Duncan I, King of Scots

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Donnchad mac Crínáin, Rí na h'Alba

Also Known As: "Duncan I", "Donnchad mac Crínán", "the Gracious", "An t-Ilgarach", "the Diseased", "Donchadd l", "King of Alba"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
Death: Died in Elgin, Moray, Scotland, Scotland
Cause of death: contest in battle for the throne of Bothganowan, near Elgin
Place of Burial: Isle of Iona, Scotland
Immediate Family:

Son of Crínán of Dunkeld and Bethóc ingen Maíl Coluim meic Cináeda
Husband of Suthen Sibylla (of Northumbria) of Scotland, (NOT Siward's daughter)
Father of Malcolm III, 'Canmore', King of Scots; Donald III "Bane", King of Scots and Mael Muire mac Donnchad, Mormaer of Atholl
Brother of NN possible daughter of Crinan & Bethoc of Atholl, Princess of Scotland and Maldred mac Crínán, Earl of Dunbar

Occupation: King of Scotland (1034 - 1040), Roi, de Strathclyde, 1018/1034, d'Ecosse, 1034, King of Alba (Scotland), King of Scotland, Donnchad mac Crínáin, King of Scots, Killed by MacBeth, King of Alba
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Duncan I, King of Scots

Donnchad mac Crínáin (Modern Gaelic: Donnchadh mac Crìonain) anglicised as Duncan I, and nicknamed An t-Ilgarach, "the Diseased" or "the Sick" (died 14 August 1040) was king of Scotland (Alba).

Parents: Crínán 'the Thane', Mormaer of Atholl and Bethóc of Scotland

Wife: Suthen also called Sibylla (NB: NOT Siward's daughter but his cousin, read her About) Children:

1. Mael Coluim III 'Canmore'

2. Domnall Bán

3. Mael Muire, Earl of Atholl (son)

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Parents: CRINAN "the Thane", son of --- (-killed in battle 1045). Abthane of Dule. Lay abbot of Dunkeld. Steward of the Western Isles. Mormaer of Atholl. He was killed fighting King Macbeth. m ([1000]) BETHOC, daughter of MALCOLM II King of Scotland & his wife ---. Crinan & Bethoc had two children:

i) DUNCAN King DUNCAN I 1034-1040; [Donnchad], son of CRINAN "the Thane" Mormaer of Atholl & his wife Bethoc of the Scots ([1001]-killed in battle either Bothganowan/Pitgaveny, near Elgin, or Burghead 14 Aug 1040, buried Isle of Iona). His parentage is confirmed by the Annals of Ulster which record the death of "Donnchad son of Crínán, king of Scotland" in 1040[265]. He is not named as king in the 12th century Cronica Regum Scottorum king-list[266]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun names "Duncan" as son of "Crynyne Abthane of Dul and Steward of the Isles" and his wife[267]. He succeeded in 1018 as King of Strathclyde. [This is disputed by Duncan, A. A. M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8 - Sharon] He succeeded his maternal grandfather in 1034 as DUNCAN I King of Scotland. The Orkneyinga Saga records that “Karl Hundason” succeeded King Malcolm in Scotland and records his battles with Thorfinn Jarl of Orkney[268]. No other record has been identified of this alleged person. The Annales Dunelmenses record that "Dumechanus rex Scotorum" besieged Durham in 1039 with a large army but retreated from the siege[269]. He was killed in battle by his first cousin, Macbeth, who succeeded as King of Scotland. The Chronicon of Marianus Scottus records that "Donnchal rex Scotiæ" was killed "1040 XIX Kal Sep" by "duce suo Macbethad mac Finnloech" who succeeded as king for 17 years[270]. The Annals of Ulster record that "Donnchad son of Crínán, king of Scotland, was killed by his own people" in 1040[271]. The Annals of Tigernach record that “Donncadh mac Crínan, airdrí Alban” was killed “immaturo etate a suis” in 1040[272]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that Duncan was killed by "Machabeus son of Finele…at Bothgofnane" and buried in the island of Iona[273]. The Chronicle of the Scots and Picts dated 1177 records that "Donchath mac Cran Abbatis de Dunkelden et Bethok filia Malcolm mac Kynnet" reigned for 6 years, was killed "a Maketh mac Fyngel in Bothngouane" and was buried "in Yona insula"[274]. Cawley’s Medlands

m ([1030]) SUTHEN [SIBYLLA], [cousin of SIWARD Earl of Northumbria, daughter of ---]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that the mother of Malcolm and Donald Bane, Duncan´s sons, was "the cousin of Earl Siward"[275]. This information is not included in any earlier source and should be considered dubious. In one earlier king list, King Malcolm III's mother is named "Suthen"[276]. No reference has been found in primary sources to her being named Sibylla, the name found in many secondary sources. Cawley’s Medlands

King Duncan I & his wife had [three] children:

1. MALCOLM (1031-killed in battle near Alnwick, Northumberland 13 Nov 1093, buried Tynemouth, later transferred to Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, and later still to Escorial, Madrid). The Chronicon of Marianus Scottus records that "Moelcol…filius Donchael" succeeded Lulach in 1058[277]. He succeeded in 1058 as MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland. Cawley’s Medlands

