Edmund I "The Magnificent", King of the English

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Ēadmund

Nicknames: "The Magnificent", "the Deed-doer", "the Just"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wessex, England
Death: Died in Pucklechurch, Dorset, England
Place of Burial: Glastonbury Abbey, Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Edward I "The Elder", King of the Anglo-Saxons and Eadgifu
Husband of Saint Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury and Æthelflæd, Queen of England
Father of Eadwig, King of the English and Edgar I "The Peaceful", King of the English
Brother of Eadburgha Edburga of Wessex, Nun at Nunnaminster; Elgiva England Sigurdsson; Eadgifu and Princess of England Eadgifu Edgiva, Gewissa Courcy
Half brother of Aelfgifu of England, Duchess of Bohemia; Eadwin Edwin Æthling of Wessex; Ælfweard, King of the English; Ēadgifu Ogive of Wessex, Queen of France; Æthelhild, Nun at Wilton and 11 others

Occupation: cr Kingston-upon-Thames 29.11.939; King of England from 939 until his death; Roi de Wessex, d'Angleterre, 940, murdered king, King of England, The Magnificant, King 939 - 946, Roi d'Angleterre
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
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About Ēadmund

Ēadmund I 'the Magnificent

Links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Edwarddied924B

Edmund I (Old English: Ēadmund) (922 – 26 May 946), called the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Athelstan. Athelstan died on 27 October 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king.

Married: 1. Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury, St Ælfgifu, two children: a) Eadwig b) Edgar 'the Peaceble' 2. Æthelfled, no children

King Edward "the Elder" & his third wife (EADGIFU, daughter of SIGEHELM Lord of Meopham, Cooling and Lenham in Kent) had four children:

13. EADMUND (921-murdered Pucklechurch, Gloucestershire 26 May 946, bur Glastonbury Abbey[1690]). "Eadmundus regis frater" subscribed charters of King Æthelstan dated 931 and 939, under the latter also being the grantee of land at Droxford, Hampshire[1691]. He fought with his half-brother King Æthelstan at Brunanburh in 937[1692]. He succeeded his half-brother in 939 as EDMUND King of Wessex, crowned 29 Nov 939 at Kingston-upon-Thames. Olaf Guthfrithson King of Dublin invaded England in 939 and by the end of that year had occupied York. In raids on northern Mercia the following year, King Olaf took Tamworth and nearby land, and under a treaty agreed with King Edmund took the whole of modern Leicestershire, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. King Olaf continued by invading Northumbria over the Tees, but died before the end of 940. King Edmund regained the lost territories from Olaf's successor Olaf Sihtricson in 942. King Edmund brought Northumbria under his control in 944, expelling both Olaf Sihtricson and Rægnald Guthfrithson from York. From that time he may be regarded as king of a united England. He ravaged Strathclyde in 945. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death on St Augustine's day 946 of King Edmund[1693]. Simeon of Durham records that King Edmund was killed "VII Kal Jun" in 946 and buried at Glastonbury[1694]. Florence of Worcester records that he was stabbed to death by Leof "a ruffianly thief" while attempting to defend his steward from being robbed[1695].

[m firstly] ([940]) ÆLFGIFU, daughter of --- & his wife Wynflæd --- (-Shaftesbury Abbey after 943). "Alfgifu concubine regis" subscribed a 943 charter of King Edmund[1696]. This reference suggests that Ælfgifu was not married to King Edmund, corroborated by another charter of the same year1700 in which his [second] wife is differentiated by the epithet "regina" and the dating of which (if accurate) suggests that the king's relationship with both "wives" was simultaneous. If this is correct, Ælfgifu's date of death cannot necessarily be assumed to be [944/46]. She was popularly reputed a saint after her death as St Elgiva[1697]. Ælfgifu was probably the daughter of Wynflæd as "Wynflæd aua mea" is named in King Edgar's grant of confirmations to Shaftesbury Abbey dated 966[1698].

m [secondly] (943 or before) ÆTHELFLÆD, daughter of ÆLFGAR Ealdorman of the Wilsaetas & his wife --- (Damerham, Wiltshire ----Shaftesbury Abbey [after 975/92], bur Shaftesbury Abbey). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle names "Æthelflæd of Damerham, daughter of ealdorman Ælfgar" as queen of King Edmund in 946[1699]. "Eadmundus rex" granted "Æthelflæd regina sua" lands in Hampshire and Dorset by charter dated 943[1700]. She became a nun at Shaftesbury Abbey.

King Edmund & his first [wife] had two children:

a) EADWIG ([940]-1 Oct 959, bur Winchester Cathedral). "Eaduuius filius regis" subscribed a charter of King Edmund dated 941[1701]. As an infant, he was passed over for the succession in 946 in favour of his uncle. "Eadwig rex" subscribed a charter of King Edmund dated 946 and "Eadwig cliton" one of King Eadred dated 956[1702]. He succeeded his uncle in 955 as EADWIG King of England, crowned [26] Jan 956 at Kingston-upon-Thames. The people of Mercia and Northumbria rebelled against him in 957 and elected his brother Edgar king, after which the River Thames formed the boundary between the two kingdoms[1703]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the death 1 Oct 959 of King Eadwig[1704]. m ([955], separated 958) ÆLFGIFU, daughter of [EADRIC & his wife Æthelgifu] (-Gloucester [Sep 959][1705]). There is no direct proof that Ælfgifu whose will is dated to [966/75] was the same person as the wife of King Eadwig but this looks likely. Ælfgifu and her husband were separated on grounds of consanguinity by Oda Archbishop of Canterbury[1706], but the precise relationship has not been found. Weir dates the death of Ælfgifu to [Sep 959][1707] but the source on which this is based is not known and the date is inconsistent with the dating of the will. The will of "Ælfgifu" dated to [966/75] devises estates at Mongewell and Berkhampstead to "Ælfweard and Æthelweard and Ælfwaru", grants to "my sister Ælfwaru…all that I have lent her", and "to my brother's wife Æthelflæd the headband which I have lent her"[1708].

