Edward Montagu, 1st Baron of Boughton

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About Edward Montagu, 1st Baron of Boughton

Family and Education b. 1562, 1st surv. s. of Edward Montagu I and bro. of Henry and Sidney educ. Christ Church, Oxf. c.1574, BA Mar. 1579; M. Temple 1581. m. (1) 21 Sept. 1585, Elizabeth (d.1611), da. and h. of (Sir) John Jeffrey of Chiddingly, Suss., 1da.; (2) 24 Feb. 1612, Frances (d.1620), da. of Thomas Cotton† of Conington, Hunts., 3s. (1 d.v.p.) 1da.; (3) 16 Feb. 1625, Anne, da. of John Crouch of Corneybury, Herts., wid. of Robert Wynchell, painter-stainer, of Richard Chamberlain, and of (Sir) Ralph Hare of Stow Bardolph, Norf., s.p. suc. fa. 1602; KB 1603; cr. Baron Montagu 1621.3

Offices Held

J.p. Northants. from c.1595, sheriff 1595-6, commr. musters 1596, dep. lt. from 1602, ld. lt. from 1642; dep. keeper, Rockingham forest by 1593.4

Biography The heir to one of the principal estates in Northamptonshire, Montagu, once his formal education was over, divided his time between London and Boughton. As deputy keeper of Rockingham forest Montagu left a musters book that has survived containing letters directed to him, and copies of those he despatched. After his marriage Montagu abandoned attempts to find a suitable residence in the county on the grounds that his wife’s health necessitated her staying in London. In a letter to his mother announcing his intention of residing at Boughton when in Northamptonshire, he wrote:

And I may be set so to work that I may at my father’s hands earn my victuals, for which I may keep him company at chess, and if need be I may take his part at double-handed Irish, and if there be occasion of weightier matters, as punishing rogues and such like, if it please him to employ me, [it] may ease him. And to do you some service I may in summer time [gather aprico]ts and peaches, or some such like work ... And if [none of] all these pains do deserve my meat and drink, yet truly they would be well bestowed of me, because they will be well seen by me especially if I may have fromenty and cheesecakes.5 In 1584 a seat was found for Montagu at the new parliamentary borough of Bere Alston. The patron was presumably Lord Mountjoy, perhaps acting through his relative Edward Lane, who was Montagu’s cousin. In 1597 he represented Tavistock, where his fellow-Member was Valentine Knightley. Knightley had earlier represented the borough under Russell patronage, and may by 1597 have had enough influence to secure Montagu’s return. During this Parliament he sat on a committee considering a bill for the town of Northampton, 16 Nov., and another concerning a bill for tellers and receivers, 12 Dec. His return for Brackley in 1601 was probably procured by his friend Robert Spencer. On 3 Dec. 1601 Montagu made a charitable motion

which I hope will tend to a charitable end, and briefly it is this: that no private bill may pass this House but the procurers to give something to the poor ... Because I offered to the consideration of this House this motion first, I will presume also more particularly to deliver my opinion. I think for every private bill for sale of lands, ten pounds a reasonable benevolence; and for every estate for life or for jointure, five pounds. The bills against drunkenness and for the proper observing of the Sabbath day were committed to him on 4 Nov., and he spoke in the subsidy debate on 7 Nov. His name appears in a list of Members served with subpoenas in the course of the 1601 Parliament.

In Jame’s reign Montagu successfully claimed a county seat in all the elections before his elevation to the peerage. It is just possible that his reference, in a letter to Robert Spencer, Lord Spencer, during 1625 ‘I have not a son fit to join with yours, as your lordship and I once did, for the service of the country’—implies that they unsuccessfully contested the county seat in Elizabeth’s reign, but it is more probable that it is concerned with their preparations to fight the county seat against Anthony Mildmay, at the election they expected early in 1603, before Spencer’s elevation to the peerage.6

James I thought Montagu ‘smelt a little of puritanism’, and he certainly supported the 1605 petition in favour of puritan ministers. In 1642 he was arrested by Parliament because they feared his influence on the county, where he was popular as a hospitable neighbour and a good landlord. He died in captivity in 1644 and was buried in Weekley church 26 June.7