2. DONALD (- died in prison Rescobie, Forfarshire 1099, buried Dunkeld Abbey, later transferred to Isle of Iona). Matthew Paris names him as brother of King Malcolm, and records that he was elected by the Scots to succeed his brother in 1093 as DONALD III "Bane", King of Scotland 1093-1097 [278]. Florence of Worcester records that "Dufenaldum regis Malcolmi fratrem" was elected king after his brother's death but that "filius regis Malcolmi Dunechain" expelled "patruum suum Dufenaldum"[279]. According to Florence of Worcester, he expelled all the English from the Scottish court[280]. "Douenald filius Conchat Regis" made donations "cum ceteris regibus…Duncano rege Edgaro et Alexandro et David fratribus"[281]. This charter is undated and the reference to the four brothers all as kings indicates that it is probably spurious. Florence of Worcester records that King Donald was deposed in 1094 by his nephew Duncan, with help from the English and Normans[282]. The Annals of Inisfallen record that "Domnall son of Donnchadh” killed “Donnchadh son of Mael Coluim king of Alba” in 1094 and “took the kingship of Alba”[283]. The Chronicle of John of Fordun records that "his uncle Donald…again usurped the kingship" after the death of "Duncan, King Malcolm´s illegitimate son" and reigned for three years[284]. Florence of Worcester records that "clitorem Eadgarum" led an army to Scotland in [1097] to place "consobrinum suum Eadgarum Malcolmi regis filium" on the Scottish throne after expelling "patruo suo Dufenaldo"[285]. William of Malmesbury records that King Duncan II "was murdered by the wickedness of his uncle Donald" and that the latter was "dispatched by the contrivance of David, the youngest brother and the power of [King] William [II]"[286]. He was imprisoned. The Chronicle of the Picts and Scots dated 1251 records that "Donald mac Donchat" was captured "a Edgar mac Malcolm", blinded, died in "Rosolpin" and was buried "in Dunkelden", transferred to Iona[287]. m ---. The name of Donald's wife is not known. Cawley’s Medlands

3. MAELMUIRE [Melmare] (-died after [1135]). According to the Complete Peerage, Melmare, who it says was the father of Madach Earl of Atholl, was the son of Duncan I King of Scotland & his wife ---, but it cites no corresponding primary source[302]. The primary source which confirms that this is correct has not yet been identified. The only primary source reference to Maelmuire which has so far been found is the undated charter under which David I King of Scotland granted protection to the clerics of Deer, which is witnessed by "Donchado comite de Fib et Malmori d´Athotla et Ggillebrite comite d´Engus et Ghgillcomded Mac Aed…"[303]. From the names of the earls of Fife and Angus, it is unlikely that this document can be dated to before 1135 at the earliest. If that is correct, it is evidently impossible from a chronological point of view that Maelmuire could have been the son of King Duncan I.] Cawley’s Medlands

ii)   MALDRED, son of CRINAN "the Thane" Mormaer of Atholl [Scotland] & his wife Bethoc of Scotland Lady of Atholl (-killed in battle [1045]).  He is named son of Crinan by Roger of Hoveden[1346].  Lord of Allerdale.  Regent of Strathclyde 1034/35.  Cawley’s Medlands m ([before 1040])   EALDGYTH [Ælfgifu], daughter and heiress of UHTRED Earl of Northumbria & his third wife Ælfgifu of England (1016 or before-).  Simeon of Durham names "Algiva daughter of earl Uchtred [and] of Algiva daughter of king Agelred" when recording that her father arranged her marriage to "Maldred the son of Crinan"[1347], although her father was long since dead when she married.  Named daughter of Uhtred and Elgiva by Roger of Hoveden, who also names her husband and his father[1348].   Cawley’s Medlands

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Wikipedia:

Donnchad mac Crínáin (Modern Gaelic: Donnchadh mac Crìonain;[2] anglicised as Duncan I, and nicknamed An t-Ilgarach, "the Diseased" or "the Sick"[3]; died 14 August 1040)[1] was king of Scotland (Alba). He was son of Crínán, hereditary lay abbot of Dunkeld, and Bethóc, daughter of king Malcolm II of Scotland (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda).

Unlike the "King Duncan" of Shakespeare's Macbeth, the historical Duncan appears to have been a young man. He followed his grandfather Malcolm as king after the latter's death on 25 November 1034, without apparent opposition. He may have been Malcolm's acknowledged successor or tánaise as the succession appears to have been uneventful.[4] Earlier histories, following John of Fordun, supposed that Duncan had been king of Strathclyde in his grandfather's lifetime, ruling the former Kingdom of Strathclyde as an appanage. Modern historians discount this idea.[5]

An earlier source, a variant of the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba (CK-I), gives Duncan's wife the Gaelic name Suthen.[6] Whatever his wife's name may have been, Duncan had at least two sons. The eldest, Malcolm III (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada) was king from 1057 to 1093, the second Donald III (Domnall Bán, or "Donalbane") was king afterwards. Máel Muire, Earl of Atholl is a possible third son of Duncan, although this is uncertain.[7]

The early period of Duncan's reign was apparently uneventful, perhaps a consequence of his youth. Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findláich) is recorded as his dux, literally duke, but in the context — "dukes of Francia" had half a century before replaced the Carolingian kings of the Franks and in England the over-mighty Godwin of Wessex was called a dux — this suggests that Macbeth was the power behind the throne.[8]

In 1039, Duncan led a large Scots army south to besiege Durham, but the expedition ended in disaster. Duncan survived, but the following year he led an army north into Moray, traditionally seen as Macbeth's domain. There he was killed, at Pitgaveny near Elgin, by his own men led by Macbeth, probably on 14 August 1040.[9]

Depictions in fiction

Duncan is depicted as an elderly King in Macbeth by William Shakespeare. He is killed in his sleep by the protagonist, Macbeth.

In the animated television series Gargoyles he is depicted as a weak and conniving king who assassinates those who he believes threaten his rule. He even tries to assassinate Macbeth. However like in actual history he is killed in battle.

Notes

  1. ^ a b Broun, "Duncan I (d. 1040)".
  2. ^ Donnchad mac Crínáin is the Mediaeval Gaelic form.
  3. ^ Skene, Chronicles, p. 101.
  4. ^ Duncan, Kingship of the Scots, p. 33.
  5. ^ Duncan, Kingship of the Scots, p. 40.
  6. ^ Duncan, Kingship of the Scots, p. 37.
  7. ^ Oram, David I, p. 233, n. 26: the identification is from the Orkneyinga saga but Máel Muire's grandson Máel Coluim, Earl of Atholl is known to have married Donald III's granddaughter Hextilda.
  8. ^ Duncan, Kingship of the Scots, pp. 33–34.
  9. ^ Broun, "Duncan I (d. 1040)"; the date is from Marianus Scotus and the killing is recorded by the Annals of Tigernach.