b) EDGAR ([943]-Winchester 8 Jul 975, bur Glastonbury Abbey). Florence of Worcester records the birth of "filium…Eadgarum" to "regi Eadmundo…sua regina sancta Ælfgiva", undated but dateable to [943] from the context[1709]. Reuniting the kingdom on his brother's death, he succeeded in 959 as EDGAR "the Peaceable" King of England. - see below.

------------------------------- (Wikipedia cont) Military threats Shortly after his proclamation as king he had to face several military threats. King Olaf III Guthfrithson conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands. When Olaf died in 942 Edmund reconquered the Midlands. In 943 he became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria. In the same year his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Olaf Cuaran and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945 Edmund conquered Strathclyde but ceded the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland in exchange for a treaty of mutual military support. Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began.

Louis IV of France One of Edmund's last political movements of which we have some knowledge is his role in the restoration of Louis IV of France to the throne. Louis, son of Charles the Simple and his English queen Eadgifu, had resided at the West-Saxon court for some time until 936, when he returned to be crowned King of France. In the summer of 945, he was captured by the Norsemen of Rouen and subsequently released by Duke Hugh the Great, who however, held him in custody. The chronicler Richerus claims that Eadgifu wrote letters both to Edmund and to Otto I in which she requested support for her son; Edmund responded to her plea by sending angry threats to Hugh, who however, brushed them aside.[1] Flodoard's Annales, one of Richerus' sources, report: “ Edmund, king of the English, sent messengers to Duke Hugh about the restoration of King Louis, and the duke accordingly made a public agreement with his nephews and other leading men of his kingdom. [...] Hugh, duke of the Franks, allying himself with Hugh the Black, son of Richard, and the other leading men of the kingdom, restored to the kingdom King Louis.[2][3] ” [edit]Death and succession

On 26 May, 946, Edmund was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, while celebrating St Augustine's Mass Day in Pucklechurch (South Gloucestershire).[4] John of Worcester and William of Malmesbury add some lively detail by suggesting that Edmund had been feasting with his nobles, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. He attacked the intruder in person, but in the event, Edmund and Leofa were both killed.[5] Edmund's sister Eadgyth, wife to Otto I, died (earlier) the same year, as Flodoard's Annales for 946 report.[6] Edmund was succeeded as king by his brother Edred, king from 946 until 955. Edmund's sons later ruled England as: Eadwig of England, King from 955 until 957, king of only Wessex and Kingdom of Kent from 957 until his death on 1 October 959. Edgar of England, king of only Mercia and Northumbria from 957 until his brother's death in 959, then king of England from 959 until 975.

-------------------- Athelstan died on October 27, 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king. Shortly after his proclamation as king he had to face several military threats. King Olaf I of Dublin conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands. When Olaf died in 942 Edmund reconquered the Midlands. In 943 he became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria. In the same year his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Olaf Cuaran and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945 Edmund conquered Strathclyde but conceded his rights on the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland. In exchange they signed a treaty of mutual military support. Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began.

Edmund was murdered in 946 by Leofa, an exiled thief. He had been having a party in Pucklechurch, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. After the outlaw refused to leave, the king and his advisors fought Leofa. Edmund and Leofa were both killed:

But William, libro ij° de Regibus, seyth (says) that this kyng kepyng a feste at Pulkirchirche, in the feste of seynte Austyn, and seyng a thefe, Leof by name, sytte [th]er amonge hys gestes, whom he hade made blynde afore for his trespasses -- (quem rex prios propter scelera eliminaverat, whom the King previously due to his crimes did excile) -- , arysede (arrested) from the table, and takenge that man by the heire of the hedde, caste him unto the grownde. Whiche kynge was sleyn -- (sed nebulonis arcano evisceratus est) -- with a lyttle knyfe the [th]e man hade in his honde [hand]; and also he hurte mony men soore with the same knyfe; neverthelesse he was kytte (cut) at the laste into smalle partes by men longyng to the kynge. -- Polychronicon, 1527

Edmund was succeeded as king by his brother Edred, king from 946 until 955. Edmund's sons later ruled England as:

Edwy of England, King from 955 until 957, king of only Wessex and Kingdom of Kent from 957 until his death on October 1, 959. Edgar of England, king of only Mercia and Northumbria from 957 until his brother's death in 959, then king of England from 959 until 975. -------------------- Edmund I (or Eadmund) 922 – May 26, 946), called the Elder, the Deed-Doer, the Just or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Athelstan.

Athelstan died on October 27, 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king. Shortly after his proclamation as king he had to face several military threats. King Olaf I of Dublin conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands. When Olaf died in 942 Edmund reconquered the Midlands. In 943 he became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria. In the same year his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Olaf Cuaran and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945 Edmund conquered Strathclyde but conceded his rights on the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland. In exchange they signed a treaty of mutual military support. Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began.

