Edmund Freeman, II

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Edmund Freeman, II

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Pulborough, Sussex, England
Death: Died in Sandwich, (Present Barnstable County, Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts)
Place of Burial: Rear of home: oldest burial place in town. He placed 2 boulders after his wife's death called "the saddle and pillion"., Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Edmund Freeman and Alice Coles
Husband of Bennett Freeman and Elizabeth Freeman
Father of Eleanor Freeman; Alice Paddy; Edmund E. Freeman, Jr.; Thomas Freeman; Bennett Freeman and 7 others
Brother of Alice Beauchamp; Eleanor (Elinor) Freeman; John Freeman; William Freeman; Nathaniel Freeman and 2 others

Occupation: settler of Lynn and of Sandwich, Massachusetts
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Edmund Freeman, II

Listed as passengers on the "Abigail", mid-July, 1635:

  • Freeman Edward 34, husbandman #135
  • Freeman Elizabeth 35, wife of Edward #136
  • Freeman Elizabeth 12, #149
  • Freeman Alice 17, #150
  • Freeman Edmund 15, #152
  • Freeman John 8, #153

All the above children would have been born to his first wife, Bennet, who died in 1630.

http://minerdescent.com/2010/05/17/edmund-freeman/

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Edmund Freeman was the first white settler on Cape Cod.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Freeman

Edmund Freeman (c. July 25, 1596 – 1682) was one of the founders of Sandwich, Massachusetts and an Assistant Governor of Plymouth Colony under Governor William Bradford.

Freeman was the son of Edmund and Alice (Coles) Freeman of Pulborough, Sussex, England and was baptised July 25, 1596. Edmund married firstly to Bennett Hodsoll on June 16, 1617, she was buried at Pulborough on April 12, 1630. Freeman along with his second wife Elizabeth and his family set sail from Plymouth, England on 4 June 1635 aboard The Abigail. During the crossing an epidemic of smallpox broke out on shipboard. They arrived in Boston on 8 October 1635 and then settled in Saugus.[3].

Edmund (or Edmond) Freeman was admitted freeman at Plymouth on 23 January 1637.

He was one of the nine founders of Sandwich, Massachusetts. Freeman died in 1682 in Sandwich. He is buried in a well-known, marked private burial plot in Sandwich along with his second wife Elizabeth. -----------------------

July 1635, on the ship "Abigail".  According to "Sandwich" by Vuilleumier, pg.12 - Edmand and Elizabeth Freeman were the town founders.

-------------------- He sailed from England aboard the :Abigail", with Robert Hackwell, master, early in July 1635, arriving the following October. He settled first at Lynn, Massachusetts Bay Colony. On April 3, 1637 he received a grant in Sandwich. Edmund is called a freeman in Plymouth, Mass, on March 7, 1636-37. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He sailed for New England with four surviving children and some other people with his surname on the Abigail in July 1635, and he settled first at Saugus (Lynn) in the Bay Colony. He was evidently the leader of the Saugus men who moved in 1637 to Sandwich, and it was to him that a deed was granted as agent for the others. He became an Assistant in Plymouth Colony, but was not reelected in 1646, and Edward Winslow wrote to Gov. 
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Freeman Family in America

The original member of the Freeman family in America was Edmund Freeman. From Historic Homes and Places of Middlesex County, Mass. P. 1497-8, “Edmund Freeman, the immigrant ancestor, was born in England in 1590, and came in the ship “Abigail” in 1635. [This was one of the first three ships to come to New Plimouth, which therefore made him one of the “old comers” of the Plimouth Colony, in addition to his role as a founder of the Plimouth Colony enterprise in England]. He settled in Lynn, Massachusetts, as early as 1635. Mr Lewis, in his History of Lynn, says, ‘This year [1635] many new inhabitants appear in Lynn in 1635; among them, worthy of note, Mr. Edmund Freeman, who presented to the colony twenty corselets or pieces of plate armor.’ He was subsequently in the Plymouth colony, and with nine associates was soon recognized by the government as a suitable person to originate a new settlement. He was admitted freeman at Plymouth January 2, 1637, and after being for a short time a resident of Duxbury, he settled in what was incorporated later as the town of Sandwich. Most of the grantees of this town were formerly of Lynn. Mr. Freeman had the largest grants and was evidently the foremost man in the enterprise. He was elected as assistant to the governor and commissioner to hear and determine causes within the several contiguous townships. He was one of the first judges of the ‘select’ court of Plymouth county. During the persecution of the Quakers he opposed the course of the government and was fined ten shillings once for refusing to aid in the baiting of Friends under pretense of law. ‘Pre-eminently respected, always fixed in principle, and decisive in action, nevertheless quiet and unobtrusive, a counselor and leader without ambitious ends in view, of uncompromising integrity, and of sound judgment, the symmetry of his entire character furnished an example that is a rich legacy to his descendants.” He died in 1682 at the advanced age of ninety-two. His will is dated June 21, 1682. He was buried on his own land on the hill in the rear of his dwelling at Sandwich. It is the oldest burial place in the town. His grave and that of his wife are marked by two boulders which he placed in position after her death and called from fancied resemblances ‘the saddle and pillion’. His home was a mile and a quarter west of the town hall and near the junction of the old and new county roads to the Cape. He married Elizabeth _________ who died February 14, 1675-1676. Children: 1. Alice, born in England, married Deacon William Paddy, November 24, 1639. 2. Edmund, born in England, married April 22, 1646, Rebecca Prence; (second) Margaret Perry. 3. Elizabeth, born in England in 1625, married John Ellis. 4. John, born in England about 1627, mentioned below. 5. Mary, married Edward Perry.”

