Diego I 'el Blanco' López, III señor de Vizcaya (b. - c.1124) MP

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Nicknames: ""El Blanco" (The White)", "V Conde de Bizkaia"
Death: Died
Cause of death: Probably in battle
Occupation: VIII Señor de Vizcaya, 3er Seños de Vizcaya, Señor de Vizcaya, Fue tercer señor de Vizcaya entre los años 1093 y 1124., Señor de Alava, Guipúzcoa y Nájera, VIII Señor Soberano de Vizcaya, de Alva, Nájera y Haro
Managed by: Francisco Saavedra Basigaluz
Last Updated:

About Diego I 'el Blanco' López, III señor de Vizcaya

Diego López I de Haro died 1124-1126

Third Lord of Biscay, and also ruler of Álava, Buradón, Grañón, Nájera, Haro, and perhaps Guipúzcoa.

The most powerful Castilian magnate in the Basque Country and the Rioja during the first quarter of the twelfth century. He was a loyal supporter of Queen Urraca and he fought the invading armies of her estranged husband Alfonso the Battler on two, or perhaps three, occasions.

Sources

FMG MedLands Vizcaya

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Wiki - Diego López I de Haro

Diego López I de Haro

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from Diego López de Haro I)

Diego López I de Haro (died 1124×6) was the third Lord of Biscay, and also the ruler of Álava, Buradón, Grañón, Nájera, Haro, and perhaps Guipúzcoa: the most powerful Castilian magnate in the Basque Country and the Rioja during the first quarter of the twelfth century.[1] He was a loyal supporter of Queen Urraca and he fought the invading armies of her estranged husband Alfonso the Battler on two, or perhaps three, occasions.

Diego succeeded his father, Lope Íñiguez, in Biscay (and perhaps Guipúzcoa) on the latter's death in 1093, but Álava went to his brother-in-law Lope González.[2] On the death of García Ordóñez at the Battle of Uclés (1108), the tenencias of Grañón, Nájera and Haro passed to Diego by an act of Alfonso VI. In June 1110 Diego received a grant of privileges from Queen Urraca, acting without the consent of Alfonso the Battler, whereby she gave all his patrimonial lands (that is, lands he owned, not fiscal lands he governed on behalf of the crown) complete immunity from confiscation.[1] In August Urraca, then advancing with her army on Zaragoza, confirmed some rights and privileges of the monastery of San Millán de la Cogolla, an act confirmed by the three most important magnates of the region: Sancho, Count of Pamplona, Diego, described as senior in Nagera,[3] and Íñigo Jiménez de los Cameros, dominante in Calahorra.[4] At that time Íñigo Jiménez was also ruling Buradón. After Lope González's death in 1110 and before 1113 Diego succeeded to Álava and re-united all his father's tenencias.[5] It was Diego who first began using the toponymic "de Haro", which became the family name.

It is possible that Diego, alongside the Navarrese count Ladrón Íñiguez, first went to war against Alfonso in 1112, and that there was fighting in the vicinity of Castrojeriz that July. Alfonso made reference to Diego and the fighting in a charter to Santo Domingo de la Calzada, but this charter is dated differently in each of its surviving copies. One copy dates it to July 1124, which fits with Diego's last known rebellion.[6] In August 1116 Diego raised the standard of revolt against Alfonso, whose Navarrese lands his lordships bordered.[1] He was consequently deprived of Nájera, which was bestowed on Fortunio Garcés Caixal, although he may never had actually given it up.[5][4] He was allowed to retain Haro and Buradón, which he had received some time after 1110. In February 1117 Alfonso made a donation to Santa María la Real de Nájera calling himself Imperator and still claiming the kingdoms of Urraca. The donation was confirmed by Diego López, along with Pedro González de Lara and Suero Vermúdez, several bishops and many Aragonese. The charter is in the style of the Leonese chancery and its authenticity has been called into question, but it may reflect a moment of heightened negotiations between Alfonso and Urraca. It cannot be taken to reflect a desertion on the part of her major supporters (Diego, Pedro and Suero).[7] Diego remained on good terms with Alfonso in 1118, when he participated in the Reconquista of the great city of Zaragoza, and into 1119, taking part in the continuing conquest of the taifa.[5] In July 1124, perhaps encourged by Urraca or her son, Alfonso VII, Diego again aided by Ladrón of Navarre rose against Alfonso's forces and was besieged in Haro by Alfonso himself.[8] Alfonso confiscated all his tenencias and granted them to Íñigo Vélaz.[2] There is some discrepancy over when and how Diego died. According to some source, he died in 1124, probably in the fighting,[4] while others place his death in 1126, after having lost all his lands and titles.[5]