Edmund was murdered in 946 by Leofa, an exiled thief. He had been having a party in Pucklechurch, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. After the outlaw refused to leave, the king and his advisors fought Leofa. Edmund and Leofa were both killed:

But William, libro ij° de Regibus, seyth (says) that this kyng kepyng a feste at Pulkirchirche, in the feste of seynte Austyn, and seyng a thefe, Leof by name, sytte [th]er amonge hys gestes, whom he hade made blynde afore for his trespasses -- (quem rex prios propter scelera eliminaverat, whom the King previously due to his crimes did excile) -- , arysede (arrested) from the table, and takenge that man by the heire of the hedde, caste him unto the grownde. Whiche kynge was sleyn -- (sed nebulonis arcano evisceratus est) -- with a lyttle knyfe the [th]e man hade in his honde [hand]; and also he hurte mony men soore with the same knyfe; neverthelesse he was kytte (cut) at the laste into smalle partes by men longyng to the kynge. -- Polychronicon, 1527

Edmund was succeeded as king by his brother Edred, king from 946 until 955. Edmund's sons later ruled England as:

Edwy of England, King from 955 until 957, king of only Wessex and Kingdom of Kent from 957 until his death on October 1, 959. Edgar of England, king of only Mercia and Northumbria from 957 until his brother's death in 959, then king of England from 959 until 975.

-------------------- Notes

  1. ^ Richerus, Historiae, Book 2, chapters 49-50. See MGH online.
  2. ^ Dorothy Whitelock (tr.), English Historical Documents c. 500-1042. 2nd ed. London, 1979. p. 345).
  3. ^ Edmundus, Anglorum rex, legatos ad Hugonem principem pro restitutione Ludowici regis dirigit: et idem princeps proinde conventus publicos eumnepotibus suis aliisque regni primatibus agit. [...] Hugo, dux Francorum, ascito secum Hugo Nneigro, filio Richardi, ceterisque regni primatibus Ludowicum regem, [...] in regnum restituit. (Flodoard, Annales 946.)
  4. ^ "Here King Edmund died on St Augustine’s Day [26 May]. It was widely known how he ended his days, that Liofa stabbed him at Pucklechurch. And Æthelflæd of Damerham, daughter of Ealdorman Ælfgar, was then his queen." Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, MS D, tr. Michael Swanton.
  5. ^ John of Worcester, Chronicon AD 946; William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum, book 2, chapter 144. The description of the circumstances remained a popular feature in medieval chronicles, such as Higden's Polychronicon: "But William, libro ij° de Regibus, seyth (says) that this kyng kepyng a feste at Pulkirchirche, in the feste of seynte Austyn, and seyng a thefe, Leof by name, sytte [th]er amonge hys gestes, whom he hade made blynde afore for his trespasses -- (quem rex prios propter scelera eliminaverat, whom the King previously due to his crimes did excile) -- , arysede (arrested) from the table, and takenge that man by the heire of the hedde, caste him unto the grownde. Whiche kynge was sleyn -- (sed nebulonis arcano evisceratus est) -- with a lyttle knyfe the [th]e man hade in his honde [hand]; and also he hurte mony men soore with the same knyfe; neverthelesse he was kytte (cut) at the laste into smalle partes by men longyng to the kynge." Polychronicon, 1527. See Google Books
  6. ^ Edmundus rex Transmarinus defungitur, uxor quoque regis Othonis, soror ipsius Edmundi, decessit. "Edmund, king across the sea, died, and the wife of King Otto, sister of the same Edmund, died also." (tr. Dorothy Whitelock, English Historical Documents c. 500-1042. 2nd ed. London, 1979. p. 345).

References

   * Flodoard, Annales, ed. Philippe Lauer, Les Annales de Flodoard. Collection des textes pour servir à l'étude et à l'enseignement de l'histoire 39. Paris: Picard, 1905.

http://www.geni.com/profile/edit_about_me/6000000006598812036?tab=about#

-------------------- Eadmund I, King of England (1) M, #102428, b. between 920 and 922, d. 26 May 946 Last Edited=4 Dec 2005 Consanguinity Index=0.0%

    Eadmund I, King of England was born between 920 and 922. (1) He was the son of Eadweard I, King of Wessex and Eadgifu (?). (2) He married, firstly, Ælfgifu (?) circa 940. (1) He married, secondly, Æthelflæd (?), daughter of Ælfgar, Ealdorman of the Wilsaetas, circa 946. (1) 

He died on 26 May 946 at Pucklechurch, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England, murdered, by an outlaw named Liofa. (1) He was buried at Glastonbury, Somerset, England.

    Eadmund I, King of England also went by the nick-name of Edmund 'the Elder' (?). He succeeded to the title of King Eadmund I of England on 27 October 939.1 He was crowned King of England on 29 November 939 at Kingston-upon-Thames, London, England.1 
    Edmund was the brother of Athelstan and was only 18 years old on his accession. When Vikings from Ireland invaded, the Archbishop of Canterbury arranged a treaty between them and the English and this divided the country. Later Edmund defeated these Vikings and regained the lost territory. Edmund had allies in the Welsh princes and together they laid waste to Strathclyde. Edmund was warlike and an effective monarch. An interesting story about Edmund concerns Dunstan, who in later years became Archbishop of Canterbury. Edmund and Dunstan were good companions but treacherous courtiers wrongly discredited Dunstan and he was so upset that he contemplated leaving the country he loved so much. Just afterwards, the year was 943, he and Edmund were out riding at Cheddar when Edmund's horse reared up and bolted towards the cliffs of the Gorge. When all seemed lost, the thought struck Edmund of the evil done to Dunstan by the courtiers. He struggled and managed to regain control of his horse and thus avoid the cliffs. He called Dunstan and straightway rode with him to Glastonbury and immediately appointed his good friend as Abbot there.