References

   * Anderson, Alan Orr, Early Sources of Scottish History AD 500 to 1286, volume one. Republished with corrections, Paul Watkins, Stamford, 1990. ISBN 1-871615-03-8
   * Broun, Dauvit, "Duncan I (d. 1040)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 15 May 2007
   * Duncan, A. A. M., The Kingship of the Scots 842–1292: Succession and Independence. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2002. ISBN 0-7486-1626-8
   * Oram, Richard, David I: The King Who Made Scotland. Tempus, Stroud, 2004. ISBN 0-7524-2825-X

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Links:

The Peerage: http://thepeerage.com/p10288.htm#i102879

Geneall: http://www.geneall.net/U/per_page.php?id=9427

Predecessor Malcolm II:

Successor MacBeth:

Wikipedia:

English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duncan_I_of_Scotland

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Duncan I became king of Scotland in succession to his maternal grandfather Malcolm II in 1034, having previously ruled as rex Cumbrorum in the Kingdom of Strathclyde. His accession is said to be "the first example of inheritance of the Scottish throne in the direct line", as opposed to the previous tanistry system.

Duncan was known as Duncan The Gracious, a title that was not entirely complimentary. His uncaring approach to matters of state made him unpopular both with his subjects and the nobility. Not a strong ruler, he is chiefly known today through his connection with King Macbeth, which has been immortalized by William Shakespeare. The feud between these two when princes originated probably in a dispute over the succession to the throne; its details, however, are obscure, and the only fact which can be stated with any certainty is that Duncan was slain in battle by Macbeth, near Elgin, Moray, on August 15, 1040.

In 1039, Duncan marched south to besiege Durham, Northumbria, England, but was defeated with heavy losses. He also attempted to seize control of Moray, but was twice defeated by the Earl of Orkney's son, Thorfinn, before being killed in battle. He was killed at Bothnguane and buried at Iona.

Details of Duncan's marital life are a matter of debate among historians. The Scottish Regnal List I calls his wife Suthen, and John of Fordun calls her a kinswoman of Siward Biornsson, Earl of Northumbria. The United Kingdom's official history of the monarchy states that she was Siward's cousin.

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Ruled 1034 - 1040

Duncan I (d. Aug. 1, 1040, near Elgin, Moray, Scot.), king of the Scots from 1034 to 1040. Duncan was the grandson of King Malcolm II (ruled 1005-34), who irregularly made him ruler of Strathclyde when that region was absorbed into the Scottish kingdom (probably shortly before 1034). Malcolm violated the established system of succession whereby the kingship alternated between two branches of the royal family. Upon Malcolm's death, Duncan succeeded peacefully, but he soon faced the rivalryof Macbeth, Mormaor (subking) of Moray, who probably had a better claim to the throne. Duncan besieged Durham unsuccessfully in 1039 and in the following year was murdered by Macbeth. Duncan's elder son later killed Macbeth and ruled as King Malcolm III Canmore (1058-93).

1034-1040: King of Scots [Ref: Tapsell p180, Weis AR7 170:20] King of Scots [Ref: Moncreiffe p20] 1018-1034: King of Strathclyde [Ref: Paget p153] 1034: King of Scots [Ref: Paget p153] 1034: Duncan, the son of Crinan, abbot of Dunkeld, and Bethoc,daughter of Malcolm, the son of Kenneth, reigned six years [Ref: Weis AR 170:20]

1038 or 1039: Ealdred, Earl of Northumbria, invaded Strathclyde, perhaps in an attempt to wrest it from the Scots. Duncan responded in 1040 with an attack on Durham. Like his grandfather's attack in 1006, it ended in disaster, with Scottish forcesfleeing, and Scottish heads decorating the Durham marketplace. This defeat seems to hae weakened his authority so severely that Macbeth of the Cenel Loairn was able to defeat and kill him in battle near Elgin [Ref: Davidson 1995]

Duncan I (c. 1010-1040). King of Scots (1034-40), succeeding his grandfather Malcolm II. At his accession Duncan was already king of Stratyclyde, which thus became united to Scotia. In 1040 Duncan unsuccessfully besieged Durham and was twice defeated by Thorfinn, earl of Orkney, before being killed by Macbeth. [Ref: Dict of Brit History] Duncan, who was not a good old king but a headstrong young one, succeeded in 1034, but, having prejudiced his position by a failure against Durham (1039)was killed by his rival in 1040. [A History of Scotland by J.D. Mackie] Malcolm II's grandson Duncan became King of Strathclyde, as one of a line of Scottish sub-Kings of the small neighboring kingdom. When Malcolm died in 1034, Duncan succeeded him, and thus the kingdoms of Scotia, Lothian and Strathclyde were at last united. .Duncan was quite young, probably about thirty-three, when he succeeded his grandfather. At the time of his death in 1040 his two sons, Malcolm and Donald Ban (or Donaldbain), were small children.

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  • Duncan I King of Scotland

born 1007 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland

died 14 August 1040 Iona, near Elgin, Scotland

buried Iona, near Elgin, Scotland

father:

  • Crinan (Grimus) de Mormaer Abbot of Dunkeld

born about 0975 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland

died 1045 Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland

mother:

  • Bethoc (Beatrix) Princess of Scotland

born about 0984 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland

married about 1010 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland

siblings:

  • daughter of Crinan de Mormaer Princess of Scotland born about 1011 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
  • Maldred Earl of Dunbar King of Scotland born about 1015 Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland

died about 1045

spouse:

  • Sibyl Fitzsiward

born about 1014 Northumberland, England

died 1070

married 1030 Scotland

children:

  • Malcolm III King of Scotland born about 1033 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland

died 13 Nov 1093 Alnwick, Northumberland, England

buried Holy Trinity Church, Dumferline, Fifeshire, Scotland

  • Melmare (Maelmuire) (Melkofr) Earl of Atholl

born about 1040 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland

  • Donald III "Bane" King of Scotland born about 1033/34 Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland

died after 1097 Rescobie, Angusshire, Scotland buried Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland

Duncan Earl of Moray born about 1038 Morayshire, Scotland

biographical and/or anecdotal:

Macbeth siezed the throne of Scotland in 1040 after defeating and killing *Duncan I near Elgin.

