Ealdgyth, Queen consort of England

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Ealdgyth, Queen consort of England

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wessex Kingdom, Anglo Saxon England
Death: Died in Tower Hill, London, England
Place of Burial: England
Immediate Family:

Wife of Edmund II 'Ironside' King of England and Sigeferth, Thane in England
Mother of Edmund of England and Edward 'the Exile', Ætheling of England

Occupation: Queen consort of England, Queen of England
Managed by: Jason Scott Wills
Last Updated:

About Ealdgyth, Queen consort of England

Ealdgyth, Algitha, unknown parents. NOT MORCAR'S DAUGHTER!!!

Married:

1. Sigeferth (no children) Morcars' brother

2. Edmund II Ironside

Children with Edmund:

a) Edward the Exile/Atheling

b) Edmund

a) SIGEFERTH (-murdered Oxford summer 1015). Simeon of Durham records that "Sigeferth and Morkar the sons of Earngrim" were killed in 1015 on the orders of "duke Edric Streona" and that the king took possession of their estates[715]. Ætheling Æthelstan, under his will dated [1014], made a bequest to "Sigeferth, an estate at Hockliffe"[716]. With his brother, he was one of the leading thegns of the northern Danelaw. He was murdered on the orders of Eadric "Streona/the Acquisitor" Ealdorman of Mercia[717].

m as her first husband, ÆLDGYTH, daughter of ---. After her husband was killed, she was arrested, but abducted against the wishes of King Æthelred II by his son Edmund, later Edmund "Ironsides" King of England, whom she married as her second husband. Simeon of Durham records that Edmund married "Algitha widow of Sigeferth" in 1015[718].

b) MORCAR (-murdered Oxford summer 1015). King Æthelred II granted land in Derbyshire to "Morcar minister" under a charter dated 1009[719]. With his brother, a leading thegn of the northern Danelaw. Simeon of Durham records that "Sigeferth and Morkar the sons of Earngrim" were killed in 1015 on the orders of "duke Edric Streona" and that the king took possession of their estates[720]. m EALDGYTH, daughter of ÆLFTHRYTH & his wife ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Morcar & his wife had one child:

i) ÆLFGIFU. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m as his first wife, ÆLFGAR Earl of Mercia, son of LEOFRIC Earl of Mercia & his wife Godgifu --- (-1062).

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#AelfgifuNorthumbriaMAelfgarMercia

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ARNGRIM. m ---. The name of Arngrim's wife is not known. Arngrim & his wife had two children:

a) SIGEFERTH (-murdered Oxford summer 1015). Simeon of Durham records that "Sigeferth and Morkar the sons of Earngrim" were killed in 1015 on the orders of "duke Edric Streona" and that the king took possession of their estates[715]. Ætheling Æthelstan, under his will dated [1014], made a bequest to "Sigeferth, an estate at Hockliffe"[716]. With his brother, he was one of the leading thegns of the northern Danelaw. He was murdered on the orders of Eadric "Streona/the Acquisitor" Ealdorman of Mercia[717].

m as her first husband, ÆLDGYTH, daughter of ---. After her husband was killed, she was arrested, but abducted against the wishes of King Æthelred II by his son Edmund, later Edmund "Ironsides" King of England, whom she married as her second husband. Simeon of Durham records that Edmund married "Algitha widow of Sigeferth" in 1015[718].

b) MORCAR (-murdered Oxford summer 1015). King Æthelred II granted land in Derbyshire to "Morcar minister" under a charter dated 1009[719]. With his brother, a leading thegn of the northern Danelaw. Simeon of Durham records that "Sigeferth and Morkar the sons of Earngrim" were killed in 1015 on the orders of "duke Edric Streona" and that the king took possession of their estates[720].

m EALDGYTH, daughter of ÆLFTHRYTH & his wife ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified.

Morcar & his wife had one child:

i) ÆLFGIFU. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.

m as his first wife, ÆLFGAR Earl of Mercia, son of LEOFRIC Earl of Mercia & his wife Godgifu --- (-1062).