Children of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?) Eadwig, King of England3 b. bt 941 - 943, d. 1 Oct 959 Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England+ b. bt 942 - 944, d. 8 Jul 975

Forrás / Source: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10243.htm#i102428 -------------------- Edmund I King of England 940-946 -------------------- Edmund I (or Eadmund)

(922 – May 26, 946), called the Elder, the Deed-Doer, the Just or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Athelstan. Athelstan died on October 27, 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king.

Military threats Shortly after his proclamation as king he had to face several military threats. King Olaf I of Dublin conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands. When Olaf died in 942 Edmund reconquered the Midlands. In 943 he became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria. In the same year his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Olaf Cuaran and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945 Edmund conquered Strathclyde but conceded his rights on the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland. In exchange they signed a treaty of mutual military support. Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began.

Louis IV of France One of Edmund's last political movements of which we have some knowledge is his role in the restoration of Louis (IV) d'Outremer to the throne. Louis, son of Charles III and his Anglo-Saxon queen Eadgifu, had resided at the West-Saxon court for some time until 936, when he returned to be crowned king of France. In the summer of 945, he was captured by the Norsemen of Rouen and subsequently released by Duke Hugh the Great, who however, held him in custody. The chronicler Richerus claims that Eadgifu wrote letters both to Edmund and to Otto I in which she requested support for her son; Edmund responded to her plea by sending angry threats to Hugh, who however, brushed them aside.[1] Flodoard's Annales, one of Richerus' sources, report:

Edmundus, Anglorum rex, legatos ad Hugonem principem pro restitutione Ludowici regis dirigit: et idem princeps proinde conventus publicos eumnepotibus suis aliisque regni primatibus agit. [...] Hugo, dux Francorum, ascito secum Hugo Nneigro, filio Richardi, ceterisque regni primatibus Ludowicum regem, [...] in regnum restituit.[2] "Edmund, king of the English, sent messengers to Duke Hugh about the restoration of King Louis, and the duke accordingly made a public agreement with his nephews and other leading men of his kingdom. [...] Hugh, duke of the Franks, allying himself with Hugh the Black, son of Richard, and the other leading men of the kingdom, restored to the kingdom King Louis."[3]

Death and succession On 26 May, 946, Edmund was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, while celebrating St Augustine's Mass Day in Pucklechurch (South Gloucestershire).[4] John of Worcester and William of Malmesbury add some lively detail by suggesting that Edmund had been feasting with his nobles, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. He attacked the intruder in person, but in the event, Edmund and Leofa were both killed.[5]

Edmund's sister Eadgyth, wife to Otto I, died (earlier) the same year, as Flodoard's Annales for 946 report.[6]

Edmund was succeeded as king by his brother Edred, king from 946 until 955. Edmund's sons later ruled England as:

Edwy of England, King from 955 until 957, king of only Wessex and Kingdom of Kent from 957 until his death on October 1 959. Edgar of England, king of only Mercia and Northumbria from 957 until his brother's death in 959, then king of England from 959 until 975.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England -------------------- wiki King Edgar was born around the year 942 in Wessex. He was the younger son of King Edmund I. Because of his peaceful reign Edgar is known as "the Peaceable". He was a stronger king than his elder brother, Edwy, from whom he took the kingdoms of Northumbria and Mercia in 958. Edgar was named as King of England north of the Thames by a group of Mercian nobles in 958, but officially succeeded when Edwy died in October 959. Edgar was crowned at Bath, but not at the start of his reign. His coronation was in 973, and was planned as the culmination of his reign. The symbolic coronation was an important step, and six other kings of Britain, including the kings of Scotland and of Strathclyde, came and gave their allegiance to Edgar shortly afterwards at Chester. Edgar married twice, first to Ethelfled, and later to Elfrida. He had several children. When he died on 8 July 975 at Winchester he left two sons, both of whom became kings of England. His eldest son, Edward, by his first wife, succeeded him on his death, and a second son, called Ethelred, by his second wife, succeeded his half brother. Edgar was buried at Glastonbury Abbey. There is some belief that Edgar married his mistress, Wulfryth, in between his other two wives, and that she produced a daughter, Eadgyth, who became the Abbess at Wilton. -------------------- Edmund, also called the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. Edmund succeeded his two brothers as king.

Edmund established safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During Edmund's reign, the revival of the monasteries in England began.

On 26 May, 946, Edmund was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, while celebrating St. Augustine's day. Edmund had been feasting with his nobles when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. He attacked the intruder in person, but in the event, Edmund and Leofa were both killed. -------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_476.htm

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle calls him "the deed-doer"; Florence of Worcester calls him "Edmundus magnificus"; "buried at Glastonbury, an abbey which he had entrusted in 943 to the famous Dunstan" {-Encycl.Brit., 1956 Ed., 7:962}. He reigned 940-946. He regained northern England and Strathclyde from the Vikings and gave Strathclyde to his ally Malcolm I MacDonald, King of Scots. Edmund I is known as a legal reformer, especially for his restrictions on the "blood feud."