He based his claim to the crown on his wife's royal descent (Duncan's former wife Sibyl).

Malcolm III, (son of Duncan I), and Earl Siward of Northumberland defeated Macbeth at

Dunsinane in 1054, but they did not dethrone him. Three years later, Malcolm III killed

Macbeth at Lumphanan. Macbeth's stepson Lulach reigned for a few months,

and then Malcolm III succeeded him as king.

William Shakespeare based his play, Macbeth, one of his greatest tragedies,

upon a distorted version of these events which he found in

Raphael Holinshed's 'Chronicle of Scottish History.'

The only kernel of historical truth in the play is Duncan's death at the hand of Macbeth.

From this fact, Shakespeare drew his portrait of ambition leading to a violent and tragic end.

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House of Dunkeld, 1034-1286

Duncan succeeded to the throne as the maternal grandson of Malcolm II. After an unsuccessful reign, Duncan was killed in battle by Macbeth, who had a long and relatively successful reign. In a series of battles between 1057 and 1058, Duncan's son Malcolm III defeated and killed Macbeth and Macbeth's stepson and heir Lulach, and claimed the throne. The dynastic feuds did not end there: on Malcolm's death in battle, his brother Donald Ban claimed the throne, expelling Malcolm's sons from Scotland; a civil war in the family ensued, with Donald Ban and Malcolm's son Edmund opposed by Malcolm's English-backed sons, led first by Duncan II and then by Edgar. Edgar triumphed, sending his uncle and brother to monasteries. After the reign of David I, the Scottish throne was passed according to rules of primogeniture, moving from father to son, or where not possible, brother to brother.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Domnall_D%C3%A1sachtach.jpg/70px-Domnall_D%C3%A1sachtach.jpg&imgrefurl=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_monarchs_of_Scotland&usg=__HWHPBS0PjJqtG6GXeq-qb6W2vSo=&h=94&w=70&sz=3&hl=en&start=14&tbnid=HP2XBCdwLKSBLM:&tbnh=80&tbnw=60&prev=/images%3Fq%3Ddonald%2BII%2Bthe%2Bmadman%2Bking%2Bof%2Bthe%2Bpicts%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG

http://www.clan-duncan.co.uk/duncan1.html

	

Duncan was the son of Malcolm II's eldest daughter Bethoc and her husband Crinan, Lay Abbot of Dunkeld. He was about 33 when he succeeded his grandfather. Married to a cousin of Siward, Earl of Northumberland

William Shakespeare based his play, Macbeth, one of his greatest tragedies, upon a distorted version of these events which he found in Raphael Holinshed's 'Chronicle of Scottish History.' The only kernel of historical truth in the play is Duncan's death at the hand of Macbeth. From this fact, Shakespeare drew his portrait of ambition leading to a violent and tragic end.

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From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_443.htm

Duncan was the grandson of King Malcolm II (ruled 1005-34), who irregularly made him ruler of Strathclyde when that region was absorbed into the Scottish kingdom (probably shortly before 1034). Malcolm violated the established system of succession whereby the kingship alternated between two branches of the royal family. Upon Malcolm's death, Duncan succeeded peacefully, but he soon faced the rivalry of Macbeth, Mormaor (subking) of Moray, who probably had a better claim to the throne. Duncan besieged Durham unsuccessfully in 1039 and in the following year was murdered by Macbeth. Duncan's elder son later killed Macbeth and ruled as King Malcolm III Canmore (1058-93).

Duncan married a daughter of Siward, Danish Earl of Northumbria (a Viking) and his first wife Elfleda of Northumbria; Siward, d. 1055, is son of Earl Berne of the Royal House of Denmark. Duncan succeeded his maternal grandfather, Malcolm II, in 1034 ("the first example of inheritance of the Scottish throne in the direct line"); previously he was King of Cumbria (ruling from Strathclyde){-Encycl.Brit.,1956,7:736,20:146}. He was slain by his own general, Macbeth. His male line ruled Scotland until the death of Alexander III in 1286. Duncan is the first king of the House of Atholl.

Killed by MacBeth, his successor. He was slain by his cousin Macbeth, whose wife Gruoch was a claiment

to the throne. His life was forfeited according to the old Gaelic system whereby a king expected to be slain by his rightful successor, unless he could manage to kill him first, a relic from Pagan times...that was written about by William Shakespeare in "MacBeth".

References: [AR7],[Paget1],[RFC],[Weis1],[BurkeP]

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BIOGRAPHY: Married to the daughter or sister of Siward, Earl of Northumberland. Killed by MacBeth, his successor. King of Strathclyde.

Notes: This is the King Duncan who was murdered by Macbeth in the fictional play Macbeth by William Shakespeare. Apparently, Shakespeare used as his source the writings of Raphael Holinshed, author of 'Chronicle of Scottish History', but the only historical fact to survive in Shakespear's rendition is Duncan's death at the hand of Macbeth.

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Duncan I (1001?-40), king of Scotland (1034-40), grandson of King Malcolm II Mackenneth, whom he succeeded. Before his accession to the Scottish throne he was ruler of the kingdom of Strathclyde. Macbeth, who ruled the neighboring kingdom of Moray and served Duncan as a general, killed him and became king of Scotland. Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth is based on the struggle between the two kings.

Source: "Duncan I," Microsoft(R) Encarta(R) 98 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

History: Duncan I (1001?-1040), king of Scotland (1034-1040), grandson of King Malcolm II Mackenneth, whom he succeeded. Before his accession to the Scottish throne he was ruler of the kingdom of Strathclyde. Macbeth, who ruled the neighboring kingdom of Moray and served Duncan as a general, killed him and became king of Scotland. Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth is based on the struggle between the two kings.