Hutchinson says, ‘John Carver, William Bradford, Edward Winslow, Isaac Allerton, Miles Standish, William White, Stephan Hopkins, Richard Warren, John Alden, John Howland, Timothy Hatherly, Thomas Willet, William Thomas, Edmund Freeman, James Cudworth, and Thomas Southworth, were the founders of the Colony of New Plymouth, the settlement of which colony occasioned the settlement of Massachusetts Bay, which was the source of all the other colonies of New England. Virginia was in a dying state, and seemed to revive and flourish from the example of New England.’ He adds, ‘I am not preserving from oblivion the names of heroes whose chief merit is the overthrow of cities, provinces, and empires, but the names of the founders of a flourishing town and colony, if not the whole British Empire in America’” (History of Cape Cod, p. 128.).

“The year 1637 marks the era of the first English settlement on the Cape [Cod]. The settlement at Sandwich was projected by Mr. Edmund Freeman [including Thomas Dexter and others], and others, who, April 3 of this year, obtained a grant from the Colony of Plymouth, and at once, with a large number of families from Lynn, Duxbury, and Plymouth, but chiefly from Lynn, the ancient Saugus, removed to the location designated. The settlement was begun this year under very favorable auspices, although it was not regularly incorporated as a town until about two years later.

“Touching this settlement, the following record appears: ‘April 3, 1637, it is also agreed by the Court that these ten men of Saugus, viz. Edmund Freeman, Henry Feake [& Co] shall have liberty to view a place to sit down, and have sufficient lands for threescore families, upon the conditions propounded to them by the governor and Mr Winslow.’ We may properly regard the energetic movement of Mr. Freeman and associates as the first in the order of the settlement of the towns. This first settlement found the Plymouth Colony just emerging from that state of things so concisely and aptly described by the Baylies, when he says, “for twelve years, Plymouth was the colony and church discipline was the law’ and by Thatcher and earlier writers, who say on the authority of earlier records, ‘The people were governed by the moral law of Moses and the New Testament as paramount to all others.’” (History of Cape Cod, p. 128). It was at the time of the first settlement of the Plymouth Colony outside of Plymouth town that it was agreed that “no law” would be instituted “without the consent of the body of freeman or their representatives legally assembled.” It was also decided that “for the well governing of this colony, it is also ordered that there be a free election annually of governor, deputy governor, and assistants, by vote of the freeman of this corporation” (church membership was required in order to be a “freeman” (ibid.). Mr. Edmund Freeman was listed as a resident of Sandwich and was elected assistant governor of Plymouth Colony under William Bradford in 1640 and yearly thereafter for several years.

The original group of ‘Pilgrims’ had formed an association in Leyden with London merchants called the ‘merchant adventurers’ for a business partnership to last seven years. At that time the patent obtained by William Bradford for the Plymouth Colony was surrendered to the ‘freeman’ of the colony for 1800 pounds under the leadership of Governor William Bradford. Those who undertook the purchase of the partnership were called the “purchasers”, while those who came over on the original ships, the Mayflower, Fortune, and Anne, were called the “old comers”. Edmund Freeman acted as the agent for a Mr. Beauchamp in London who was a purchaser. The “purchasers and old comers” obtained charters to establish new settlements at Yarmouth and ancient Eastham (which later became Brewster and Orleans).

Edmund Freeman was appointed by the Colony Court to “hear and determine all causes and controversies within the three townships now existing on the Cape, not exceeding twenty shillings. In that year Edmund Freeman and the court ordered “that profane swearing should be punished by setting in the stocks three hours, or by imprisonment,” and “that for telling lies, a fine of ten shillings should be imposed for each and every offence, or setting in the stocks two hours.” An act was passed to “prevent idleness and other evils.” The grand jurors were authorized to “take special view and notice all persons, married and single, that have means to maintain themselves, and are supposed to live idly and loosely, and require an account of them how they live; and finding any delinquent, were to order a constable to carry them before a magistrate, or the selectmen, to deal with them as they see fit” (ibid. p. 153).