5. Edmund I., the Magnificent. was born in 922, the twelfth of his father's fifteen children. The first of the six Boy Kings, he reigned from 939 to 946. He had to meet a general uprising of the Danes of Mercia as well as those of the North. In the suppression of this he showed himself to be a great statesman as well as a great warrior. Little is definitely known about the policy of the Scots at this time but it appears that they joined the English whenever they were afraid of the Danes, and joined the Danes whenever they were afraid of the English. Edmund made it to be the interest of the Scottish King permanently to join the English. The southern part of the kingdom of Strathclyde had for some time been under the English Kings. In 945 Edmund took the remainder, but gave it to Malcolm on condition that he should be his fellow worker by sea and land. The king of the Scots thus entered into a position of dependent alliance towards Edmund. A great step was thus taken; the dominant powers in the island were to be English and Scots, not English and Danes. Edmund thought it worth while to conciliate the Scottish Celts rather than to endeavor to conquer them. The result of Edmund's statesmanship was soon seen, but he did not live to gather its fruits. On May 26, 946 an outlaw named Lief, who had taken his seat at a banquet in his hall, slew him as Edmund was attempting to drag him out by his hair. He was succeeded by his brother Edred. He married Princess Elgiva (Aelfgifu)., known as the "Fairies Gift,." who died in 944.

  • ************

Edmund the Magnificent the Elder. The name Eadmund in Saxon meant "protector of riches" giving an indication of Edmund's presumed role as guardian of the realm. Edmund was the half-brother of Athelstan, and the first child of Edward the Elder’s third marriage. He had been raised in Athelstan's household and once old enough had accompanied Athelstan in several of his campaigns, fighting heroically at Brunanburh in 937. As Athelstan had no children, Edmund succeeded him, even though he was only eighteen. His reign began inauspiciously, as the Norse king of Dublin, Olaf Gothfrithson, regarded him as a weak successor and took the opportunity to regain his family's hold on York. This he did in little over a month after Edmund's succession, followed by his army's march down into Mercia, devastating countryside and towns, including Tamworth, before they were confronted by Edmund at Leicester. A rather ineffectual siege followed from which Olaf and his chief adviser, Wulfstan, archbishop of York, escaped. Talks followed which resulted in Olaf being allowed to retain the kingship over York, as well as rule over the Danish territories in East Anglia and the Five Boroughs. The Danes were none too pleased about this, as they were enemies of the Norse. Nevertheless, Edmund managed to recover from this ignominy. After only eighteen months, Olaf died. His successor, Olaf Sitricson, was not quite his match. Edmund undertook a lightning strike across Mercia in 942 and recovered the Danish territories. Soon after Olaf was driven out of York, and was replaced by his cousin, Ragnall Gothfrithson, who was open to discussion with Edmund and more prepared to accept Christianity. Olaf took refuge in the kingdom of Strathclyde where guerilla warfare now existed between the Norse factions. Edmund took this as an opportunity to resolve the problem once and for all. In 944 he led an army into northern Britain. In the battle in York Ragnall was killed and York came back under Saxon control. The following year the army marched on Strathclyde. Olaf was driven out and back to Ireland. The king Donald was also ejected, and Edmund conquered all of the Norse lands in Cumbria. These he handed to the new Scots king Malcolm (1) on the basis that he would remain faithful to Edmund and not support the Norse.

From an ignominious start, Edmund's reign now looked highly successful. He had regained the territories that he had lost and was recognized as overlord by all the native kings. At twenty-four he should have been set for an auspicious reign, but then tragedy struck. In May 946 Edmund was celebrating the feast of St Augustine at Pucklechurch, north of Bath. During the feast he recognized a thief called Leofa whom Edmund had exiled six years earlier. Edmund asked his steward to arrest the man but a fight followed in which Edmund intervened and was stabbed. He soon died of his wounds. Edmund had two infant sons, Edwy and Edgar, both of whom would become kings, but he was succeeded by his brother Eadred.


References: [AR7],[Weis1],[RFC] -------------------- Edmund I of England From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Edmund I (or Eadmund) 922 – May 26, 946), called the Elder, the Deed-Doer, the Just or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Athelstan. Athelstan died on October 27, 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king. Shortly after his proclamation as king he had to face several military threats. King Olaf I of Dublin conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands. When Olaf died in 942 Edmund reconquered the Midlands. In 943 he became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria. In the same year his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Olaf Cuaran and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945 Edmund conquered Strathclyde but conceded his rights on the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland. In exchange they signed a treaty of mutual military support. Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began. Edmund was murdered in 946 by Leofa, an exiled thief. He had been having a party in Pucklechurch, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. After the outlaw refused to leave, the king and his advisors fought Leofa. Edmund and Leofa were both killed. He was succeeded as king by his brother Edred, king from 946 until 955. Edmund's sons later ruled England as: Edwy of England, King from 955 until 957, king of only Wessex and Kingdom of Kent from 957 until his death on October 1, 959. Edgar of England, king of only Mercia and Northumbria from 957 until his brother's death in 959, then king of England from 959 until 975.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England

Edmund I King of the English


Reign 27 October,939 – 26 May,946 Predecessor Athelstan Successor Eadred Spouse Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury; Æthelflæd of Damerham Issue Eadwig Edgar Father Edward the Elder Mother Eadgifu of Kent Born 921 Wessex, England Died 26 May 946 Pucklechurch, Wessex, England Burial Glastonbury Abbey

Edmund I (Old English: Ēadmund) (922 – 26 May 946), called the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Athelstan. Athelstan died on 27 October 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king.

