charitable. St. Gau­den=s statue of AThe Puritan,@ unveiled at Springfield in 1887, with a replica in Cen­tral Park, New York City, is intended as an ideal of Deacon Samuel Chapin, though Athere is of his face or features no oral or written record.@ It is a remarkable work of art, embodying the aggressive force of the people who settled New England, and some of the characteristics of those days, and incidents in the history of Deacon Chapin. With the Bible in hand it is easy to conceive that he is on the way to the meeting‑ house, to participate in the religious services about which he felt so strongly..

-------------------- Deacon Samuel Chapin, Magistrate; Town Commissioner; Church Deacon was born 8 Oct 1598 in Paignton, Devonshire, England and died 11 Nov 1675 in Springfield, MA at age 77. Samuel married Cicely PENNY on 9 Feb 1623 in Paignton, Devonshire, England

"The Puritan" - a bronze statue in Merrick Park next to the Public Library in Springfield, Mass. honors one of the town's founders, the Deacon Samuel Chapin. The artist was Augustus St. Gaudens and it was commissioned by Chester W. Chapin, Springfield's railroad magnate, in 1885. The statue was originally unveiled on Thanksgiving Day in 1887 in Stearns Square, and remained there for twelve years before being moved to its current location. In moving the statue, the beautiful bronze fountain and pink granite bench that were constructed to compliment the artwork were relocated to other parts of the city. The working model is now owned by the Carnegie Museum of Art.

Samuel CHAPIN and his wife, Cicely, came from England with three sons and two daughters in 1635. He most likely came over in the summer, when the passage was the mildest, and probably landed at Boston, which was then, as it is now, the chief port of New England. They probably settled immediately in Roxbury. Roxbury was founded a few years earlier, in 1630, by William Pynchon. It soon became a small village of from two to three score families, most of whom came from Nazing, London, or the west of England. Possibly it was because he had friends among the latter that determined Samuel to settle in Roxbury. Samuel held land as early as 1639, as is shown by the Roxbury land records.

Like most of the early settlers, Samuel Chapin must have been principally a farmer, although undoubtedly he had to turn his hand to many other pursuits as occasion required, which was in fact very often. In 1636 Samuel, then comparatively a young man, was very probably one "of the Roxbury people" who worked on the fortifications at Cornhill in Boston. In the fall of that year the General Court met at Roxbury, thus giving Samuel a chance to see its workings. During his stay in Roxbury the Pequot War took place, which resulted in making it possible to settle with safety in Western New England as at Springfield. The Chapins lived in Roxbury till the close of the year 1642.

In 1636 William Pynchon, then a resident of Roxbury, led a party of about a dozen families to the Connecticut River, where he founded a settlement then called Agawam, but which four years later was renamed Springfield, after his home in England. Most of the settlers took up farming, as there were many fertile meadows along the banks of the Connecticut, while Pynchon for the most part engaged in the fur trade. The settlement grew slowly at first, but by the time the Chapins arrived, it had become a village of respectable size for New England in those days.

As he had in Roxbury, as at Springfield, Samuel was primarily a farmer, but of course here also he had to do all sorts of other things besides. He soon became one of the leading men in the government of the town and held many public offices during his life including Selectman, Auditor and Magistrate and he was Deacon of the church.

Samuel Chapin lived to be an old man and having borne for over twenty years the burdens of government, now in his declining years withdrew from the center of political affairs. He slowly handed over the reins to the younger men in town. Samuel died 11 Nov 1675; according to the diary of his son Japhet, "My father was taken out of this troublesome world the 11th day of November about eleven of the clock, 1675." His widow, Cicely, died 8 Feb 1683.

Samuel had an inventory of his estate performed for his will. The total sum of his goods, not including his land, was over 45 English pounds. His wife's estate was inventoried in 1682 for her will and the goods were then valued at over 100 English pounds.

 Note 

Samuel was a Puritan and resided in Springfield, Mass. where he was appointed deacon of the church to watch over morals, health and public measures. In addition he conducted services, including preaching when the church lacked a pastor.

-------------------- Biography

Deacon Samuel Chapin, Magistrate; Town Commissioner; Church Deacon was born 8 Oct 1598 in Paignton, Devonshire, England and died 11 Nov 1675 in Springfield, MA at age 77. Samuel married Cicely PENNY on 9 Feb 1623 in Paignton, Devonshire, England

"The Puritan" - a bronze statue in Merrick Park next to the Public Library in Springfield, Mass. honors one of the town's founders, the Deacon Samuel Chapin. The artist was Augustus St. Gaudens and it was commissioned by Chester W. Chapin, Springfield's railroad magnate, in 1885. The statue was originally unveiled on Thanksgiving Day in 1887 in Stearns Square, and remained there for twelve years before being moved to its current location. In moving the statue, the beautiful bronze fountain and pink granite bench that were constructed to compliment the artwork were relocated to other parts of the city. The working model is now owned by the Carnegie Museum of Art.

Samuel CHAPIN and his wife, Cicely, came from England with three sons and two daughters in 1635. He most likely came over in the summer, when the passage was the mildest, and probably landed at Boston, which was then, as it is now, the chief port of New England. They probably settled immediately in Roxbury. Roxbury was founded a few years earlier, in 1630, by William Pynchon. It soon became a small village of from two to three score families, most of whom came from Nazing, London, or the west of England. Possibly it was because he had friends among the latter that determined Samuel to settle in Roxbury. Samuel held land as early as 1639, as is shown by the Roxbury land records.