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#AelfgifuNorthumbriaMAelfgarMercia

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Ealdgyth (1015–1016), modern English Edith, may have been the name of the wife of Sigeferth son of Earngrim, thegn of the Seven Boroughs, and later of King Edmund Ironside. She was probably the mother of Edmund's sons Edward the Exile and Edmund.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Sigeferth and his brother Morcar, described as "foremost thegns of the Seven Burghs" were killed at an assembly of the English nobility at Oxford. Ealdorman Eadric Streona is said to have killed them "dishonourably" after having invited them to his rooms. The Seven Burghs, otherwise unknown, are presumed to have been the Five Burghs and Torksey and York. Following the killings, King Æthelred the Unready had the property of Sigeferth and Morcar seized and ordered that Sigeferth's widow, whose name the Chronicle does not record, should be detained at Malmesbury Abbey. The chronicle of John of Worcester calls her Ealdgyth.[1]

In the late summer of 1015, at some time between 15 August and 8 September, Edmund Ironside raised a revolt against his father King Æthelred. Either then, or perhaps even earlier, he removed Sigeferth's widow from Malmesbury, against his father's wishes, and married her. Sigeferth and Morcar's friends and allies supported Edmund after this.[2] While two charters issued by Edmund which mention his wife survive from about this time, neither of them contain her name in the surviving texts.[3]

It is generally, but not universally, supposed that Ealdgyth, if that was her name, was the mother of Edmund Ironside's sons.[4] These were Edmund, who died young in exile, and Edward the Exile, who returned to England late in the reign of his uncle King Edward the Confessor and died soon afterwards. Whether she went into exile with her children following Edmund's death in 1016 is unknown.

One reason advanced for supposing that John of Worcester may have been mistaken in naming this woman Ealdgyth is that Sigeferth's brother Morcar had also been married to a woman named Ealdgyth. This Ealdgyth was the daughter of Ælfthryth, and niece of Ælfhelm, Ealdorman of York and Wulfric Spot. While Ealdgyth is a common female name in the period, this coincidence has raised the suspicion that the Worcester chronicle has confused Sigeferth's widow with his sister-in-law.[5]

[edit] Notes

^ Stafford, Unification and Conquest, pp. 67–68; Swanton, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, pp. 145–146, Ms. E, s.a. 1015, & p. 146, note 3; Williams, Æthelred, pp. 132–134 & p. 132, note 6.

^ Swanton, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, p. 146, Ms. E, s.a. 1015; Higham, Death of Anglo-Saxon England, p. 62; Williams, Æthelred, p. 134.

^ These are charters S 947 and S 948; Williams, Æthelred, p. 134 & note 13.

^ For dissent from the common view, see Howard, Ian (2003), Swein Forkbeard's Invasions and the Danish Conquest of England, 991–1017, Woodbridge: Boydell, p. 69, ISBN 0-85115-928-1 .

^ Williams, Æthelred, p. 132, note 6. Insley

[edit] References

Higham, Nick (1997), The Death of Anglo-Saxon England, Stroud: Sutton, ISBN 0-7509-2469-1

Insley, Charles (2000), "Politics, conflict and Kinship in Early Eleventh-Century Mercia", Midland History XXV, http://www.midlandhistory.bham.ac.uk/issues/2000/insleyc.pdf

Stafford, Pauline (1989), Unification and Conquest: A Political and Social History of England in the Tenth and Eleventh Centuries, London: Edward Arnold, ISBN 0-7131-6532-4

Stenton, Frank (1971), Anglo-Saxon England (3rd ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-280139-2

Swanton, Michael (1996), The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, New York: Routledge, ISBN 0-415-92129-5

Williams, Ann (2003), Æthelred the Unready: The Ill-Counselled King, London: Hambeldon & London, ISBN 0-85285-382-4

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ealdgyth_(floruit_1015%E2%80%931016)"

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Ealdgyth (floruit 1015–1016), modern English Edith, may have been the name of the wife of Sigeferth son of Earngrim, thegn of the Seven Boroughs, and later of King Edmund Ironside. She was probably the mother of Edmund's sons Edward the Exile and Edmund.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Sigeferth and his brother Morcar, described as "foremost thegns of the Seven Burghs" were killed at an assembly of the English nobility at Oxford. Ealdorman Eadric Streona is said to have killed them "dishonourably" after having invited them to his rooms. The Seven Burghs, otherwise unknown, are presumed to have been the Five Burghs and Torksey and York. Following the killings, King Æthelred the Unready had the property of Sigeferth and Morcar seized and ordered that Sigeferth's widow, whose name the Chronicle does not record, should be detained at Malmesbury Abbey. The chronicle of John of Worcester calls her Ealdgyth.[1]

