Edward Mosby, Sr. (c.1573 - d.)

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Edward Mosby, Sr.'s Geni Profile

Records for Edward Mosby

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Birthplace: England
Death: (Date and location unknown)
Managed by: James Hutchison
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Edward Mosby, Sr.

The surname Mosby is a form of the old de Moresby, which in turn sprung from Mourice, Moriseby or Morrysbye, meaning Morris' or Maurice's bye or dwelling.. Wales is named as the probable birthplace of the original Moris or Maurice who gave his name to the manor Moresby. It seens when Edd Mosby the emigrant for some reason changed the spelling to Mosby. Apparently when he left England it was spelled Moresby, as some who went to the South Pacific and Australia as due to the naming of Port Moresby , New Guinea.

Norway origin:

The name Mosby is Norwegian in origin. It was given to one who came from Mosby, the name of several places in Norway. Mosby means "place where malt is crushed."

When you read the History of England, you learn that at the beginning of the first millennium, the island of England was populated by monks in monasteries, and the Vikings from Denmark and Norway thought nothing wrong with invading England very often because they thought it was great and easy to serve themselves with all the gold and silver hidden in those monasteries with no army. This could explain why Mosby became an English name, very early on. The Vikings or Normans (=Normandy) were very strong, and went all over Europe, by estuaries (Seine, Volga, Thames).

Spelling variations of the Mosby family name include: Moorsby, Morrisby, Moresby, Moriceby and others. First found in Cumbria, where the were seated from ancient times

During the Middle Ages surnames were first used in order to distinguish between numbers of people bearing the same christian name. As taxation, under William The Conqueror, who invaded England in 1066, became the law, documentation became essential, and names were chosen from a man's trade, his father's name, some personal physical characteristic, or from his place of residence. In the case of the name MOSBY it was a locational name from MOSBOROUGH, a spot in Derbyshire. The name was derived from the Old English word MORESBUR, literally meaning 'the dweller at the fort in the moor'. The earliest of the name on record appears to be MORESBURH (without surname) who was listed as a tenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. MORESBUR (without surname) was documented in Derbyshire in the year 1002. Surnames derived from placenames are divided into two broad categories; topographic names and habitation names. Topographic names are derived from general descriptive references to someone who lived near a physical feature such as an oak tree, a hill, a stream or a church. Habitation names are derived from pre-existing names denoting towns, villages and farmsteads. Other classes of local names include those derived from the names of rivers, individual houses with signs on them, regions and whole countries. A notable member of the name was William Harry MOSBY, born 24th January, 1898, in Sioux City, Ia. He was an artist and educator and his appointments included, teacher at the National Acadamy of Art, Chicago (1927-30). He exhibited in Europe. He lived at Wilmette, Illinois. In the Middle Ages heraldry came into use as a practical matter. It originated in the devices used to distinguish the armoured warriors in tournament and war, and was also placed on seals as marks of identity. As far as records show, true heraldry began in the middle of the 12th century, and appeared almost simultaneously in several countries of Western Europe. -------------------- During the Middle Ages surnames were first used in order to distinguish between numbers of people bearing the same christian name. As taxation, under William The Conqueror, who invaded England in 1066, became the law, documentation became essential, and names were chosen from a man's trade, his father's name, some personal physical characteristic, or from his place of residence. In the case of the name MOSBY it was a locational name from MOSBOROUGH, a spot in Derbyshire. The name was derived from the Old English word MORESBUR, literally meaning 'the dweller at the fort in the moor'. The earliest of the name on record appears to be MORESBURH (without surname) who was listed as a tenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. MORESBUR (without surname) was documented in Derbyshire in the year 1002. Surnames derived from placenames are divided into two broad categories; topographic names and habitation names. Topographic names are derived from general descriptive references to someone who lived near a physical feature such as an oak tree, a hill, a stream or a church. Habitation names are derived from pre-existing names denoting towns, villages and farmsteads. Other classes of local names include those derived from the names of rivers, individual houses with signs on them, regions and whole countries. A notable member of the name was William Harry MOSBY, born 24th January, 1898, in Sioux City, Ia. He was an artist and educator and his appointments included, teacher at the National Acadamy of Art, Chicago (1927-30). He exhibited in Europe. He lived at Wilmette, Illinois. In the Middle Ages heraldry came into use as a practical matter. It originated in the devices used to distinguish the armoured warriors in tournament and war, and was also placed on seals as marks of identity. As far as records show, true heraldry began in the middle of the 12th century, and appeared almost simultaneously in several countries of Western Europe.

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Edward Mosby, Sr.'s Timeline

1573
1573
England
1595
1595
Age 22
England
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