History: Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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Donnchad mac Crínáin (en inglés, Duncan) (fallecido el 15 de agosto de 1040) fue rey de Alba. Era hijo de Crínán, de la abad hereditaria de Dunkeld, y de Bethóc, hija del rey Máel Coluim mac Cináeda.

A diferencia del "Rey Duncan" de la obra de William Shakespeare, Macbeth, el Donnchad histórico, y por tanto real, parece haber sido un hombre joven. Sucedió a su abuelo Máel Coluim como rey, tras la muerte de este último el 25 de noviembre de 1034, sin una aparente oposición. Debió ser reconocido como el sucesor legítimo de Máel Coluim o tanista, debido a que la sucesión no no fue inmemorable.[1] Algunos relatos más tempranos, siguiendo a John de Fordun, hacen suponer que Donnchad había sido rey de Strathclyde en tiempos de su abuelo, gobernando el primer reino de Strathclyde como un apanage. Los historiadores modernos, sin embargo, no dan crédito a esta idea.[2

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Duncan I av Skottland (gælisk Donnchad mac Crínáin) 15. august 1001 – 15. august 1040, var skottenes konge, sønn av Crínán av Dunkeld, lekmannsabbed av klosteret i Dukeld og prinsesse Bethoc av Skottland. Han ble konge i Skottland ved å etterfølge sin farfar Malcolm II av Skottland i 1034 etter tidligere å ha styrt som rex Cumbrorum (småkonge) over kongedømmet Strathclyde.

Hans tronebesittelse sies å ha vært det første eksempel i Skottland hvor tronen ble arvet i direkte linje, i motsetning til det gamle gæliske system, tanisteri, hvor kongen valgte sine etterfølger uten hensyn til familiebånd.

Duncan var også kjent som Duncan den nådige, men det er tittel som ikke var dekkende i alle sammenhenger. Hans følelseskalde holdning for politiske spørsmål gjorde ham upopulær blant folk og hos adelen. Duncan var ingen sterkt hersker, og han er hovedsakelig kjent i dag via sin forbindelse med kong Macbeth som ble gjort udødelig av William Shakespeare, skjønt for de gale årsaker. Striden mellom disse angikk nok hvem som skulle kunne kreve den skotske tronen. Detaljene er derimot svært uklare, og det eneste fakta som kan bli slått fast med sikkerhet er at

Duncan ble drept i et slag av Macbeth. Det skjedde i nærheten av Elgin, Moray den 15. august 1040.

Året før, i 1039, marsjerte Duncan sørover med hæren for beleire Durham i Northumbria, men ble beseiret med store tap. Han forsøkte også ta kontroll over Moray, men ble beseiret to ganger av Torfinn den mektige, sønn av jarlen av Orknøyene, før han ble drept i et slag mot Macbeth og senere begravet på Iona.

Detaljer om hans øvrige liv blir stadig diskutert blant historikerne. Den skotske kongeliste, Scottish Regnal List I, kaller hans kone for Suthen, mens John av Fordun nevner henne som en slektning av den danske «Sigurd Bjørnsson» eller «Sigurd Danske», forvansket til Siward av Northumbria, jarl av Northumbria, og i Storbritannias offisielle kongeliste slår fast at hun var Siwards kusine.

To av Ducans sønner, Malcolm III Canmore og Donald Bane ble begge konge av Skottland. En annen sønn, Máel Muire, ble far til Matad, mormaer av Atholl, og dennes sønn, Harald Maddadsson, halvt norsk på morsiden, styrte senere Orknøyene som norrøn jarl.

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Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Scotland was born circa 1001.2 He was the son of Crinan, Mormaer of Atholl and Bethoc of Scotland. He married Sybilla (?), daughter of Siward Digera, Earl of Northumberland and Elfleda (?), circa 1030. He died on 14 August 1040 at Pitgaveny, Elgin, Morayshire, Scotland, killed by a blow from Macbeth.4 He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.

    Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Scotland gained the title of King Duncan of Strathclyde in 1018.3,5 He succeeded to the title of King Duncan I of Scotland on 25 November 1034.

Children of Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Scotland and Sybilla (?)

   * Malcolm III 'Caennmor', King of Scotland+ b. c 1031, d. 13 Nov 1093
   * Donald III 'Donald bane', King of Scotland+ b. c 1033, d. 1099
   * Melmare (?)+ b. c 1035

http://thepeerage.com/p10288.htm#i102879

--------------------

King Duncan I (King of Scotland 1034 - 1040). Duncan was born the son of Crinan, a powerful lay abbot of Dunkeld and Atholl noble, and Bethoc, the daughter of Malcolm II. Very little is known of Duncan but it can be reasonably assumed that he was far younger than the aged Duncan depicted by William Shakespeare. The Annals of Tigernach say that he was killed at an "immature age".

In 1018 Malcolm II's vassal, , Owen the Bald the (last) Welsh king of Strathclyde, died and he granted Duncan the throne. Malcolm II was determined to establish a Royal house, a family claim to the throne. The established system of the right of succession to the Scottish throne tanistry. Under this system the kingship of scotland had, for some time, alternated between two branches of the royal family. Malcolm had decided that his grandson, Duncan, should succeed him to the throne and a feud developed between Malcolm and the Gaelic tribes to the west and the Pictish tribes of the north. During this feud Malcolm managed to kill off several 'tanist' claimants to the throne.