Like most of the early settlers, Samuel Chapin must have been principally a farmer, although undoubtedly he had to turn his hand to many other pursuits as occasion required, which was in fact very often. In 1636 Samuel, then comparatively a young man, was very probably one "of the Roxbury people" who worked on the fortifications at Cornhill in Boston. In the fall of that year the General Court met at Roxbury, thus giving Samuel a chance to see its workings. During his stay in Roxbury the Pequot War took place, which resulted in making it possible to settle with safety in Western New England as at Springfield. The Chapins lived in Roxbury till the close of the year 1642.

In 1636 William Pynchon, then a resident of Roxbury, led a party of about a dozen families to the Connecticut River, where he founded a settlement then called Agawam, but which four years later was renamed Springfield, after his home in England. Most of the settlers took up farming, as there were many fertile meadows along the banks of the Connecticut, while Pynchon for the most part engaged in the fur trade. The settlement grew slowly at first, but by the time the Chapins arrived, it had become a village of respectable size for New England in those days.

As he had in Roxbury, as at Springfield, Samuel was primarily a farmer, but of course here also he had to do all sorts of other things besides. He soon became one of the leading men in the government of the town and held many public offices during his life including Selectman, Auditor and Magistrate and he was Deacon of the church.

Samuel Chapin lived to be an old man and having borne for over twenty years the burdens of government, now in his declining years withdrew from the center of political affairs. He slowly handed over the reins to the younger men in town. Samuel died 11 Nov 1675; according to the diary of his son Japhet, "My father was taken out of this troublesome world the 11th day of November about eleven of the clock, 1675." His widow, Cicely, died 8 Feb 1683.

Samuel had an inventory of his estate performed for his will. The total sum of his goods, not including his land, was over 45 English pounds. His wife's estate was inventoried in 1682 for her will and the goods were then valued at over 100 English pounds.

 Note 

Samuel was a Puritan and resided in Springfield, Mass. where he was appointed deacon of the church to watch over morals, health and public measures. In addition he conducted services, including preaching when the church lacked a pastor.

 Sources 

• Roots Web <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scanderson/deacon_chapin.HTM /> • "The Chapin Book of Genealogical Data." • S201 Author: Ancestry.com Title: North Adams Transcript (North Adams, Massachusetts) Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.Original data - North Adams Transcript. North Adams, MA, USA. Database created from microfilm copies of the newspaper.Original data: North Adams Transcript. North Adams, MA, USA. Data Repository: #R1 Record ID Number: MH:S201 User ID: EC4B89E8-C2E8-4CB4-BD1B-A98B72E48FA2 • S202 Author: Ancestry.com Title: Early days in New England : life and times of Henry Burt of Springfield and some of his descendants, genealogical and biographi Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data - Burt, Henry Martyn,. Early days in New England : life and times of Henry Burt of Springfield and some of his descendants, genealogical and biographical mention of James and Repository: #R1 Note: Includes index. Record ID Number: MH:S202 User ID: E70667A0-6EFC-47F6-972C-21367972E37B • S203 Author: Ancestry.com Title: Gazetteer of Hampshire County, Mass. : 1654-1887 Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.Original data - Gay, W. B.. Gazetteer of Hampshire County, Mass. : 1654-1887. Syracuse, N.Y: W.B. Gay & Co., 1886?.Original data: Gay, W. B.. Gazetteer of Hampshire County, Mass. : 1654-18 Repository: #R1 Note: At head of title: Part first.|||Part second has title: Business directory of Hampshire County, Mass. : 1654-1887 / compiled by W.B. Gay & Co. Syracuse, N.Y. : W.B. Gay & Co., 1886.|||Includes biographical sketches.|||Includes advertising on numbered pages. Record ID Number: MH:S203 User ID: 6CA418D9-B728-49E6-AB59-766247D1D23C • S204 Author: Ancestry.com Title: The Chapin genealogy : containing a very large proportion of the descendants of Dea. Samuel Chapin, who settled in Springfield, Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.Original data - Chapin, Orange,. The Chapin genealogy : containing a very large proportion of the descendants of Dea. Samuel Chapin,who settled in Springfield, Mass. in 1642. Northampton Repository: #R1 Note: 'To which is added a "centennial discourse, delivered before the First Congregational Society in Chicopee, September, 26, 1852, by E.B. Clark, pastor of the church, which was organized Sept. 27, 1752." Also, an address, delivered at the opening of the town hall in Springfield, March 24, 1828, containing sketches of the early history of that town, and those in that vicinity--with an appendix--by George Bliss.'|||Includes blank pages at end for "family record. "|||Includes indexes. Record ID Number: MH:S204 User ID: CCF6831A-853F-462A-95A2-A181967DE841 • Source: S205 Author: Ancestry.com Title: A family history Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - Hitchcock, Russell Snow,. A family history : recording the ancestors of Russell Snow Hitchcock : this includes the ancestral lines of Hitchcock, Andrews, Snow, Russell, Bar Repository: #R1 Note: Caption title.|||Typescript.|||Publication information suggested by NUC pre-1956 imprints.|||Includes bibliographical references and index. Record ID Number: MH:S205 User ID: CA0373BF-61FB-4E12-8588-2ADD54BB5CD4

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Deacon Samuel Chapin's Timeline

1598
October 8, 1598
Paignton, Devon, England, (Present UK)
October 8, 1598
Paignton, Devon, England, (Present UK)
October 8, 1598
St. John Bapt., Paignton, Devonshire, Eng.
October 8, 1598
St.John Baptist, Paignton, Devonshire, England
October 8, 1598
St. John Bapt., Paignton, Devonshire, Eng.
October 8, 1598
Paignton, Devon, Eng
October 8, 1598
St. John Bapt., Paignton, Devonshire, Eng.
October 8, 1598
Paignton,Devon,,England
October 8, 1598
St. John Bapt., Paignton, Devonshire, Eng.
October 8, 1598
Paignton,Devon,England