Diego married a certain María Sánchez of obscure origins. In 1121 he and his wife joined his sister, Toda López, and her daughter, his niece, María López, in making a donation to Santa María la Real.[9] María Sánchez has been called a sister of García Ordóñez, an impossibility in light of her patronymic; a daughter of Sancho Núñez, son of count Munio Sánchez, ruler of the Duranguesado; and a sister of Lope García Sánchez of the Llodio branch of the Ayala clan. More likely than any of these hypotheses is that she was a daughter of Sancho Sánchez de Erro, ruler of Tafalla in Navarre, and his wife, Elvira García, daughter of García Ordóñez. Diego's claim to García's lordships in 1108 may have stemmed partially from his wife's ancestry.[4] She gave four sons: Lope Díaz I, who later ruled Biscay and Álava, and three obscure names, Sancho, Fortunio and Gil. Some historians have reckoned Sancha Díaz de Frias, the founder of Santa María de Bujedo, his daughter, but she was more probably a daughter of Diego Sánchez de Ayala and a sister of Toda Díaz.[10] In May 1140, widowed, María "the mother of Count Lope" (mater comitis Lupi) and Mayor Garcés gave the monastery of San Ginés to that of San Juan de Burgos.[1]

[edit]Notes

^ a b c d Barton, 263 n2.

^ a b Martín Duque, 895.

^ The title senior (modern Spanish señor) was preferred in Navarre, whereas in Castile the form dominus (modern Spanish don) was more common.

^ a b c d Canal Sánchez-Pagín, 8–10.

^ a b c d Martín Duque, 899.

^ Reilly, 85 n123.

^ Reilly, 121–23.

^ Reilly, 181–82. There was fighting circa castellum Fari (near the castle of Haro) according to a document in the archives of Santo Domingo de la Calzada, cf. Canal Sánchez-Pagín, 10 n21.

^ This donation records her full name: Sunt autem testes inde Didago Lopiz, meo germano, y sua uxor Maria Sancii, cf. Canal Sánchez-Pagín, 9 n18.

^ Canal Sánchez-Pagín, 10 n22.

[edit]References

Simon Barton. The Aristocracy in Twelfth-century León and Castile. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

José María Canal Sánchez-Pagín. "La Casa de Haro en León y Castilla durante el siglo XII: Nuevas conclusiones." Anuario de estudios medievales, 25(1995):1, 3–38, cf. esp. pp. 8–10 for Diego López I.

Ángel J. Martín Duque. "Vasconia en la Alta Edad Media: Somera aproximación histórica." Príncipe de Viana, 63(2002):227, 871–908.

J. Ramón Prieto Lasa. "Significado y tradición de un relato mítico: Los orígenes de la Casa de Haro." Revista de dialectología y tradiciones populares, 47(1992), 203–220.

Bernard F. Reilly. The Kingdom of León-Castilla under Queen Urraca, 1109–1126. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982.

Diego López de Haro I

For other characters the same name, see Diego Lopez de Haro.

Diego López de Haro I, nicknamed the White (circa 1075 - 1124), son of Lope Iñiguez, was third Lord of Biscay between 1093 and 1124.

Served King Alfonso VI of Leon and settled in La Rioja, near Garcia Ordonez, warring against the Cid, who was the enemy of the king of Leon.