In 1304 Malcolm II died after being wounded in battle with the Moray family and Duncan succeeded him. This united the land of the Picts and Scots with that of Lothian and Strathclyde under one rule for the first time. The day before Duncan's investiture one of his rival claimants was killed and another soon after. However much opposition remained in the north of the kingdom. Macbeth of Moray (Macbethad mac Findlaech), son of Finlech and the daughter of Malcolm II, had a strong claim to the throne in his own right because, like Duncan, he was a grandson of Malcolm II. However Macbeth had a double claim to the throne because, under the law of tanistry, his wife Gruoch, the widowed mother of Lulach, was a granddaughter of Kenneth III. Lulach the Fool, son of Gruoch, also had a strong claim but, because he was only a simple-minded child, it would appear that Duncan did not consider him a threat.

Those in the north would have been further antagonised when Duncan, who had married a sister of Siward the Dane, started to introduce many of his Danish relatives into the Royal court. It would appear that, for the first few years of his short reign, Duncan remained unopposed. In 1039 Duncan made a bold attempt at expanding his lands to the south by raiding the north of England. In confidence he made his way to lay siege at Durham but suffered great loses, many of his cavalry slain and most of his infantry were lost during the retreat.

Macbeth, possibly encouraged by the weakened position of Duncan, formed an alliance with their first cousin Thorfinn, earl of Orkney, Caithness and Sutherland under the King of Norway started a revolt. The rival armies met and Duncan was defeated and killed on August 1, 1040 near Elgin in Moray. There is some dispute as to the exact nature of Duncan's death, some texts say he died in battle and others say he was killed shortly after the battle by Macbeth.

Macbeth immediately seized the throne and Duncan's two sons, Malcolm and Donald, either escaped or were exiled. The eldest, Malcolm Canmore, was brought up in England by his maternal uncle, Earl Siward of Northumbria and Donald Bane (Domnall mac Donnchada or Domnall Bán) was brought up by relatives in the Western Isles/Outer Hebrides


Shakespeare's Duncan I

It is widely accepted that the way in which Duncan I is described in Shakespeare's "Macbeth" is incorrect. It must be remembered that Shakespeare was writing for entertainment purposes and not as a historian and, as such, his writings contain errors and elements which are based purely upon legend. It is clear that historical documentation supports the assumption that Duncan was a young man when he died. Shakespeare described him as aged and grey-bearded with Lady Macbeth being reminded of her father. However it is known that Duncan's father did not die until 1045 and if Shakespeare had been correct that would have Duncan's father reaching an impossible age. Furthermore when Duncan I died his sons, Malcolm and Donald, were still children.

Most historians agree that Duncan died in battle against Macbeth, however, there are some that suggest that he was killed by Macbeth shortly after the battle. All historians agree that he was not killed in his sleep by Macbeth. Shakespear paints Macbeth in an unfair light. I am sure, that having read this article, you will realise that Macbeth behaved like any other claimant to the throne and was within his rights to fight for his rights.

source: http://www.virtualscotland.co.uk/scotland_articles/famous-scots/king-duncan-I.htm

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____________________________________________________

Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Scotland was born circa 1001.2 He was the son of Crinan of Atholl, Mormaer of Atholl and Bethoc of Scotland.1 He married Sybilla, daughter of Siward Digera, Earl of Northumberland and Elfleda, circa 1030.3 He died on 14 August 1040 in Pitgaveny, Elgin, Morayshire, Scotland, killed by a blow from Macbeth.4 He was also reported to have died on 14 October 1043 in Bothnagowan. He was buried in Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.4

    Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Scotland gained the title of King Duncan of Strathclyde in 1018.3,5 He succeeded to the title of King Duncan I of Scotland on 25 November 1034.3 

Family 1 Sybilla

Children Malcolm III 'Caennmor', King of Scotland+ b. c 1031, d. 13 Nov 1093

Donald III 'Donald bane', King of Scotland+ b. c 1033, d. 1099

Melmare+ b. c 1035


Family 2

Child Madach, 1st Earl of Atholl+ b. b 1115, d. bt 1142 - 11526


Citations [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 179. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 180.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 181.

[S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 13. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.

[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 642. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition

--------------------

Sources:

1) Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

2) Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 179. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

3) Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 180.

4) Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 181.

5) Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 13. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.

--------------------

King Duncan the 1st of Scotland (r. 1030 -1040)

Duncan was the son of Malcolm II's eldest daughter Bethoc and her husband Crinan, Lay Abbot of Dunkeld. He was about 33 when he succeeded his grandfather. Married to a cousin of Siward, Earl of Northumberland, he may have favoured southern ways and this is perhaps why he became unpopular with his subjects.

He was not the best tactician and in 1038 he marched south to besiege Durham but he was beaten off, with heavy losses. Duncan attempted to impose his over lordship over Moray (an independent dynasty) by military force. He was then twice defeated by the Earl of Orkney's son, Thorfinn, before being killed in battle by Macbeth, one of his commanders, near Elgin, Morayshire on 14 August 1040 and is at rest with other Scottish in Iona.

William Shakespeare based his play, Macbeth, one of his greatest tragedies, upon a distorted version of these events which he found in Raphael Holinshed's 'Chronicle of Scottish History.' The only kernel of historical truth in the play is Duncan's death at the hand of Macbeth. From this fact, Shakespeare drew his portrait of ambition leading to a violent and tragic end.

by John A. Duncan of Sketraw, KCN, FSA Scot.

--------------------

Sources:

The book, 'The Queen Mother'

The book, 'Scotlands Story', by Tom Steel

The book, 'Scotland, A Concise History', by Fitzroy Maclean

(plus many more ~ see Ancestors/Descendants)


_______________

WEBPAGES:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duncan_I_of_Scotland

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTLAND.htm#_Toc253996186

http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/dunkeld.htm

-------------------- Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duncan_I_of_Scotland -------------------- Duncan was the ancestor of the entire Irving Clan. Sometime before 1034, Duncan was named Prince of Cumberland by his Grandfather, Malcolm II, King of Scotland. Prince Duncan took several of the old Clans to the south border to defend Scotland from England, and Prince Duncan's uncle brought his clan, the Erivine's, with him. They built the Towers of Bonshaw along the banks of the Kirtle and many manor houses in what became the ancient home of the Irving Clan.