Ref Volumes: 1558-1603 Author: S. M. Thorpe Notes 1. Folger V. b. 298. 2. Did not serve for the full duration of the Parliament. 3. Vis. Northants. (Harl. Soc. lxxxvii), 137; Vis. Northants. ed. Metcalfe, 114-15; CP; DNB. 4. Musters, Beacons and Subsidies in Northants. ed. Wake (Northants. Rec. Soc. iii), p. cxvi; HMC Buccleuch, i. xix. 5. Lansd. 78, f. 166; 81, f. 79; HMC Buccleuch, i. pp. xix, xx, 224, 225, 228, 231, 233, 234, 235; iii. 41, 52, 55, 65, 66; HMC Montagu, 26, 28. 6. D’Ewes, 557, 572, 626, 637, 665; Townshend, Hist. Colls. 279, 280; HMC Buccleuch, iii. 74-5, 172-3, 257; HMC Hatfield, xi. 485. 7. HMC Buccleuch, i. p. xx; DNB; CP.

  • 'Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  • http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/19007
  • 'Montagu, Edward, first Baron Montagu of Boughton (1562/3–1644), politician and local administrator, was the second son of Sir Edward Montagu (c.1532–1602) of Boughton Castle, in the parish of Weekley, Northamptonshire, and his wife, Elizabeth (c.1542–1618), daughter of Sir James Harington of Exton, Rutland. He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford about 1574, supplicated for the degree of BA on 14 March 1579, and was a student of the Middle Temple in 1580. On 21 September 1585 he married Elizabeth (c.1568–1611), daughter and heir of Sir John Jeffrey of Chiddingly, Sussex, chief baron of the exchequer; this was the first of three marriages. She died on 6 December 1611 and within three months, on 24 February 1612, Montagu married Frances, daughter of Thomas Cotton of Conington, Huntingdonshire. She was buried at Weekley on 16 May 1620. On 16 February 1625 Montagu married Anne (1572/3–1648), daughter of John Crouch of Corneybury, in Layston, Hertfordshire, and widow in turn of Robert Wyncoll, Richard Chamberlain, and Sir Ralph Hare. He represented Bere Alston in the parliament of 1584, Tavistock in 1597, Brackley in 1601, and then Northamptonshire in the parliaments of 1604, 1614, and 1621. He was made a knight of the Bath on 24 July 1603 and was raised to the peerage as Baron Montagu of Boughton on 29 June 1621.
  • Northamptonshire magnate
  • 'Montagu was an influential figure in Northamptonshire from the time he succeeded his father in 1602 until his death. His family had been settled in the county since the fifteenth century, but its principal estates had been acquired by Edward's grandfather Sir Edward Montagu, who became lord chief justice in 1539 and purchased a cluster of manors centred on the family's principal seat at Boughton. Edward's father consolidated the family's local position, establishing himself as one of the wealthiest landowners in the shire and earning a considerable reputation for wisdom and piety for his service as JP and deputy lieutenant under Elizabeth. In spite of his regular attendance in parliament, Edward's own priorities remained essentially local and dynastic—to maintain the unity and prosperity of his family and establish them as the leaders of the gentry in the eastern half of the shire. He himself acted as JP (from 1595), deputy lieutenant (from 1602), sheriff (1595–6), and deputy keeper of Rockingham Forest (from 1593), and again became renowned for his conscientious service. When the midland revolt broke out in May 1607 he took a leading role in its suppression, commanding the contingent of trained bands which dispersed the rebels at the battle of Newton Field and then presiding over the hanging of the ringleaders at Kettering. He was also much involved in schemes for poor relief and in 1630 provided his brother Henry Montagu, first earl of Manchester and lord privy seal, with information on local procedures which helped in the formulation of the Book of Orders.
  • For much of James's reign Montagu's position as leading magnate in the eastern half of the shire was unchallenged. He and his friend Robert Spencer, Lord Spencer, from Althorp in the western half, presided over the shire's affairs, dominating the county bench, settling local quarrels, and determining who should represent the shire in parliament. This changed, however, when Sir Francis Fane (later earl of Westmorland) arrived in the shire in 1617 having married the heiress of Sir Anthony Mildmay of Apethorpe. He set about challenging Montagu's primacy in a series of disputes which arose out of the enforcement of James I's declaration of sports and jurisdiction in Rockingham Forest. Montagu tried, unsuccessfully, to have him punished in Star Chamber. These quarrels had repercussions for the county elections when, in 1624 and again in 1626, Spencer and the western gentry took offence at Fane's contentiousness and abandoned the long-standing arrangement whereby one candidate was returned from each half of the county. Montagu was caught in the middle, apparently powerless to uphold the claims of the eastern half, and he felt snubbed and humiliated. Westmorland's death in 1628, however, allowed tensions to subside and after this Montagu re-established his dominance of the east.
  • Puritan patron
  • Much of Montagu's status in Northamptonshire rested on his reputation as a patron of godly ministers. He used his patronage in the area around Kettering to promote a string of puritan preachers to local livings, including Joseph Bentham, Nicholas Estwick, William Spencer, and the renowned Robert Bolton. He was also the patron of the puritan lecture at Kettering, making great show of regular attendance at the sermons and trying, unsuccessfully, to defend it against the bishop of Peterborough's efforts at suppression. Montagu can best be described as a moderate puritan. The ministers he sponsored all conformed to the ceremonies of the Church of England and, like Montagu, tended to direct most of their energies into combating various forms of sinfulness—notably sabbath-breaking, swearing, simony and usury (which were particular preoccupations of Montagu), and, above all, popery. James I got the measure of Montagu when he told him he ‘smelt a little of puritanism’ (HoP, Commons, 1558–1603, 3.70). In 1605, however, Sir Edward got caught up in a more radical puritan initiative when he, with Sir Richard Knightley and his son, presented James I with a petition, signed by forty-five gentlemen, requesting the reinstatement of ministers who had recently been deprived of their livings. The king regarded the petition as tantamount to rebellion and immediately had Montagu removed from the commission of the peace. He was only restored after making a personal submission, arranged by his brother James Montagu who was dean of the Chapel Royal.