Shortly after his proclamation as king he had to face several military threats. King Olaf III Guthfrithson conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands. When Olaf died in 942 Edmund reconquered the Midlands. In 943 he became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria. In the same year his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Olaf Cuaran and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945 Edmund conquered Strathclyde but ceded the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland in exchange for a treaty of mutual military support. Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began.

One of Edmund's last political movements of which we have some knowledge is his role in the restoration of Louis IV of France to the throne. Louis, son of Charles the Simple and his English queen Eadgifu, had resided at the West-Saxon court for some time until 936, when he returned to be crowned King of France. In the summer of 945, he was captured by the Norsemen of Rouen and subsequently released by Duke Hugh the Great, who however, held him in custody. The chronicler Richerus claims that Eadgifu wrote letters both to Edmund and to Otto I in which she requested support from her son; Edmund responded to her plea by sending angry threats to Hugh, who however, brushed them aside.[1] Flodoard's Annales, one of Richerus' sources, report:

“ Edmund, king of the English, sent messengers to Duke Hugh about the restoration of King Louis, and the duke accordingly made a public agreement with his nephews and other leading men of his kingdom. [...] Hugh, duke of the Franks, allying himself with Hugh the Black, son of Richard, and the other leading men of the kingdom, restored to the kingdom King Louis.”

On 26 May, 946, Edmund was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, while celebrating St Augustine's Mass Day in Pucklechurch (South Gloucestershire). John of Worcester and William of Malmesbury add some lively detail by suggesting that Edmund had been feasting with his nobles, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. He attacked the intruder in person, but in the event, Edmund and Leofa were both killed.

Children of EDMUND and ELGIVA are:

i. EDWY (EADWIG), KING OF THE ENGLISH (955-959), b. 941 d. Oct 1, 959 at Gloucester. m. ELGIVA. Buried at Gloucester

5. ii. EDGAR THE PEACEFUL, KING OF THE ENGLISH (959-975) , b. 943; d..July 8, 975 at Winchester. Buried at Glastonbury.


-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England -------------------- When Æthelstan died without immediate successors, Edmund succeeded his half brother as King of England on 10/27/939. He was crowned on 11/29/939 at Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey.

Edmund tried to conquer the north of England. At home, his civil administration wars marked by efforts to enforce order. His secular laws refer to his efforts to prevent robberies. His laws involving murder changed the long time clan-law provision which held not only the murderer but also his entire family responsible for the act. Edmund proposed that the person guilty of murder be held responsible for their own action and stand alone to receive punishment.

His second wife was said to have been Æthelfled, daughter of Ælfgar.

Edmund successfully suppressed rebellions by the Mercian Danes. From 944 onwards, he was effective ruler of all England until his death.

He was murdered at a feast in his own hall, at the age of 25 in 946, after only seven years on the throne. His men slew his murderer immediately thereafter. After his death, he was hallowed as a saint and miracles were worked at his tomb.

His brother Edred succeeded him [Colonial and Revolutionary Lineages of America, Vol. 1, p. 352; Britain's Royal Families : The Complete Genealogy, p. 16]. -------------------- Edmund I (Old English: Ēadmund) (922 – 26 May 946), called the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Athelstan. Athelstan died on 27 October 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king.

Military threats Shortly after his proclamation as king he had to face several military threats. King Olaf III Guthfrithson conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands. When Olaf died in 942 Edmund reconquered the Midlands. In 943 he became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria. In the same year his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Olaf Cuaran and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945 Edmund conquered Strathclyde but ceded the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland in exchange for a treaty of mutual military support. Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began.

[edit] Louis IV of France One of Edmund's last political movements of which we have some knowledge is his role in the restoration of Louis IV of France to the throne. Louis, son of Charles the Simple and his English queen Eadgifu, had resided at the West-Saxon court for some time until 936, when he returned to be crowned King of France. In the summer of 945, he was captured by the Norsemen of Rouen and subsequently released by Duke Hugh the Great, who however, held him in custody. The chronicler Richerus claims that Eadgifu wrote letters both to Edmund and to Otto I in which she requested support from her son; Edmund responded to her plea by sending angry threats to Hugh, who however, brushed them aside.[1] Flodoard's Annales, one of Richerus' sources, report:

“ Edmund, king of the English, sent messengers to Duke Hugh about the restoration of King Louis, and the duke accordingly made a public agreement with his nephews and other leading men of his kingdom. [...] Hugh, duke of the Franks, allying himself with Hugh the Black, son of Richard, and the other leading men of the kingdom, restored to the kingdom King Louis.[2][3] ”

[edit] Death and succession On 26 May, 946, Edmund was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, while celebrating St Augustine's Mass Day in Pucklechurch (South Gloucestershire).[4] John of Worcester and William of Malmesbury add some lively detail by suggesting that Edmund had been feasting with his nobles, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. He attacked the intruder in person, but in the event, Edmund and Leofa were both killed.[5]

Edmund's sister Eadgyth, wife to Otto I, died (earlier) the same year, as Flodoard's Annales for 946 report.[6]

Edmund was succeeded as king by his brother Edred, king from 946 until 955. Edmund's sons later ruled England as:

Eadwig of England, King from 955 until 957, king of only Wessex and Kingdom of Kent from 957 until his death on 1 October 959. Edgar of England, king of only Mercia and Northumbria from 957 until his brother's death in 959, then king of England from 959 until 975. -------------------- Acceded 29 NOV 939 Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, England .