Malcolm II had no male heir when he was assassinated in 1034. The throne was occupied by the grandson of Malcolm and son of Erinus, Duncan Erivine I. During his reign, Duncan was defeated in his campaign against the Norsemen and led the remnants of his army home in 1040. While returning, he was attacked and killed by his first cousin, MacBeth the Usurper; who assumed the throne and ruled for 17 years. It is around Duncan's murder that Shakespeare's play MacBeth is based. Erinus was killed by MacBeth's forces in 1045 while seeking revenge for the murder of his son.

-------------------- Acceded to title (King) Nov 1034

Duncan I King of Scotland Fanciful artists impression commisioned many hundred years after his death.


Notes 1 - Duncan was a haemophiliac who bled to death after fighting with MacBeth. In 1034 Malcolm's grandson Duncan I succeeded him, but in 1040 he was killed by Macbeth, who contrary to Shakespearian legend ruled well and wisely tor seventeen years, extending Scotland's connections with England and the Continent, until defeated and killed by Duncan's son, Malcolm III, known as Malcolm Canmore.

2 - Duncan's reign was short and unsuccessful. He was killed, probably in battle at Pitgaveny near Elgin, by a rival claimant and cousin MacBeth.

3 - On Malcolm's death in 1034, Duncan became king, the second to rule all Scotland. He was a weaker man than his grandfather, Malcolm II, with less understanding of the vulnerability of his position. The northern Scots, ever on the watch to snatch the throne, took advantage of this weakness. Macbeth, chief of this powerful race, harboured a claim to the throne through his mother. He fought tenaciously, and finally managed to kill Duncan in 1040 becoming King of Scotland in his place. [ An Illustrated History of Scotland by Elisabeth Fraser pub. 1997 ] [5]


Sources [S265] Colquoun_Cunningham.ged, Jamie Vans

[S260] Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain 2001, Peter Beauclerk Dewar,, (2001.)

[S370] Kings & Queens, Neil Grant, (pub 2003 by HarperCollinsPublishers Hammersmith London W6 8JB), p10 (Reliability: 3)

[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Temp06 (Reliability: 3)

[S370] Kings & Queens, Neil Grant, (pub 2003 by HarperCollinsPublishers Hammersmith London W6 8JB), 2 - p10 (Reliability: 3 --------------------

Notes 1 - Duncan was a haemophiliac who bled to death after fighting with MacBeth. In 1034 Malcolm's grandson Duncan I succeeded him, but in 1040 he was killed by Macbeth, who contrary to Shakespearian legend ruled well and wisely tor seventeen years, extending Scotland's connections with England and the Continent, until defeated and killed by Duncan's son, Malcolm III, known as Malcolm Canmore.

2 - Duncan's reign was short and unsuccessful. He was killed, probably in battle at Pitgaveny near Elgin, by a rival claimant and cousin MacBeth.

3 - On Malcolm's death in 1034, Duncan became king, the second to rule all Scotland. He was a weaker man than his grandfather, Malcolm II, with less understanding of the vulnerability of his position. The northern Scots, ever on the watch to snatch the throne, took advantage of this weakness. Macbeth, chief of this powerful race, harboured a claim to the throne through his mother. He fought tenaciously, and finally managed to kill Duncan in 1040 becoming King of Scotland in his place. [ An Illustrated History of Scotland by Elisabeth Fraser pub. 1997 ] [5]


Sources [S265] Colquoun_Cunningham.ged, Jamie Vans

[S260] Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain 2001, Peter Beauclerk Dewar,, (2001.)

[S370] Kings & Queens, Neil Grant, (pub 2003 by HarperCollinsPublishers Hammersmith London W6 8JB), p10 (Reliability: 3)

[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Temp06 (Reliability: 3)

-------------------- Historical basis of "King Duncan" in Shakespeare's Macbeth -------------------- Main article: Scotland in the High Middle Ages

Malcolm's father Duncan I (Donnchad mac Crínáin) became king in late 1034, on the death of Malcolm II (Máel Coluim mac Cináeda), Duncan's maternal grandfather and Malcolm's Great-grandfather. According to John of Fordun, whose account is the original source of part at least of William Shakespeare's Macbeth, Malcolm's mother was a niece of Siward, Earl of Northumbria,[8][9] but an earlier king-list gives her the Gaelic name Suthen.[10] Other sources claim that either a daughter or niece would have been too young to fit the timeline, thus the likely relative would have been Siward's own sister Sybil, which may have translated into Gaelic as Suthen.

Duncan's reign was not successful and he was killed by Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findlaích) on 15 August 1040. Although Shakespeare's Macbeth presents Malcolm as a grown man and his father as an old one, it appears that Duncan was still young in 1040,[11] and Malcolm and his brother Donalbane (Domnall Bán) were children.[12] Malcolm's family did attempt to overthrow Macbeth in 1045, but Malcolm's grandfather Crínán of Dunkeld was killed in the attempt.[13]

Soon after the death of Duncan his two young sons were sent away for greater safety — exactly where is the subject of debate. According to one version, Malcolm (then aged about 9) was sent to England,[14] and his younger brother Donalbane was sent to the Isles.[15][16] Based on Fordun's account, it was assumed that Malcolm passed most of Macbeth's seventeen-year reign in the Kingdom of England at the court of Edward the Confessor.[17][18]

According to an alternative version, Malcolm's mother took both sons into exile at the court of Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Earl of Orkney, an enemy of Macbeth's family, and perhaps Duncan's kinsman by marriage.[19]