Other actions taken by Edmund Freeman and his court were settling boundary disputes between Yarmouth and Barnstable, and ordering “Mr. Andrew Hellot to pay Massatumpaine one fathom of beads within two moons, besides the net he allegeth the said Massatumpaine sold him, for the deer the Mr. Hellot’s son bought of Massatumpaine about two years since.” And it was ordered “that Walter Devile shall pay two shillings to Massatumpaine for mending the hole in his kettle which the said Devile shot with his gun—to be paid within one moon next ensuing.” (ibid. p. 158). It was ordered by the General Court that, “Mr. Edmund Freeman, one of the assistants, shall, at the next court holdeth towards Yarmouth and Barnstable, inflict such punishment goods in his house, as according to her fault shall be just and equal.” Later the General Court decided to “provide forces, on account of the Indians, for offensive and defensive war.” Miles Standish was elected captain, and Mr. Edmund Freeman and others to the council of war (ibid. p. 169). Later that year the Plymouth Colony allied for defensive purposes with Massachusetts Bay Colony (Naumkeag (Salem) and Shawmut (Boston), Connecticut Colony (Windsor and Wethersfield) and New Haven Colony. This confederation, called “The United Colonies of New England,” lasted until 1686. New Hampshire (Dover and Portsmouth) and Rhode Island (Providence) were not included as they did not share the same religious orientation as the hardline Puritans present at that time in the Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut and New Haven Colonies.

http://www.bremnerhistory.com/C_2.html ---------------------------- Edmunds wife Bennet listed as the Dau. of John and Faith ( ) (Bacon) Hodsall. Plymouth Colony, its history & people, 1620-1691 By Eugene Aubrey Stratton Pg.294 http://books.google.com/books?id=17zCU76ZtH0C&pg=PA293&lpg=PA293&dq=Edmund+Freeman+July+25,+1596&source=bl&ots=Tk8URhCyCs&sig=TizvAbtzA_qiNltvbdL2A25Z318&hl=en&ei=ZFh4TL3hFpTqnQeV8qGdCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAzge#v=onepage&q&f=false -------------------------------- This source lists only Elizabeth as probably Edmund's second wife. History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters By Leon C. Hills, Leon Clark Hills Pg.49 http://books.google.com/books?id=7R9FrcTCswMC&pg=RA1-PA49&lpg=RA1-PA49&dq=Edmund+Freeman+July+25,+1596&source=bl&ots=UKDHr4jO16&sig=HNpffqrLDDU_n4M6giPPXcbe6DU&hl=en&ei=PV54TOGjL9Srnge5q8mdCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CC4Q6AEwBzgo#v=onepage&q=Edmund%20Freeman%20July%2025%2C%201596&f=false ------------------------------------------------

-------------------- http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bob_fitzgerald&id=I18304

CHILDREN WITH ELIZABETH BEAUCHAMP:

1. Mary FREEMAN b: 2 Jun 1631 in London, Middlesex, England 2. John FREEMAN b: 1 Dec 1627 in Eastham, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts 3. Cycella (Cecelia) FREEMAN b: 1631 in London, Middlesex, England 4. Edmund (Edward) FREEMAN b: 26 Nov 1620 in Billingshurst, Sussex, England c: 26 Nov 1620 in Billingshurst, Sussex, England 5. Edward Perry FREEMAN b: Abt 1635 in Pulborough, Sussex, England 6. Cicelia FREEMAN b: Abt 1633 in Sandwich, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts c: Abt 1631 in Pulborough, Sussex, England 7. John FREEMAN b: 28 Jan 1626 in Pulborough, Sussex, England c: 28 Jan 1626 in Billingshurst, Sussex, England 8. Alice FREEMAN b: 4 Apr 1619 in Pulborough, Sussex, England c: 4 Apr 1619 in Pulborough, Sussex, England

EDMOND FREEMAN - Dawes-Gates, p.349-64, gives a well documented account listing that Edmond Freeman is baptized 25th July 1596 at Saint Mary's Church, Pulborough, Sussex, the son of Edmond and Alice (Coles) Freeman, and he died 2nd November 1682 at Sandwich, Plymouth Colony. He married (1) at Cowfold, Sussex, on 16th June 1617 Bennett Hodsoll, daughter of John and Faith ( ) (Bacon) Hodsoll, who died in 1630 at Pulborough and (2 ) Elizabeth, whose surname is not known, but who may have been the Elizabeth Raymer who married Edmond Freeman on 10 August 1632 at Shipley, Sussex (parish register). He sailed for New England with four surviving children and some other people with his surname on the Abigail in July 1635, and he settled first at Saugus (Lynn) in the Bay Colony. He was evidently the leader of the Saugus men who moved in 1637 to Sandwich, and it was to him that a deed was granted as agent for the others. He became an Assistant in Plymouth Colony, but was not re-elected in 1646, and Edward Winslow wrote to Governor John Winthrop in Boston that "I suppose the country left [Freeman] out in regard of his professed Anabaptistry & Separacon from the Churches' (MHS Collections, 4th series, 6:178 ). The Dawes-Gates account lists also that he is of an unorthodox nature for his time and place, and is later sympathetic to the Quakers. He had business interests of his own in New England, and he had a power of attorney in behalf of his brother-in-law, John Beauchamp, who had continued as one of the four London Undertakers after the other Adventurers sold out their interests. His will dated 21st June 1682, proved 2nd November 1682, named his three "sons," Edmond Freeman, John Freeman, and Edward Perry (whose wife Mary has sometimes been assumed to have been a daughter of Edmond Freeman though no evidence has been found). Also named were his daughter Elizabeth Ellis, and his grandsons Matthias Freeman and Thomas Paddy (MD 12:248). His son Edmond married (1) Rebecca Prence, daughter of Thomas and (2) Margaret Perry. His son John married Mercy Prence, daughter of Thomas. His daughter Elizabeth married John Ellis. His other children are Alice Freeman, she married William Paddy, a daughter Bennett and a son Nathaniel, both of whom died young. For additional commentson the Perrys, see Lydia B. (Phinney) Brownson and Maclean McLean, "Ezra Perry of Sandwich. Mass. (c. 1625-1689), "NEHGR 115:86.