Reigned 940-946. Murdered: An Outlaw, Leolf, stabbed him to death at a banquet to St.Augustine. He expelled the Norse King Olaf from Northumbria in 944. He supported Dunstan in the reintroduction of the Monastic rule of St. Benedict. Shows Saint AElfgifu as the mother of all his children and says that he was also married to AEthelflaed of Domerham. The dates given are the same though.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England -------------------- Name: King Edmund Born: c.922 Parents: Edward the Elder and Edgiva Relation to Elizabeth II: 30th great-grandfather House of: Wessex Ascended to the throne: October 27, 940 Crowned: November 29, 940 at Kingston-upon-Thames, aged c.18 Married: 1) Elgiva (2) Ethelfleda Children: 2 sons Edwy and Edgar Died: May 26, 946 at Pucklechurch near Bath (murdered) Buried at: Glastonbury Reigned for: 5 years, 6 months, and 28 days Succeeded by: his brother Edred

King of England 939–46. The son of Edward the Elder, he succeeded his half-brother, Athelstan, as king in 939. He succeeded in regaining control of Mercia, which on his accession had fallen to the Norse inhabitants of Northumbria, and of the Five Boroughs, an independent confederation within the Danelaw. He then moved on to subdue the Norsemen in Cumbria and finally extended his rule as far as southern Scotland. As well as uniting England, he bolstered his authority by allowing St Dunstan to reform the Benedictine order. He was killed in 946 at Pucklechurch, Gloucestershire, by an outlawed robber.

Timeline for King Edmund Historical Timeline 800 - Present

940 
Edmund becomes King. Sandinavian forces from Northumbria overun the East Midlands. 
942 
Edmund re-establishes control over Northumbria and rules a united England. 
943 
Edmund extends his rule into southern Scotland, 
945 
Dunstan becomes abbot of Glastonbury Abbey 
945 
Edmund conquers Strathclyde, but Cumbria is annexed by the Scots. 
946 
Edmund murdered at a party in Pucklechurch 

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_I_of_England

Edmund I (Old English: Ēadmund) (922 – 26 May 946), called the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Athelstan. Athelstan died on 27 October 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king.

-------------------- second son, reigned 941-46 -------------------- Notes for Edmund I Of England: Killed at a banquest by an exiled outlaw, Leota. Crowned King 27 Oct 940.

More About Edmund I Of England: Burial: Unknown, Glastonbur, Somerset, England. Occupation: Bet. 940 - 946, King of England.

-------------------- Edmund I From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Edmund Edmund I - MS Royal 14 B V.jpg King of the English Tenure 27 October 939 – 26 May 946 Coronation c.29 November 939 probably at Kingston upon Thames[1] Predecessor Æthelstan Successor Eadred Spouse Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury Æthelflæd of Damerham Issue Eadwig, King of England Edgar, King of England House House of Wessex Father Edward, King of Wessex Mother Eadgifu of Kent Born 921 Wessex, England Died 26 May 946 Pucklechurch, Gloucestershire, England Burial Glastonbury Abbey Religion Chalcedonian Christianity Edmund I (Old English: Ēadmund; 921 – 26 May 946), called the Elder, the Deed-doer, the Just, or the Magnificent, was King of England from 939 until his death. He was a son of Edward the Elder and half-brother of Æthelstan. Athelstan died on 27 October 939, and Edmund succeeded him as king. Contents [hide] 1 Military threats 2 Louis IV of France 3 Death and succession 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Ancestry Military threats[edit] Edmund came to the throne as the son of Edward the Elder,[2] grandson of Alfred the Great, great-grandson of Æthelwulf of Wessex, great-great grandson of Egbert of Wessex and great-great-great grandson of Ealhmund of Kent. Shortly after his proclamation as king, he had to face several military threats. King Olaf III Guthfrithson conquered Northumbria and invaded the Midlands; when Olaf died in 942, Edmund reconquered the Midlands.[2] In 943, Edmund became the god-father of King Olaf of York. In 944, Edmund was successful in reconquering Northumbria.[3] In the same year, his ally Olaf of York lost his throne and left for Dublin in Ireland. Olaf became the king of Dublin as Amlaíb Cuarán and continued to be allied to his god-father. In 945, Edmund conquered Strathclyde but ceded the territory to King Malcolm I of Scotland in exchange for a treaty of mutual military support.[3] Edmund thus established a policy of safe borders and peaceful relationships with Scotland. During his reign, the revival of monasteries in England began. Louis IV of France[edit] One of Edmund's last political movements of which there is some knowledge is his role in the restoration of Louis IV of France to the throne. Louis, son of Charles the Simple and Edmund's half-sister Eadgifu, had resided at the West-Saxon court for some time until 936, when he returned to be crowned King of France. In the summer of 945, he was captured by the Norsemen of Rouen and subsequently released to Duke Hugh the Great, who held him in custody. The chronicler Richerus claims that Eadgifu wrote letters both to Edmund and to Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor in which she requested support for her son. Edmund responded to her plea by sending angry threats to Hugh, who brushed them aside.[4] Flodoard's Annales, one of Richerus' sources, report: Edmund, king of the English, sent messengers to Duke Hugh about the restoration of King Louis, and the duke accordingly made a public agreement with his nephews and other leading men of his kingdom. [...] Hugh, duke of the Franks, allying himself with Hugh the Black, son of Richard, and the other leading men of the kingdom, restored to the kingdom King Louis.[5][6] Death and succession[edit]