An English invasion in 1054, with Siward, Earl of Northumbria, in command, had as its goal the installation of one "Máel Coluim, son of the King of the Cumbrians". This Máel Coluim has traditionally been identified with the later Malcolm III.[20] This interpretation derives from the Chronicle attributed to the 14th-century chronicler of Scotland, John of Fordun, as well as from earlier sources such as William of Malmesbury.[21] The latter reported that Macbeth was killed in the battle by Siward, but it is known that Macbeth outlived Siward by two years.[22] A. A. M. Duncan argued in 2002 that, using the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle entry as their source, later writers innocently misidentified "Máel Coluim" with the later Scottish king of the same name.[23] Duncan's argument has been supported by several subsequent historians specialising in the era, such as Richard Oram, Dauvit Broun and Alex Woolf.[24] It has also been suggested that Máel Coluim may have been a son of Owen the Bald, British king of Strathclyde[25] perhaps by a daughter of Máel Coluim II, King of Scotland.[26]

In 1057 various chroniclers report the death of Macbeth at Malcolm's hand, on 15 August 1057 at Lumphanan in Aberdeenshire.[27][28] Macbeth was succeeded by his stepson Lulach, who was crowned at Scone, probably on 8 September 1057. Lulach was killed by Malcolm, "by treachery",[29] near Huntly on 23 April 1058. After this, Malcolm became king, perhaps being inaugurated on 25 April 1058, although only John of Fordun reports this.[

-------------------- Donnchad mac Crinain anglicized as Duncan I, and nicknamed An t-Ilgarach, "the Diseased" or "the Sick"; was king of Scotland (Alba) from 1034 to 1040. He is the historical basis of the "King Duncan" in Shakespeare's play Macbeth.

He was son of Crínán, hereditary lay abbot of Dunkeld, and Bethóc, daughter of king Máel Coluim mac Cináeda (Malcolm II).

Unlike the "King Duncan" of Shakespeare's Macbeth, the historical Duncan appears to have been a young man. He followed his grandfather Malcolm as king after the latter's death on 25 November 1034, without apparent opposition. He may have been Malcolm's acknowledged successor or tánaise as the succession appears to have been uneventful. Earlier histories, following John of Fordun, supposed that Duncan had been king of Strathclyde in his grandfather's lifetime, between 1018 and 1034, ruling the former Kingdom of Strathclyde as an appanage. Modern historians discount this idea.

An earlier source, a variant of the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba (CK-I), gives Duncan's wife the Gaelic name Suthen. Whatever his wife's name may have been, Duncan had at least two sons. The eldest, Malcolm III (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada) was king from 1058 to 1093, the second Donald III (Domnall Bán, or "Donalbane") was king afterwards. Máel Muire, Earl of Atholl is a possible third son of Duncan, although this is uncertain.

The early period of Duncan's reign was apparently uneventful, perhaps a consequence of his youth. Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findláich) is recorded as having been his dux, today rendered as "duke" and meaning nothing more than the rank between prince and marquess, but then still having the Roman meaning of "war leader". In context — "dukes of Francia" had half a century before replaced the Carolingian kings of the Franks and in England the over-mighty Godwin of Wessex was called a dux — this suggests that Macbeth may have been the power behind the throne.

In 1039, Duncan led a large Scots army south to besiege Durham, but the expedition ended in disaster. Duncan survived, but the following year he led an army north into Moray, Macbeth's domain, apparently on a punitive expedition against Moray. There he was killed in action, at Bothnagowan, now Pitgaveny, near Elgin, by the men of Moray led by Macbeth, probably on 14 August 1040. He is thought to have been buried at Elgin before later relocated to the Isle of Iona. -------------------- Donnchad mac Crinain anglicized as Duncan I, and nicknamed An t-Ilgarach, "the Diseased" or "the Sick"; was king of Scotland (Alba) from 1034 to 1040. He is the historical basis of the "King Duncan" in Shakespeare's play Macbeth.

He was son of Crínán, hereditary lay abbot of Dunkeld, and Bethóc, daughter of king Máel Coluim mac Cináeda (Malcolm II).

Unlike the "King Duncan" of Shakespeare's Macbeth, the historical Duncan appears to have been a young man. He followed his grandfather Malcolm as king after the latter's death on 25 November 1034, without apparent opposition. He may have been Malcolm's acknowledged successor or tánaise as the succession appears to have been uneventful. Earlier histories, following John of Fordun, supposed that Duncan had been king of Strathclyde in his grandfather's lifetime, between 1018 and 1034, ruling the former Kingdom of Strathclyde as an appanage. Modern historians discount this idea.

An earlier source, a variant of the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba (CK-I), gives Duncan's wife the Gaelic name Suthen. Whatever his wife's name may have been, Duncan had at least two sons. The eldest, Malcolm III (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada) was king from 1058 to 1093, the second Donald III (Domnall Bán, or "Donalbane") was king afterwards. Máel Muire, Earl of Atholl is a possible third son of Duncan, although this is uncertain.

The early period of Duncan's reign was apparently uneventful, perhaps a consequence of his youth. Macbeth (Mac Bethad mac Findláich) is recorded as having been his dux, today rendered as "duke" and meaning nothing more than the rank between prince and marquess, but then still having the Roman meaning of "war leader". In context — "dukes of Francia" had half a century before replaced the Carolingian kings of the Franks and in England the over-mighty Godwin of Wessex was called a dux — this suggests that Macbeth may have been the power behind the throne.

In 1039, Duncan led a large Scots army south to besiege Durham, but the expedition ended in disaster. Duncan survived, but the following year he led an army north into Moray, Macbeth's domain, apparently on a punitive expedition against Moray. There he was killed in action, at Bothnagowan, now Pitgaveny, near Elgin, by the men of Moray led by Macbeth, probably on 14 August 1040. He is thought to have been buried at Elgin before later relocated to the Isle of Iona.

view all 14

Duncan I, King of Scots's Timeline

1001
August 15, 1001
Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
1016
1016
- present
Age 14
King of Strathclyde
1030
1030
Age 28
UK
1030
Age 28
1031
March 26, 1031
Age 29
Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland
1032
1032
Age 30
Perth, Perthshire, Scotland
1034
1034
- 1040
Age 32
1034
- 1040
Age 32
King of Scots
1035
1035
Age 33
Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland
1040
August 14, 1040
Age 39
Elgin, Moray, Scotland, Scotland