  • Religion was also the principal theme of Montagu's interventions in parliament. As an MP he spoke sparingly but regularly, and he was a diligent attender of Commons' committees. He looked after the interests of his constituents, at the opening of the 1604 parliament reporting ‘the cry of the country’ against abuses such as ‘depopulation’ and ‘conversion of tillage’. But it was religious matters which concerned him most. He sponsored a bill against pluralities and was a mainstay of committees to deal with issues such as sabbath observance and drunkenness; however, he perhaps made his greatest mark in January 1606 when he initiated the bill for a public thanksgiving every 5 November for the king's deliverance from the Gunpowder Plot. This summed up the basis of his political beliefs—loyalty to the monarch combined with an absolute abhorrence of popery.
  • The crown's servant
  • Montagu never displayed any ambition for high office; however, his personal affection and gratitude towards James I, his dependence on the support of his brothers Henry and James, and his need for backing from the duke of Buckingham in his local quarrels ensured that he forged strong links with the royal court. On several occasions during James's parliaments he proposed the grant of royal subsidies. He also backed the king's project for union with Scotland in 1606 and in 1614 attempted to defuse the row over undertaking. His support for the crown became particularly apparent during the forced loan of 1626–7 when he joined with Henry in launching the collection in Northamptonshire. As a result he was castigated by his neighbours, who contrasted his apparent subservience to the wishes of Buckingham with the resistance of local ‘patriots’, like Richard Knightley and Lord Spencer. This episode destroyed Montagu's earlier reputation as a spokesman for ‘the country’; but, undeterred, he continued to serve the crown loyally, taking a leading role in the levying of knighthood fines in 1630–31 and supporting the collection of ship money, after initially complaining about the unfairness of the assessment imposed on the eastern division. In early 1639 he was even prepared to travel to York to serve the king in person against the covenanters, until he was talked out of it on account of his age. As civil war approached in 1642 Montagu found himself torn between conflicting loyalties. He attended the Short Parliament and joined the opposition peers' protest against its dissolution. He also strongly supported the measures taken by the Long Parliament to dismantle Laudianism. However, when he was summoned to execute the king's commission of array in June 1642 he responded positively. He thought long and hard about it and desperately hoped for accommodation between king and parliament. But, eventually, he decided that his personal duty to serve his king outweighed all other obligations.
  • 'Montagu's support for the king led to his arrest in August 1642 and imprisonment in the Tower of London. He was eventually allowed to move to more comfortable quarters in the Savoy, but he remained in London, where he died on 15 June 1644, aged eighty-one. He was buried at Weekley eleven days later. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Edward.
  • _______________________
  • http://www.thepeerage.com/p2679.htm#i26790
  • 'Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton1
  • 'M, #26790, b. circa 1562, d. 15 June 1644
  • Last Edited=4 Apr 2010
  • 'Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton was born circa 1562. He was the son of Sir Edward Montague and Elizabeth Harington.3 He married, firstly, Elizabeth Jeffrey, daughter of Sir John Jeffrey, before 21 September 1585 at Weekley, Northamptonshire, England.3 He married, secondly, Frances Cotton, daughter of Thomas Cotton and Dorothy Tamworth, on 24 February 1611/12 at Weekley, Northamptonshire, England.3 He died on 15 June 1644 at the Savoy, Westminster, London, England.4
  • ' Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton was created 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton in 1621.
  • 'Child of Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton and Elizabeth Jeffrey
    • 1.Hon. Elizabeth Montagu+5 d. 30 Nov 1654
  • 'Children of Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton and Frances Cotton
    • 1.Hon. Frances Montagu+1 b. 1613, d. 1671
    • 2.Edward Montagu, 2nd Baron Montagu of Boughton+4 b. 11 Jul 1616, d. 10 Jan 1683/84
  • Citations
  • 1.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 134. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  • 2.[S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  • 3.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 104.
  • 4.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 105.
  • 5.[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 2348. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
  • __________________
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Montagu,_1st_Baron_Montagu_of_Boughton
  • 'Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton (1562/3 – 15 June 1644) was an English politician. His support for King Charles I led to his arrest in August 1642. He was imprisoned for a time in the Tower of London but was moved to the Savoy due to ill health and died a prisoner in 1644.[1]
  • Notes
  • 1.^ Richard Cust, ‘Montagu, Edward, first Baron Montagu of Boughton (1562/3–1644)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004, accessed 11 Dec 2009.
  • _______________