[Plymouth Colony Its History & People 1620-1691 by Eugene Aubrey Stratton] EDMOND FREEMAN is born before 25th July 1596 in Pulborough, Sussex, England. He is christened on 25th July 1596 in Pulborough, Sussex, England. He died between 21st June 1682 and 2nd November 1682 at Sandwich, Barnstable Co., MA. (dates his will is written and presented for probate) [Beverly J. Freeman. The Lineage of Richard Vernon Freeman. Privately published Auburn MA 1971.] Edmund and his family sailed from Oxford on the Abigail in 1635. They settled first in Saugus (later known as Lynn); Edmund's portion of land is the largest. He presented the Colony with 20 corsletts (pieces of plate armor), supposedly for defense against the Indians. In 1637 they removed to Plymouth. Soon after he removed to Sandwich, with ten others, in order "to worship God and to make money". Received a grant of 500 acres from King Charles I (location not specified by Freeman). Edmund was Assistant Governor 1640-1646, and headed a court that settled disputes in area townships. He is dropped from this position because of his "liberal and tolerant principles" and belief in freedom of worship. Edmund and Elizabeth both rode on horseback over the area. They are buried on their own land in the rear of their dwelling -- the oldest burying place in Sandwich. A stone on the property resembled a pillion; shortly after Elizabeth's death, it was hauled by oxen to mark her grave. Another stone resembled a saddle, and Edmond had this placed over the precise spot "where ere long another grave must be digged". The monuments are known as the "Saddle and Pillion"; the burial ground is given to the town of Sandwich shortly before 1971. "A well-worn path leads from the street through a field and then one sees the graves under the trees. From the street the Freeman farm is visible, banked on the side with yellow forsythia bushes." That original homestead burned and a new house was built about 1695, by either son John or grandson John. When Beverly Freeman wrote in 1971, the house is still standing, and the property is occupied by a descendant of John Freeman, Mrs. Everard Pratt.

-------------------- Edmund Freeman (c. July 25, 1596 - 1682) was one of the founders of Sandwich, Massachusetts and an Assistant Governor of Plymouth Colony under Governor William Bradford.

Freeman was the son of Edmund and Alice (Coles) Freeman of Reigate, Surrey, England and was baptised July 25, 1596. Edmund married firstly to Bennett Hodsoll in 1617, she died in 1630 in England. Freeman along with his second wife Elizabeth and his family set sail from Plymouth, England on 4 June 1635 aboard The Abigail. During the crossing an epidemic of smallpox broke out on shipboard. They arrived in Boston on 8 October 1635 and then settled in Saugus.

Edmund (or Edmond) Freeman was admitted freeman at Plymouth on 23 January 1637.

He was one of the nine founders of Sandwich, Massachusetts. Freeman died in 1682 in Sandwich. He is buried in a well-known, marked private burial plot in Sandwich along with his second wife Elizabeth.

Edmund Freeman

One of the Ten Men of Saugus

From the book, Ellenwood, Wharton and 20 Allied Families;

In 1635 the ship, ABIGAIL came from England, and among her passengers was, "MR. EDMUND FREEMAN, who presented to the Colony twenty corsletts or pieces of plate armor." The use of the "MR." before his name is of interest, as the History of Massachusetts Bay tells us that in a list of 100 freemen not more than four or five were distinguished by this title. He was at Saugus (Lynn) in 1635, admitted freeman at Plymouth 2 Jan. 1637, was of Duxbury a short time, and was one of the "ten men of Saugus" mentioned in Plymouth Records 3 April 1637 who were granted authority to form a new settlement, which was the first English town on Cape Cod, the Town of Sandwich. We learn his status from the fact that, of the 58 who were entitled to shares in the division of lands, his portion was much the largest. He was early appointed the head of a court of three, was always prominent and influential, and from 1640 to 1647 was successively elected assistant to Governor Bradford.