In the late summer of 1015, at some time between 15 August and 8 September, Edmund Ironside raised a revolt against his father King Æthelred. Either then, or perhaps even earlier, he removed Sigeferth's widow from Malmesbury, against his father's wishes, and married her. Sigeferth and Morcar's friends and allies supported Edmund after this.[2] While two charters issued by Edmund which mention his wife survive from about this time, neither of them contain her name in the surviving texts.[3]

It is generally, but not universally, supposed that Ealdgyth, if that was her name, was the mother of Edmund Ironside's sons.[4] These were Edmund, who died young in exile, and Edward the Exile, who returned to England late in the reign of his uncle King Edward the Confessor and died soon afterwards. Whether she went into exile with her children following Edmund's death in 1016 is unknown.

One reason advanced for supposing that John of Worcester may have been mistaken in naming this woman Ealdgyth is that Sigeferth's brother Morcar had also been married to a woman named Ealdgyth. This Ealdgyth was the daughter of Ælfthryth, and niece of Ælfhelm, Ealdorman of York and Wulfric Spot. While Ealdgyth is a common female name in the period, this coincidence has raised the suspicion that the Worcester chronicle has confused Sigeferth's widow with his sister-in-law.[5]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ealdgyth_(floruit_1015%E2%80%931016)

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Ealdgyth (floruit 1015–1016), modern English Edith, may have been the name of the wife of Sigeferth son of Earngrim, thegn of the Seven Burghs, and later of King Edmund Ironside. She was probably the mother of Edmund's sons Edward the Exile and Edmund.

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Edith of East Anglia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Edith (Eadgyth) of East Anglia, wife of Edmund II of England (circa 963-1017) was married to Sigeferth, a supporter of Edmund Ironside against his father, Ethelred the Unready. Sigeferth was killed on orders of Ethelred in 1015 by being invited to a feast with Ealdorman Morcar by Eadric Streona and then both were murdered whilst drunk. Edmund II took Edith from the nunnery she had been sent to and married her. They would have two children before Edmund's death in 1016, Edward the Exile and Edmund. Edith hanged herself soon after, before her sons were sent to Kiev in 1017.

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Ealdgyth married Edmund II "Ironside" King Of England, son of Ethelred II "The Unready" King Of England and Alfgifu (Aelflaed) Queen Of England, about Aug 1015 in Of, London, Middlesex, England. (Edmund II "Ironside" King Of England was born about 988 in Of, , Wessex, England, died on 30 Nov 1016 in , London, Middlesex, England and was buried in Of, Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England.)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ealdgyth_%28floruit_1015%E2%80%931016%29

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Ealdgyth married, firstly, Sigeferth, Thane in East Anglia, son of Earngrim, before 1015.2 She married, secondly, Edmund II 'Ironside', King of England, son of Æthelred II 'the Unready', King of England and Ælgifu, circa August 1015 in Malmesbury, Wiltshire, England.3

    Ealdgyth was also known as Eldgith. She was also known as Edith.3 

Family 1 Sigeferth, Thane in East Anglia d. 1015

Family 2 Edmund II 'Ironside', King of England b. between 988 and 993, d. 30 November 1016

Children Edward 'Atheling'+ b. c 1016, d. 10574

Edmund b. bt 1016 - 10174


Citations [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 27. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 26.

[S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grencville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 6. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.


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[Royal Genealogy Data Base]

Says she was the daughter of Sigeferth, a Danish Thane killed in 1015, son of Earnfrim father of Sigeferth and Morcar

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ealdgyth_(floruit_1015%E2%80%931016)

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Ealdgyth, Queen consort of England's Timeline

986
986
Wessex Kingdom, Anglo Saxon England
1010
1010
Age 24
1015
August 1015
Age 29
Of, London, Middlesex, England
1016
1016
Age 30
1016
Age 30
Anglo Saxon England
1016
Age 30
Tower Hill, London, England
1016
Age 30
England
1933
May 27, 1933
Age 30
May 27, 1933
Age 30
May 27, 1933
Age 30