Alfonso VI gave him the town of Haro, incorporating the place name of the village to his name, probably to thank for the real (not the importance of the territory itself, which was minuscule compared to its possession of the Basque), being from family then known by that name. Inhabiting the town of Haro, probably in the area Villabona, and built a castle in Haro, exact location unknown.

In 1109 Alfonso VI died, leaving the kingdoms of León and Castile to his daughter Urraca, widow for two years, so the kingdom of Galicia had to pass to his son Alfonso of about sixteen. Leon and Castile the noble queen imposed on remarriage. Without finishing the year he married Alfonso I of Aragon, who decided not to give the kingdom of Galicia to his stepson, giving rise to disputes. In 1111 Alfonso I invaded La Rioja, replacing the governors Aragonese nobles. In Haro tried to besiege Diego Lopez, but he appears to reach an agreement without taking the people. Diego always remained faithful to Urraca, even in times when it was in discord with her husband, and contributing their retinues in the wars against the Muslims when the marriage was congenial.

In 1118 forces fought alongside Aragon, and Navarre on the French conquest of Zaragoza, where Alfonso I went on January 6th of 1119.

[Edit] Descendants

Ms Almicena married, daughter of Lord St. Jean Pied de Port, with whom he had to Lope Diaz. He married his second wife, Doña María Sánchez (as evidenced by a deed of 1121). He fathered at least Lope Sancho, Fortun and Gil Diaz. -------------------- Diego López I de Haro, apodado el Blanco (hacia 1075 – 1124), hijo de Lope Íñiguez, fue tercer señor de Vizcaya entre los años 1093 y 1124.

Vida

[editar]Sirviente de Alfonso VI de León y origen del apellido "de Haro" Sirvió al rey Alfonso VI de León y se ubicó en la Rioja, al lado de García Ordóñez. Alfonso VI le donó la tenencia de Haro. Un documento real asocia su nombre a este topónimo, con lo cual se ha creído durante mucho tiempo que era el origen del apellido. Pero no hay constancia documental de otra utilización antes de los años 1180, con lo cual el verdadero inventor del apellido fue Diego López II de Haro.1 Pobló la villa de Haro, probablemente en la zona de Villabona, y levantó un castillo en Haro, sin conocerse su ubicación exacta. [editar]Reinado de Alfonso I de Aragón En 1109 falleció Alfonso VI, dejando los reinos de León y Castilla a su hija Urraca, viuda desde hacía dos años, por lo que Galicia podría haber pasado a ser gobernada por su hijo Alfonso Raimúndez, de unos dieciséis años. Alfonso VI impuso en su lecho de muerte a la reina un nuevo matrimonio. Sin terminar el año contrajo matrimonio con Alfonso I de Aragón. En los tratados de esponsales se relegaba a su hijastro Alfonso Raimúndez, lo que dio lugar a disputas. En 1111 Alfonso I intervino en La Rioja, nombrando como tenentes a nobles aragoneses. En Haro intentó sitiar a Diego López, aunque parece que llegaron a un acuerdo sin llegar a tomar la población. Diego contribuyó con sus mesnadas en las guerras contra los musulmanes cuando el matrimonio regio estaba avenido. Alternó su fidelidad por ambos cónyuges. En 1110, en vísperas de la batalla de Candespina, obtuvo de la reina importantes privilegios para tener a Diego López de Haro entre sus partidarios.2 En 1113 Alfonso I el Batallador sustituye a Diego López en la tenencia de Nájera (por entonces, la principal ciudad de la actual región de La Rioja) y nombra en su lugar a Fortún Garcés Cajal, uno de los más fieles magnates del rey aragonés, que mantuvo el señorío de La Rioja hasta 1134. Sin embargo, cinco años más tarde, en 1118, Diego López combatió en la hueste de Alfonso I el Batallador al lado de fuerzas aragonesas, francesas y navarras en la conquista de Zaragoza, que capitulaba el 18 de diciembre de aquel mismo año.3 Hasta 1123 las relaciones de Diego López de Haro, por entonces señor de Vizcaya y de Álava, con Alfonso I el Batallador fueron buenas. En ese año concurre como testigo a la concesión del Batallador del fuero del lugar de Alesón. [editar]Enfrentamiento contra Alfonso I y fallecimiento Hacia comienzos de 1124 comienza, junto a Ladrón Íñiguez, una revuelta contra su señor, el rey de Aragón, que se extendió por Álava y el norte de Burgos. Alfonso I contraatacó afianzando su autoridad en Logroño, y desde allí debió recabar el apoyo de uno de los nobles aragoneses de mayor rango, Fortún Garcés Cajal, señor de Nájera. El objetivo inicial fue arrebatar Haro a Diego López, pues era su tenencia más destacada en La Rioja, y para este fin el aragonés le puso sitio en julio de 1124. Para atraerse aliados en la zona, el Batallador concedió prerrogativas a Santo Domingo de la Calzada. En agosto, seguramente tras haber tomado Haro, Alfonso I dominó Pangua (condado de Treviño) y amenazaba Salinas de Añana (entonces llamado Valle Salado), Término y Valdegovía, que constituían las bases del poder de Ladrón Íñiquez y Diego López. No se conoce el final de la campaña, pero todo indica que acabó con victoria de Alfonso I, quien en septiembre ya estaba en la extremadura turolense. Tras este conflicto, el Batallador impuso su dominio en su frontera occidental de Álava, Vizcaya, norte de Burgos y La Rioja. Quizá Diego López muriese en el transcurso de esta guerra, pues no hay más menciones a él desde 1124.4 Tras su muerte el actual territorio de Vizcaya continuaba en manos de Alfonso el Batallador.5 Más tarde aparecería Ladrón Íñiguez como señor de Álava y Vizcaya4 y como vasallo de Alfonso I acudió a la movilización de la hueste del rey convocada para asediar Bayona (1130-1131) junto a sus hermanos Lope Íñiguez y Fortún Íñiguez.6 [editar]Descendencia