ELIZABETH MONTAGU WHO MARRIED ROBERT BERTIE IS WRONGLY LISTED AS SISTER TO EDWARD MONTAGU, 1ST BARON, FROM ROBERT BERTIE'S PAGE SHE IS RIGHTLY LISTED AS DAU. OF EDWARD 1ST BARON.

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Montagu_%28judge%29
  • Sir Edward Montagu (c. 1485 – 10 February 1557) was an English lawyer and judge.
  • Life
  • He was born in Broughton, the son of Thomas Montagu of Hemington, Northamptonshire and Agnes Dudley, daughter of William Dudley of Clopton, Northamptonshire and Christiana Darrel. He was appointed Lord Chief Justice of the Court of the King's Bench in 1539, which office he resigned in 1545 when he was constituted Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. He was a member of the Privy Council of King Henry VIII of England, who appointed him one of sixteen executors of his last will, and governor to his son Edward .During the crisis of 1553 when Edward VI was induced to alter the succession in favour of Lady Jane Grey, Montagu had sufficient courage to protest at the patent illegality of the proceedings. However he was unable to withstand the ferocious bullying of the Duke of Northumberland who called him a traitor and threatened him with physical violence, and soon withdrew his protest. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London on Mary’s Accession but bought his way out.
  • Family
  • He married three times, firstly to Agnes Kirkham, secondly to Cicely Lane. By his third wife Elenor, daughter of John Roper of Well Hall, Eltham, Kent he had eleven children, the eldest son Sir Edward Montagu was father of:
      • 'Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu, ancestor of the Dukes of Montagu.
      • Sir Walter Montagu.
      • Sir Henry Montagu, 1st Earl of Manchester, ancestor of the Dukes of Manchester.
      • Sir Charles Montagu.
      • James Montagu, Bishop of Winchester.
      • Sir Sidney Montagu, ancestor of the Earls of Sandwich.
      • Elizabeth Montagu who married Robert Bertie
  • References
  • Foss, Edward. Biographia Juridica: A Biographical Dictionary of the Judges of the England from the Conquest to the Present Time, 1066-1870. London: J. Murray, 1870. googlebooks.com Accessed September 16, 2007
  • Collins, Arthur. The Peerage of England: Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of That Kingdom. London: Printed for H. Woodfall [and 27 others]. 1768. googlebooks.com Accessed September 16, 2007
  • __________________
  • http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/MONTAGUE.htm#Edward MONTAGUE (1° B. Montagu of Boughton)
  • 'Edward MONTAGUE (1° B. Montagu of Boughton)
  • 'Born: 1562
  • 'Died: 1644
  • 'Buried: 26 Jun 1644, Weekley Church
  • Notes: See his Biography.
  • Father: Edward MONTAGUE of Boughton Castle (Sir Knight)
  • Mother: Elizabeth HARRINGTON
  • 'Married 1: Elizabeth JEFFREY (d. 1611) (dau. of Sir John Jeffrey of Chiddingly and Alice Apsley) 21 Sep 1585
  • Children:
    • 1. Elizabeth MONTAGUE (C. Lindsey)
  • 'Married 2: Frances COTTON (d. 1620) (dau. of Thomas Cotton of Conington and Dorothy Tamworth) 24 Feb 1612
  • Children:
    • 2. Edward MONTAGUE (2º B. Montagu of Boughton)
    • 3. William MONTAGUE
    • 4. Christopher MONTAGUE
    • 5. Frances MONTAGUE (C. Rutland)
  • 'Married 3: Anne CROUCH (dau. of John Crouch of Corneybury) (w.1 of Robert Wynchell - w.2 of Richard Chamberlain - w.3 of Sir Ralph Hare of Stow Bardolph) 16 Feb 1625
  • The details in this biography come from the History of Parliament, a biographical dictionary of Members of the House of Commons.
  • 'Born ABT 1562, first surv. son of Sir Edward Montague of Boughton, and brother of James, Henry and Sidney. Educ. Christ Church, Oxf. c.1574, BA Mar. 1579; M. Temple 1581. Married first, 21 Sep 1585, Elizabeth, dau. and h. of Sir John Jeffrey of Chiddingly, Suss.; second, 24 Feb 1612, Frances, dau. of Thomas Cotton of Conington, Hunts.; and third, 16 Feb 1625, Anne, dau. of John Crouch of Corneybury, Herts., wid. of Robert Wynchell, painter-stainer, of Richard Chamberlain, and of Sir Ralph Hare of Stow Bardolph, Norf., s.p. Suc. family 1602; KB 1603; cr. Baron Montagu 1621.2 J.p. Northants. from c.1595, sheriff 1595-6, commr. musters 1596, dep. lt. from 1602, ld. lt. from 1642; dep. keeper, Rockingham forest by 1593.