EDMOND (1) FREEMAN, b. Pulborough, Essex, England 1590, d. in Sandwich 1682, where his grave may still be seen. Confusion has existed regarding his wives, and grateful acknowledgment is given the well known genealogist, John Insley Coddington, who furnished me the following data based on research he did in England in 1936-37: "EDMOND (1) FREEMAN m. 1st at Cowfold, Co. Sussex, Eng. 16 June 1617, BENNET(T) HODSOLL, and she was the mother of his six children. He m. 2nd at a date and place unknown, perhaps in England, perhaps in New England, a widow named ELIZABETH(???)." Her gravestone in Sandwich reads: Born in England 1600 Died in Sandwich 1675-6.

-------------------------------------------------------------

From the book, Thomas Tupper and His Descendants;

"Mr. Edmund Freeman, a native of Pulborough, county Sussex, was a brother-in-law to John Beauchamp, merchant of London, to whom the leaders of the colony in New Plymouth were heavily indebted. Mr. Freeman was also brother-in-law of the Earl of Warwick, whose word went a great way with the leaders of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay. He came over under power of attorney from John Beauchamp to collect monies due from the Plymouth colonists, and also armed with authority to organize a colonization under his own initiative granted through the direction of his powerful kinsman. He made the collections for his principal, and opportunely, after a short residence in Duxbury, he made use of his organizing authority to promote the establishment of a town on Cape Cod, the first in that section of the Colony.

At a sitting of the Court of Assistants held at Plymouth 3 April 1637 permission was obtained from the government of New Plymouth to begin this settlement, in these oft-quoted words: "... agreed by the Court that those ten men of Saugus, viz: Edmund Freeman, Henry Feake, Thomas Dexter, Edward Dillingham, William Wood, John Carman, Richard Chadwell, William Almy, Thomas Tupper and George Knott, shall have liberty to view a place to sit down and have sufficient lands for three score families, upon the conditions propounded by the Governor and Mr. Winslow." The result of this action was the settlement of what came to be called Sandwich, the first town on Cape Cod, and the ten men named, known as the proprietors of the new town, were soon on the ground. The grant was made to these ten men on the assumption that they were all church members and freemen, and that being such they would receive into the township when organized only such persons as already were church members or fit to become so. Mr. Edmund Freeman picked his own associates in the enterprise, and the nine men who with himself were known as the ten proprietors of Sandwich were of his own choice from the list of his personal friends. It has been stated that Freeman displayed a well balanced judgment in this choice, with respect to his associates' station in life and their respective ages. Including himself five were men of means, the other four being Carman, Dexter, Feake and Chadwell, the other five being in contrasting moderate circumstances, namely, Almy, Dillingham, Wood, Tupper and Knott. Similarly, ages were balanced; Dexter, Feake, Carman, Knott and Tupper being each well past fifty, whereas Freeman himself, Almy, Dillingham, Wood and Chadwell were all comparatively young men. Whether or not this adjustment was intentional on his part it worked to advantage, and in any event the apportionment gives us an interesting angle on the ten proprietors. Of the ten, five eventually moved from the community, the five remaining to end their days in Sandwich being Edmund Freeman, George Knott, Richard Chadwell, Edward Dillingham and Thomas Tupper."

There is no good evidence for the maiden surname of Elizabeth, second wife of Edmund Freeman. Robert Charles Anderson lists her surname as blank. Homer Worthington Brainard says she was a widow, Elizabeth Perry. Both Rosemary Canfield and Henry J. Perry suggest that she may have been the Elizabeth Raymer who married at Shipley, Sussex, 10 Aug 1632, Edmund Freeman. Shipley is a village about four miles from Billinghurst on the road to Cowfold.

Edmund, husbandman, ae. 45, Thomas, ae. 24, Edmund or Edward, husbandman, ae. 34, Elizabeth, ae. 35, Alice, ae. 17, Edward, ae. 15, Elizabeth, ae. 12, and John, ae. 8, came in the Abigail in July, 1635. Making allowance for errors in age and the probable repetition of names, this record applies to Mr. Edmund F. and his family. He settled first at Saugus; rem. to Sandwich. [Plym. Col. Rec. I, 57.] Sold lands at Scituate 10 March, 1642, on behalf of his brother-in-law Mr. John Beauchamp, one of the adventurers of the Plymouth Colony. Frm. 7 Feb. 1636-7. Assistant. His dau. Alice m.

William Paddy; Elizabeth m. John Ellis, and Mary m. Edward Perry. His wife Elizabeth d. Feb. 14, 1675.

From Pioneers of Massachusetts

1. He had married Bennett Hodsoll (born ca 1598) on June 16, 1617 at St Peter's Church in Cowfold. She was from Cowfold. They had children: Alice, born 1618; Edmund Jr, born 1620; Elizabeth, born 1623; and John (my ancestor), born 1627, all of whom sailed across the Atlantic in July 1635 on the Abigail, arriving in Saugus, Massachusetts, now called Lynn, in October 1635.