Antiguos genealogistas afirmaban que había casado con Almicena, hija del señor de San Juan Pie de Puerto; sin embargo, la única esposa documentada es la condesa María Sánchez con quien contrajo matrimonio antes de 1121. La condesa María fue hija de Sancho Sánchez, conde en Erro y Tafalla, y de la condesa Elvira García, hija del conde García Ordóñez y de Urraca Garcés (hija a su vez del rey García Sánchez III de Pamplona y la reina Estefanía de Foix).7 8 Los hijos documentados de este matrimonio fueron: Lope Díaz I de Haro, quien sucedió a su padre en el señorío. Sancho (fallecido después de 1170), tenente en Treviana, casado con Sancha Rodríguez, de la familia de los Salvadores. Gil Díaz (fallecido antes de 1168).

Don Diego Lopez llamado el Blanco octavo Señor de Vizcaya cafò con vna Dama de Navarra, hija del Señor de San Iuan de Pie del Puerto, en quie vuo a don Lope Diaz. Llamada el Conde don Pedro doña Almicena, y el mifmo Conde efcrive, que murio efte don Diego en el año de 1124. En vn autor antiguo de linages fe haze memoria, que efte Conde don Diego tuvo otros dos hijos, a don Diego Lopez, que poblo en Vrbina, y a Nuño Diaz, q poblo en Fineftrofa. NOBLEZA DEL ANDALVZIA Por Gonçalo Argote de Molina, Sevilla 1588. De Don Lope Chico Primer Caudillo del Reyno de Iaen, y de las Armas y fucefsion del apellido de Haro y de Baeça. Cap. LXXXIII. Págs. 84 y 85 -------------------- Diego López I de Haro (died 1124×6) was the third Lord of Biscay, and also the ruler of Álava, Buradón, Grañón, Nájera, Haro, and perhaps Guipúzcoa: the most powerful Castilian magnate in the Basque Country and the Rioja during the first quarter of the twelfth century. He was a loyal supporter of Queen Urraca and he fought the invading armies of her estranged husband Alfonso the Battler on two, or perhaps three, occasions.