  • Graduated from Oxford, 1574; student of the Middle Temple, 1580. The heir to one of the principal estates in Northamptonshire, Montague, once his formal education was over, divided his time between London and Boughton. As deputy keeper of Rockingham forest Montague left a musters book that has survived containing letters directed to him, and copies of those he despatched. After his marriage Montague abandoned attempts to find a suitable residence in the county on the grounds that his wife's health necessitated her staying in London. In a letter to his mother announcing his intention of residing at Boughton when in Northamptonshire, he wrote:
  • '...And I may be set so to work that I may at my father's hands earn my victuals, for which I may keep him company at chess, and if need be I may take his part at double-handed Irish, and if there be occasion of weightier matters, as punishing rogues and such like, if it please him to employ me, [it] may ease him. And to do you some service I may in summer time [gather aprico]ts and peaches, or some such like work ... And if [none of] all these pains do deserve my meat and drink, yet truly they would be well bestowed of me, because they will be well seen by me especially if I may have fromenty and cheesecakes...'
  • In 1584 a seat was found for Montague at the new parliamentary borough of Bere Alston. The patron was presumably Lord Mountjoy, perhaps acting through his relative Edward Lane, who was Montague's cousin. In 1597 he represented Tavistock, where his fellow-Member was Valentine Knightley. Knightley had earlier represented the borough under Russell patronage, and may by 1597 have had enough influence to secure Montague's return. During this Parliament he sat on a committee considering a bill for the town of Northampton, 16 Nov, and another concerning a bill for tellers and receivers, 12 Dec His return for Brackley in 1601 was probably procured by his friend Robert Spencer. On 3 Dec 1601 Montague made a charitable motion which tend to a charitable end, and briefly it is this:
  • '... that no private bill may pass this House but the procurers to give something to the poor ... Because I offered to the consideration of this House this motion first, I will presume also more particularly to deliver my opinion. I think for every private bill for sale of lands, ten pounds a reasonable benevolence; and for every estate for life or for jointure, five pounds...'
  • The bills against drunkenness and for the proper observing of the Sabbath day were committed to him on 4 Nov, and he spoke in the subsidy debate on 7 Nov. His name appears in a list of Members served with subpoenas in the course of the 1601 Parliament.
  • In James reign Montague successfully claimed a county seat in all the elections before his elevation to the peerage. He was severe, not a courtier, and apparently an able administrator. Established a Hospital for Aged Men, 1613. It is just possible that his reference, in a letter to Robert Spencer, Lord Spencer, during 1625 ‘I have not a son fit to join with yours, as your lordship and I once did, for the service of the country’ implies that they unsuccessfully contested the county seat in Elizabeth's reign, but it is more probable that it is concerned with their preparations to fight the county seat against Anthony Mildmay, at the election they expected early in 1603, before Spencer's elevation to the peerage.
  • 'James I thought Montague ‘smelt a little of puritanism’, and he certainly supported the 1605 petition in favour of puritan ministers. In 1642 he was arrested by Parliament because due to known loyalty to the King, they feared his influence on the county, where he was popular as a hospitable neighbour and a good landlord; ordered by parliament to be brought to London as a prisoner 1642. Responding to the parliamentary summons, his coach encountered a Parliamentary army. The commander, the Earl of Essex, offered to allow him to reside in the house of his daughter, but the aged Montague refused. Committed to the Tower, 1642; he died in captivity in 1644 and was buried in Weekley church 26 Jun.
  • ___________________