2. His first wife, Bennett had died and been buried in Pulborough on April 12, 1630. His daughter Bennett, baptized in 1621, had died on or before January 13, 1634; and his son Nathaniel, baptized in 1629, had died 12 days later.

3. Edmund Freeman married a second time to Elizabeth Rayment in neighboring Shipley on August 10, 1632.

4. These conditions, plus the inheritance received in January 1623-4, had a bearing on his decision to migrate.

Also, he was a Puritan-a Separatist like the Pilgrims-who objected to the ways and means of the Church in England that were fostered and supported by King James I.

5. His brother-in-law John Beauchamp, a salt merchant from London, was one of the prime financiers of the Pilgrims, Another brother-in-law. Sir Robert Rich, Earl of Warwick: (1587-1658), "whose word went a great way with the leaders of the Colony of Massachusetts" "was a British nobleman and Colonial Administrator. He organized privateering missions and colonial ventures as a Member of the Virginia Company and of the Council of the New England Company. He helped found the colonies of Plymouth (Massachusetts), Connecticut, Virginia, and Rhode Island . In 1643 Warwick was appointed the Lord High Admiral and Governor-in-Chief of all British royal colonies".

The Edmund Freeman family lived in Saugus during 1635-6, moved to Duxbury and Plymouth in 1636-7. On March 3, 1636-7, Edmund Freeman attended a "general meeting of all accepted freemen" at Plymouth (page 28, "Sandwich"). Research identified no properties owned by him in Saugus, Duxbury, and Plymouth.

According to "Sandwich", page 4, "The impetus for founding the new town (i.e.. Sandwich) on Cape Cod originated from a dedicated and persuasive leader, Edmund Freeman of Pulborough, Sussex". Plymouth Colony Records, dated April 3, 1637, indicate he was the leader of the "Ten Men of Saugus" who received the chartering authority to create this town and plan for 60 families to inhabit it in . 1637.

Although actively involved in the settling of Sandwich, Edmund Freeman took time off in 1639 to sail back to Sussex, England on family financial affairs. He returned shortly with a consignment of hats worth 52 pounds.

The Pilgrims of Plymouth had arranged for financing of their venture with Merchants in London including John Beauchamp. The agreement stated that the monies loaned were to be repaid in 1627. As stated repeatedly in Governor Bradford's "Of Plimouth Plantation" poor account keeping and chicanery greatly increased the obligation to the Merchants. And the debt went on and on. When Edmund Freeman sailed to the Colony, he carried with him the authority from John Beauchamp to handle this financial responsibility. He was Beauchamp's agent.

From 1640 to 1646, Edmund Freeman was Assistant Governor serving Governor Bradford and also Governor Prence.

Edmund Honington Freeman (son of John Freeman and Isham) was born Abt. 1560 in Pulborough, Sussex, England, and died Jun 06, 1623 in Pulborough, Sussex, England. He married Alice Coles on Jan 01, 1592 in Pulborough, Sussex, England.

More About Edmund Honington Freeman and Alice Coles:

Marriage: Jan 01, 1592, Pulborough, Sussex, England.

If it helps, my records show that Edmund had one child with Elizabeth Beauchamp: Mary Freeman, b. 2 June 1631, London, England, d. 16 February 1694. One can deduce that it is not Benett's child, as she died in 1630. I'm not sure, but she may have married Edward Perry.

Correction...Make that Elizabeth RAYMER, whom he married in Aug 1632 in Shipley, Sussex, England. The record reads, "Edmundus Freiman & Elizabetha RAYMER nupti fudrunt decimo die Augusti" by license, 1632 in Shipley

-------------------- 1635- Resided in Saugus/ Lynn, MA.

1637, January 2- Admitted freeman of Plymouth, MA. He was then a resident of Duxbury, MA for a short time.

1637, April3- Given leave by the colonial Government to establish along with others the first town on the Cape, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA.

He is buried about a mile and a quarter west of the Sandwich, MA Town Hall on what was once part of his homestead land. -------------------- Founder of the Town of Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA was assistant to Governor Bradford (Mass) 1640-1647

Twenty-two coats of Arms are registered to the Freeman name in Great Britain and Ireland, but only two came to America. The one in this file is the one that Edmond brought with him to Lynn in 1635. The motto is "Liber et Audax" , "Free and Bold" Source: FHL US/CAN book area 929.273 A1 No.4583

Edmund FREEMAN bapt 25 Jul 1596 in St. Mary's, Pulborough, Sussex, England; married: 13 Oct 1617 Bennett Hodsoll (had 6 children, two died early; died in 1630); secound marrige to an Elizabeth Raymen or Raymond or Raynier August 10, 1632 at Cowfold, Shipley, Sussex and had four children with them, Alice 17, Edmund Jr. 15, Elizabeth 12, and John 8 (ages in 1635 when embarked on the Abigail and a fifth child, Mary, may have been born in Mass. or adopted); died: 1682 "age 92" in Sandwich MA; will dated 21 Jun 1682, proved 2 Nov 1682; Son of Edmond FREEMAN and Alice COLES. Edmond - remained in Sandwich all his life, suported good causes such as rebuilding the mill and meeting house, oppossed persecution of the Quakers, died 1682 the of the Ten Men of Saugus.