Diego succeeded his father, Lope Íñiguez, in Biscay (and perhaps Guipúzcoa) on the latter's death in 1093, but Álava went to his brother-in-law Lope González. On the death of García Ordóñez at the Battle of Uclés (1108), the tenencias of Grañón, Nájera and Haro passed to Diego by an act of Alfonso VI. In June 1110 Diego received a grant of privileges from Queen Urraca, acting without the consent of Alfonso the Battler, whereby she gave all his patrimonial lands (that is, lands he owned, not fiscal lands he governed on behalf of the crown) complete immunity from confiscation. In August Urraca, then advancing with her army on Zaragoza, confirmed some rights and privileges of the monastery of San Millán de la Cogolla, an act confirmed by the three most important magnates of the region: Sancho, Count of Pamplona, Diego, described as senior in Nagera, and Íñigo Jiménez de los Cameros, dominante in Calahorra. At that time Íñigo Jiménez was also ruling Buradón. After Lope González's death in 1110 and before 1113 Diego succeeded to Álava and re-united all his father's tenencias. It was Diego who first began using the toponymic "de Haro", which became the family name.


It is possible that Diego, alongside the Navarrese count Ladrón Íñiguez, first went to war against Alfonso in 1112, and that there was fighting in the vicinity of Castrojeriz that July. Alfonso made reference to Diego and the fighting in a charter to Santo Domingo de la Calzada, but this charter is dated differently in each of its surviving copies. One copy dates it to July 1124, which fits with Diego's last known rebellion. In August 1116 Diego raised the standard of revolt against Alfonso, whose Navarrese lands his lordships bordered. He was consequently deprived of Nájera, which was bestowed on Fortunio Garcés Caixal, although he may never had actually given it up. He was allowed to retain Haro and Buradón, which he had received some time after 1110. In February 1117 Alfonso made a donation to Santa María la Real de Nájera calling himself Imperator and still claiming the kingdoms of Urraca. The donation was confirmed by Diego López, along with Pedro González de Lara and Suero Vermúdez, several bishops and many Aragonese. The charter is in the style of the Leonese chancery and its authenticity has been called into question, but it may reflect a moment of heightened negotiations between Alfonso and Urraca. It cannot be taken to reflect a desertion on the part of her major supporters (Diego, Pedro and Suero). Diego remained on good terms with Alfonso in 1118, when he participated in the Reconquista of the great city of Zaragoza, and into 1119, taking part in the continuing conquest of the taifa. In July 1124, perhaps encouraged by Urraca or her son, Alfonso VII, Diego again aided by Ladrón of Navarre rose against Alfonso's forces and was besieged in Haro by Alfonso himself. Alfonso confiscated all his tenencias and granted them to Íñigo Vélaz. There is some discrepancy over when and how Diego died. According to some source, he died in 1124, probably in the fighting, while others place his death in 1126, after having lost all his lands and titles.


Diego married a certain María Sánchez of obscure origins. In 1121 he and his wife joined his sister, Toda López, and her daughter, his niece, María López, in making a donation to Santa María la Real. María Sánchez has been called a sister of García Ordóñez, an impossibility in light of her patronymic; a daughter of Sancho Núñez, son of count Munio Sánchez, ruler of the Duranguesado; and a sister of Lope García Sánchez of the Llodio branch of the Ayala clan. More likely than any of these hypotheses is that she was a daughter of Sancho Sánchez de Erro, ruler of Tafalla in Navarre, and his wife, Elvira García, daughter of García Ordóñez. Diego's claim to García's lordships in 1108 may have stemmed partially from his wife's ancestry. She gave four sons: Lope Díaz I, who later ruled Biscay and Álava, and three obscure names, Sancho, Fortunio and Gil. Some historians have reckoned Sancha Díaz de Frias, the founder of Santa María de Bujedo, his daughter, but she was more probably a daughter of Diego Sánchez de Ayala and a sister of Toda Díaz. In May 1140, widowed, María "the mother of Count Lope" (mater comitis Lupi) and Mayor Garcés gave the monastery of San Ginés to that of San Juan de Burgos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diego_L%C3%B3pez_I_de_Haro