-------------------- He was educated at Christ Church, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.3 He was admitted to Middle Temple.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Beeralston between 1584 and 1586.3 He held the office of High Sheriff of Northamptonshire from 1595 to 1596.3 He held the office of High Sheriff of Northamptonshire from 1600 to 1601.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Brackley in 1601.3 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Bath (K.B.) in 1603.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Northamptonshire between 1604 and 1611.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Northamptonshire in 1614.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Northamptonshire from 1620 to 1621.3 He was created 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton [England] on 29 June 1621.3 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Northamptonshire in 1642.3 He fought in the English Civil War, as a Royalist.3

view all 11

Edward Montagu, 1st Baron of Boughton's Timeline

1562
1562
Boughton, Northamptonshire, England
1585
September 21, 1585
Age 23
Weekley, Northamptonshire, England
1586
November 1586
Age 24
Lindsey, Nottinghamshire, , England
1611
February 24, 1611
Age 49
Weekley, Northamptonshire, England
1614
1614
Age 52
Boughton Castle, Boughton, Northamptonshire
1616
July 11, 1616
Age 54
Weekley, Northamptonshire, England
1618
1618
Age 56
Boughton, Northamptonshire, England
1618
Age 56
Oakley Parsonage, Northamptonshire, England
1624
February 16, 1624
Age 62
St. Michael, Cornbury, Hertfordshire, England
1644
June 15, 1644
Age 82
Savoy, Westminster, London, England