Sources: Sandwich A Cape Cod Town by R.A. Lovell, Jr. 3rd edition and the Cowfold, Shipley, Sussex, Enland church records.

Children: 1 Alice b. 1618 (England ae 17 on Abigail - 1635) bapt 4 Apr 1619 (St. Mary's Essex Eng) m. 24 Nov 1639 Deacon William PADDY d. 24 Apr 1651 - 2. Edmund bapt. 26 Nov 1620 in St. Mary's, Pulborough, Essex England m. 18 Jul 1651 Margaret PERRY in Sandwich MA d. 29 Mar 1673 in Sandwich MA - 3. Bennett bapt 20 Jan 1621 d. 1633 - 4. Elizabeth b. 1623 (England ae 12 on the Abigail - 1635) bapt. 11 Apr 1624 m. John ELLIS - 5. John b. 1627 (28 Jan 1626) (England ae 8 on the Abigail 1635) m. 13 Feb 1649 Mercy PRENCE d. 28 Oct 1719 (Eastham MA) - 6. Nathaniel bapt 2 Sep 1629 d. 1629 - 7. Mary b. aft 1635 (MA) 1653 Edward PERRY

Indisputably Edmund helped to establish the wonderful Cape Cod town of Sandwich MA in what is now Barnstable County. He migrated from England aboard the Abigail in 1635 where the ship's manifest list him as age 45 and travelling with his wife Elizabeth and children Alice (age 17), Edmund (age 15), Elizabeth (age 12) and John (age 8). The family first went to what is now Lynn where he is recorded in in 1635. He also appeared in Plymouth (where he was made a freeman 2 Jan 1637) and in Duxbury records before finally moving to Sandwich (his grant for the settlement of Sandwich was given by the king and was dated 3 Apr 1637). He was the first English settler on Cape Cod and served as assistant governor to the Colonial Governor (William Bradford) seven consecutive terms beginning in 1640. Other public offices that he was known to have held included membership on the Council of War in 1642 and Deputy to the General Court in 1646. His two sons who survived to manhood both married daughters of Governor Thomas PRENCE (who's wife was Mayflower daughter Patience BREWSTER). The Tolland & Windham book says that he "continued to hold public office and exert a wide influence up to the time of his death" and that he was "buried on his own land on the hill at the rear of his dwelling".

Sources: Tolland and Winham Counties, Connecticut- Biographies - 1903; Freeman Genealogy in Three Parts by Frederick Freeman - 1875; Sandwich MA Vital Records; Our Family Museum: A Collection of Family History Notes

Edmond was generally recognized as disfavoring the church and legislative censure and coercion of the Quakers. He was said to have sympathized with them, and that his views were too liberal for the times. Edmond, after having been a Maglstrate or assistant to the Governor for several years, was permanently dropped at the next election, and some said it was because of his theological tolerance.

It was in the year 1658 that the "Monthly Meeting" of the Quakers was established at Sandwich. Public opinion in this section in favor of the Quakers became so prevelant, and efforts to protect them from the harshness became so frequent that in June 1658 the Plymouth government appointed George Barlow as the state marshal for the locality. He was to coliect the fines and punish the offenders, but his unfairness only increased the resentment. Knowing the feelmg of the Freeman family toward the Quakers, George Barlow had the audacity to ask Edmond for aid in his duties, for which he received an indignant refusal. This prompted Barlow to make a complaint at court for which Edmond was fined ten shillings.

At one court in 1661 the fines amounted to 150 pounds for the attendance at Quaker meetings, and for refusing to take the oath of fidelity. One list of fines imposed upon nineteen Quakers in and a-round Sandwich for this period showed a total of 660 pounds, of which over 89 pounds was paid by Edward Perry. In March 1676 Edward Perry proclaimed that he had received a message from God, saying that the sufferings of New England were caused by general sin and by the persecution of the Quakers, and demanded that this message be published by the governments of Plymouth and Massachusetts.

Edmond's wife Elizabeth died on 14 February 1675-76 and was buried on the hill of the Freeman farm. It is said that Edmond and his sons placed a large stone which in shape resembled a pillion, as a monument for her grave Another, longer stone was placed nearby, which was similar in form to a saddle. These two large stones are known as "the saddle and pillion", and family tradition tells us that they reminded Edmond of the early years in Sandwich when he and Elizabeth traveled by horseback over the fields of their farm. Edmond Freeman died in 1682 and was buried beside Elizabeth and the longer stone, "the saddle", was placed over his grave.