"The Murder of King Edmund at Pucklechurch", drawn by R. Smirke, published in Ashburton's History of England, 1793 On 26 May 946, Edmund was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, while attending St Augustine's Day mass in Pucklechurch (South Gloucestershire).[7] John of Worcester and William of Malmesbury add some lively detail by suggesting that Edmund had been feasting with his nobles, when he spotted Leofa in the crowd. He attacked the intruder in person, but in the event, Leofa killed him. Leofa was killed on the spot by those present.[8] Edmund's sister Eadgyth, wife to Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor, died (earlier) the same year, as Flodoard's Annales for 946 report.[9] Edmund was succeeded as king by his brother Eadred, king from 946 until 955. Edmund's sons later ruled England as: Eadwig, King of England from 955 until 957, king of only Wessex and Kent from 957 until his death on 1 October 959. Edgar the Peaceful, king of only Mercia and Northumbria from 957 until his brother's death in 959, then king of England from 959 until 975. See also[edit] Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury Burial places of British royalty Edmund the Just, fictional king of Narnia Notes[edit] Jump up ^ The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England, p. 514 ^ Jump up to: a b Edmund I (king of England), "Edmund-I" Encyclopedia Brittanica ^ Jump up to: a b David Nash Ford, Edmund the Magnificent, King of the English (AD 921-946), Early British Kingdoms. Jump up ^ Richerus, Historiae, Book 2, chapters 49–50. See MGH online. Jump up ^ Dorothy Whitelock (tr.), English Historical Documents c. 500–1042. 2nd ed. London, 1979. p. 345. Jump up ^ Edmundus, Anglorum rex, legatos ad Hugonem principem pro restitutione Ludowici regis dirigit: et idem princeps proinde conventus publicos eumnepotibus suis aliisque regni primatibus agit. [...] Hugo, dux Francorum, ascito secum Hugo Nneigro, filio Richardi, ceterisque regni primatibus Ludowicum regem, [...] in regnum restituit. (Flodoard, Annales 946.) Jump up ^ "Here King Edmund died on St Augustine’s Day [26 May]. It was widely known how he ended his days, that Liofa stabbed him at Pucklechurch. And Æthelflæd of Damerham, daughter of Ealdorman Ælfgar, was then his queen." Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, MS D, tr. Michael Swanton. Jump up ^ John of Worcester, Chronicon AD 946; William of Malmesbury, Gesta regum, book 2, chapter 144. The description of the circumstances remained a popular feature in medieval chronicles, such as Higden's Polychronicon: "But William, libro ij° de Regibus, seyth (says) that this kyng kepyng a feste at Pulkirchirche, in the feste of seynte Austyn, and seyng a thefe, Leof by name, sytte [th]er amonge hys gestes, whom he hade made blynde afore for his trespasses – (quem rex prios propter scelera eliminaverat, whom the King previously due to his crimes did excile) – , arysede (arrested) from the table, and takenge that man by the heire of the hedde, caste him unto the grownde. Whiche kynge was sleyn – (sed nebulonis arcano evisceratus est) – with a lyttle knyfe the [th]e man hade in his honde [hand]; and also he hurte mony men soore with the same knyfe; neverthelesse he was kytte (cut) at the laste into smalle partes by men longyng to the kynge." Polychronicon, 1527. See Google Books Jump up ^ Edmundus rex Transmarinus defungitur, uxor quoque regis Othonis, soror ipsius Edmundi, decessit. "Edmund, king across the sea, died, and the wife of King Otto, sister of the same Edmund, died also." (tr. Dorothy Whitelock, English Historical Documents c. 500–1042. 2nd ed. London, 1979. p. 345). References[edit] Flodoard, Annales, ed. Philippe Lauer, Les Annales de Flodoard. Collection des textes pour servir à l'étude et à l'enseignement de l'histoire 39. Paris: Picard, 1905. Ancestry[edit] [show]Ancestors of Edmund I of England Regnal titles Preceded by Æthelstan King of the English 939–946 Succeeded by Eadred [show] v t e English monarchs [show] v t e Monarchs of Northumbria Categories: 921 births946 deaths946 crimesAnglo-Saxon monarchsBurials at Glastonbury AbbeyMurdered monarchs10th-century English monarchsEnglish murder victimsChalcedonian Christian monarchsHouse of Wessex

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Edmund I "The Magnificent", King of the English's Timeline

923
923
Wessex, England
939
October 27, 939
- May 26, 946
Age 16
940
940
Age 17
Wessex, England
940
Age 17
Wessex, England
940
Age 17
Wessex,,,England
943
August 7, 943
Age 20
Wessex, England
946
May 26, 946
Age 23
Pucklechurch, Dorset, England
May 26, 946
Age 23
Glastonbury Abbey, Glastonbury, Somersetshire, England
946
Age 23
Wessex,,,England
1927
May 21, 1927
Age 23