At one time these graves were encircled by a stone fence, remnants of which were still visible in the late 1800's. The beautiful bronze tablets which are presently on these stone monuments were placed there on 22 August 1910 by members of the Freeman family, descendants of Edmond. The photographs of these monuments on page five are by courtesy of Stanley C. Freeman.

ref: Freeman Genealogy; Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines; Planters of the Commonwealth by Charles E.Banks Source: "Freeman Families of Nova Scotia" FHL Book area US/CAN 929.271 F877f v.1

Sources: 1.Abbrev: The Pioneers of Massachusetts Title: Charles Henry Pope, The Pioneers of Massachusetts : a descriptive list, drawn from records of the colonies, towns and churches, and other contemporaneous documents (Baltimore : Geneal. Pub., 1991)rawn from records of the colonies, towns and churches, and other contemporaneous documentsrawn from records of the colonies, towns and churches, and other contemporaneous documents. Baltimore : Geneal. Pub., 1991. Name: Footnote Name: ShortFootnote Name: Bibliography Repository: Name: LDS Family History Library Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA

Page: p. 175 2.Abbrev: The Great Migration, 1634-1635 Title: Robert Charles Anderson, George F. Sanborn Jr., Melinde Lutz Sanborn, The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England 1634-1635 (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999)he Great Migration, Immigrants to New England 1634-1635he Great Migration, Immigrants to New England 1634-1635. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999. Name: Footnote Name: ShortFootnote Name: Bibliography Repository: Name: NEHGS Circulating Library Framingham, MA 01701

Page: Vol. II, p. 579 3.Abbrev: New England Marriages Prior to 1700, CD Title: Clarence Almon Torrey ; with an introduction by Gary Boyd Roberts ; prepared for publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, CD with Torrey's References (Baltimore, Md. : Genealogical Publishing Company, c1985 CD ver. Boston: NEHGS, 2001)pared for publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, CD with Torrey's Referencespared for publication by Elizabeth P. Bentley. New England Marriages Prior to 1700, CD with Torrey's References. Baltimore, Md. : Genealogical Publishing Company, c1985 CD ver. Boston: NEHGS, 2001. Name: Footnote Name: ShortFootnote Name: Bibliography Repository: Name: Tim Farr Washington, UT 84780USA 4.Abbrev: Shipley, Sussex Church Records Title: Church of England, Shipley, Sussex Church Records Name: Footnote Name: ShortFootnote Name: Bibliography Repository: Name: LDS Family History Library Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA

Page: Item 11, 1632 5.Abbrev: New England Marriages 3rd Supplement Title: Melinde Lutz Sanborn, <i>New England Marriages Third Supplement</i> (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing C0., 2003)ltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing C0., 2003. Name: Footnote Name: ShortFootnote Name: Bibliography Repository: Name: NEHGS Circulating Library Framingham, MA 01701

Page: p. 103

-------------------- Note: There is an Edmond Freeman (born in England in 1590 and married to Elizabeth, born in England in 1600) who was co-founder of Town of Barnstable in 1637 and whose descendents still live on the family farm there. He was also Asst. to Gov Bradford. Since Bennett Hodsoll died in 1630 in England, Elizabeth may have been his 2nd wife. DOB is a bit off, but date and place of death match up! See story page 197-198 of Towns of New England...Vol 1-2 by State Street Trust Co., Boston, Allan Forbes [See http://sandwichhistory.org/dbayley/?page_id=286]

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Freeman

http://www.immigrantships.net/v2/1600v2/abigail16351008.html#Winthrop : Freeman Edmond II - baptized 25 Jul 1596, died at age 86, body was interred at Old Town Cemetery, in Sandwich Plymouth colony. Will on 21 Jun 1682 in Sandwich, Inventory of estate in Sandwich taken on 4 Oct 1682, amount unknown, probated 2 Nov 1682. He married first Bennett Hodsoll in 1617, who died in England in 1630 and then he married Elizabeth Perry in 1632. She is on this voyage. Edmond III and Alice on this voyage are both children of Edmond II and Bennett. -------------------- Freeman along with his second wife Elizabeth and his family set sail from Plymouth, England on 4 June 1635 aboard The Abigail. During the crossing an epidemic of smallpox broke out on shipboard. They arrived in Boston on 8 October 1635 and then settled in Saugus.[3]

Edmund (or Edmond) Freeman was admitted freeman at Plymouth on 23 January 1637.

He was one of the ten founders of Sandwich, Massachusetts. Freeman died in 1682 in Sandwich. He is buried in a well-known, marked private burial plot in Sandwich along with his second wife Elizabeth.

From Wikipedia entry for Edmund Freeman.

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Edmund Freeman, II's Timeline

1596
July 25, 1596
Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
St Mary's Church, Pulborough, Sussex, Eng
July 25, 1596
Saint Mary's Church, Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
St.Marys Church, Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
Saint Mary's Church, Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
St.Marys Church, Pulborough, Sussex, England
July 25, 1596
St Mary's Church,Pulborough,Sussex,England